Sample records for major fraction thereof

  1. Green emitting phosphors and blends thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Siclovan, Oltea Puica (Rexford, NY); Nammalwar, Prasanth Kumar (Bangalore, IN); Sathyanarayan, Ramesh Rao (Bangalore, IN); Porob, Digamber G. (Goa, IN); Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi (Bangalore, IN); Heward, William Jordan (Saratoga Springs, NY); Radkov, Emil Vergilov (Euclid, OH); Briel, Linda Jane Valyou (Niskayuna, NY)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphor compositions, blends thereof and light emitting devices including white light emitting LED based devices, and backlights, based on such phosphor compositions. The devices include a light source and a phosphor material as described. Also disclosed are phosphor blends including such a phosphor and devices made therefrom.

  2. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  3. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  4. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  5. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jessop, Philip G; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L; Heldebrant, David J

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  6. Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL); St. Martin, Edward (Libertyville, IL); Arora, Michelle (Woodridge, IL); de la Garza, Linda (Woodridge, IL)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

  7. Liquid crystal device and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Gu, Mingxia; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a liquid crystal device and method thereof. Subsequent to applying a first electrical voltage on a liquid crystal to induce a reorientation of the liquid crystal, a second electrical voltage with proper polarity is applied on the liquid crystal to assist the relaxation of the reorientation that was induced by the first electrical voltage. The "switch-off" phase of the liquid crystal can therefore be accelerated or temporally shortened, and the device can exhibit better performance such as fast response to on/off signals. The invention can be widely used LCD, LC shutter, LC lens, spatial light modulator, telecommunication device, tunable filter, beam steering device, and electrically driven LC device, among others.

  8. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Jeon, Sea Ho (Dracut, MA); Mack, Nathan H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  9. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Jeon, Sea Ho (Dracut, MA); Mack, Nathan H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  10. System and method for detecting cells or components thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Porter, Marc D. (Ames, IA); Lipert, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Doyle, Robert T. (Ames, IA); Grubisha, Desiree S. (Corona, CA); Rahman, Salma (Ames, IA)

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for detecting a detectably labeled cell or component thereof in a sample comprising one or more cells or components thereof, at least one cell or component thereof of which is detectably labeled with at least two detectable labels. In one embodiment, the method comprises: (i) introducing the sample into one or more flow cells of a flow cytometer, (ii) irradiating the sample with one or more light sources that are absorbed by the at least two detectable labels, the absorption of which is to be detected, and (iii) detecting simultaneously the absorption of light by the at least two detectable labels on the detectably labeled cell or component thereof with an array of photomultiplier tubes, which are operably linked to two or more filters that selectively transmit detectable emissions from the at least two detectable labels.

  11. Switchgrass ubiquitin promoter (PVUBI2) and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stewart, C. Neal; Mann, David George James

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject application provides polynucleotides, compositions thereof and methods for regulating gene expression in a plant. Polynucleotides disclosed herein comprise novel sequences for a promoter isolated from Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) that initiates transcription of an operably linked nucleotide sequence. Thus, various embodiments of the invention comprise the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 2 or fragments thereof comprising nucleotides 1 to 692 of SEQ ID NO: 2 that are capable of driving the expression of an operably linked nucleic acid sequence.

  12. Method for forming nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction and the product thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Bo-Ching (Fremont, CA); Rosenbaum, Herman S. (Fremont, CA); Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for producing nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction having components providing therein a barrier system for resisting destructive action by volatile fission products or impurities and also interdiffusion of metal constituents, and the product thereof. The composite nuclear fuel containers of the method comprise a casing of zirconium or alloy thereof with a layer of copper overlying an oxidized surface portion of the zirconium or alloy thereof.

  13. Preparation of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline and analogs thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Pat J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compound 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline and analogs thereof may be used to produce an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth, dry weight, nutritional value (proteins and amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation and photosynthetically derived chemical energy when applied to plants through their roots and/or through their foliar portions. The present invention includes an essentially quantitative chemical synthesis for this compound which is performed in a single step reaction of Fremy's Salt (potassium nitrosodisulphonate) with either glutamine or 2-pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid. Fremy's salt (potassium nitrosodisulphonate) is available commercially, or can be readily synthesized.

  14. Absorption-emission optrode and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1990-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described for monitoring the physical and chemical properties of a sample fluid by measuring an optical signal generated by a fluorescent substance and modulated by an absorber substance. The emission band of the fluorescent substance overlaps the absorption band of the absorber substance, and the degree of overlap is dependent on the physical and chemical properties of the sample fluid. The fluorescent substance and absorber substance are immobilized on a substrate so that an effective number of molecules thereof are sufficiently close for resonant energy transfer to occur, thereby providing highly efficient modulation of the fluorescent emissions of the fluorescent substance by the absorber substance. 4 figs.

  15. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  16. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janke, Christopher J. (Oliver Springs, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  17. Engineered enzymatically active bacteriophages and methods of uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, James J (Newton, MA); Kobayashi, Hideki (Yokohama, JP); Kearn, Mads (Ottawa, CA); Araki, Michihiro (Minatoku, JP); Friedland, Ari (Boston, MA); Lu, Timothy Kuan-Ta (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides engineered bacteriophages that express at least one biofilm degrading enzyme on their surface and uses thereof for degrading bacterial biofilms. The invention also provides genetically engineered bacteriophages expressing the biofilm degrading enzymes and proteins necessary for the phage to replicate in different naturally occurring biofilm producing bacteria. The phages of the invention allow a method of biofilm degradation by the use of one or only a few administration of the phage because the system using these phages is self perpetuating, and capable of degrading biofilm even when the concentration of bacteria within the biofilm is low.

  18. Absorption-emission optrode and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for monitoring the physical and chemical properties of a sample fluid by measuring an optical signal generated by a fluorescent substance and modulated by an absorber substance. The emission band of the fluorescent substance overlaps the absorption band of the absorber substance, and the degree of overlap is dependent on the physical and chemical properties of the sample fluid. The fluorescent substance and absorber substance are immobilized on a substrate so that an effective number of molecules thereof are sufficiently close for resonant energy transfer to occur, thereby providing highly efficient modulation of the fluorescent emissions of the fluorescent substance by the absorber substance.

  19. Carbon monoxide sensor and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDaniel; Anthony H. (Livermore, CA), Medlin; J. Will (Boulder, CO), Bastasz; Robert J. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon monoxide sensors suitable for use in hydrogen feed streams and methods of use thereof are disclosed. The sensors are palladium metal/insulator/semiconductor (Pd-MIS) sensors which may possess a gate metal layer having uniform, Type 1, or non-uniform, Type 2, film morphology. Type 1 sensors display an increased sensor response in the presence of carbon monoxide while Type 2 sensors display a decreased response to carbon monoxide. The methods and sensors disclosed herein are particularly suitable for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

  20. Pyrin gene and mutants thereof, which cause familial Mediterranean fever

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kastner, Daniel L. (Bethesda, MD); Aksentijevichh, Ivona (Bethesda, MD); Centola, Michael (Tacoma Park, MD); Deng, Zuoming (Gaithersburg, MD); Sood, Ramen (Rockville, MD); Collins, Francis S. (Rockville, MD); Blake, Trevor (Laytonsville, MD); Liu, P. Paul (Ellicott City, MD); Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan (Los Angeles, CA); Gumucio, Deborah L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Richards, Robert I. (North Adelaide, AU); Ricke, Darrell O. (San Diego, CA); Doggett, Norman A. (Santa Cruz, NM); Pras, Mordechai (Tel-Hashomer, IL)

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides the nucleic acid sequence encoding the protein associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The cDNA sequence is designated as MEFV. The invention is also directed towards fragments of the DNA sequence, as well as the corresponding sequence for the RNA transcript and fragments thereof. Another aspect of the invention provides the amino acid sequence for a protein (pyrin) associated with FMF. The invention is directed towards both the full length amino acid sequence, fusion proteins containing the amino acid sequence and fragments thereof. The invention is also directed towards mutants of the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences associated with FMF. In particular, the invention discloses three missense mutations, clustered in within about 40 to 50 amino acids, in the highly conserved rfp (B30.2) domain at the C-terminal of the protein. These mutants include M6801, M694V, K695R, and V726A. Additionally, the invention includes methods for diagnosing a patient at risk for having FMF and kits therefor.

  1. Polyoxometalate water oxidation catalysts and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Craig L.; Gueletii, Yurii V.; Musaev, Djamaladdin G.; Yin, Qiushi; Botar, Bogdan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneous water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) for the oxidation of water to produce hydrogen ions and oxygen, and methods of making and using thereof are described herein. In a preferred embodiment, the WOC is a polyoxometalate WOC which is hydrolytically stable, oxidatively stable, and thermally stable. The WOC oxidized waters in the presence of an oxidant. The oxidant can be generated photochemically, using light, such as sunlight, or electrochemically using a positively biased electrode. The hydrogen ions are subsequently reduced to form hydrogen gas, for example, using a hydrogen evolution catalyst (HEC). The hydrogen gas can be used as a fuel in combustion reactions and/or in hydrogen fuel cells. The catalysts described herein exhibit higher turn over numbers, faster turn over frequencies, and/or higher oxygen yields than prior art catalysts.

  2. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  3. Zymomonas pentose-sugar fermenting strains and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Chou, Yat-Chen (Golden, CO); Howe, William (Golden, CO); Eddy, Christine (Golden, CO); Evans, Kent (Littleton, CO); Mohagheghi, Ali (Northglenn, CO)

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed in the present invention is a Zymomonas integrant and derivatives of these integrants that posses the ability to ferment pentose into ethanol. The genetic sequences encoding for the pentose-fermenting enzymes are integrated into the Zymomonas in a two-integration event of homologous recombination and transposition. Each operon includes more than one pentose-reducing enzyme encoding sequence. The integrant in some embodiments includes enzyme sequences encoding xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transketolase and transketolase. The Zymomonas integrants are highly stable, and retain activity for producing the pentose-fermenting enzyme for between 80 to 160 generations. The integrants are also resistant to acetate inhibition, as the integrants demonstrate efficient ethanol production even in the presence of 8 up to 16 grams acetate per liter media. These stably integrated sequences provide a unique Zymomonas that may then be used for the efficient conversion of pentose sugars (xylose, arabinose) to ethanol. Method of using the Zymomonas integrants and derivatives thereof in production of ethanol from cellulosic feedstock is also disclosed. The invention also provides a method for preparing a Zymomonas integrant as part of the present invention. The host Zymomonas strain found particularly useful in the creation of these compositions and methods is Zymomonas mobilis 31821.

  4. Magnetorheological materials, method for making, and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Rui; Yang, Hong; Shafrir, Shai N.; Miao, Chunlin; Wang, Mimi; Mici, Joni; Lambropoulos, John C.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetorheological material comprises a magnetic particle and a ceramic material, wherein the magnetorheological material is in a dried form and further wherein a portion of the ceramic material is in the form of a nanocrystalline coating over the entire exterior surface of the magnetic particle and another portion of the ceramic material is in the form of a free nanocrystal. A magnetorheological material comprises a magnetic particle having a ceramic material coating over an external surface thereof as a result of a coating process, and a free nanocrystal of the ceramic material in the form of a residual by-product of the coating process. A sol-gel process for making a magnetorheological product comprises providing a sol of a desired ceramic coating material; combining a desired quantity of carbonyl iron (CI) particles with the sol to coat the CI particles with the ceramic coating material; creating a resulting quantity of nanocrystalline ceramic material-coated CI particles and a quantity of free nanocrystals of the ceramic material; and, drying the resulting quantity of coated CI particles and free nanocrystals to a moisture content equal to or less than 2 wt %.

  5. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsyth, P.F.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.

    1980-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite, neutron absorbing, coated article, suitable for installation in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel and for other neutron absorbing applications, includes a backing member, preferably of flexible material such as woven fiberglass cloth, a synthetic organic polymeric coating or a plurality of such coatings on the backing member, preferably of cured phenolic resin, such as phenol formaldehyde or trimethylolphenol formaldehyde and boron carbide particles held to the backing member by the cured coating or a plurality of such coatings. Also within the invention is a method for the manufacture of the neutron absorbing coated article and the use of such an article. In a preferred method the backing member is first coated on both sides thereof with a filling coating of thermosettable liquid phenolic resin, which is then partially cured to solid state, one side of the backing member is then coated with a mixture of thermosettable liquid resin and finely divided boron carbide particles and the resin is partially cured to solid state, the other side is coated with a similar mixture, larger boron carbide particles are applied to it and the resin is partially cured to solid state, such side of the article is coated with thermosettable liquid phenolic resin, the resin is partially cured to solid state and such resin, including previously applied partially cured resins, is cured to final cross-linked and permanently set form.

  6. Media for control of thermal emission and methods of applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of media for control of emission of thermal radiation from an object or part thereof is disclosed. These materials can be used for a wide variety of thermal control applications.

  7. Plasma processes for producing silanes and derivatives thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Richard M; Massey, Dean Richard; Peterson, Peter Young

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is generally related to process for generating one or more molecules having the formula Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z, and mixtures thereof, where x,y and z are integers .gtoreq.1, H is hydrogen and D is deuterium, such as silane, comprising the steps of: providing a silicon containing material, wherein the silicon containing material includes at least 20 weight percent silicon atoms based on the total weight of the silicon containing material; generating a plasma capable of vaporizing a silicon atom, sputtering a silicon atom, or both using a plasma generating device; and contacting the plasma to the silicon containing material in a chamber having an atmosphere that includes at least about 0.5 mole percent hydrogen atoms and/or deuterium atoms based on the total moles of atoms in the atmosphere; so that a molecule having the formula Si.sub.xH.sub.y; (e.g., silane) is generated. The process preferably includes a step of removing one or more impurities from the Si.sub.xH.sub.y (e.g., the silane) to form a clean Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z (e.g., silane). The process may also include a step of reacting the Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z (e.g., the silane) to produce a high purity silicon containing material such as electronic grade metallic silicon, photovoltaic grade metallic silicon, or both.

  8. Fraction Collector User Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Fraction Collector Frac-950 18-1139-56 User Manual #12;#12;Important user information All users Territories Hong Kong © Copyright Amersham Biosciences AB 2002 - All rights reserved Fraction Collector Frac Fraction Collector Frac-950 User Manual 18-1139-56 Edition AE v Contents 1 Introduction 1.1 General

  9. Conclusions Fractionated Space Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Conclusions Fractionated Space Systems There is a growing interest in fractionated space system design. Fractionated space systems are inherently flexible and modular. There are many key technologies of flexibility serves as a source of motivation for system designers to embed flexibility into a system design (i

  10. Cellulase variants with improved expression, activity and stability, and use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aehle, Wolfgang; Bott, Richard R; Bower, Benjamin; Caspi, Jonathan; Estell, David A; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus W.J.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Kralj, Slavko; Van Lieshout, Johan; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Stigt Thans, Sander; Wallace, Louise; Vogtentanz, Gudrun; Sandgren, Mats

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having improved expression, activity and/or stability. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase variants, compositions comprising the cellulase variants, and methods of use thereof.

  11. Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

  12. Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekala, Malla R.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OP A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Approved as to style and content by: A. R. McFarland (Chair of Committee) N. K. Anand (Mer toer) (', & C. B...

  13. Fractional Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

  14. Fractions continues Michel Waldschmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldschmidt, Michel

    ´erentes oeuvres d'art, 2 appara^it aussi dans des oeuvres artistiques persanes. 2 #12;Figure 1. Fraction continue

  15. Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and uses thereof for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-tolerant microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), acrylic acid, and propionic acid. Further modifications to the microorganisms such as increasing expression of malonyl-CoA reductase and/or acetyl-CoA carboxylase provide or increase the ability of the microorganisms to produce 3HP. Methods of generating an organic acid with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers include replacing acsA or homologs thereof in cells with genes of interest and selecting for the cells comprising the genes of interest with amounts of organic acids effective to inhibit growth of cells harboring acsA or the homologs.

  16. Microwave-emitting rotor, separator apparatus including same, methods of operation and design thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H.

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for use in separating, at least in part, a mixture, including at least one chamber and at least one microwave generation device configured for communicating microwave energy into the at least one chamber is disclosed. The rotor assembly may comprise an electric generator for generating electricity for operating the microwave generation device. At least one microwave generation device may be positioned within a tubular interior shaft extending within the rotor assembly. At least a portion of the tubular interior shaft may be substantially transparent to microwave energy. Microwave energy may be emitted in an outward radial direction or toward an anticipated boundary surface defined between a mixture and a separated constituent thereof. A method including flowing a mixture through at least one chamber and communicating microwave energy into the at least one chamber while rotating same is disclosed. Methods of operating a centrifugal separator and design thereof are disclosed.

  17. Holographic fractional topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jensen, Kristan; Karch, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a holographic realization of the recently proposed low-energy effective action describing a fractional topological insulator. In particular we verify that the surface of this hypothetical material supports a fractional quantum Hall current corresponding to half that of a Laughlin state.

  18. Process For The Preparation Of 3,4-Dihyd Roxybutanoic Acid And Salts Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Rawle I. (Haslett, MI)

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid (1) and salts thereof from a glucose source containing 1,4-linked glucose as a substituent is described. The process uses an alkali metal hdyroxide and hydrogen peroxide to convert the glucose source to (1). The compound (1) is useful as a chemical intermediate to naturally occurring fatty acids and is used to prepare 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid-gamma-lactone (2) and furanone (3), particularly stereoisomers of these compounds.

  19. Process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid and salts thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Rawle I. (Haslett, MI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid (1) and salts thereof from a glucose source containing 1,4-linked glucose as a substituent is described. The process uses an alkali metal hdyroxide and hydrogen peroxide to convert the glucose source to (1). The compound (1) is useful as a chemical intermediate to naturally occurring fatty acids and is used to prepare 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid-gamma-lactone (2) and furanone (3), particularly stereoisomers of these compounds.

  20. A discrete fractional random transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengjun Liu; Haifa Zhao; Shutian Liu

    2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  1. Triode carbon nanotube field emission display using barrier rib structure and manufacturing method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, In-taek (Yongin, KR); Kim, Jong-min (Seongnam, KR)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A triode carbon nanotube field emission display (FED) using a barrier rib structure and a manufacturing method thereof are provided. In a triode carbon nanotube FED employing barrier ribs, barrier ribs are formed on cathode lines by a screen printing method, a mesh structure is mounted on the barrier ribs, and a spacer is inserted between the barrier ribs through slots of the mesh structure, thereby stably fixing the mesh structure and the spacer within a FED panel due to support by the barrier ribs.

  2. Amorphous semiconducting and conducting transparent metal oxide thin films and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, John (Boulder, CO); Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David (Evergreen, CO); Taylor, Matthew (Golden, CO); Neuman, George A. (Holland, MI); Luten, Henry A. (Holland, MI); Forgette, Jeffrey A. (Hudsonville, MI); Anderson, John S. (Holland, MI)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal oxide thin films and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a metal oxide thin film may comprise introducing at least two metallic elements and oxygen into a process chamber to form a metal oxide. The method may also comprise depositing the metal oxide on a substrate in the process chamber. The method may also comprise simultaneously controlling a ratio of the at least two metallic elements and a stoichiometry of the oxygen during deposition. Exemplary amorphous metal oxide thin films produced according to the methods herein may exhibit highly transparent properties, highly conductive properties, and/or other opto-electronic properties.

  3. Process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid and salts thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Rawle I. (Haslett, MI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid (1) and salts thereof from a glucose source containing 1,4-1inked glucose as a substituent is described. The process uses an alkali metal hdyroxide and hydrogen peroxide to convert the glucose source to (1). The compound (1) is useful as a chemical intermediate to naturally occurring fatty acids and is used to prepare 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid-gamma-lactone (2) and furanone (3), particularly stereoisomers of these compounds.

  4. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives. 4 figs.

  5. Method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell and device thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Bo; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of fabricating back-contact solar cells and devices thereof are described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming an N-type dopant source layer and a P-type dopant source layer above a material layer disposed above a substrate. The N-type dopant source layer is spaced apart from the P-type dopant source layer. The N-type dopant source layer and the P-type dopant source layer are heated. Subsequently, a trench is formed in the material layer, between the N-type and P-type dopant source layers.

  6. Fractional Standard Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Edelman; Vasily E. Tarasov

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of the phase space of the standard map with memory are investigated. This map was obtained from a kicked fractional differential equation. Depending on the value of the parameter of the map and the fractional order of the derivative in the original differential equation this nonlinear dynamical system demonstrates attractors (fixed points, stables periodic trajectories, slow converging and slow diverging trajectories, ballistic trajectories, and fractal-like structures) and/or chaotic trajectories. At least one type of fractal-like sticky attractors in the chaotic sea was observed.

  7. Fractionation, rearrangement, consolidation, reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Mabrouk, Nadia

    is an innovation. WGD and fractionation are particularly prevalent in flowering plants [6], where the slow (tens itself does not add any new adjacencies or remove any; the pre-existing adjacencies simply continue or by pseudogenization. Even if xy and yz still exist in the homeologous region of the genome, the adjacency xz

  8. Ferrite permanent magnet electrical machine and the application thereof within vehicle traction drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritter, D.J.; O'Neil, W.K.; Turner, D.

    1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes, in combination, a land vehicle having axially aligned ground engaging tractive wheels, and a drivetrain carried by the vehicle for the propulsion thereof. The drivetrain comprises: (a) a substantially fixed DC power source including at least one chemical battery, (b) transmission means including selectable multiple gear ratios, an input shaft and a mechanical differential operative to transfer torque to the wheels, (c) a single-phase self-synchronous permanent magnet motor including, (i) an elongated central shaft, (ii) a generally u-shaped frame assembly adapted for mechanical grounding the shaft to a relatively stationary portion of the vehicle, the shaft being secured to the frame proximate each end thereof, (iii) a stator assembly secured to the shaft and characterized by a plurality of outwardly directed integrally formed salient poles and associated bifilar-wound induction coils, and (iv) a rotor assembly rotatably disposed on the shaft and substantially enclosing the stator assembly, the rotor assembly comprising a cylindrical shell defining an inner surface.

  9. Trumping and Power Majorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Kribs; Rajesh Pereira; Sarah Plosker

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Majorization is a basic concept in matrix theory that has found applications in numerous settings over the past century. Power majorization is a more specialized notion that has been studied in the theory of inequalities. On the other hand, the trumping relation has recently been considered in quantum information, specifically in entanglement theory. We explore the connections between trumping and power majorization. We prove an analogue of Rado's theorem for power majorization and consider a number of examples.

  10. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  11. Evaluating guayule resin fractions for mutagenicity and toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avirett, Donald Baker

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATING GUAYULE RESIN FRACTIONS FOR NUTAGENICITY AND TOXICITY A Thesis by DONALD BAKER AVIRETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene EVALUATING GUAYULE RESIN FRACTIONS FOR MUTAGENICITY AND TOXICITY A Thesis by DONALD BAKER AVIRETT Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  12. for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    and Marketing, Consulting, Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Education, Chemical Engineering, ChemicalHANDBOOK for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY Fall 2010 #12;#12;TABLE OF CONTENTS A Career in Chemistry - What It Means ___________________________________________ 4 What do

  13. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HANDBOOK FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR Old Dominion University Department of Mechanical Engineering Batten College of Engineering and Technology Norfolk, Virginia 23529-0247 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS MECHANICAL ENGINEERING HANDBOOK

  14. Incompressible Stars and Fractional Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Bayin; J. P. Krisch

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractional calculus is an effective tool in incorporating the effects of non-locality and memory into physical models. In this regard, successful applications exist rang- ing from signal processing to anomalous diffusion and quantum mechanics. In this paper we investigate the fractional versions of the stellar structure equations for non radiating spherical objects. Using incompressible fluids as a comparison, we develop models for constant density Newtonian objects with fractional mass distributions or stress conditions. To better understand the fractional effects, we discuss effective values for the density, gravitational field and equation of state. The fractional ob- jects are smaller and less massive than integer models. The fractional parameters are related to a polytropic index for the models considered.

  15. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Craxton, R. Stephen (Rochester, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  16. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  17. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be conservatively applied to confined CSNF assemblies.

  18. Contract Major Report Form Name __________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Contract Major Report Form 12/1/94 Name __________________________ Degree __________________________ College __________________________ Descriptive title of contract major _______________________________________________ Current GAP is ___________ in ___________________ hours attempted. Summary of Proposed contract Major 1

  19. A Holographic Fractional Topological Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Hoyos-Badajoz; Kristan Jensen; Andreas Karch

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a holographic realization of the recently proposed low energy effective action describing a fractional topological insulator. In particular we verify that the surface of this hypothetical material supports a fractional quantum Hall current corresponding to half that of a Laughlin state.

  20. Undergraduate Education DECLARATION OF MAJOR(S) / CHANGE OF ADVISOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    Undergraduate Education DECLARATION OF MAJOR(S) / CHANGE OF ADVISOR For Liberal Arts Students Updated 7/31/2014 Please inform your previous advisor(s) of any major or advisor changes prior A MAJOR I am declaring a major in ________________________________________________ Major advisor

  1. DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

  2. Get a major competitive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    that energy moves things forward. + #12;Many Majors. Innovation Academy students can choose from any Information Systems Management Marketing COLLeGe OF deSIGn, COnSTruCTIOn And PLAnnInG Sustainability Engineering COLLeGe OF FIne ArTS Visual Art Studies COLLeGe OF JOurnALISm And COmmunICATIOnS Advertising

  3. 4, 6998, 2007 Carbon fractionation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    communities, in which the major source of energy and biomass originates from microalgae and bacteria

  4. Upgrading petroleum and petroleum fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, S.; Reese, D.D.

    1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for neutralizing the organic naphthenic acids acidity present in petroleum and petroleum fractions to produce a neutralization number less than 1.0 whereby they are rendered suitable as lube oil feed stocks which consists essentially of treating the petroleum and petroleum fractions with a neutralizing amount of monoethanolamine to form an amine salt with the organic acids and then heating the thus-neutralized petroleum and petroleum fractions at a temperature at least about 25/sup 0/F greater than the boiling point of water and for a time sufficient to convert the amine salts to amides.

  5. Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects Martha Isabel Fandiño Pinilla NRD Department of transforming "Knowledge" into "knowledge to teach" is called didactic transposition and constitutes a moment

  6. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Han Wei

    Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate ...

  7. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

  8. EFRC CMSNF Major Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Hurley; Todd R. Allen

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) has been to develop a first-principles-based understanding of thermal transport in the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2, in the presence of defect microstructure associated with radiation environments. The overarching goal within this mission was to develop an experimentally validated multiscale modeling capability directed toward a predictive understanding of the impact of radiation and fission-product induced defects and microstructure on thermal transport in nuclear fuel. Implementation of the mission was accomplished by integrating the physics of thermal transport in crystalline solids with microstructure science under irradiation through multi institutional experimental and computational materials theory teams from Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, the University of Florida, the University of Wisconsin, and the Colorado School of Mines. The Center’s research focused on five major areas: (i) The fundamental aspects of anharmonicity in UO2 crystals and its impact on thermal transport; (ii) The effects of radiation microstructure on thermal transport in UO2; (iii) The mechanisms of defect clustering in UO2 under irradiation; (iv) The effect of temperature and oxygen environment on the stoichiometry of UO2; and (v) The mechanisms of growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation. The Center has made important progress in each of these areas, as summarized below.

  9. PROPOSED PORTHOLE FOR ASTRONOMY MAJORS Information for Astronomy Majors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson Jr., James E.

    PROPOSED PORTHOLE FOR ASTRONOMY MAJORS Information for Astronomy Majors The Astronomy Major sciences such as Astronomy, Physics, or Engineering. (Link to details on Astrophysics Concentration) The General Astronomy Concentration is intended for students who do not plan on research careers in astronomy

  10. Nano-sized particles, processes of making, compositions and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Stephen (New York, NY); Yin, Ming (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention describes methods for preparing high quality nanoparticles, i.e., metal oxide based nanoparticles of uniform size and monodispersity. The nanoparticles advantageously comprise organic alkyl chain capping groups and are stable in air and in nonpolar solvents. The methods of the invention provide a simple and reproducible procedure for forming transition metal oxide nanocrystals, with yields over 80%. The highly crystalline and monodisperse nanocrystals are obtained directly without further size selection; particle size can be easily and fractionally increased by the methods. The resulting nanoparticles can exhibit magnetic and/or optical properties. These properties result from the methods used to prepare them. Also advantageously, the nanoparticles of this invention are well suited for use in a variety of industrial applications, including cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations and compositions.

  11. Listing Unique Fractional Factorial Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrivastava, Abhishek Kumar

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    fractional factorial design. The defining contrast subgroup is {I, ABE, BCD, ACDE}. Suppose the 25?2 design is constructed by using defining words {BCD, ABE}. This design, shown in Fig. 4, has the runs {1,4,6,7,9,12,14,15} of Fig. 3. Taking the modulo-2 sum... in generating design catalogs . . . . . . . . . . . 5 I.2.1. Computational issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 I.2.2. Complicated designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 I.3. Research objectives and contributions . . . . . . . . . . 8 I.4. Organization...

  12. THE PAIR FRACTION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT 0 {<=} z {<=} 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Man, Allison W. S.; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew W. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Van der Wel, Arjen, E-mail: allison@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: azirm@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: swuyts@mpe.mpg.de, E-mail: vdwel@mpia.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a mass-selected (M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) sample of 198 galaxies at 0 {<=} z {<=} 3.0 with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS H{sub 160}-band images from the COSMOS survey, we find evidence for the evolution of the pair fraction above z {approx} 2, an epoch in which massive galaxies are believed to undergo significant structural and mass evolution. We observe that the pair fraction of massive galaxies is 0.15 {+-} 0.08 at 1.7 {<=}z {<=} 3.0, where galaxy pairs are defined as massive galaxies having a companion of flux ratio from 1:1 to 1:4 within a projected separation of 30 kpc. This is slightly lower but still consistent with the pair fraction measured previously in other studies, and the merger fraction predicted in halo-occupation modeling. The redshift evolution of the pair fraction is described by a power law F(z) = (0.07 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign (1 + z){sup 0.6{+-}0.5}. The merger rate is consistent with no redshift evolution; however it is difficult to constrain due to the limited sample size and the high uncertainties in the merging timescale. Based on the merger rate calculation, we estimate that a massive galaxy undergoes on average 1.1 {+-} 0.5 major mergers from z = 3 to 0. The observed merger fraction is sufficient to explain the number density evolution of massive galaxies, but insufficient to explain the size evolution. This is a hint that mechanism(s) other than major merging may be required to increase the sizes of the massive, compact quiescent galaxies from z {approx} 2 to 0.

  13. Understanding fractional equivalence and the differentiated effects on operations with fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naiser, Emilie Ann

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compared two representations for teaching fraction equivalence. It traced the implications of both representations on the student?s comprehension of fractions as well as their ability to perform operations with fractions...

  14. Fractional topological insulators in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Maciejko; Xiao-Liang Qi; Andreas Karch; Shou-Cheng Zhang

    2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators can be generally defined by a topological field theory with an axion angle theta of 0 or pi. In this work, we introduce the concept of fractional topological insulator defined by a fractional axion angle and show that it can be consistent with time reversal (T) invariance if ground state degeneracies are present. The fractional axion angle can be measured experimentally by the quantized fractional bulk magnetoelectric polarization P_3, and a `halved' fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of the form (p/q)(e^2/2h) with p,q odd. In the simplest of these states the electron behaves as a bound state of three fractionally charged `quarks' coupled to a deconfined non-Abelian SU(3) `color' gauge field, where the fractional charge of the quarks changes the quantization condition of P_3 and allows fractional values consistent with T-invariance.

  15. Fractional Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maciejko, Joseph; Zhang Shoucheng [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Qi Xiaoliang [Microsoft Research, Station Q, Elings Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Karch, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators can be generally defined by a topological field theory with an axion angle {theta} of 0 or {pi}. In this work, we introduce the concept of fractional topological insulator defined by a fractional axion angle and show that it can be consistent with time reversal T invariance if ground state degeneracies are present. The fractional axion angle can be measured experimentally by the quantized fractional bulk magnetoelectric polarization P{sub 3}, and a 'halved' fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of the form {sigma}{sub H}=(p/q)(e{sup 2}/2h) with p, q odd. In the simplest of these states the electron behaves as a bound state of three fractionally charged 'quarks' coupled to a deconfined non-Abelian SU(3) 'color' gauge field, where the fractional charge of the quarks changes the quantization condition of P{sub 3} and allows fractional values consistent with T invariance.

  16. Selecting Fractionators for Product Composition Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, D. E.; Anderson, J. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are presented for selecting those fractionators where installations of product composition control systems will result in energy savings. Suggestions are included for a preliminary screening of all fractionators and for detailed evaluation of the promising...

  17. What is a Weber fraction? Justin Halberda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halberda, Justin

    What is a Weber fraction? Justin Halberda Johns Hopkins University Corresponding Author: Justin System (ANS), discrimination within the ANS, and how to think about Weber fractions (w). What the ANS representations for numerosities 4-10 for an individual with Weber fraction = .125. You can think

  18. Original article Micronutrients in biomass fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Micronutrients in biomass fractions of holm oak, beech and fir forests biomass fractions in individual monospecific stands of holm oak (Quercus ilex L), beech (Fagus sylvatica L in different biomass fractions of the holm oak forest studied. This can be related to the low soil pH values

  19. @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major. From the basic laws of physics to the resulting emergent behavior, physics studies what the universe is made of and how it works. As a Physics major that surrounds us, to the structure and evolution of the entire universe. We offer three degrees in Physics

  20. Risk Management In Major Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Scott William

    The integration of risk management in major projects within the construction and oil and gas industries has never been more significant especially as these projects are becoming larger and more complex. The increased ...

  1. Echocardiographic and scintigraphic methods of left ventricular ejection fraction determination in dogs: a comparative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyn, Phillip Franswa

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC AND SCINTI GRAPHIC METHODS OF LEFT VENTRICULAR EJECTION FRACTION DETERMINATION IN DOGS; A COMPARATIVE STUDY A THESIS BY PHILLIP FRANSWA STEYN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1989 Major subject: Veterinary Medical Sciences ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC AND SCINTIGRAPHIC METHODS OF LEFT VENTRICULAR EJECTION FRACTION DETERMINATION IN DOGS; A COMPARATIVE STUDY A THESIS...

  2. Development of magnetic separation methods of analysis: magnetic field flow fractionation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Ramirez, Jaime

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC SEPARATION METHODS OF ANALYSIS: MAGNETIC FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION A Thesis by JAIME GARCIA-RAMIREZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Chemistry DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC SEPARATION METHODS OF ANALYSIS: MAGNETIC FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION A Thesis by JAIME GARCIA-RAMIREZ Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) 1...

  3. Catalytic cracking of residual petroleum fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, H.F.; Mayo, S.L.; Goolsby, T.L. (Research and Development Dept., Ashland Petroleum Co., Ashland, KY (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on Arabian Light crude oil vacuum bottoms fractionated into five high-boiling fractions by wiped film evaporation, and the fractions subjected to catalytic cracking in a fixed-fluidized bed using a commercial equilibrium cracking catalyst. Density, aromaticity, and heteroatom content generally increased with boiling point, as did metals content except for vanadium and iron which demonstrated possible bimodal distributions. The cracking response of these fractions showed increasing yields of dry gas and coke, with decreasing gasoline yields, as a function of increasing apparent boiling point as would normally be expected. Surprisingly, however, local maxima were observed for wet gas yield and total conversion, with local minima for cycle oil and slurry yields, in the region of the 1200-1263{degrees}F (650-680{degrees}C) middle fraction. All fractions showed significant response to cracking, with coke yields generally being the only negative factor observed.

  4. Nonlinear time-fractional dispersive equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Artale Harris; R. Garra

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study some cases of time-fractional nonlinear dispersive equations (NDEs) involving Caputo derivatives, by means of the invariant subspace method. This method allows to find exact solutions to nonlinear time-fractional partial differential equations by separating variables. We first consider a third order time-fractional NDE that admits a four-dimensional invariant subspace and we find a similarity solution. We also study a fifth order NDE. In this last case we find a solution involving Mittag-Leffler functions. We finally observe that the invariant subspace method permits to find explicit solutions for a wide class of nonlinear dispersive time-fractional equations.

  5. Accelerator dynamics of a fractional kicked rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iomin

    2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the Weyl fractional derivative can quantize an open system. A fractional kicked rotor is studied in the framework of the fractional Schrodinger equation. The system is described by the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian by virtue of the Weyl fractional derivative. Violation of space symmetry leads to acceleration of the orbital momentum. Quantum localization saturates this acceleration, such that the average value of the orbital momentum can be a direct current and the system behaves like a ratchet. The classical counterpart is a nonlinear kicked rotor with absorbing boundary conditions.

  6. Assessment of the corrosivity of crude fractions from varying feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tebbal, S.; Kane, R.D. [CLI International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Yamada, Kazuo [Japan Energy Corp., Okayama (Japan)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude corrosivity is becoming a critical issue because of frequent variation of feedstock based on spot market opportunities and high sulfur and naphthenic acid content of low cost crudes. The choice of remediation methods (blending, inhibition, upgrading, and/or process changes) depends on accurate prediction of the corrosivity of these crudes. This paper presents the results of autoclave and flow loop runs conducted to assess the corrosivity of Middle East, Shengli, and Bachequero-13 crudes fractions on several materials used in refinery construction. Autoclave tests were conducted in vacuum heater feed line (VHFL) and Asphalt`s fractions from each crude and in atmospheric gas oil (AGO) and heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) from the Bachequero-13. Flow loop tests were conducted only on the VHFL`s of each crude. As expected, the test results showed a major increase in corrosion rate with increasing temperature. Corrosion rates were generally less than 10 mpy for all materials at up to 300 C. At 400 C, corrosion rates on the low Cr steels (0 to 5 Cr) were generally around 100 mpy. For the Middle East and Shengli oils, the asphalt`s were more corrosive than the VHFL cuts. Only slight differences were found in the corrosivity of these two oils. By comparison, the Bachequero-13 fractions were generally more corrosive than those from the Shengli or the Middle Eastern crudes. At 200 ft/s (67 m/s), the corrosion rates of the carbon steel specimens were high in the Middle Eastern fraction compared to the Bachequero-13 and Shengli fractions.

  7. Companies Hiring by Majors Booth # Organization Name Majors Recruited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    Pont Electrical,Mechanical,Chemical 83 Eaton Corporation Electrical,Mechanical #12;Companies Hiring by Majors),Computer & Systems,Industrial,Aerospace 106 BASF Corporation Electrical,Mechanical,Civil,Chemical 86 Bayer Technology Engineering Corporation Engineering 108 Conestoga-Rovers & Associates Engineering 3/4 Conoco

  8. Fractional Exact Solutions and Solitons in Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitru Baleanu; Sergiu I. Vacaru

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We survay our recent results on fractional gravity theory. It is also provided the Main Theorem on encoding of geometric data (metrics and connections in gravity and geometric mechanics) into solitonic hierarchies. Our approach is based on Caputo fractional derivative and nonlinear connection formalism.

  9. Void Fraction Instrument operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgonovi, G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.; Martin, J.D.; Gimera, M.; Graves, D.B.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operations and Maintenance Manual (O&MM) addresses riser installation, equipment and personnel hazards, operating instructions, calibration, maintenance, removal, and other pertinent information necessary to safely operate and store the Void Fraction Instrument. Final decontamination and decommissioning of the Void Fraction Instrument are not covered in this document.

  10. Inverse Problems for Fractional Diffusion Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Lihua

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.5.3 Derivation of fractional difiusion equations . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.6 Fractional calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.7 Mittag-Le?er function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1... point theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.3 Volterra equation of the second kind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Classical difiusion equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4.1 Derivation...

  11. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 116 GENERAL BIOLOGY 2 Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 115 GENERAL BIOLOGY 1 Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

  12. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIOL 105 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOL 104 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

  13. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 1580 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 1570 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

  14. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

  15. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIOL 117 + BIOL 118 GENERAL BIOLOGY II and LAB Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOL 115 + BIOL 116 GENERAL BIOLOGY I and LAB Introductory Chemistry

  16. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BI 202 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BI 201 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

  17. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 152 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 151 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

  18. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 156 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 155 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

  19. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIOL 1520 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOL 1510 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

  20. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 152 / BY 52 MODERN BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 150 / BY 50 MODERN BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

  1. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 220 BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 210 BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I CHE 201

  2. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIOL 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOL 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

  3. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 110 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 109 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

  4. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY SC 139 INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY: ANIMALS AND PLANTS Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY SC 135 INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY: MOLECULES AND CELLS Introductory Chemistry

  5. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 117 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 118 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

  6. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 132 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 2 Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 131 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 1 Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

  7. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BI 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BI 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

  8. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 01400 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 01300 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

  9. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 106H GENERAL BIOLOGY II HONORS Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 105H GENERAL BIOLOGY I HONORS Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

  10. BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BI 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY 2 Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BI 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY 1 Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

  11. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and management. The program emphasizes sustainable, multiple-use management and includes substantial field work work, etc.) Fall FNR 4624C Field Operations for Management of Ecosystems 3 credits FNR 4660 NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Forest Resource Management Forest

  12. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    -use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Watershed Science & Management Watershed Science & Management prepares students to address the many management issues associated with water

  13. Dirichlet polynomials, Majorization, and Trumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajesh Pereira; Sarah Plosker

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Majorization and trumping are two partial orders which have proved useful in quantum information theory. We show some relations between these two partial orders and generalized Dirichlet polynomials, Mellin transforms, and completely monotone functions. These relations are used to prove a succinct generalization of Turgut's characterization of trumping.

  14. Fractional Zaslavsky and Henon Discrete Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to the memory of Professor George M. Zaslavsky passed away on November 25, 2008. In the field of discrete maps, George M. Zaslavsky introduced a dissipative standard map which is called now the Zaslavsky map. G. Zaslavsky initialized many fundamental concepts and ideas in the fractional dynamics and kinetics. In this paper, starting from kicked damped equations with derivatives of non-integer orders we derive a fractional generalization of discrete maps. These fractional maps are generalizations of the Zaslavsky map and the Henon map. The main property of the fractional differential equations and the correspondent fractional maps is a long-term memory and dissipation. The memory is realized by the fact that their present state evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights.

  15. Major Communications Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Major Communications Reports Major Communications Reports May 18, 2012 Green Button Data: More Power to You May 28, 2009 Major Communications Report May 28, 2009 May 7, 2009 Major...

  16. Carbonylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Renner, Mark W

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity carborane-containing porphyrin compounds with halide, amine, or nitro groups and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), X-ray radiation therapy (XRT), and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these carborane-containing porphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  17. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  18. Carboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Haitao; Miura, Michiko

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity carborane-containing 5, 10, 15, 20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these carborane-containing tetraphenyl porphyrin compounds to methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  19. Carboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Haitao; Miura, Michiko

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity carborane-containing 5, 10, 15, 20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head, neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these carborane-containing tetraphenyl porphyrin compounds to methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  20. Carboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Renner, Mark W

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity carborane-containing porphyrin compounds with halide, amine, or nitro groups and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), X-ray radiation therapy (XRT), and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these carborane-containing porphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  1. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  2. Major contributions of the Tevatron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowellfor 2013 |Spherical TorusMajor

  3. Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, William R.

    Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance Major I ­ Pre-professional (Medicine, Dentistry, Business, Law, Engineering) Major II ­ ACS Certified e.g. Graduate Study or Entry Level Chemistry Employment. Major III ­ Forensic Chemistry Major IV** ­ Biochemistry Option Chemistry Minor General Chemistry I & II

  4. On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

  5. The First Billion Years Project: The escape fraction of ionising photons in the epoch of reionisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proto-galaxies forming in low-mass dark matter haloes are thought to provide the majority of ionising photons needed to reionise the Universe, due to their high escape fractions of ionising photons. We study how the escape fraction in high-redshift galaxies relates to the physical properties of the halo in which the galaxies form by computing escape fractions for 75801 haloes between redshifts 27 and 6 that were extracted from the FiBY project, high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy formation. We find that the main constraint on the escape fraction is the presence of dense gas within 10 pc of the young sources that emit the majority of the ionising photons produced over the lifetime of the stellar population. This results in a strong mass dependence of the escape fraction. The lower potential well in haloes with virial mass below 10^8 solar mass results in lower column densities close to the sources that can be penetrated by the radiation from young, massive stars. In general only a ...

  6. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions with Iron Oxides. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions with Iron Oxides....

  7. The Undergrad Major in Geography or Cartography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    honors in the major Cancel a major in Geography or Cartography Interpret a DARS report (or What-If DARS if you haven't yet declared) for your major to see what requirements you need to fulfill Explain and substitutions in your L&S degree (BA,BS) Arrange for a course substitution for your major (DARS Exception

  8. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  9. Aqueous fractionation of biomass based on novel carbohydrate hydrolysis kinetics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-function process for hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components comprising extractives and proteins; a portion of a solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising: a) introducing either solid fresh biomass or partially fractioned lignocellulosic biomass material with entrained acid or water into a reactor and heating to a temperature of up to about 185.degree. C.-205.degree. C. b) allowing the reaction to proceed to a point where about 60% of the hemicellulose has been hydrolyzed in the case of water or complete dissolution in case of acid; c) adding a dilute acid liquid at a pH below about 5 at a temperature of up to about 205.degree. C. for a period ranging from about 5 to about 10 minutes; to hydrolyze the remaining 40% of hemicellulose if water is used. d) quenching the reaction at a temperature of up to about 140.degree. C. to quench all degradation and hydrolysis reactions; and e) introducing into said reaction chamber and simultaneously removing from said reaction chamber, a volumetric flow rate of dilute acid at a temperature of up to about 140.degree. C. to wash out the majority of the solubilized biomass components, to obtain improved hemicellosic sugar yields.

  10. Effect of dietary protein quality on fractional rates of muscle protein synthesis and catabolism in the rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roeder, Richard Anthony

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF DIETARY PROTEIN QUALITY ON FRACTIONAL RATES OF MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND CATABOLISM IN THE RAT A Thesis by RICHARD ANTHONY ROEDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition EFFECT OF DIETARY PROTEIN QUALITY ON FRACTIONAL RATES OF MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND CATABOLISM IN THE RAT A Thesis by RICHARD ANTHONY ROEDER Approved...

  11. 1Fractions and Chemistry Because molecules and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1Fractions and Chemistry Because molecules and atoms come in 'integer' packages, the ratios of gasoline (ethane) are combined with 7 molecules of oxygen you get 4 molecules of carbon dioxide and 6;1 Answer Key Problem 1 - What makes your car go: When 2 molecules of gasoline (ethane) are combined with 7

  12. Measurement of the D -> pipi branching fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for D0 --> pi+pi-, and we present the first measurements of D0 --> pi0pi0 and of D+ --> pi+pi0, which is ...

  13. Measurement of the D*(2010) branching fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the D*+ and D*0 decay branching fractions based on 780 pb-1 of data collected with the CLEO II detector. For radiative D*+ decay, we obtain an upper limit, B(D*+ --> D+ gamma) < 4.2% (90% confidence ...

  14. Hamilton-Jacobi Fractional Sequential Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eqab M. Rabei; Bashar S. Ababneh

    2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    As a continuation of Rabei et al. work [11], the Hamilton- Jacobi partial differential equation is generalized to be applicable for systems containing fractional derivatives. The Hamilton- Jacobi function in configuration space is obtained in a similar manner to the usual mechanics. Two problems are considered to demonstrate the application of the formalism. The result found to be in exact agreement with Agrawal's formalism.

  15. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlatti, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  16. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Merlatti; G. Sabella

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  17. Water addition for increased CO/H[sub 2] hydrocarbon synthesis activity over catalysts comprising cobalt, ruthenium and mixtures thereof which may include a promoter metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C.J.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A once-through, fixed or slurry bed Fischer Tropsch process is described with enhanced CO conversion activity and C[sub 5] + liquid hydrocarbon selectivity comprising contacting a feed mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a reaction zone with about 1 Vol % to about 70 Vol % water based on the total volume of feed mixture, at a pressure above one atmosphere and a temperature ranging from about 150 C to about 300 C, with a catalyst selected from the group consisting of cobalt, ruthenium, and mixtures thereof on a titania support, wherein said titania support is less than 40 m[sup 2]/g, converting at least 90 Vol % of the carbon monoxide to liquid hydrocarbons, and in the substantial absence of CO[sub 2] formation.

  18. Combined Delta-Nabla Sum Operator in Discrete Fractional Calculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastos, Nuno R O

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a more general discrete fractional operator, given by convex linear combination of the delta and nabla fractional sums. Fundamental properties of the new fractional operator are proved. As particular cases, results on delta and nabla discrete fractional calculus are obtained.

  19. Infrared spectroscopy of diatomic molecules - a fractional calculus approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Herrmann

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The eigenvalue spectrum of the fractional quantum harmonic oscillator is calculated numerically solving the fractional Schr\\"odinger equation based on the Riemann and Caputo definition of a fractional derivative. The fractional approach allows a smooth transition between vibrational and rotational type spectra, which is shown to be an appropriate tool to analyze IR spectra of diatomic molecules.

  20. Mozambique becomes a major coking coal exporter?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffini, A.

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to its potential role as a major international supplier of coking coal, Mozambique will also become a major source of power generation for southern Africa. 3 figs.

  1. STUDY ABROADFOR GOVERNMENT MAJORS DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    many hours of elective (lower vs. upper division) credit do I have remaining in my major building your resume now. CREDIT Obtain core, major, or elective credits that count toward your degree

  2. Major/Conce ntration Advisor Grad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name TITLE Major/Conce ntration Advisor Grad Abhishek Sharma Computer Science g Addie Evans. Hamid Shahnasser g #12;Name TITLE Major/Conce ntration Advisor Grad Bita Nosratieh Convexity of Domains Mathematics Dr. Alex Schuster g #12;Name TITLE Major/Conce ntration Advisor Grad David Newstrom The Role

  3. Major/Concen tration Advisor Grad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name TITLE Major/Concen tration Advisor Grad Archer, H. M., Sekercioglu, C. H. Mendenhall, C. Carmen R. Domingo g #12;Name TITLE Major/Concen tration Advisor Grad Henry Hunter Confirmation Major/Concen tration Advisor Grad Meghan Bishop DIet and food webs of the California red-legged frog

  4. Degree: Bachelor of Science Major: Quantitative Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cakoni, Fioralba

    Degree: Bachelor of Science Major: Quantitative Biology The College of Arts and Sciences administers an interdisciplinary major pro- gram in Quantitative Biology leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. The major provides a strong background in mathematics, biology, chemistry and physics appro

  5. Committee on Educational Policy MAJOR QUALIFICATION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Committee on Educational Policy MAJOR QUALIFICATION POLICY CEP encourages all undergraduate to formalize these guidelines by implementing a policy that restricts qualification to one or more majors. CEP of the major qualifications policy on other undergraduate programs; · discuss the potential effects

  6. Fluid catalytic cracking of heavy petroleum fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHenry, K.W.

    1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is claimed for fluid catalytic cracking of residuum and other heavy oils comprising of gas oil, petroleum residue, reduced and whole crudes and shale oil to produce gasoline and other liquid products which are separated in various streams in a fractionator and associated vapor recovery equipment. The heat from combustion of coke on the coked catalyst is removed by reacting sulfur-containing coke deposits with steam and oxygen in a separate stripper-gasifier to produce a low btu gas stream comprising of sulfur compounds, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide at a temperature of from about 1100/sup 0/F. To about 2200/sup 0/F. The partially regenerated catalyst then undergoes complete carbon removal in a regeneration vessel. The regenerated catalyst is recycled for re-use in the cracking of heavy petroleum fractions. The liquid products are gasoline, distillates, heavy fuel oil, and light hydrocarbons.

  7. Chiral anomaly, bosonization, and fractional charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mignaco, J.A.; Monteiro, M.A.R.

    1985-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to evaluate the Jacobian of chiral rotations, regulating determinants through the proper-time method and using Seeley's asymptotic expansion. With this method we compute easily the chiral anomaly for ..nu.. = 4,6 dimensions, discuss bosonization of some massless two-dimensional models, and handle the problem of charge fractionization. In addition, we comment on the general validity of Fujikawa's approach to regulate the Jacobian of chiral rotations with non-Hermitian operators.

  8. Fractional Quantum Hall States in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Jellal; Bellati Malika

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We quantum mechanically analyze the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene. This will be done by building the corresponding states in terms of a potential governing the interactions and discussing other issues. More precisely, we consider a system of particles in the presence of an external magnetic field and take into account of a specific interaction that captures the basic features of the Laughlin series \

  9. Pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.; Vetter, T.; Sonntag, R.; Moniz, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The freezing point of JP-5, the Navy jet fuel, has been related to the n-alkane content, specifically n-hexadecane. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest n-alkanes. The formation of n-alkanes in the jet fuel distillation range can be explained if large n-alkanes are present in the crude oil source. Quantities of large n-alkanes are insufficient, however, to explain the amounts found - up to 37% n-alkanes in the jet fuel range. Other possible precursors to small straight chain molecules are substituted cyclic compounds. Attack in the side chain obviously afford a path to an n-alkane. Aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, acids, amines, and ethers also have the potential to form n-alkanes if an unbranched alkyl chain is present in the molecule. Investigations showed that the best yield of the JP-5 cut comes at different times for the various fractions, but a time in the 60 to 120 min range would appear to be the optimum time for good yield at 450/sup 0/C. The longer time would be preferred with respect to lower potential n-alkane yield. None of the fractions gave n-alkane yields approaching the 37% amount found in the Shale-I JP-5. A temperature different than the 450/sup 0/C used here might affect the conversion percentage. Further the combined saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions may interact under pyrolysis conditions to give higher potential n-alkane yields than the fractions stressed independently.

  10. The Fractional London Equation and The Fractional Pippard Model For Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José Weberszpil

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    With the discovery of new superconductors there was a running to find the justifications for the new properties found in these materials. In order to describe these new effects some theories were adapted and some others have been tried. In this work we present an application of the fractional calculus to study the superconductor in the context of London theory. Here we investigated the linear London equation modified by fractional derivatives for non-differentiable functions, instead of integer ones, in a coarse grained scenario. We apply the fractional approach based in the modified Riemann-Liouville sense to improve the model in order to include possible non-local interactions and the media. It is argued that the e ects of non-locality and long memory, intrinsic to the formalism of the fractional calculus, are relevant to achieving a satisfactory phenomenological description. In order to compare the present results with the usual London theory, we calculated the magnetic field distribution for a mesoscopic superconductor system. Also, a fractional Pippard-like model is proposed to take into account the non-locality beside effects of interactions and the media. We propose that parameter alfa of fractionality can be used to create an alternative way to characterize superconductors.

  11. Pyrolysis of shale oil vacuum distillate fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The freezing point of US Navy jet fuel (JP-5) has been related to the amounts of large n-alkanes present in the fuel. This behavior applies to jet fuels derived from alternate fossil fuel resources, such as shale oil, coal, and tar sands, as well as those derived from petroleum. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest and those from coal the lowest n-alkane content. The origin of these n-alkanes in the amounts observed, especially in shale-derived fuels, is not readily explained on the basis of literature information. Studies of the processes, particularly the ones involving thermal stress, used to produce these fuels are needed to define how the n-alkanes form from larger molecules. The information developed will significantly contribute to the selection of processes and refining techniques for future fuel production from shale oil. Carbon-13 nmr studies indicate that oil shale rock contains many long unbranched straight chain hydrocarbon groups. The shale oil derived from the rock also gives indication of considerable straight chain material with large peaks at 14, 23, 30, and 32 ppM in the C-13 nmr spectrum. Previous pyrolysis studies stressed fractions of shale crude oil residua, measured the yields of JP-5, and determined the content of potential n-alkanes in the JP-5 distillation range (4). In this work, a shale crude oil vacuum distillate (Paraho) was separated into three chemical fractions. The fractions were then subjected to nmr analysis to estimate the potential for n-alkane production and to pyrolysis studies to determine an experimental n-alkane yield.

  12. Pyrolysis of shale oil vacuum distillate fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The freezing point of U.S. Navy jet fuel (JP-5) has been related to the amounts of large nalkanes present in the fuel. This behavior applies to jet fuels derived from alternate fossil fuel resources, such as shale oil, coal, and tar sands, as well as those derived from petroleum. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest and those from coal the lowest n-alkane content. The origin of these n-alkanes in the amounts observed, especially in shale-derived fuels, is not readily explained on the basis of literature information. Studies of the processes, particularly the ones involving thermal stress, used to produce these fuels are needed to define how th n-alkanes form from larger molecules. The information developed will significantly contribute to the selection of processes and refining techniques for future fuel production from shale oil. Carbon-13 nmr studies indicate that oil shale rock contains many long unbranched straight chain hydrocarbon groups. The shale oil derived from the rock also gives indication of considerable straight chain material with large peaks at 14, 23, 30 and 32 ppm in the C-13 nmr spectrum. Previous pyrolysis studies stressed fractions of shale crude oil residua, measured the yields of JP-5, and determined the content of potential n-alkanes in the JP-5 distillation range (4). In this work, a shale crude oil vacuum distillate (Paraho) was separated into three chemical fractions. The fractions were then subjected to nmr analysis to estimate the potential for n-alkane production and to pyrolysis studies to determine an experimental n-alkane yield.

  13. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  14. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO); Padukone, Nandan (Denver, CO); Hatzis, Christos (Denver, CO); Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 3 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process.

  15. Fractional electric charge and quark confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sam R. Edwards; André Sternbeck; Lorenz von Smekal

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Owing to their fractional electric charges, quarks are blind to transformations that combine a color center phase with an appropriate electromagnetic one. Such transformations are part of a global $Z_6$-like center symmetry of the Standard Model that is lost when quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is treated as an isolated theory. This symmetry and the corresponding topological defects may be relevant to non-perturbative phenomena such as quark confinement, much like center symmetry and ordinary center vortices are in pure SU($N$) gauge theories. Here we report on our investigations of an analogous symmetry in a 2-color model with dynamical Wilson quarks carrying half-integer electric charge.

  16. Fractional revivals through Rényi uncertainty relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elvira Romera; Francisco de los Santos

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the R\\'enyi uncertainty relations give a good description of the dynamical behavior of wave packets and constitute a sound approach to revival phenomena by analyzing three model systems: the simple harmonic oscillator, the infinite square well, and the quantum bouncer. We prove the usefulness of entropic uncertainty relations as a tool for identifying fractional revivals by providing a comparison in different contexts with the usual Heisenberg uncertainty relation and with the common approach in terms of the autocorrelation function.

  17. Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Montana Major Facility Siting Act aims to protect the environment from unreasonable degradation caused by irresponsible siting of electric transmission, pipeline, and geothermal facilities. The...

  18. Characterization of the bovine major histocompatibility complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McArthur, Monica

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are involved in immune response to infectious agents, tumor metastasis, stress response, gametogenesis, and development, including embryogenesis. Therefore, characterization...

  19. Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui Sitindra S studied the controls on the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui, a halophilic archaea, in pure culture experiments by varying organic substrate, the hydrogen

  20. Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

  1. Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of systems within Caputo's fractional derivative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eqab M. Rabei; Ibtesam Almayteh; Sami I. Muslih; Dumitru Baleanu

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we develop a fractional Hamilton-Jacobi formulation for discrete systems in terms of fractional Caputo derivatives. The fractional action function is obtained and the solutions of the equations of motion are recovered. An example is studied in details.

  2. Electron Spin Precession for the Time Fractional Pauli Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosein Nasrolahpour

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we aim to extend the application of the fractional calculus in the realm of quantum mechanics. We present a time fractional Pauli equation containing Caputo fractional derivative. By use of the new equation we study the electron spin precession problem in a homogeneous constant magnetic field.

  3. Economics Major? Need Money for School?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics Major? Need Money for School? Then Apply for a: The Economics Department will award two scholarships, each in the amount of $750 this Spring 2014 to students majoring in Economics at San Francisco. First - a retired member of the Economics faculty. Both graduate and undergraduate students

  4. Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    and energy fluxes in soils (water, air, nutrients and pollutants) · provide solutions for sustainable land1 Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or Soil and Terrestrial Environmental Physics CHN F 29.1 Universitätstrasse 16 8092 Zürich dani.or@env.ethz.ch +41 44 633 60 15 Objectives of soil protection major

  5. Astronomy Major www.physicsandastronomy.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Astronomy Major www.physicsandastronomy.pitt.edu Revised: 03/2013 The University of Pittsburgh's internationally recognized Department of Physics and Astronomy has been an important leader at the frontier, chemistry, engineering, and computer science. Required courses for the Astronomy major The BA in astronomy

  6. What is required for a Philosophy Major?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta, Charles A.

    PHILOSOPHY What is required for a Philosophy Major? at Northern Kentucky University For students who entered the University in 2011. The major in philosophy requires a total of at least thirty (30/PHI 280 Classical and Medieval Philosophy (fall) · PHI 355 Socrates and Plato (spring 2014) History II

  7. What is required for a Philosophy Major?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta, Charles A.

    PHILOSOPHY What is required for a Philosophy Major? at Northern Kentucky University For students who entered the University before 2011. The major in philosophy requires a total of at least thirty or PHI 265 Logic (every semester) · PHI 180 or PHI 280 Classical and Medieval Philosophy (fall) · PHI 185

  8. What is required for a Philosophy Major?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta, Charles A.

    PHILOSOPHY What is required for a Philosophy Major? at Northern Kentucky University For students who entered the University in 2012. The major in philosophy requires a total of at least thirty (30) · PHI 280 Classical and Medieval Philosophy (offered fall) · PHI 285 Modern and Contemporary Philosophy

  9. What is required for a Philosophy Major?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta, Charles A.

    PHILOSOPHY What is required for a Philosophy Major? at Northern Kentucky University For students who entered the University in (or after) 2013. The major in philosophy requires a total of at least (every semester) · PHI 280 Classical and Medieval Philosophy (offered fall) · PHI 285 Modern

  10. EXPLORATION ACTIVITY WORKSHEET MAJOR & CAREER EXPLORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milchberg, Howard

    of activity or process you should explore to bring you closer to your academic goals. NameEXPLORATION ACTIVITY WORKSHEET MAJOR & CAREER EXPLORATION Purpose: The exploration activity is designed for students to "explore" opportunities at UM as they relate to student success, majors, careers

  11. Topological Current in Fractional Chern Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koma, Tohru

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider interacting fermions in a magnetic field on a two-dimensional lattice with the periodic boundary conditions. In order to measure the Hall current, we apply an electric potential with a compact support. Then, due to the Lorentz force, the Hall current appears along the equipotential line. Introducing a local current operator at the edge of the potential, we derive the Hall conductance as a linear response coefficient. For a wide class of the models, we prove that if there exists a spectral gap above the degenerate ground state, then the Hall conductance of the ground state is fractionally quantized without averaging over the fluxes. This is an extension of the topological argument for the integrally quantized Hall conductance in noninteracting fermion systems on lattices.

  12. Topological Current in Fractional Chern Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tohru Koma

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider interacting fermions in a magnetic field on a two-dimensional lattice with the periodic boundary conditions. In order to measure the Hall current, we apply an electric potential with a compact support. Then, due to the Lorentz force, the Hall current appears along the equipotential line. Introducing a local current operator at the edge of the potential, we derive the Hall conductance as a linear response coefficient. For a wide class of the models, we prove that if there exists a spectral gap above the degenerate ground state, then the Hall conductance of the ground state is fractionally quantized without averaging over the fluxes. This is an extension of the topological argument for the integrally quantized Hall conductance in noninteracting fermion systems on lattices.

  13. ABJ Fractional Brane from ABJM Wilson Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sho Matsumoto; Sanefumi Moriyama

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new Fermi gas formalism for the ABJ matrix model. This formulation identifies the effect of the fractional M2-brane in the ABJ matrix model as that of a composite Wilson loop operator in the corresponding ABJM matrix model. Using this formalism, we study the phase part of the ABJ partition function numerically and find a simple expression for it. We further compute a few exact values of the partition function at some coupling constants. Fitting these exact values against the expected form of the grand potential, we can determine the grand potential with exact coefficients. The results at various coupling constants enable us to conjecture an explicit form of the grand potential for general coupling constants. The part of the conjectured grand potential from the perturbative sum, worldsheet instantons and bound states is regarded as a natural generalization of that in the ABJM matrix model, though the membrane instanton part contains a new contribution.

  14. Multidimensional optical fractionation with holographic verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke Xiao; David G. Grier

    2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The trajectories of colloidal particles driven through a periodic potential energy landscape can become kinetically locked in to directions dictated by the landscape's symmetries. When the landscape is realized with forces exerted by a structured light field, the path a given particle follows has been predicted to depend exquisitely sensitively on such properties as the particle's size and refractive index These predictions, however, have not been tested experimentally. Here, we describe measurements of colloidal silica spheres' transport through arrays of holographic optical traps that use holographic video microscopy to track individual spheres' motions in three dimensions and simultaneously to measure each sphere's radius and refractive index with part-per-thousand resolution. These measurements confirm previously untested predictions for the threshold of kinetically locked-in transport, and demonstrate the ability of optical fractionation to sort colloidal spheres with part-per-thousand resolution on multiple characteristics simultaneously.

  15. Anomalous Topological Pumps and Fractional Josephson Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan Zhang; C. L. Kane

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discover novel topological pumps in the Josephson effects for superconductors. The phase difference, which is odd under the chiral symmetry defined by the product of time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries, acts as an anomalous adiabatic parameter. These pumping cycles are different from those in the "periodic table", and are characterized by $Z\\times Z$ or $Z_2\\times Z_2$ strong invariants. We determine the general classifications in class AIII, and those in class DIII with a single anomalous parameter. For the $Z_2\\times Z_2$ topological pump in class DIII, one $Z_2$ invariant describes the coincidence of fermion parity and spin pumps whereas the other one reflects the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana Kramers pairs, leading to three distinct fractional Josephson effects.

  16. The effective delayed neutron fraction for bare-metal criticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given sufficient material, a large number of actinides could be used to form bare-metal criticals. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical comprised of a fissile material is comparable with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical composed of a fissionable material is reduced by factors of 2 to 10 when compared with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. When the effective delayed neutron fraction is small, the difference between delayed and prompt criticality is small, and extreme caution must be used in critical assemblies of these materials. This study uses an approximate but realistic model to survey the actinide region to compare effective delayed neutron fractions with absolute delayed neutron fractions.

  17. Fractional Calculus in Hydrologic Modeling: A Numerical Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Benson; Mark M. Meerschaert; Jordan Revielle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractional derivatives can be viewed either as a handy extension of classical calculus or, more deeply, as mathematical operators defined by natural phenomena. This follows the view that the diffusion equation is defined as the governing equation of a Brownian motion. In this paper, we emphasize that fractional derivatives come from the governing equations of stable Levy motion, and that fractional integration is the corresponding inverse operator. Fractional integration, and its multi-dimensional extensions derived in this way, are intimately tied to fractional Brownian (and Levy) motions and noises. By following these general principles, we discuss the Eulerian and Lagrangian numerical solutions to fractional partial differential equations, and Eulerian methods for stochastic integrals. These numerical approximations illuminate the essential nature of the fractional calculus.

  18. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 is the eighteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 24 major U.S. energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the United States and abroad.

  19. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

  20. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication examines developments in the operations of the major US e energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area. In 1996, 24 companies filed Form EIA-28. The analysis and data presented in this report represents the operations of the Financial Reporting System companies in the context of their worldwide operations and in the context of the major energy markets which they serve. Both energy and nonenergy developments of these companies are analyzed. Although the focus is on developments in 1996, important trends prior to that time are also featured. Sections address energy markets in 1996; key financial developments; oil and gas exploration, development, and production; downstream petroleum in 1996; coal and alternative energy; and foreign direct investment in US energy. 30 figs., 104 tabs.

  1. Major Efforts 2010-2015 Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    pay syste o acu ty · FY12 OMB submission and FY12 budget planning · Enrollment planning #12;#12;Major Efforts · 2010-2015 Strategic Plan · Trustees approved at Sep meeting · http

  2. Energy Reduction in Major State Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisiana enacted legislation (SB 240) in July 2007 which required energy efficiency measures to be incorporated in the construction and renovation of major facility projects funded by the state....

  3. Major Business Expansion Bond Program (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Major Business Expansion Bond Program provides long-term, credit-enhanced financing up to $25,000,000 at taxable bond rates for businesses creating or retaining at least 50 jobs; up to $10,000...

  4. 685 Communication Studies AAH Major Code Major College Bachelor's Master's Doctor's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    685 Communication Studies AAH Major Code Major College Bachelor's Master's Doctor's 822 Communication Studies AAH BABA 210 Construction Science and Management AAH BS MCSM 620 English AAH Professional Communication AAH MA 212 Real Estate Development AAH MRED 615 Rhetorics

  5. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

  6. Major Oak Diseases and Their Control.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jerral D.; Appel, David N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )OC ?A245 Q7 173 . \\00 ILl78 , LIBRARY -?'?AUG 3 1?1S84 r ex.J$ MM University MAJOR OAK DISEASES AND THEIR CONTROL 8-1478 J ~ Texas Agricultural Extension Service. The Texas A&M University System ? Zerle L. Carpenter, Director. College... Station, Texas (Blaok Page bl-?OriglulBidletial? / . , ,;..,' ,- ; ~ ~ " OAK DISEASES AND THEIR CONTROL Jerral D. Johnson and David N. Appel* Oaks represent the major shade trees of Texas and are also...

  7. The sublethal effects of the non volatile water soluble fraction of Southern Louisiana crude oil on the growth of Skeletonema costatum (Greve.) Cleve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schauffler, Sue Myhre

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF THE NON VOLATILE WATER SOLUBLE FRACTION OF SOUTHERN LOUISIANA CRUDE OIL ON THE GROWTH OF Skeletonema costatum (GREVE. ) CLEVE A Thesis by SUE MYHRE SCHAUFFLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ~I University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Oceanography THE SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF THE NON VOLATILE WATER SOLUBLE FRACTION OF SOUTHERN LOUISIANA CRUDE OIL ON THE GROWTH OF Skeletonema...

  8. Synchronization of piece-wise continuous systems of fractional order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marius-F. Danca

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study is to prove analytically that synchronization of a piece-wise continuous class of systems of fractional order can be achieved. Based on our knowledge, there are no numerical methods to integrate differential equations with discontinuous right hand side of fractional order which model these systems. Therefore, via Filippov's regularization [1] and Cellina's Theorem [2,3], we prove that the initial value problem can be converted into a continuous problem of fractional-order, to which numerical methods for fractional orders apply. In this way, the synchronization problem transforms into a standard problem for continuous systems of fractional order. Three examples of fractional-order piece-wise systems are considered: Sprott system, Chen and Shimizu-Morioka system.

  9. Power-law spatial dispersion from fractional Liouville equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Vasily E. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)] [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscopic model in the framework of fractional kinetics to describe spatial dispersion of power-law type is suggested. The Liouville equation with the Caputo fractional derivatives is used to obtain the power-law dependence of the absolute permittivity on the wave vector. The fractional differential equations for electrostatic potential in the media with power-law spatial dispersion are derived. The particular solutions of these equations for the electric potential of point charge in this media are considered.

  10. Projective synchronization in fractional order chaotic systems and its control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chunguang Li

    2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The chaotic dynamics of fractional (non-integer) order systems have begun to attract much attention in recent years. In this paper, we study the projective synchronization in two coupled fractional order chaotic oscillators. It is shown that projective synchronization can also exist in coupled fractional order chaotic systems. A simple feedback control method for controlling the scaling factor onto a desired value is also presented.

  11. Fractional Equations of Kicked Systems and Discrete Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov; George M. Zaslavsky

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from kicked equations of motion with derivatives of non-integer orders, we obtain "fractional" discrete maps. These maps are generalizations of well-known universal, standard, dissipative, kicked damped rotator maps. The main property of the suggested fractional maps is a long-term memory. The memory effects in the fractional discrete maps mean that their present state evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. These forms are represented by combinations of power-law functions.

  12. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 is the sixteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 25 major energy companies (the FRS companies) required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. The data are presented in the context of key energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing strategies of corporate development and measuring the apparent success of current ongoing operations.

  13. Tunable fractional quantum Hall phases in bilayer graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coulomb interactions drive the existence of a correlated many-body state. Bilayer graphene represents a particularly interesting material in which to study the fractional...

  14. Linear Stochastic Fractional Programming with Sum-of-Probabilistic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractional Programming Problem with Mixed Constraints”, Acta Ciencia Indica,. Vol. XXX M, No. 3, pp 497-506. 11. Charles, V., and Dutta, D., “Extremization of ...

  15. Non-Linear Stochastic Fractional Programming Model of Financial ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Charles, V. and Dutta, D., A method for solving linear stochastic fractional programming problem with mixed constraints, Acta Ciencia Indica, Vol. XXX M,. No.

  16. Determination of Charm Hadronic Branching Fractions at CLEO-c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ryd

    2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from CLEO-c on measurements of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D0, D+, and Ds+ mesons are presented.

  17. amorphous volume fractions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically. P. Merlatti; G. Sabella 2001-01-11 5 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Particle Coarsening in High Volume Fraction...

  18. The Political Science Major Johns Hopkins University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    The Political Science Major Johns Hopkins University The Department The programs of the Political Science department are designed to help students attain a deeper understanding of politics in its various dimensions. The department encourages students to become sophisticated theoretically and to study politics

  19. RBS' New BAIT Major: Business Analytics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :623:386) ­ Analytics / decision making and planning ­ Building mathematical models of business situations ­ Also builds · 33:623:485 Time Series Modeling for Business · 33:623:400 Business Decision Analytics underRBS' New BAIT Major: Business Analytics and Information Technology "Introducing the New Business

  20. HEALTH AND SAFETY PROCEDURES -Major Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEALTH AND SAFETY PROCEDURES - Major Projects HEALTH & SAFETY UNIT SPRING 2006 #12;CONTENTS of this document is to provide the University with a summary of the principle activities in construction projects the reliance on physical controls and use of personnel protective equipment. The procedures that consider

  1. Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The information and analyses in Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers is intended to provide a critical review, and promote an understanding, of the possible motivations and apparent consequences of investment decisions made by some of the largest corporations in the energy industry.

  2. Sustainability Studies at WWU Minor and Major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    Sustainability Studies at WWU ­ Minor and Major Schematic Concept Draft October 13, 2008 Sustainability Faculty and Advisement: WWU Sustainability Academy WWW SUSTAINABILITY MINOR -- 30 Credits A. Sustainability Literacy, (4 Credits) B Sustainability research skills (9 Credits) C. Research and seminars

  3. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Bin (West Lebanon, NH); Wyman, Charles E. (Norwich, VT)

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  4. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein.

  5. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul Joseph; Chaikin, Paul Michael; Man, Weining

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to devices constructed from quasicrystalline heterostructures. In preferred embodiments, two or more dielectric materials are arranged in a two- or three-dimensional space in a lattice pattern having at least a five-fold symmetry axis and not a six-fold symmetry axis, such that the quasicrystalline heterostructure exhibits an energy band structure in the space, the band structure having corresponding symmetry, which symmetry is forbidden in crystals, and which band structure comprises a complete band gap. The constructed devices are adapted for manipulating, controlling, modulating, trapping, reflecting and otherwise directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for a pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating within or through the heterostructure in multiple directions.

  6. Chemical microreactor and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan (Livermore, CA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a chemical microreactor includes forming at least one capillary microchannel in a substrate having at least one inlet and at least one outlet, integrating at least one heater into the chemical microreactor, interfacing the capillary microchannel with a liquid chemical reservoir at the inlet of the capillary microchannel, and interfacing the capillary microchannel with a porous membrane near the outlet of the capillary microchannel, the porous membrane being positioned beyond the outlet of the capillary microchannel, wherein the porous membrane has at least one catalyst material imbedded therein.

  7. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul J; Chaikin, Paul Michael; Man, Weining

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the field of quasicrystalline structures. In preferred embodiments, the stopgap structure is more spherically symmetric than periodic structures facilitating the formation of stopgaps in nearly all directions because of higher rotational symmetries. More particularly, the invention relates to the use of quasicrystalline structures for optical, mechanical, electrical and magnetic purposes. In some embodiments, the invention relates to manipulating, controlling, modulating and directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating in multiple directions.

  8. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul Joseph (Princeton, NJ); Chaikin, Paul Michael (New York, NY); Man, Weining (San Francisco, CA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the field of quasicrystalline structures. In preferred embodiments, the stopgap structure is more spherically symmetric than periodic structures facilitating the formation of stopgaps in nearly all directions because of higher rotational symmetries. More particularly, the invention relates to the use of quasicrystalline structures for optical, mechanical, electrical and magnetic purposes. In some embodiments, the invention relates to manipulating, controlling, modulating and directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for a pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating in multiple directions.

  9. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ozkan, Umit S. (Worthington, OH); Holmgreen, Erik M. (Columbus, OH); Yung, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  10. Chemical microreactor and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical microreactor suitable for generation of hydrogen fuel from liquid sources such as ammonia, methanol, and butane through steam reforming processes when mixed with an appropriate amount of water contains capillary microchannels with integrated resistive heaters to facilitate the occurrence of catalytic steam reforming reactions. One such microreactor employs a packed catalyst capillary microchannel and at least one porous membrane. Another employs a porous membrane with a large surface area or a porous membrane support structure containing a plurality of porous membranes having a large surface area in the aggregate, i.e., greater than about 1 m.sup.2 /cm.sup.3. The packed catalyst capillary microchannels, porous membranes and porous membrane support structures may be formed by a variety of methods.

  11. Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents Rahoma S. Mohamed* and Anto. The results indicated possible asphaltene aggregation as well as the probable existence of critical micelle fraction. Average molecular areas for asphaltenes adsorbed at different interfaces estimated from surface

  12. Correlated topological insulators and the fractional magnetoelectric effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swingle, B.; Barkeshli, M.; McGreevy, J.; Senthil, T. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are characterized by the presence of gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In three space dimensions the magnetoelectric response is described in terms of a bulk {theta} term for the electromagnetic field. Here we construct theoretical examples of such phases that cannot be smoothly connected to any band insulator. Such correlated topological insulators admit the possibility of fractional magnetoelectric response described by fractional {theta}/{pi}. We show that fractional {theta}/{pi} is only possible in a gapped time-reversal-invariant system of bosons or fermions if the system also has deconfined fractional excitations and associated degenerate ground states on topologically nontrivial spaces. We illustrate this result with a concrete example of a time-reversal-symmetric topological insulator of correlated bosons with {theta}=({pi}/4). Extensions to electronic fractional topological insulators are briefly described.

  13. Correlated Topological Insulators and the Fractional Magnetoelectric Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Swingle; Maissam Barkeshli; John McGreevy; T. Senthil

    2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are characterized by the presence of gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In three space dimensions the magnetoelectric response is described in terms of a bulk theta term for the electromagnetic field. Here we construct theoretical examples of such phases that cannot be smoothly connected to any band insulator. Such correlated topological insulators admit the possibility of fractional magnetoelectric response described by fractional theta/pi. We show that fractional theta/pi is only possible in a gapped time reversal invariant system of bosons or fermions if the system also has deconfined fractional excitations and associated degenerate ground states on topologically non-trivial spaces. We illustrate this result with a concrete example of a time reversal symmetric topological insulator of correlated bosons with theta = pi/4. Extensions to electronic fractional topological insulators are briefly described.

  14. Impact of dose size in single fraction spatially fractionated (grid) radiotherapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hualin, E-mail: hualin.zhang@northwestern.edu, E-mail: hualinzhang@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois 60611 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois 60611 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Zhong, Hualiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Barth, Rolf F. [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Cao, Minsong; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose size in single fraction, spatially fractionated (grid) radiotherapy for selectively killing infiltrated melanoma cancer cells of different tumor sizes, using different radiobiological models. Methods: A Monte Carlo technique was employed to calculate the 3D dose distribution of a commercially available megavoltage grid collimator in a 6 MV beam. The linear-quadratic (LQ) and modified linear quadratic (MLQ) models were used separately to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of a series of single fraction regimens that employed grid therapy to treat both acute and late responding melanomas of varying sizes. The dose prescription point was at the center of the tumor volume. Dose sizes ranging from 1 to 30 Gy at 100% dose line were modeled. Tumors were either touching the skin surface or having their centers at a depth of 3 cm. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the melanoma cells and the therapeutic ratio (TR) were defined by comparing grid therapy with the traditional open debulking field. The clinical outcomes from recent reports were used to verify the authors’ model. Results: Dose profiles at different depths and 3D dose distributions in a series of 3D melanomas treated with grid therapy were obtained. The EUDs and TRs for all sizes of 3D tumors involved at different doses were derived through the LQ and MLQ models, and a practical equation was derived. The EUD was only one fifth of the prescribed dose. The TR was dependent on the prescribed dose and on the LQ parameters of both the interspersed cancer and normal tissue cells. The results from the LQ model were consistent with those of the MLQ model. At 20 Gy, the EUD and TR by the LQ model were 2.8% higher and 1% lower than by the MLQ, while at 10 Gy, the EUD and TR as defined by the LQ model were only 1.4% higher and 0.8% lower, respectively. The dose volume histograms of grid therapy for a 10 cm tumor showed different dosimetric characteristics from those of conventional radiotherapy. A significant portion of the tumor volume received a very large dose in grid therapy, which ensures significant tumor cell killing in these regions. Conversely, some areas received a relatively small dose, thereby sparing interspersed normal cells and increasing radiation tolerance. The radiobiology modeling results indicated that grid therapy could be useful for treating acutely responding melanomas infiltrating radiosensitive normal tissues. The theoretical model predictions were supported by the clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Grid therapy functions by selectively killing infiltrating tumor cells and concomitantly sparing interspersed normal cells. The TR depends on the radiosensitivity of the cell population, dose, tumor size, and location. Because the volumes of very high dose regions are small, the LQ model can be used safely to predict the clinical outcomes of grid therapy. When treating melanomas with a dose of 15 Gy or higher, single fraction grid therapy is clearly advantageous for sparing interspersed normal cells. The existence of a threshold fraction dose, which was found in the authors’ theoretical simulations, was confirmed by clinical observations.

  15. Enrollment by Major Native American Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Enrollment by Major Native American Students Agricultural Business 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 3 2 1 Agricultural Education 1 1 2 1 3 2 3 2 1 4 Agricultural Operations Technology 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 American Studies 1 Horticulture 1 2 Environmental Science 4 4 6 1 0 1 2 3 4 4 Family an Consumer Sciences 4 8 8 Film

  16. Enrollment by Major Native American Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Enrollment by Major Native American Students Addiction Counselor 1 Agricultural Business 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 3 2 1 2 5 Agricultural Education 2 1 1 2 1 3 2 3 2 1 4 5 2 Agricultural Operations Technology Film and Photography 5 10 6 8 5 Fish and Wildlife Management 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Food

  17. Major Contract Solicitations | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitorsfor Shade LandscapingMaintaining Your AirMajor

  18. Performance profiles of major energy producers, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy industry generally and petroleum and natural gas operations in particular are frequently reacting to a variety of unsettling forces. Falling oil prices, economic upswings, currency devaluations, increasingly rigorous environmental quality standards, deregulation of electricity markets, and continued advances in exploration and production technology were among the challenges and opportunities to the industry in 1997. To analyze the extent to which these and other developments have affected energy industry financial and operating performance, strategies, and industry structure, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains the Financial Reporting Systems (FRS). Through Form EIA-28, major US energy companies annually report to the FRS. Financial and operating information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production (upstream), petroleum refining and marketing (downstream), other energy operations, and nonenergy business. Performance Profiles of Major Producers 1997 examines the interplays of energy markets, companies` strategies, and government policies (in 1997 and in historical context) that gave rise to the results given here. The report also analyzes other key aspects of energy company financial performance as seen through the multifaceted lens provided by the FRS data and complementary data for industry overall. 41 figs., 77 tabs.

  19. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm[sup 3

  20. The effects the use of manipulatives and cooperative learning has on complex fraction skill level of fifth graders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratz, Linda Susan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction THE EFFECTS THE USE OF MANIPULATIVES AND COOPERATIVE LEARNING HAS ON COMPLEX FRACTION SKILL LEVEL OF FIFTH GRADERS A Thesis by LINDA SUSAN KRATZ... OF THE VERSA-TILE CASE. APPENDIX F APPENDIX G SAMPLE OF A VERSA-TILE WORKSHEET. . . . . . . 44 CHECKLIST FOR CLASSROOM PLACEMENT. . . . . . 45 VITA . 46 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Mean Scores for the Groups on the Pretest, Posttest, and Test...

  1. Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. B. Ma; F. Lu; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; W. L. Zhong; F. P. An

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor antineutrino experiment are used to study neutrino oscillation, search for signatures of nonstandard neutrino interaction, and monitor reactor operation for safeguard application. Reactor simulation is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. Commercial code is used for reactor simulation to evaluate fission fraction in Daya Bay neutrino experiment, but the source code doesn't open to our researcher results from commercial secret. In this study, The open source code DRAGON was improved to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions, $^{235}$U,$^{238}$U,$^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu, and then was validated for PWRs using the Takahama-3 benchmark. The fission fraction results are consistent with those of MIT's results. Then, fission fraction of Daya Bay reactor core was calculated by using improved DRAGON code, and the fission fraction calculated by DRAGON agreed well with these calculated by SCIENCE. The average deviation less than 5\\% for all the four isotopes. The correlation coefficient matrix between $^{235}$U,$^{238}$U,$^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu were also studied using DRAGON, and then the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was calculated by using the correlation coefficient matrix. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6\\% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment. The uncertainties source of fission fraction calculation need further to be studied in the future.

  2. UCLA CHEMISTRY MAJOR 2012-2013 CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.): This major is designed primarily for students who are interested in attending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    UCLA CHEMISTRY MAJOR 2012-2013 CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.): This major is designed primarily for students who are interested in attending graduate school in Chemistry or related areas. It also satisfies this major and others offered in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, consult the Undergraduate

  3. Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

  4. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the first project year (July 1 through September 30, 2002). This work included producing general descriptions of Utah's major petroleum provinces, gathering field data, and analyzing best practices in the Utah Wyoming thrust belt. Major Utah oil reservoirs and/or source rocks are found in Devonian through Permian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. Stratigraphic traps include carbonate buildups and fluvial-deltaic pinchouts, and structural traps include basement-involved and detached faulted anticlines. Best practices used in Utah's oil fields consist of waterflood, carbon-dioxide flood, gas-injection, and horizontal drilling programs. Nitrogen injection and horizontal drilling programs have been successfully employed to enhance oil production from the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone (the major thrust belt oil-producing reservoir) in Wyoming's Painter Reservoir and Ryckman Creek fields. At Painter Reservoir field a tertiary, miscible nitrogen-injection program is being conducted to raise the reservoir pressure to miscible conditions. Supplemented with water injection, the ultimate recovery will be 113 million bbls (18 million m{sup 3}) of oil (a 68 percent recovery factor over a 60-year period). The Nugget reservoir has significant heterogeneity due to both depositional facies and structural effects. These characteristics create ideal targets for horizontal wells and horizontal laterals drilled from existing vertical wells. Horizontal drilling programs were conducted in both Painter Reservoir and Ryckman Creek fields to encounter potential undrained compartments and increase the overall field recovery by 0.5 to 1.5 percent per horizontal wellbore. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation to the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and two publications. A project home page was set up on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  5. EM Major Procurements | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOEDisabilityContractors forProcurements EM Major

  6. Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1CubicMajor Characteristics of All

  7. major-projects | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. Norem October 23, 1984 6 GeV7Major

  8. Sunlight creates oxygenated species in water-soluble fractions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310-4005, United States h i g h l i g h t s * Oxidation seen in water-soluble oil fraction after exposure...

  9. Dirac Quantization and Fractional Magnetoelectric Effect on Interacting Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -S. Park; H. Han

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Dirac quantization of flux to study fractional charges and axion angles \\theta in interacting topological insulators with gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In interacting topological insulators, there are two types of fractional axion angle due to conventional odd and nontrivial even flux quantization at the boundary. On even flux quantization in a gapped time reversal invariant system, we show that there is a halved quarter fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of p/4q e2/2h with p and q odd integers. The gapless surface modes can be characterized by a nontrivial Z2 anomaly emerged from the even flux quantization. It is suggested that the electron can be regarded as a bound state of fractionally charged quarks confined by a nonabelian color gauge field on the Dirac quantization of complex spinor fields.

  10. Deriving emissions time series from sparse atmospheric mole fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigby, Matthew

    A growth-based Bayesian inverse method is presented for deriving emissions of atmospheric trace species from temporally sparse measurements of their mole fractions. This work is motivated by many recent studies that have ...

  11. acidic antigenic fractions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 (> 170 o C). Each fraction was analyzed composition of fatty acid ethyl esters using gas chromatography (GC). The result showed that the yield medium chain fatty acid ethyl...

  12. Measurement of the Topological Branching Fractions of the ? Lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new and precise measurements of the decay branching fractions of the ? lepton to one and three charged particles. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 176 pb(?1), were collected by the high ...

  13. A fractional dispersion model for overland solute transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Zhi-Qiang; de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Singh, Vijay P.; de Lima, Jo??o L. M. P.

    2006-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the kinematic-wave overland flow equation and a fractional dispersion-advection equation, a process-oriented, physically-based model is developed for overland solute transport. Two scenarios, one consisting of downslope and the other...

  14. On fractional differential inclusions with the Jumarie derivative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamocki, Rafa?, E-mail: rafkam@math.uni.lodz.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chair of Differential Equations and Computer Science, University of Lodz, Banacha 22, 90-238 Lodz (Poland)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chair of Differential Equations and Computer Science, University of Lodz, Banacha 22, 90-238 Lodz (Poland); Obczy?ski, Cezary, E-mail: czacza@math.uni.lodz.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chair of Nonlinear Analysis, University of Lodz, Banacha 22, 90-238 Lodz (Poland)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chair of Nonlinear Analysis, University of Lodz, Banacha 22, 90-238 Lodz (Poland)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper, fractional differential inclusions with the Jumarie derivative are studied. We discuss the existence and uniqueness of a solution to such problems. Our study relies on standard variational methods.

  15. RESEARCH Open Access Gene expression and fractionation resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankoff, David

    in Paramecium, Gout et al. [10] identify a clear relationship between high WGD duplicate gene retention rates for explaining variable resistance to fractionation. The Gout et al. paper [10] is the primary inspiration

  16. A BIFURCATION RESULT FOR NON-LOCAL FRACTIONAL EQUATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimal surfaces, materials science and water waves. This is one of the reason why, recently, non studied non-local fractional Laplacian equations with superlinear and subcritical or critical

  17. Dynamic optimization of fractionation schedules in radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Jagdish

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate the improvement in treatment effectiveness when dynamically optimizing the fractionation scheme in radiation therapy. In the first part of the thesis, we consider delivering a different dose ...

  18. Electron absorption spectra of coal pitch and its fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popov, V.K.; Rus'yanova, N.D.; Plastun, S.N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation into the electron absorption spectra of coal pitch and its fractions was presented. The pitch tested had a softening point of 67 degrees C, volatile matter of 61.1 %, density of 1.308 g/cm/sup 3/, and an ash content of 0.17 %. The fractions tested were the ..gamma.., ..beta.., ..cap alpha../sub 2/, and ..cap alpha../sub 1/ fractions, and the fractional yield was 31.4, 43.6, 19.3, and 5.7%, respecively. The minimum absorption level in the electron spectrum of the pitch was found to be in the ultraviolet region indicating aromatic compounds. The aromatics of interest were anthracene, anthraquinone, and pyrene. (JMT)

  19. Energy Efficiency in Cryogenic Fractionation Through Distributive Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carradine, C. R.; McCue, R. H.

    -down and cryogenic fractionation steps, the technology can significantly reduce refrigeration power requirements. ARS technology can be applied to revamps of existing plants as well as new plant designs. Additional applications are now being considered...

  20. acid oxidase fraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically. P. Merlatti; G. Sabella 2001-01-11 436 The Geometry of Fractional D1-branes HEP - Theory (arXiv) Summary: We...

  1. Characterization and fractionation by ultrafiltration of guayule resin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Monica Ann

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber Production. 2. Solute Flow Through GPC Column. 3. Comparison of UF, MF, and RO Processes. 4. Pressure Gradient in Tubular Membrane. 5. Flow Pattern for Hollow Tube Asymmetric UF Membranes. 6. Structure of an Asymmetric Tubular Membrane. 7... information from the GPC analysis, indicates which compounds were present in each fraction. Identification and separation of potentially valuable fractions in the resin would increase the overall market value of the guayule shrub. Ultrafiltration (UF...

  2. Models of three-dimensional fractional topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Maciejko; Xiao-Liang Qi; Andreas Karch; Shou-Cheng Zhang

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-reversal invariant three-dimensional topological insulators can be defined fundamentally by a topological field theory with a quantized axion angle theta of zero or pi. It was recently shown that fractional quantized values of theta are consistent with time-reversal invariance if deconfined, gapped, fractionally charged bulk excitations appear in the low-energy spectrum due to strong correlation effects, leading to the concept of a fractional topological insulator. These fractionally charged excitations are coupled to emergent gauge fields which ensure that the microscopic degrees of freedom, the original electrons, are gauge-invariant objects. A first step towards the construction of microscopic models of fractional topological insulators is to understand the nature of these emergent gauge theories and their corresponding phases. In this work, we show that low-energy effective gauge theories of both Abelian or non-Abelian type are consistent with a fractional quantized axion angle if they admit a Coulomb phase or a Higgs phase with gauge group broken down to a discrete subgroup. The Coulomb phases support gapless but electrically neutral bulk excitations while the Higgs phases are fully gapped. The Higgs and non-Abelian Coulomb phases exhibit multiple ground states on boundaryless spatial 3-manifolds with nontrivial first homology, while the Abelian Coulomb phase has a unique ground state. The ground state degeneracy receives an additional contribution on manifolds with boundary due to the induced boundary Chern-Simons term.

  3. Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ?), where (1-?) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

  4. A measurement of the branching fractions of the f1(1285) and f1(1420) produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis et al

    1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the f1(1285) and f1(1420) produced in central pp interactions has been performed. For the first time in a single experiment the branching fractions of both mesons in all major decay modes have been determined. Both the f1(1285) and f1(1420) are consistent with being produced by double Pomeron exchange.

  5. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  6. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1995, January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication examines developments in the operations of the major U.S. energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area.

  7. Paper on "Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE" ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Paper on "Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE" Paper on "Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE" Paper on Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE,...

  8. Energy Department Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean Hydroelectric Power Energy Department Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean Hydroelectric Power April 17, 2012 -...

  9. TOMORROW: Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Make Major Renewable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Make Major Renewable Energy Announcement TOMORROW: Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Make Major Renewable Energy Announcement December 15, 2010 -...

  10. Energy Department Awards First Major Task Order Under Streamlined...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    First Major Task Order Under Streamlined Contracting System Energy Department Awards First Major Task Order Under Streamlined Contracting System October 17, 2005 - 11:59am Addthis...

  11. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Dec 2010 Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

  12. Major Communications Report February 23, 2009 | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of February 23, 2009....

  13. Major Communications Report March 13, 2009 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of March 13, 2009....

  14. Major Communications Report May 7, 2009 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of May 7, 2009....

  15. Major Communications Report March 24, 2009 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of March 24, 2009....

  16. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

  17. Outcome of Patients Treated With a Single-Fraction Dose of Palliative Radiation for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Tarita O.; Agrawal, Priya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Guitart, Joan [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rosen, Steven T. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rademaker, Alfred W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Querfeld, Christiane [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hayes, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kuzel, Timothy M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a radiosensitive tumor. Presently, treatment with radiation is given in multiple fractions. The current literature lacks data that support single-fraction treatment for CTCL. This retrospective review assesses the clinical response in patients treated with a single fraction of radiation. Methods and Materials: This study reviewed the records of 58 patients with CTCL, primarily mycosis fungoides, treated with a single fraction of palliative radiation therapy (RT) between October 1991 and January 2011. Patient and tumor characteristics were reviewed. Response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regressions. Survival rates were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to assess the cost of a single vs a multifractionated treatment regimen. Results: Two hundred seventy individual lesions were treated, with the majority (97%) treated with ?700 cGy; mean follow-up was 41.3 months (range, 3-180 months). Response rate by lesion was assessed, with a complete response (CR) in 255 (94.4%) lesions, a partial response in 10 (3.7%) lesions, a partial response converted to a CR after a second treatment in 4 (1.5%) lesions, and no response in 1 (0.4%) lesion. The CR in lower extremity lesions was lower than in other sites (P=.0016). Lesions treated with photons had lower CR than those treated with electrons (P=.017). Patients with lesions exhibiting large cell transformation and tumor morphology had lower CR (P=.04 and P=.035, respectively). Immunophenotype did not impact response rate (P=.23). Overall survival was significantly lower for patients with Sézary syndrome (P=.0003) and erythroderma (P<.0001). The cost of multifractionated radiation was >200% higher than that for single-fraction radiation. Conclusions: A single fraction of 700 cGy-800 cGy provides excellent palliation for CTCL lesions and is cost effective and convenient for the patient.

  18. CHANGE OF MAJOR/ADVISOR Instructions: Complete this form to change your major and/or faculty advisor. If you are changing both your major AND your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    CHANGE OF MAJOR/ADVISOR Instructions: Complete this form to change your major and/or faculty advisor. If you are changing both your major AND your faculty advisor, complete Sections I, II and III. If you are only changing your faculty advisor, complete Sections I and III. Please note: Your faculty

  19. Model of Fractionalization of Faraday Lines in Compact Electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott D. Geraedts; Olexei I. Motrunich

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by ideas of fractionalization and intrinsic topological order in bosonic models with short-range interactions, we consider similar phenomena in formal lattice gauge theory models. Specifically, we show that a compact quantum electrodynamics (CQED) can have, besides the familiar Coulomb and confined phases, additional unusual confined phases where excitations are quantum lines carrying fractions of the elementary unit of electric field strength. We construct a model that has $N$-tupled monopole condensation and realizes $1/N$ fractionalization of the quantum Faraday lines. This phase has another excitation which is a $Z_N$ quantum surface in spatial dimensions five and higher, but can be viewed as a quantum line or a quantum particle in four or three spatial dimensions respectively. These excitation have statistical interactions with the fractionalized Faraday lines; for example, in three spatial dimensions, the particle excitation picks up a Berry phase of $e^{i2\\pi/N}$ when going around the fractionalized Faraday line excitation. We demonstrate the existence of this phase by Monte Carlo simulations in (3+1) space-time dimensions.

  20. DEGREES, MAJORS, AND OPTIONS This is a list of the degrees, majors, and options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    &S) Asian Studies* (L&S) Astronomy - Physics* (L&S) Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences* (L&S) Biochemistry* (L to the degree are shown. These degree titles appear on the student's transcript and on the diploma. The major titles and any applicable options appear only on the student's transcript. The school

  1. Locoregional Outcomes of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Standard Fractionation Radiation and Daily Skin Bolus in the Taxane Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damast, Shari, E-mail: damasts@mskcc.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ho, Alice Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Montgomery, Leslie [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Fornier, Monica N. [Department of Breast Cancer Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ishill, Nicole; Elkin, Elena [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess locoregional outcomes of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 107 patients diagnosed with IBC between January 1995 and March 2006 who presented to our department for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Results: All patients received chemotherapy (95% anthracycline and 95% taxane), modified radical mastectomy, and RT to the chest wall and regional lymphatics using standard fractionation to 50 Gy and daily skin bolus. The RT to the chest wall was delivered via electrons (55%) or photons (45%) in daily fractions of 180 cGy (73%) or 200 cGy (27%). Scar boost was performed in 11%. A majority (84%) of patients completed the prescribed treatment. Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 10-134 months). Locoregional control (LRC) at 3 years and 5 years was 90% and 87%, respectively. Distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) at 3 years and 5 years was 61% and 47%, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this population of IBC patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy. Distant metastases-free survival remains a significant therapeutic challenge.

  2. Pressurized water reactor fuel assembly subchannel void fraction measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akiyama, Yoshiei [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Fuel and Core Engineering Dept.; Hori, Keiichi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Hyougo (Japan); Miyazaki, Keiji [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mishima, Kaichiro [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Sugiyama, Shigekazu [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Dept.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The void fraction measurement experiment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies has been conducted since 1987 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry as a Japanese national project. Two types of test sections are used in this experiment. One is a 5 x 5 array rod bundle geometry, and the other is a single-channel geometry simulating one of the subchannels in the rod bundle. Wide gamma-ray beam scanners and narrow gamma-ray beam computed tomography scanners are used to measure the subchannel void fractions under various steady-state and transient conditions. The experimental data are expected to be used to develop a void fraction prediction model relevant to PWR fuel assemblies and also to verify or improve the subchannel analysis method. The first series of experiments was conducted in 1992, and a preliminary evaluation of the data has been performed. The preliminary results of these experiments are described.

  3. Fractional power-law spatial dispersion in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Vasily E., E-mail: tarasov@theory.sinp.msu.ru [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Departamento de Análisis Matemático, Universidad de La Laguna, 38271 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Trujillo, Juan J., E-mail: jtrujill@ullmat.es [Departamento de Análisis Matemático, Universidad de La Laguna, 38271 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric fields in non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion are discussed. Equations involving a fractional Laplacian in the Riesz form that describe the electric fields in such non-local media are studied. The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for power-law non-local media are characterized. We consider simple models with anomalous behavior of plasma-like media with power-law spatial dispersions. The suggested fractional differential models for these plasma-like media are discussed to describe non-local properties of power-law type. -- Highlights: •Plasma-like non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion. •Fractional differential equations for electric fields in the media. •The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for the media.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aragonitic fraction essais Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxygen, Carbon, Strontium, Summary: , C.S., Grossman, E.L. and Morse, J.W. 1992. Carbon isotopic fractionation in synthetic aragonite... fractionation for sulfides with...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates fractionated whole-brain Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fractionated whole-brain Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ameliorates fractionated whole-brain Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

  6. Some topics on the fractional Brownian motion and stochastic partial differential equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jian

    2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we investigate some problems in fractional Brownian motion and stochastic partial differential partial differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motion and Hilbert space valued Wiener ...

  7. This document was prepared as part of the Alternative Fuel Implementation Team project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program. The U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the us

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program. The U.S. Government nor any agency thereof diesel 30 biodiesel (B20) 27 neighborhood electric vehicles (NEV's) Motivation to Change In 2005, the State of North Carolina mandated all state agencies to reduce petroleum consumption by 20% in order

  8. Fractional Power-Law Spatial Dispersion in Electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric fields in non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion are discussed. Equations involving a fractional Laplacian in the Riesz form that describe the electric fields in such non-local media are studied. The generalizations of Coulomb's law and Debye's screening for power-law non-local media are characterized. We consider simple models with anomalous behavior of plasma-like media with power-law spatial dispersions. The suggested fractional differential models for these plasma-like media are discussed to describe non-local properties of power-law type.

  9. Fractional noise destroys or induces a stochastic bifurcation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qigui, E-mail: qgyang@scut.edu.cn [School of Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)] [School of Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zeng, Caibin, E-mail: zeng.cb@mail.scut.edu.cn [School of Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China) [School of Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); School of Automation Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Cong, E-mail: wangcong@scut.edu.cn [School of Automation Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)] [School of Automation Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Little seems to be known about the stochastic bifurcation phenomena of non-Markovian systems. Our intention in this paper is to understand such complex dynamics by a simple system, namely, the Black-Scholes model driven by a mixed fractional Brownian motion. The most interesting finding is that the multiplicative fractional noise not only destroys but also induces a stochastic bifurcation under some suitable conditions. So it opens a possible way to explore the theory of stochastic bifurcation in the non-Markovian framework.

  10. Separation of carbon nanotubes into chirally enriched fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doorn, Stephen K. (Los Alamos, NM); Niyogi, Sandip (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixture of single-walled carbon nanotubes ("SWNTs") is separated into fractions of enriched chirality by preparing an aqueous suspension of a mixture of SWNTs and a surfactant, injecting a portion of the suspension on a column of separation medium having a density gradient, and centrifuging the column. In some embodiments, salt is added prior to centrifugation. In other embodiments, the centrifugation is performed at a temperature below room temperature. Fractions separate as colored bands in the column. The diameter of the separated SWNTs decreases with increasing density along the gradient of the column. The colored bands can be withdrawn separately from the column.

  11. General Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours General Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours ENGN 110 2 ECE 111 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 128 ** Meets philosophy and ethics general education requirement. Electrical engineering majors mustGeneral Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours General Education and Major Coursework: Credit (C or better required) 3 PHYS 231N 4 COMM 101R 3 General Education and Major Coursework: Credit Hours

  12. Determination of Godiva`s effective delayed neutron fraction using newly calculated delayed neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G.D.; Campbell, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Busch, R.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}{sub eff} for a given reactor system, the assumed delayed neutron group spectra and the assumed number of delayed neutrons born per fission {nu}{sub d} can have a major impact on the final value. Over the years, the recommended values for the delayed neutron spectra and for {nu}{sub d} have slowly changed. To ascertain whether or not these changes have increased the accuracy of {beta}{sub eff} calculations in fast {sup 235}U systems, the authors have reevaluated {beta}{sub eff} for the benchmark system Godiva-I using newly calculated delayed neutron spectra and Tuttle`s recommended values of {nu}{sub d} for both {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U.

  13. A measurement of the effective delayed neutron fraction of the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company Slab Tank Assembly using Rossi-[alpha] techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective delayed neutron fraction of a solution reactor fueled with highly enriched uranyl nitrate was measured using two Rossi-[alpha] techniques: the slope method and the Nelson number method. The average value of the effective delayed neutron fraction was measured to be 0.0147 [plus minus] 13%, which is significantly higher than the calculated value of 0.009. The discrepancy between the measured and the calculated value is not understood at this time, but it is suspected that the majority of the bias is associated with the measurement of the intrinsic neutron source strength.

  14. FRACTIONAL SKEW MONOID RINGS P. ARA, M.A. GONZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    FRACTIONAL SKEW MONOID RINGS P. ARA, M.A. GONZ â?? ALEZ­BARROSO, K.R. GOODEARL, AND E. PARDO FQM­298 of the Junta de Andalucâ??�a. 1 #12; 2 P. ARA, M.A. GONZ â?? ALEZ­BARROSO, K.R. GOODEARL, AND E

  15. Fractionation apparatus providing improved heat recovery from bottom stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, R.A.

    1981-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy efficient design of fractionation column in which the liquid at the column bottom must be cooled to prevent thermal degradation, the column being provided with a perforated annular baffle through which liquid from the lowermost tray is channeled to the outlet of the column bottom, while a body of cooler recycled liquid is maintained in the column bottom outside of said baffle.

  16. Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a , Gregory Keywords: Polyethylene Branching Neutron scattering a b s t r a c t Commercial polyethylene is typically and catalyst activity. Further, processing of polyethylene after polymerization may also result in changes

  17. no switch: spontaneous actin polymerization (MINIMAL ACTIVTY) FractionActin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wendell

    polymerization (MINIMAL ACTIVTY) FractionActin Polymerization relative activity = t1/2 / t1/2 max actin polymerization in presence of constitutively active output domain (VCA) (MAXIMAL ACTIVITY) experimental point: actin polymerization of switch in presence/absence of inputs (EXPERIMENTAL ACTIVITY) t1/2 = time

  18. Parameter Estimation Using Dual Fractional Power Filters Jason M. Kinser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinser, Jason M.

    discriminant functions (SDF) which are reviewed in ref. 9. Unlike the previous methods, the SDF class of the SDF class. These filters are Fractional Power Filters (FPFs) which will be reviewed in Section 2 is a superset of two standard SDF-class filters: the SDF and the MACE filter. This section will review the SDF

  19. General teleportation channel, singlet fraction and quasi-distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Horodecki; Michal Horodecki; Ryszard Horodecki

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a theorem on direct relation between the optimal fidelity $f_{max}$ of teleportation and the maximal singlet fraction $F_{max}$ attainable by means of trace-preserving LQCC action (local quantum and classical communication). For a given bipartite state acting on $C^d\\otimes C^d$ we have $f_{max}= {F_{max}d+1\\over d+1}$. We assume completely general teleportation scheme (trace preserving LQCC action over the pair and the third particle in unknown state). The proof involves the isomorphism between quantum channels and a class of bipartite states. We also exploit the technique of $U\\otimes U^*$ twirling states (random application of unitary transformation of the above form) and the introduced analogous twirling of channels. We illustrate the power of the theorem by showing that {\\it any} bound entangled state does not provide better fidelity of teleportation than for the purely classical channel. Subsequently, we apply our tools to the problem of the so-called conclusive teleportation, then reduced to the question of optimal conclusive increasing of singlet fraction. We provide an example of state for which Alice and Bob have no chance to obtain perfect singlet by LQCC action, but still singlet fraction arbitrarily close to unity can be obtained with nonzero probability. We show that a slight modification of the state has a threshold for singlet fraction which cannot be exceeded anymore.

  20. Effect of Number of Fractionating Trays on Reactive Distillation Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Arfaj, Muhammad A.

    Effect of Number of Fractionating Trays on Reactive Distillation Performance Muhammad A. Al and rectifying sec- tions of a reacti®e distillation column can degrade performance. This effect, if true®e distillation columns cannot use conser®ati®e estimates of tray numbers, that is, we cannot simply add excess

  1. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

    1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

  2. Optical transformation from chirplet to fractional Fourier transformation kernel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong-yi Fan; Li-yun Hu

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a new integration transformation which can convert a chirplet function to fractional Fourier transformation kernel, this new transformation is invertible and obeys Parseval theorem. Under this transformation a new relationship between a phase space function and its Weyl-Wigner quantum correspondence operator is revealed.

  3. Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Tetrahymena thermophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Tetrahymena thermophila Sitindra S Accepted 7 September 2013 Available online 16 September 2013 a b s t r a c t Hydrogen isotope ratio values from recording the hydrogen isotope composition of ambient water, dD values of lipids also depend

  4. New Fractional Error Bounds for Polynomial Systems with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Our major result extends the existing error bounds from the system involving only a ... linear complementarity systems with polynomial data as well as high-order ...

  5. Department of Finance Programs and Majors STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Department of Finance Programs and Majors STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS Finance & Investment Society http students http://cbaweb.sdsu.edu/finance/aef AVAILABLE BUSINESS/FINANCIAL DATA Bloomberg Terminals (Wells PROGRAMS Undergraduate majors: Finance; Financial Services; Real Estate Graduate programs: Finance

  6. Y-12 fulfills major milestone in fuel conversion commitment for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fulfills major ... Y-12 fulfills major milestone in fuel conversion commitment for Jamaican research reactor Posted: June 3, 2014 - 4:42pm The Y-12 National Security Complex...

  7. Measurement of the Fractional Thermonuclear Neutron Yield during Deuterium Neutral-Beam Injection into Deuterium Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of the Fractional Thermonuclear Neutron Yield during Deuterium Neutral-Beam Injection into Deuterium Plasmas

  8. FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

  9. Concave Majorants of Random Walks and Related Poisson Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramson, Josh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We offer a unified approach to the theory of concave majorants of random walks by providing a path transformation for a walk of finite length that leaves the law of the walk unchanged whilst providing complete information about the concave majorant. This leads to a description of a walk of random geometric length as a Poisson point process of excursions away from its concave majorant, which is then used to find a complete description of the concave majorant for a walk of infinite length. In the case where subsets of increments may have the same arithmetic mean, we investigate three nested compositions that naturally arise from our construction of the concave majorant.

  10. A supersymmetric holographic dual of a fractional topological insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Ammon; Michael Gutperle

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a supersymmetric generalization of the holographic dual of a fractional topological insulator found in \\cite{HoyosBadajoz:2010ac}. This is accomplished by introducing a nontrivial gauge field on the world volume of the probe D7 brane. The BPS equations are derived from the $\\kappa$-symmetry transformation of the probe brane. The BPS equations are shown to reduce to two first oder nonlinear partial differential equations. Solutions of the BPS equations correspond to a probe brane configuration which preserves four of the thirty-two supersymmetries of the $AdS_5\\times S^5$ background. Solutions of the BPS equations which correspond to a holographic fractional topological insulator are obtained numerically.

  11. Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

  12. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jandrasits, W.G.; Kikta, T.J.

    1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction. 9 figs.

  13. A&S/Business Dual Major 1 of 10 June 30, 2008 A&S/Business Dual Major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    A&S/Business Dual Major 1 of 10 June 30, 2008 A&S/Business Dual Major Business Programs degree options for programs in business: · Students enrolled in the College of Business Administration (CBA) earn a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree and major in Accounting

  14. Sorting by Periodic Potential Energy Landscapes: Optical Fractionation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosta Ladavac; Karen Kasza; David G. Grier

    2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscously damped objects driven through a periodically modulated potential energy landscape can become kinetically locked in to commensurate directions through the landscape, and thus can be deflected away from the driving direction. We demonstrate that the threshold for an object to become kinetically locked in to an array can depend exponentially on its size. When implemented with an array of holographic optical tweezers, this provides the basis for a continuous and continuously optimized sorting technique for mesoscopic objects called ``optical fractionation''.

  15. On the fractional Black-Scholes market with transaction costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azmoodeh, Ehsan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider fractional Black-Scholes market with proportional transaction costs. When transaction costs are present, one trades periodically i.e. we have the discrete trading with equidistance $n^{-1}$ between trading times. We derive a non trivial hedging error for a class of European options with convex payoff in the case when the transaction costs coefficients decrease as $n^{-(1-H)}$. We study the expected hedging error and asymptotic behavior of the hedge as $H \\to 1/2$

  16. Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokanson, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC) IETC 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana David Hokanson ExxonMobil Research and Engineering May 22, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy... Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 3Baytown Chemical / Refining Complex ExxonMobil Baytown Refining & Chemical Complex • One of world’s largest integrated, most technologically advanced petroleum/petrochemical complexes, in operation since 1919...

  17. Mechanism governing separation in microfluidic pinched flow fractionation devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumedh R. Risbud; German Drazer

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a computational investigation of the mechanism governing size-based particle separation in microfluidic pinched flow fractionation. We study the behavior of particles moving through a pinching gap (i.e., a constriction in the aperture of a channel) in the Stokes regime as a function of particle size. The constriction aperture is created by a plane wall and spherical obstacle, and emulates the pinching segment in pinched flow fractionation devices. The simulation results show that the distance of closest approach between the particle and obstacle surfaces (along a trajectory) decreases with increasing particle size. We then use the distance of closest approach to investigate the effect of short-range repulsive non-hydrodynamic interactions (e.g., solid-solid contact). We define a critical trajectory as the one in which the minimum particle-obstacle separation is equal to the range of the non-hydrodynamic interactions. The results further show that the initial offset of the critical trajectory (defined as the critical offset) increases with particle size. We interpret the variation of the critical offset with particle size as the basis for size-based microfluidic separation in pinched flow fractionation. We also compare the effect of different driving fields on the particle trajectories; we simulate a constant force driving the particles in a quiescent fluid as well as a freely suspended particles in a pressure-driven flow. We observe that the particles driven by a constant force approach closer to the obstacle than those suspended in a flow (for the same initial offset). On the other hand, the increment in the critical offset (as a function of particle size) is larger in the pressure-driven case than in the force-driven case. Thus, pressure-driven particle separation using pinched flow fractionation would prove more effective than its force-driven counterpart.

  18. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candish, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: mmckenzi@bccancer.bc.edu; Clark, Brenda G. [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ma, Roy [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lee, Richard [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Vollans, Emily [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Robar, James [Department of Medical Physics, Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Gete, Ermias [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Martin, Monty [Department of Radiology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-made blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.

  19. Key Distillation and the Secret-Bit Fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick S. Jones; Lluis Masanes

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider distillation of secret bits from partially secret noisy correlations P_ABE, shared between two honest parties and an eavesdropper. The most studied distillation scenario consists of joint operations on a large number of copies of the distribution (P_ABE)^N, assisted with public communication. Here we consider distillation with only one copy of the distribution, and instead of rates, the 'quality' of the distilled secret bits is optimized, where the 'quality' is quantified by the secret-bit fraction of the result. The secret-bit fraction of a binary distribution is the proportion which constitutes a secret bit between Alice and Bob. With local operations and public communication the maximal extractable secret-bit fraction from a distribution P_ABE is found, and is denoted by Lambda[P_ABE]. This quantity is shown to be nonincreasing under local operations and public communication, and nondecreasing under eavesdropper's local operations: it is a secrecy monotone. It is shown that if Lambda[P_ABE]>1/2 then P_ABE is distillable, thus providing a sufficient condition for distillability. A simple expression for Lambda[P_ABE] is found when the eavesdropper is decoupled, and when the honest parties' information is binary and the local operations are reversible. Intriguingly, for general distributions the (optimal) operation requires local degradation of the data.

  20. Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance Energy Efficiency Efforts, Improve Access to Low-Cost Financing for States and Local Communities Obama Administration...

  1. Major detectors in elementary particle physics. Supplement revision May 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second edition of a loose-leaf compendium of the properties and performance characteristics of the major detectors of elementary particle physics.

  2. Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear Activities Subject to Executive Order 12114 (State Department, 44 Fed Reg 65560) Unified Procedures...

  3. Junior Year Checklist Make sure you have declared a major!!!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    your major is declared. Check your DARS · Make sure everything is up-to-date. You don't want to catch

  4. Energy Department Announces Achievement of Major Cleanup Milestone...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site Department Issues Path Forward for Closing Additional Radioactive Waste Storage Tanks in H Tank Farm WASHINGTON - Today, the Department of Energy reached a major milestone...

  5. major-test-partners | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    major-test-partners News Gasifipedia Coal-Biomass Feed Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications Coal...

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia Labs, other major employers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STEM education in New Mexico Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia Labs, other major employers commit to STEM education in New Mexico Los Alamos, Sandia and several partners are...

  7. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  8. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  9. The fractionation and characterization of two North American lignites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Juan Manuel

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assignments for the TMSI Reaction Page TI Product of the Gascoyne Bitumen LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE I, Extraction and Fractionation Scheme for the Page Gascoyne Lignite 24 2. X-Ray Diffractogram of the Low-Temperature Ash of the Demineralized Wilcox... the required data by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emissions spectrometry, which was essential in the completion of the thesis. Many thanks goes out to Ahmad Moini for performing the X-ray diffraction on the samples submitted. Finally, I wish...

  10. Measurement of the inclusive semielectronic D(0) branching fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Farlane, P. M. Patel, and B. Spaan McGill University and the Institute of Particle Physics, Montre´al, Que´bec H3A 2T8, Canada A. J. Sadoff Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York 14850 R. Ammar, P. Baringer, A. Bean, D. Besson, D. Coppage, N. Copty, R. Davis, N...PHYSICAL REVIEW D 1 SEPTEMBER 1996VOLUME 54, NUMBER 5ARTICLES Measurement of the inclusive semielectronic D0 branching fraction Y. Kubota, M. Lattery, J. K. Nelson, S. Patton, R. Poling, T. Riehle, V. Savinov, and R. Wang University of Minnesota...

  11. Political Science Major and Minor www.polisci.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Political Science Major and Minor www.polisci.pitt.edu Revised: 09/2012 A major in political science is designed to help students understand the complexity of political developments in the United to complement their study of political science with courses in public service offered through the College

  12. To: Undergraduate Communication Majors Fr: The Department of Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    MEMORANDUM To: Undergraduate Communication Majors Fr: The Department of Communication De: 12 November, 2013 Re: The Jennifer and Eric Spiegel Book Award The Department of Communication is proud must meet the following requirements: 1. Be an undergraduate communication major (sophomore, junior

  13. Phil/RelStu, NCES Data, p. 1 Philosophy Majors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Phil/RelStu, NCES Data, p. 1 Philosophy Majors 1970-71 to 2008-09 in Comparison to Other Select Majors Based on NCES* data on Degrees Conferred by ©Kathleen Wallace Professor of Philosophy & Chairperson Department of Philosophy January 2012 The work contained herein may be used in accordance

  14. Philosophy Major and Minor www.philosophy.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Philosophy Major and Minor www.philosophy.pitt.edu Revised: 09/2011 Pitt's Department of Philosophy is one of the best in the country, with a long tradition of teaching excellence. A major in philosophy sophistication imparted by training in philosophy is invaluable in virtually any field of learning or any

  15. MATHEMATICS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: ADVISEMENT FORM BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    MATHEMATICS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: ADVISEMENT FORM BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE Name: UMBC username or ID, STAT 350 and STAT 351 are not counted as upper level electives for the major. At least TWO. These include: MATH 426, 427, 479, 480, 490, 496, 499 and STAT 432, 470, 490, 496 and 499. III Supplementary

  16. Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation The risk of a major nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation The risk of a major nuclear accident: calculation #12;1/37 The risk of a major nuclear accident: calculation and perception of probabilities François in the United States, reached this level of severity. The explosion of reactor 4 at the Chernobyl plant

  17. The Environmental Studies MAJOR The George Washington University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Geol 3193 Environmental Law 3 Amst 2520-1 American Architecture 3 Anth 3502 Cultural Ecology 3 AnthThe Environmental Studies MAJOR The George Washington University To declare as an Environmental-8523 Program Advisor Prof. Melissa Keeley, keeley@gwu.edu, (202) 994-7156 Environmental Studies majors must

  18. Extending a characterization of majorization to infinite dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajesh Pereira; Sarah Plosker

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider recent work linking majorization and trumping, two partial orders that have proven useful with respect to the entanglement transformation problem in quantum information, with general Dirichlet polynomials, Mellin transforms, and completely monotone sequences. We extend a basic majorization result to the more physically realistic infinite-dimensional setting through the use of generalized Dirichlet series and Riemann-Stieltjes integrals.

  19. Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

  20. 1. Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects....................................................3 2. Le frazioni, aspetti concettuali e didattici....................................................37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    1 CONTENTS 1. Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects...........................................................................263 #12;2 #12;3 Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects Martha Isabel Fandiño Pinilla NRD Bologna

  1. Perturbations of ionization fractions at the cosmological recombination epoch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Novosyadlyj

    2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A development of perturbations of number densities of ions and electrons during recombination epoch is analysed. The equations for relative perturbations of ionization fractions were derived from the system of equations for accurate computation of the ionization history of the early Universe given by Seager et al. (1999,2000). It is shown that strong dependence of ionization and recombination rates on the density and temperature of plasma provides the significant deviations of amplitudes of ionization fractions relative perturbations from ones of baryon matter density adiabatic perturbations. Such deviations are most prominent for cosmological adiabatic perturbations of scales larger than sound horizon at recombination epoch. The amplitudes of relative perturbations of number densities of electrons and protons at last scattering surface exceed by factor of $\\simeq$5 the amplitude of relative perturbation of baryons total number density, for helium ions this ratio reaches the value of $\\simeq$18. For subhorizon cosmological perturbations these ratios appear to be essentially lesser and depend on oscillation phase at the moment of decoupling. These perturbations of number densities of ions and electrons at recombination epoch do not contribute to the intrinsic plasma temperature fluctuations but cause the ''corrugation'' of last scattering surface in optical depth, $\\delta z_{dec}/(z_{dec}+1)\\approx -\\delta_b/3$, at scales larger than sound horizon. It may result into noticeable changes of precalculated values of CMB polarization pattern at several degrees angular scales.

  2. Analytic solution of nonlinear fractional Burgers-type equation by invariant subspace method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Artale Harris; R. Garra

    2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the analytic solutions of Burgers-type nonlinear fractional equations by means of the Invariant Subspace Method. We first study a class of nonlinear equations directly related to the time-fractional Burgers equation. Some generalizations linked to the forced time-fractional Burgers equations and variable-coefficient diffusion are also considered. Finally we study a Burgers-type equation involving both space and time-fractional derivatives.

  3. High field strength element/rare earth element fractionation during partial melting in the presence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Westrenen, Wim

    High field strength element/rare earth element fractionation during partial melting in the presence the amount of fractionation between the two decreases. In contrast, the heavy rare earth element partition field strength element/rare earth element fractionation during partial melting in the presence of garnet

  4. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  5. Optimal operation of a Petlyuk Distillation Column: Energy Savings by Over-fractionation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Optimal operation of a Petlyuk Distillation Column: Energy Savings by Over-fractionation · The Petlyuk distillation column, see Figure 1(a), with a pre-fractionator (C1) and a main column (C21 and C22) N-7465 Trondheim, Norway Abstract This work shows the unexpected result that over-fractionating one

  6. Optimal Operation of a Petlyuk Distillation Column: Energy Savings by Over-fractionating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Optimal Operation of a Petlyuk Distillation Column: Energy Savings by Over-fractionating Vidar the unexpected result that over-fractionating one of the product streams in a Petlyuk distillation column may is optimal in some cases. 1. Introduction The Petlyuk distillation column, see Figure 1(a), with a pre-fractionator

  7. Probabilistic Simulation of Multi-Stage Decisions for Operation of a Fractionated Satellite Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    base and national security programs. Fractionated Satellites While ideas regarding networked satellitesProbabilistic Simulation of Multi-Stage Decisions for Operation of a Fractionated Satellite Mission of net present value for a fractionated satellite constellation. The goal is to begin development

  8. Studies on a brittle stem mutant of rice, Oryza sativa L. ; characterization of lignin fractions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Studies on a brittle stem mutant of rice, Oryza sativa L. ; characterization of lignin fractions 78850 Thiverva!-Grignon SUMMARY Lignin fractions, associated p-coumaric and ferulic acids and polysaccharides have been characterized in the straw and in three lignin fractions isolated from the rice cultivar

  9. FAR AND MIDINFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MATTER OF ASTROCHEMICAL INTEREST: COAL, HEAVY PETROLEUM FRACTIONS, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , HEAVY PETROLEUM FRACTIONS, AND ASPHALTENES Franco Cataldo1,2 , D. A. GarcíaHernández3,4 , Arturo), heavy aromatic fraction (BQ1) and asphaltenes derived from BQ1 were used together with anthracite coal asphaltenes fraction. Particularly interesting is the ability of BQ1 to match the band pattern

  10. College of Charleston Major Roadmap: Religious Studies, B.A. | 2014-15 Page 1 MAJOR ROADMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    College of Charleston Major Roadmap: Religious Studies, B.A. | 2014-15 Page 1 MAJOR ROADMAP Religious Studies, B.A. Catalog Year: 2014-15 This roadmap is a suggested semester-by-semester planning availability may vary from semester to semester. Roadmaps are not meant to cover every possibility

  11. Computer Science Contact List for Inquiring Students First Name Last Name Major(s) Minor(s) Email

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Computer Science Contact List for Inquiring Students First Name Last Name Major(s) Minor(s) Email Summer 2011 - Mobile Applications and Game Development Taha Bakhtiyar Economics, Computer Science tahaalib@brandeis.edu Jared Dunn Undeclared jwdunn1@brandeis.edu Todd Kirkland Computer Science tkirk

  12. CORRELATING INFALL WITH DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION IN DENSE CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnee, Scott; Brunetti, Nathan; Friesen, Rachel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Pon, Andy [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Caselli, Paola, E-mail: sschnee@nrao.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a survey of HCO{sup +} (3-2) observations pointed toward dense cores with previous measurements of N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}). Of the 26 cores in this survey, 5 show the spectroscopic signature of outward motion, 9 exhibit neither inward nor outward motion, 11 appear to be infalling, and 1 is not detected. We compare the degree of deuterium fractionation with infall velocities calculated from the HCO{sup +} spectra and find that those cores with [D]/[H] > 0.1 are more likely to have the signature of inward motions than cores with smaller [D]/[H] ratios. Infall motions are also much more common in cores with masses exceeding their thermal Jeans masses. The fastest infall velocity measured belongs to one of the two protostellar cores in our survey, L1521F, and the observed motions are typically on the order of the sound speed.

  13. Emergent Fermi surfaces, fractionalization and duality in supersymmetric QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anson Hook; Shamit Kachru; Gonzalo Torroba; Huajia Wang

    2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the physics of 3d supersymmetric abelian gauge theories (with small supersymmetry breaking perturbations) at finite density. Using mirror symmetry, which provides a natural generalization of the duality between the XY model and the abelian Higgs model but now including fermionic fields, we see many dynamical phenomena conjectured to be of relevance in condensed matter systems. In particular, we find examples of the emergence of a Fermi surface at low energies from hybridization of fermions localized at magnetic defects at high energies, as well as fractionalization of charged fermions into spinon-holon pairs with the concomitant appearance of emergent gauge fields. We also find dual descriptions for Fermi surfaces coupled to critical bosons, which give rise to non-Fermi liquids.

  14. Measurement of local void fraction at elevated temperature and pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.; Trabold, T.A.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant advances have recently been made in analytical and computational methods for the prediction of local thermal-hydraulic conditions in gas/liquid two-phase flows. There is, however, a need for extensive experimental data, for the dual purposes of constitutive relation development and code qualification. There is especially true of systems involving complicated geometries and/or extreme flow conditions for which little, if any, applicable information exists in the open literature. For the tests described in the present paper, a novel electrical probe has been applied to measure the void fraction in atmospheric pressure air/water flows, and steam/water mixtures at high temperature and pressure. The data acquired in the latter experiments are compared with the results of a one-dimensional two-fluid computational analysis.

  15. Variations of the hypoxic fraction in the SCC VII tumors after single dose and during fractionated radiation therapy: Assessment without anesthesia or physical restraint of mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitakabu, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Sasai, K.; Ono, K.; Abe, M. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variations of the hypoxic fraction (HF) after single dose (13 Gy or 4 Gy) and during fractionated (5 fractions of 4 Gy, 1 or 2 fractions per day) radiation therapy were studied in SCC VII tumors implanted subcutaneously in the hind legs of C3H/He/Jms mice using the paired survival curve method. Whole-body irradiation was delivered to tumor-bearing mice without anesthesia or physical restraint, because both are known to increase the HF artificially. The HF decreased after a single 13 Gy dose in a biphasic fashion: extremely rapidly within 1 hr and comparatively slowly during the following 12-72 hr. On the other hand, nearly no fall of HF was observed in 24 hr following a single 4 Gy dose. Also, reoxygenation was found to occur more rapidly in the interfraction period as the number of fractions of 4 Gy increased irrespective of differences of interfraction time. However, the HF just before each radiation fraction was significantly higher than the pretreatment level for both fractionated regimens. Thus, the reoxygenation patterns observed after single low and high doses of irradiation were different from each other, and reoxygenation in each interfraction period did not always proceed in a similar manner to that after single low dose irradiation. Reoxygenation was facilitated as fractionated radiation therapy proceeded, but it was not sufficient for the HF to remain at a level comparable to that before irradiation.

  16. BACHELOR OF ARTS With a Major in COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    BACHELOR OF ARTS With a Major in COMPUTER SCIENCE The Bachelor of Arts degree has more flexibility in Computer Science as follows: CSci 160............ Computer Science I.................................................... (4) CSci 161............ Computer Science II................................................... (4

  17. The Major Tritone Progression in Recent Hollywood Science Fiction Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Scott

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 2002 film Treasure Planet, composer James Newton Howard accompanies the primary shot of the titular orb with an undulation between two major triads a tritone apart. I offer three approaches to understanding the ...

  18. What can I do with this major? AREAS EMPLOYERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    STRATEGIES What can I do with this major? AREAS EMPLOYERS GEOLOGY ENERGY (Oil, Coal, Gas, Other Energy Sources) Stratigraphy Sedimentology Structural Geology Geophysics Geochemistry Economic Geology Geomorphology Paleontology Fossil Energy Petroleum industry including oil and gas explora- tion, production

  19. What can I do with this major? AREAS EMPLOYERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Quality assurance Materials Management: Purchasing/buying Traffic management Inventory management DevelopSTRATEGIES What can I do with this major? AREAS EMPLOYERS MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT Business and industry including: Banks and financial institutions Retail stores Restaurants Hotels

  20. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

  1. MAJOR DETECOTRS IN ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS - May 1985 Suppl.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second edition of a loose-leaf compendium of the properties and performance characteristics of the major detectors of elementary particle physics. This introduces the second edition of the LBL-91 Supplement 'Major Detectors in Elementary Particle Physics.' For some detectors the update merely documents minor modifications or provides additional references. Others have undergone major rebuilding or have been augmented with new subsystems. The new LEP, SLC, TRISTAN, BEPC, and FNAL detectors have had their designs fixed and are now under construction. Some detectors have completed their programs since the last edition and so are omitted. The use of colored loose-leaf paper should allow users to maintain a historical record of each detector. We again thank those physicists working with each detector who took the time to summarize its properties and supply us with the appropriate drawings.

  2. Massless Electron and Fractional Spin as Electronic Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. C. Tiwari

    2004-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics has been supported by several experimental findings, the most remarkable of them being the discovery of the weak gauge bosons, W and Z. It is expected that the Higgs boson could show up by 2007 at LHC, CERN. In spite of this, the unsatisfactory features of the SM at conceptual level, and exclusion of gravity from the unification scheme have led to explore 'the physics beyond the SM'. A critique and comprehensive review of the contemporary fundamental physics was presented in a monograph completed in the centenary year,1997 of the discovery of the electron. A radically new approach to address foundational problems was outlined: masslessness of bare electron, interpretation of the squared electronic charge in terms of the fractional spin, $e^2/c$; new physicalsignificance of the electromagnetic potentials, 2+1 dimensional internal structure of electron and neutrino, and composite photon are some of the ideas proposed. Though the monograph was reviewed by E. J. Post(Physics Essays, June1999), it has remained largely inaccessible. I believe some of these unconventional ideas have a potential to throw light on the fundamental questions in physics, and therefore deserve a wider dissemination. The reader may find illuminating to supplement Section 3 on the weak gauge bosons with a candid, graceful and personal recollection by Pierre Darriulat(CERN Courier, April 2004, p.13).

  3. General teleportation channel, singlet fraction and quasi-distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horodecki, M; Horodecki, R; Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Pawel; Horodecki, Ryszard

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a theorem on direct relation between the optimal fidelity $f_{max}$ of teleportation and the maximal singlet fraction $F_{max}$ attainable by means of trace-preserving LQCC action (local quantum and classical communication). For a given bipartite state acting on $C^d\\otimes C^d$ we have $f_{max}= {F_{max}d+1\\over d+1}$. We assume completely arbitrary teleportation schemes (trace preserving LQCC action over the pair and the third particle in unknown state). The proof involves the isomorphism between quantum channels and a class of bipartite states. We also exploit the technique of $U\\otimes U^*$ twirling states (random application of unitary transformation of the above form) and the introduced analogous twirling of channels. We illustrate the power of the theorem by showing that {\\it any} bound entangled state does not provide better fidelity of teleportation than for the purely classical channel. Subsequently, we apply our tools to the problem of the so-called conclusive teleportation, then reduced t...

  4. Delayed feedback control of fractional-order chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Trifce Sandev; Viktor Urumov

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibility to stabilize unstable steady states and unstable periodic orbits in chaotic fractional-order dynamical systems by the time-delayed feedback method. By performing a linear stability analysis, we establish the parameter ranges for successful stabilization of unstable equilibria in the plane parametrizad by the feedback gain and the time delay. An insight into the control mechanism is gained by analyzing the characteristic equation of the controlled system, showing that the control scheme fails to control unstable equilibria having an odd number of positive real eigenvalues. We demonstrate that the method can also stabilize unstable periodic orbits for a suitable choice of the feedback gain, providing that the time delay is chosen to coincide with the period of the target orbit. In addition, it is shown numerically that delayed feedback control with a sinusoidally modulated time delay significantly enlarges the stability region of the steady states in comparison to the classical time-delayed feedback scheme with a constant delay.

  5. Changes in misonidazole binding with hypoxic fraction in mouse tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, D.G.; Hazlehurst, J.L.; Brown, J.M.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Binding of misonidazole (MISO) or a derivative to hypoxic cells in tumors has been proposed as a method for identifying tumors, and measuring their level of hypoxia. The author has recently shown that the hypoxic fraction of tumor cells can be altered over a wide range in vivo by acutely changing the hematocrit of the host animal by transfusion. The present study is aimed to investigate the changes in binding by /sup 14/C MISO that accompanied this procedure. Tumor bearing mice were injected with /sup 14/C MISO, irradiated with a single dose of X rays (20 Gy) and their tumor excised and bisected. One half of each tumor was used to determine cell survival in vitro, the other was used for /sup 14/C scintillation counting. As previously described, tumor cell survival was dramatically increased in acutely anemic mice and this was accompanied by an increase in /sup 14/C MISO binding to the tumors. The relationship between clonogenic cell survival and binding was found to be linear on a log-log plot for each of the tumor lines studied, but the slopes of the lines were different in different tumor lines and generally steeper than the value of 1.0 expected for a 1:1 correspondence between cells binding radioactivity and radiobiological resistance.

  6. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents five years (1989 to 1993) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, the Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities, filed on a fiscal basis.

  7. Feedback control of major disruptions in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, A. K. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10026 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that major disruptions in ITER can be avoided by the feedback control of the causative MHD precursors. The sensors will be 2D-arrays of ECE detectors and the suppressors will be modulated ECH beams injected radially to produce non-thermal radial pressures to counter the radial dynamics of MHD modes. The appropriate amplitude and phase of this signal can stabilize the relevant MHD modes and prevent their evolution to a major disruption. For multimode MHD precursors, an optimal feedback scheme with a Kalman filter is discussed.

  8. Major UMass User Facilities-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowellfor 2013 |Spherical TorusMajor NewMajor

  9. Assessing EC-4 preservice teachers' mathematics knowledge for teaching fractions concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Kimberly Boddie

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    literature, with 20 years of NAEP data highlighting the fact that only about one-third of students up to the seventh grade have been successful in determining fraction equivalency since the 1970s (Kamii & Clark, 1995). With a significant body... tendency in elementary students to over generalize the meanings of symbolic whole number representations to fractions. In the area of fraction equivalency, Kamii and Clark (1995) interviewed 120 fifth and sixth-grade students, asking them to compare two...

  10. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus having a first substrate having (1) a cavity, (2) one or more resistive heaters, and (3) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen; a second substrate having (1) an outlet valve comprising a pressure relief structure and (2) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen, wherein said second substrate is coupled to said first substrate forming a sealed volume in said cavity; a metal hydride material contained within said cavity; and a gas distribution system formed by coupling a microfluidic interconnect to said pressure relief structure. Additional apparatuses and methods are also disclosed.

  11. Semiconductive materials and associated uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lynn, Kelvin; Jones, Kelly; Ciampi, Guido

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    High rate radiation detectors are disclosed herein. The detectors include a detector material disposed inside the container, the detector material containing cadmium, tellurium, and zinc, a first dopant containing at least one of aluminum, chlorine, and indium, and a second dopant containing a rare earth metal. The first dopant has a concentration of about 500 to about 20,000 atomic parts per billion, and the second dopant has a concentration of about 200 to about 20,000 atomic parts per billion.

  12. Semiconductive materials and associated uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lynn, Kelvin (Pullman, WA); Jones, Kelly (Colfax, WA); Ciampi, Guido (Waltham, MA)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High rate radiation detectors are disclosed herein. The detectors include a detector material disposed inside the container, the detector material containing cadmium, tellurium, and zinc, a first dopant containing at least one of aluminum, chlorine, and indium, and a second dopant containing a rare earth metal. The first dopant has a concentration of about 500 to about 20,000 atomic parts per billion, and the second dopant has a concentration of about 200 to about 20,000 atomic parts per billion.

  13. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Jay A. A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hukari, Kyle W. (San Ramon, CA); Hux, Gary A. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  14. Optical distance measurement device and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowers, Mark W. (Patterson, CA)

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method of efficiently obtaining distance measurements of a target. A modulated optical beam may be used to determine the distance to the target. A first beam splitter may be used to split the optical beam and a second beam splitter may be used to recombine a reference beam with a return ranging beam. An optical mixing detector may be used in a receiver to efficiently detect distance measurement information.

  15. Nucleic acids, compositions and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Preston, III, James F. (Micanopy, FL); Chow, Virginia (Gainesville, FL); Nong, Guang (Gainesville, FL); Rice, John D. (Gainesville, FL); St. John, Franz J. (Baltimore, MD)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  16. Anthrax carbohydrates, synthesis and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Russell W.; Boons, Geert-Jan; Quinn, Conrad; Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Choudhury, Biswa; Kannenberg, Elmar; Leoff, Christine; Mehta, Alok; Saile, Elke; Rauvolfova, Jana; Wilkins, Patricia; Harvey, Alex J.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention presents the isolation, characterization and synthesis of oligosaccharides of Bacillus anthracis. Also presented are antibodies that bind to such saccharide moieties and various methods of use for such saccharide moieties and antibodies.

  17. Water-soluble polymers and compositions thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Gohdes, J.W.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-soluble polymers including functionalization from the group of amino groups, carboxylic acid groups, phosphonic acid groups, phosphonic ester groups, acylpyrazolone groups, hydroxamic acid groups, aza crown ether groups, oxy crown ethers groups, guanidinium groups, amide groups, ester groups, aminodicarboxylic groups, permethylated polyvinylpyridine groups, permethylated amine groups, mercaptosuccinic acid groups, alkyl thiol groups, and N-alkylthiourea groups are disclosed.

  18. Schottky barrier MOSFET systems and fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, James D. (10328 Pinehurst Ave., Omaha, NE 68124)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (MOS) device systems-utilizing Schottky barrier source and drain to channel region junctions are disclosed. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate operation of fabricated N-channel and P-channel Schottky barrier (MOSFET) devices, and of fabricated single devices with operational characteristics similar to (CMOS) and to a non-latching (SRC) are reported. Use of essentially non-rectifying Schottky barriers in (MOS) structures involving highly doped and the like and intrinsic semiconductor to allow non-rectifying interconnection of, and electrical accessing of device regions is also disclosed. Insulator effected low leakage current device geometries and fabrication procedures therefore are taught. Selective electrical interconnection of drain to drain, source to drain, or source to source, of N-channel and/or P-channel Schottky barrier (MOSFET) devices formed on P-type, N-type and Intrinsic semiconductor allows realization of Schottky Barrier (CMOS), (MOSFET) with (MOSFET) load, balanced differential (MOSFET) device systems and inverting and non-inverting single devices with operating characteristics similar to (CMOS), which devices can be utilized in modulation, as well as in voltage controled switching and effecting a direction of rectification.

  19. Iron aluminide knife and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy cutting edge. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800.degree. C. for a period of time followed by rolling at 650.degree. C., cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge.

  20. Textured substrate tape and devices thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a sharply biaxially textured substrate, such as a single crystal substrate, includes the steps of providing a deformed metal substrate, followed by heating above the secondary recrystallization temperature of the deformed substrate, and controlling the secondary recrystallization texture by either using thermal gradients and/or seeding. The seed is selected to shave a stable texture below a predetermined temperature. The sharply biaxially textured substrate can be formed as a tape having a length of 1 km, or more. Epitaxial articles can be formed from the tapes to include an epitaxial electromagnetically active layer. The electromagnetically active layer can be a superconducting layer.

  1. Microfluidics apparatus and methods for use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peeters, John P.; Wiggins, Thomas; Ghosh, Madhushree; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Seminara, Salvatore; Hu, Zhiyu; Seeley, Timothy; Kossek, Sebastian

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfluidics device includes a plurality of interaction cells and fluid control means including i) means for providing to the interaction cells a preparation fluid, and ii) means for providing to the interaction cells a sample fluid, wherein each interaction cell receives a different sample fluid. A plurality of microcantilevers may be disposed in each of the interaction cells, wherein each of the plurality of microcantilevers configured to deflect in response to an interaction involving a component of the sample fluid.

  2. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  3. Fast-acting valve and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, James A. (Espanola, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A very fast acting valve capable of producing a very well-defined plug of gas suitable for filling a theta pinch vacuum vessel is given. The valve requires no springs, instead being stopped mainly by a nonlinear force. Thus, the valve is not subject to bouncing; and the ratio of the size of the valve housing to the size of the valve stem is smaller than it would be if springs were needed to stop the valve stem. Furthermore, the valve can be used for thousands of valve firings with no apparent valve damage.

  4. Fast-acting valve and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, J.A.

    1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A very fast acting valve capable of producing a very well-defined plug of gas suitable for filling a theta pinch vacuum vessel is given. The valve requires no springs, instead being stopped mainly by a nonlinear force. Thus, the valve is not subject to bouncing; and the ratio of the size of the valve housing to the size of the valve stem is smaller than it would be if springs were needed to stop the valve stem. Furthermore, the valve can be used for thousands of valve firings with no apparent valve damage.

  5. Nano-ceramics and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alex (Livermore, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard (Livermore, CA); Reibold, Robert A. (Salida, CA)

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method to produce ceramic materials utilizing the sol-gel process. The methods enable the preparation of intimate homogeneous dispersions of materials while offering the ability to control the size of one component within another. The method also enables the preparation of materials that will densify at reduced temperature.

  6. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  7. Austenitic alloy and reactor components made thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John F. (Ogden, UT); Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy is disclosed, having excellent fast neutron irradiation swelling resistance and good post irradiation ductility, making it especially useful for liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications. The alloy contains: about 0.04 to 0.09 wt. % carbon; about 1.5 to 2.5 wt. % manganese; about 0.5 to 1.6 wt. % silicon; about 0.030 to 0.08 wt. % phosphorus; about 13.3 to 16.5 wt. % chromium; about 13.7 to 16.0 wt. % nickel; about 1.0 to 3.0 wt. % molybdenum; and about 0.10 to 0.35 wt. % titanium.

  8. Well-posedness of the Space-Time Fractional Diffusion Problems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... and dynamics of a bead in polymer network, and so on. In this talk, we consider initial boundary value problems of the space-time fractional diffusion equation ...

  9. Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray CM2 carbonaceous chondrites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Lawrence

    Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray CM2 carbonaceous. Investigation of the magnesium isotopic compositions of chondrules can place stringent constraints on the timing

  10. Carbon isotope ratios of organic compound fractions in oceanic suspended particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiocarbon evidence of fossil-carbon cycling in sediments1968), Metabolic fractionation of carbon isotopes in marineof particulate organic carbon using bomb 14 C, Nature,

  11. Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of carbon monoxide: Wavelength, pressure and temperature dependency.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Subrata

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultravioletmeasurement of the associated oxygen isotopic composition ofwavelength dependency of the oxygen isotopic composition in

  12. The use of carbonation and fractional evaporative crystallization in the pretreatment of Hanford nuclear wastes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumont, George Pierre, Jr.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The purpose of this work was to explore the use of fractional evaporative crystallization as a technology that can be used to separate medium-curie waste… (more)

  13. Photomicrography for the measurement of steam wetness fraction in low pressure turbines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veeder, Tricia Sue

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The measurement of steam wetness fraction at the exit of a low-pressure (LP) turbine stage is important if the highest turbine performance is to be… (more)

  14. Lyapunov exponents of a class of piecewise continuous systems of fractional order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marius-F. Danca

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we prove that a class of autonomous piecewise continuous systems of fractional order has well-defined Lyapunov exponents. For this purpose, based on some known results from differential inclusions of integer and fractional order and differential equations with discontinuous right-hand side, the associated discontinuous initial value problem is approximated with a continuous one of fractional order. Then, the Lyapunov exponents are numerically determined using, for example, the known Wolf's algorithm. Three examples of piecewise continuous chaotic systems of fractional order are simulated and analyzed: Sprott's system, Chen's system and Shimizu-Morioka's system.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternatives project fractional Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    maps shown here, however, only represent a fraction... projections of supercomplexes from potato mitochondria were processed by ... Source: Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit - Centre...

  16. Financial statistics of major publicly owned electric utilities, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Financial Statistics of Major Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues.

  17. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE With a Major in COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE With a Major in COMPUTER SCIENCE The Bachelor of Science (BS) degree is intended for students who wish to pursue a professional degree program in Computer Science. Students planning to do graduate work in computer science are strongly advised to pursue this degree program

  18. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology College of Sciences geoscience.unlv.edu/ Mission of the College: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Geology Career Geoscientists are stewards understanding of Earth processes and history. Value of the Geology Degree Opportunities for interesting

  19. Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html Revised: 04/2004 Environmental geology in environmental geology provides the diverse skills required to work in many different employment settings issues. Within the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees

  20. Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html Revised: 03/2013 Geology is a scientific discipline that aims to understand every aspect of modern and ancient Earth. A degree in geology the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees. A master

  1. HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT MAJOR Virgu1iaTech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Hospitality Facilities Planning and Methods I (3) Management (3) #HTM 3484 Socio-Cultural Impacts of Tourism 4414 Food and Beverage Management (Pre: HTM 3414) * #HTM 4464 Human Resources Management in HospHOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT MAJOR Virgu1iaTech Panplil College of BusIness Department

  2. Identication of Major Water-Soluble Fluorescent Components of Some

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    . MUROSKI and M. L. MYRICK* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 630 the ultraviolet (UV) ¯uorescence of water after exposure to gasoline, diesel fuel and crude oil are pre- sented- naphthalene and methylstyrene are the major ¯uorescent species in water following exposure to gasoline

  3. Antibiotics and access to clean water represent two major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    ABSTRACT Antibiotics and access to clean water represent two major advances for public health of clean, potable water to homes and businesses, while eliminating resulting sewage. However, today, our in spreading re- sistance. At the same time, due to growing pressure on our water resources, we are forging new

  4. Improving efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion devices is a major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    Abstract · Improving efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion devices is a major challenge Interdisciplinary Program in Material Science Thermal Physics Lab Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 2 S T ZT dominates over increase in Seebeck coefficient leading to poor device performance. Thermoelectric figure

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Evidence for weed quantity as the major information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Evidence for weed quantity as the major information gathered by organic farmers quantity was the information most frequently col- lected by organic farmers both for short- and long, as weeds are one of the main limiting factors of yield (Bàrberi 2002). Weed biomass, density, diversity

  6. Can migrogrids make a major contribution to UK energy supply ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Working Paper No. 70 March 2005 Manuscript to appear in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews #12;ii energy balance on a yearly basis if supplemented by energy storage of 2.7kWh per household. We findCan migrogrids make a major contribution to UK energy supply ? Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom

  7. Major Degree Campus Accounting B.B.A. Athens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Major Degree Campus Accounting B.B.A. Athens Accounting M.Acc. Athens Adult Education Ed.D. Athens Adult Education Ed.S. Athens Adult Education M.Ed. Athens Adult Education Ph.D. Athens Adult Education Ed.D. Gwinnett Adult Education M.Ed. Online Advertising A.B.J. Athens African American Studies A

  8. MAJORITY OPINION SIDDIQUI VS. SHALABI 27nd February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    MAJORITY OPINION SIDDIQUI VS. SHALABI 27nd February 2013 "All Judicial authority of ASUCI shall shall not hold another ASUCI elective office during his/her term on the Legislative Council." Mr is an appointed and not elective position, Ms. Shalabi did not violate this section of the ASUCI Constitution

  9. Physics Major and Minor www.physicsandastronomy.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Physics Major and Minor www.physicsandastronomy.pitt.edu Revised: 03/2014 The University of Pittsburgh's internationally recognized Department of Physics and Astronomy has been an important leader ­ and at the intersection of quantum and classical physics - our faculty and students explore the fundamental laws of nature

  10. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Physics College of Sciences www.physics.unlv.edu/ UNLV Academic Advising: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Physics Career Physics is the natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion through space and time

  11. THE PHYSICS MAJOR (Physics and Astronomy & Astrophysics Streams)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    THE PHYSICS MAJOR (Physics and Astronomy & Astrophysics Streams) Overview: Physics examines, to the behaviour of matter on the subatomic scale - and everything in between. Studying Physics at UWA gives you access to the frontiers of modern physics, built on the pillars of quantum physics and relativity. You

  12. WHY MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS? Mathematics has commonly been recognized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHY MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS? Mathematics has commonly been recognized as the queen of science. But more than its role as a mere language and foundation of scientific studies and computing, Mathematics to medicine and from government to psychology. An undergraduate degree in Mathematics will open the way

  13. Mathematical Biology Major www.mathematics.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Mathematical Biology Major www.mathematics.pitt.edu Revised: 02/2012 Mathematics has assumed a significant role in the study of biological systems, in the development of biotechnology, and in advances in medicine. The construction and analysis of mathematical models of biological systems allows for the precise

  14. Molecular Biology Major www.biology.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Molecular Biology Major www.biology.pitt.edu Revised: 07/2012 Molecular biology emphasizes question, whether in biochemistry, cell biology, developmental biology, or some other biological discipline, applies molecular biology, often as the prime approach, in its solution. Biochemical and molecular

  15. MAJOR, LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR POET, PROF. PAUL MARIANI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    MAJOR, LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR POET, PROF. PAUL MARIANI CHESTNUT HILL, MA (February 2009) -- University Prof. of English Paul Mariani, a noted Catholic poet and essayist who is one of America's foremost regarded biographies of twentieth-century American poets": William Carlos Williams: A New World Naked (1981

  16. Technology Transfer Expansion Planned UTCA is conducting a major project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Technology Transfer Expansion Planned UTCA is conducting a major project to evaluate and extend its technology transfer activities (UTCA project 03217). Steven Jones and David Eckhoff of UAB are working to expand the current technology transfer program to showcase the successes of the UTCA projects. Samples

  17. Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padilla, Dianna

    Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions? Jessica Gurevitch and Dianna K. Padilla species invasions and the extinction of natives is widely accepted by scientists as well species on extinctions. Greater clarity in our under- standing of these patterns will help us to focus

  18. Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random

  19. Statistics Major and Minor www.stat.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Statistics Major and Minor www.stat.pitt.edu Revised: 10/2012 The field of statistical science decisions in the face of uncertainties. Statistical reasoning is fundamental to research in many scientific. Recent high profile court cases have shown the importance of the use of probability and statistics in law

  20. CLOUD COVER REPORTING BIAS AT MAJOR AIRPORTS Richard Perez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    CLOUD COVER REPORTING BIAS AT MAJOR AIRPORTS Richard Perez Joshua A. Bonaventura-Sparagna & Marek Kmiecik ASRC, SUNY, Albany, NY Ray George & David Renné NREL, Golden, CO ABSTRACT Cloud cover has been generated all or in part from cloud cover measurements [1,2]. This paper presents evidence

  1. Feedback in simulations of disc-galaxy major mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Cox; Patrik Jonsson; Joel R. Primack; Rachel S. Somerville

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using hydrodynamic simulations of disc-galaxy major mergers, we investigate the star formation history and remnant properties when various parametrizations of a simple stellar feedback model are implemented. The simulations include radiative cooling, a density-dependent star formation recipe and a model for feedback from massive stars. The feedback model stores supernova feedback energy within individual gas particles and dissipates this energy on a time-scale specified by two free parameters; tau_fb, which sets the dissipative time-scale, and n, which sets the effective equation of state in star-forming regions. Using a self-consistent disc galaxy, modelled after a local Sbc spiral, in both isolated and major-merger simulations, we investigate parametrizations of the feedback model that are selected with respect to the quiescent disc stability. These models produce a range of star formation histories that are consistent with the star formation relation found by Kennicutt. All major mergers produce a population of new stars that is highly centrally concentrated, demonstrating a distinct break in the r1/4 surface density profile, consistent with previous findings. The half-mass radius and one-dimensional velocity dispersion are affected by the feedback model used. Finally, we compare our results to those of previous simulations of star formation in disc-galaxy major mergers, addressing the effects of star formation normalization, the version of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) employed and assumptions about the interstellar medium.

  2. MATHEMATICS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: ADVISEMENT FORM BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    or ID: NOTE: A grade of C or better is required in courses to fulfill major requirements. I Core be numbered higher than MATH 302. MATH 380, MATH 432, STAT 350 and STAT 351 are not counted as upper level and STAT 432, 470, 490, 496 and 499. III Supplementary Requirements Students must take TWO courses from

  3. Chemistry Major and Minor www.chem.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Chemistry Major and Minor www.chem.pitt.edu Revised: 10/2012 Chemistry is the most central disease, and processes to provide energy for societal needs. Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role design and ceramics. The bachelor's degree in chemistry consists of core courses in four primary areas

  4. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Chemistry Career

  5. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising Chemistry Career Options

  6. Digital Media Studies Major Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Digital Media Studies Major Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan Learning Objectives The program of text and visual media objects · Draw on a rigorous combination of theory, analysis and hands-on digital work in development of original ideas in digital media · Collaborate as a team in development from

  7. Major: Ecological Systems Design, Air Quality Control and Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    1 Major: Ecological Systems Design, Air Quality Control and Waste Management · Being able to solve control technologies · Knowledge in waste management and technologies Module 1: Ecological Systems Design quality control and biogas Waste management and air quality control Examples for combination of Modules

  8. Brandeis University Hispanic Studies current number of majors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    and policy; history; international and global studies; politics; psychology Website: brandeis on sexual health. As a double-major with health: science, society and policy, Lang used what she had learned have studied in places like Buenos Aires, Argentina; Santiago, Chile; Quito, ecuador; San Juan, Costa

  9. Radiocesium Discharges and Subsequent Environmental Transport at the Major U.S. Weapons Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten, Jr. C.T.; Hamby, D.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production related atomic projects in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950's account for a large fraction of the historical releases from U.S. weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early ,years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major U.S. Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early -years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for r37Cs at the three facilities that were part of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex.

  10. Japan`s refiner/marketers headed for major shakeout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan`s downstream oil industry is in a state of crisis and headed for a major shakeout. The major catalyst for this was a dramatic deregulation step during April 1996 that allowed refined petroleum product imports by non-refiners. The move, together with a sharp drop in refining margins, falling retail gasoline prices, and a service station sector on the brink of collapse, are all leading to massive changes in the way the country`s refiners and marketers do business. This paper reviews the collapse of corporate profits during this period of deregulation; the development of a new price system geared toward bringing the prices of gasoline, fuel oil, and kerosene into line with each other to offset the fall in gasoline prices; and industry restructuring including mergers, acquisitions, and marketing consolidation. The paper then makes predictions on the outcome of these changes on the Japanese oil industry.

  11. Assessment of size-fractionated species of curium-244 via alpha spectrometry in groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    Assessment of size-fractionated species of curium-244 via alpha spectrometry in groundwater S. M Abstract Curium was produced for experimental pro- grams for use as a heat source for isotopic electrical differences in 244 Cm concentration. Keywords Curium Á Groundwater Á Size-fractionation Introduction Curium

  12. Machine milkability as related to dairy yield and its fractions in dairy ewes (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Machine milkability as related to dairy yield and its fractions in dairy ewes (1) O. JATSCH R. SAGI and adaptation to machine milking were evaluated by determining milk yield fractions for Awassi and Assaf dairy conformation significantly affected milk yield and adaptation to machine milking, while breed, rearing methods

  13. A Population-Based Study of the Fractionation of Postlumpectomy Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, Allison [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's University Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada) [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's University Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Kong, Weidong [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's University Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's University Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Whelan, Timothy [Juravinski Cancer Center, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)] [Juravinski Cancer Center, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mackillop, William J., E-mail: william.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's University Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The optimal fractionation schedule of post lumpectomy radiation therapy remains controversial. The objective of this study was to describe the fractionation of post-lumpectomy radiation therapy (RT) in Ontario, before and after the seminal Ontario Clinical Oncology Group (OCOG) trial, which showed the equivalence of 16- and 25-fraction schedules. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted by linking electronic treatment records to a population-based cancer registry. The study population included all patients who underwent lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in Ontario, Canada, between 1984 and 2008. Results: Over the study period, 41,747 breast cancer patients received post lumpectomy radiation therapy to the breast only. Both 16- and 25-fraction schedules were commonly used throughout the study period. In the early 1980s, shorter fractionation schedules were used in >80% of cases. Between 1985 and 1995, the proportion of patients treated with shorter fractionation decreased to 48%. After completion of the OCOG trial, shorter fractionation schemes were once again widely adopted across Ontario, and are currently used in about 71% of cases; however, large intercenter variations in fractionation persisted. Conclusions: The use of shorter schedules of post lumpectomy RT in Ontario increased after completion of the OCOG trial, but the trial had a less normative effect on practice than expected.

  14. Limited lithium isotopic fractionation during progressive metamorphic dehydration in metapelites: A case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Limited lithium isotopic fractionation during progressive metamorphic dehydration in metapelites-zone metamorphism far removed from the pluton to partially melted rocks adjacent to the pluton. Lithium on the aureole scale. Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Lithium; Isotope fractionation; Metamorphic

  15. Self-similar solutions for a fractional thin film equation governing hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Self-similar solutions for a fractional thin film equation governing hydraulic fractures C. Imbert equation governing hydraulic fractures are constructed. One of the boundary con- ditions, which accounts, 35R11, 35C06 Keywords: Hydraulic fractures, higher order equation, thin films, fractional Laplacian

  16. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation under continuous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    intensity continuous light, e.g., in the High Arctic summer, on plant carbon and hydrogen isotope Introduction Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations under low intensity 24-h continuous light were unknownPHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation under continuous

  17. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited growth rate effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and spe- cies. Organic Geochemistry. Two species of freshwater green algae, Eudorina unicocca and Volvox aureus, were grown in batch

  18. Application of a fractional advection-dispersion equation David A. Benson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    long-term correlation and fractional derivatives in time [Giona and Roman, 1992; Compte, 1996] and ensue. During this pre-Fickian phase of transport, scale-dependent dispersion coefficients can be used-consuming process that is commonly used to gain information about a plume's pre-Fickian behavior. The fractional ADE

  19. Measurements of photon absorbed fractions and dose profiles using a gelatin-based volumetric dosimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Scottie Wayne

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dosimeter to measure dose profiles in target organs exposed to a known photon field. The dose profiles were then used to calculate an average dose for the entire target along with measured values of absorbed fractions (AF) and specific absorbed fractions...

  20. SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-induced climate change. Cloud-radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo are three key quantities

  1. The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during waterrock interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during water The fractionation of the rare earth elements (REE) in river water, as well as the immobilization of REE in the river earth elements (REE) principally originate from apatite dissolution during weathering. However, stream

  2. Methanol Fractionation of Softwood Kraft Lignin: Impact on the Lignin Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Tomonori [ORNL] [ORNL; Perkins, Joshua H [ORNL] [ORNL; Vautard, Frederic [ORNL] [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolnai, Balazs [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologies to tune lignin properties for high-performance lignin-based materials is crucial for the utilization of lignin in various applications. Here, the effect of methanol (MeOH) fractionation on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, glass transition temperature (Tg), thermal decomposition, and chemical structure of lignin were investigated. Repeated MeOH fractionation of softwood Kraft lignin successfully removed the low-molecular-weight fraction. The separated high-molecular-weight lignin showed a Tg of 211 C and a char yield of 47%, much higher than those of asreceived lignin (Tg 153 C, char yield 41%). The MeOH-soluble fraction of lignin showed an increased low-molecular-weight fraction and a lower Tg (117 C) and char yield (32%). The amount of low-molecular-weight fraction showed a quantitative correlation with both 1/Tg and char yield in a linear regression. This study demonstrated the efficient purification or fractionation technology for lignin; it also established a theoretical and empirical correlation between the physical characteristics of fractionated lignins.

  3. Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites polyurea and the polyurea matrix for the composites based on Isonate® 2143L (diisocyanate) and Versalink® P of the composites. Particle size and volume fraction were varied to study their effects on the tensile properties

  4. Weak Solutions to a Fractional Fokker-Planck Equation via Splitting and Wasserstein Gradient Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agueh, Martial

    Malcolm Bowles , Martial Agueh Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, PO. BOX. 1700 STN CSC, Victoria B.C., V8W 2Y2, Canada. Abstract We study a linear fractional Fokker.math.uvic.ca/~agueh/ (Martial Agueh) Preprint submitted to Elsevier August 8, 2014 #12;according to the fractional heat equation

  5. Positive maps, majorization, entropic inequalities, and detection of entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remigiusz Augusiak; Julia Stasi?ska

    2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we discuss some general connections between the notions of positive map, weak majorization and entropic inequalities in the context of detection of entanglement among bipartite quantum systems. First, basing on the fact that any positive map $\\Lambda:M_{d}(\\mathbb{C})\\to M_{d}(\\mathbb{C})$ can be written as the difference between two completely positive maps $\\Lambda=\\Lambda_{1}-\\Lambda_{2}$, we propose a possible way to generalize the Nielsen--Kempe majorization criterion. Then we present two methods of derivation of some general classes of entropic inequalities useful for the detection of entanglement. While the first one follows from the aforementioned generalized majorization relation and the concept of the Schur--concave decreasing functions, the second is based on some functional inequalities. What is important is that, contrary to the Nielsen--Kempe majorization criterion and entropic inequalities, our criteria allow for the detection of entangled states with positive partial transposition when using indecomposable positive maps. We also point out that if a state with at least one maximally mixed subsystem is detected by some necessary criterion based on the positive map $\\Lambda$, then there exist entropic inequalities derived from $\\Lambda$ (by both procedures) that also detect this state. In this sense, they are equivalent to the necessary criterion $[I\\ot\\Lambda](\\varrho_{AB})\\geq 0$. Moreover, our inequalities provide a way of constructing multi--copy entanglement witnesses and therefore are promising from the experimental point of view. Finally, we discuss some of the derived inequalities in the context of recently introduced protocol of state merging and possibility of approximating the mean value of a linear entanglement witness.

  6. College of Engineering Change of Major Procedures and Course Request

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    by Spring 2015 to continue taking MinE classes. #12;Plan of Study & DARS Plan of Study · Pathways Planner://www.enge.vt.edu/undergraduate/undergrad-plan-of- study.html to help you get started. Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS): · A DARS is a computer Engineering Student you can run a "what if" DARS for the major you desire to enter. Go to: Hokie Spa, degree

  7. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents 5 years (1990--94) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented. Composite tables present: Aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, financial indicators, electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data.

  8. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama Meguroku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)] [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama Meguroku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  9. Conservation laws for time-fractional subdiffusion and diffusion-wave equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Yu. Lukashchuk

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of nonlinear self-adjointness is employed to construct the conservation laws for fractional evolution equations using its Lie point symmetries. The approach is demonstrated on subdiffusion and diffusion-wave equations with the Riemann-Liouville and Caputo time-fractional derivatives. It is shown that these equations are nonlinearly self-adjoint and therefore desired conservation laws can be obtained using appropriate formal Lagrangians. Fractional generalizations of the Noether operators are also proposed for the equations with the Riemann-Liouville and Caputo time-fractional derivatives of order $\\alpha \\in (0,2)$. Using these operators and formal Lagrangians, new conserved vectors have been constructed for the linear and nonlinear fractional subdiffusion and diffusion-wave equations corresponding to its Lie point symmetries.

  10. Overview Of The Unattached Fraction of Radon Prouenv and It's Significance To Luna Dosimetrv.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr. A. Singmin

    The health risk arising from exposure to radon progeny is strongly related to the deposition of radon progeny in the lungs. It is believed that greater risk is related to the unattached fraction. Achievement of accurate estimations of the radiation dose to the lungs, requires knowledge of both the size and concentration of the unattached fraction. In spite of the capabilities available today to obtain this data, several fundamental issues still need to be resolved. Most notably: l)A clear and universally accepted clarification of precisely how the unattached fraction is to be defined, 2)Development of standardized measurement instrumentation for the detection of unattached fractions. Only then can meaningful scientific comparisons be made. The complex issues surrounding the unattached fraction and

  11. Verification of using a single void fraction sensor to identify two-phase flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.W.; Pei, B.S.; Lin, W.K. (National Tsing-Hua Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hsinchu 30043 (TW))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates methods using the signals detected by a single void fraction sensor to identify four kinds of typical vertical, cocurrent, upward, two-phase tube flow patterns. By analyzing 100 sets of time-varying void fraction signals acquired from an impedance device in an air-water two-phase loop, the results of the various methods are evaluated and demonstrated. With the high-frequency contribution fraction (HFCF) criteria, the success rate is 81%. An auxiliary criterion (the void fraction criterion) is proposed to increase the success rate to 92%. The results and the criteria from this study are compared with earlier studies. From the comparison, the applicability of the HFCF criterion to a system in which void fraction can be measured directly is verified.

  12. Prediction of refrigerant void fraction in horizontal tubes using probabilistic flow regime maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jassim, E.W.; Newell, T.A.; Chato, J.C. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A state of the art review of two-phase void fraction models in smooth horizontal tubes is provided and a probabilistic two-phase flow regime map void fraction model is developed for refrigerants under condensation, adiabatic, and evaporation conditions in smooth, horizontal tubes. Time fraction information from a generalized probabilistic two-phase flow map is used to provide a physically based weighting of void fraction models for different flow regimes. The present model and void fraction models in the literature are compared to data from multiple sources including R11, R12, R134a, R22, R410A refrigerants, 4.26-9.58 mm diameter tubes, mass fluxes from 70 to 900 kg/m{sup 2} s, and a full quality range. The present model has a mean absolute deviation of 3.5% when compared to the collected database. (author)

  13. BIOCHEMISTRYBIOCHEMISTRYBIOCHEMISTRY This major allows students to call two departments home--the Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    -- Theory and practice in chemical analysis, emphasizing instrumental techniques; error analysis, fractional distillation, extraction; chromatography; visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectroscopy; introductions

  14. Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Engines |OpenEnergy 8Operations U.S.for Major

  15. Lab subcontractor a major asset to Northern New Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOSEngineering |Lab Subcontractor Major Asset

  16. Salazar, Chu Announce Major Offshore Wind Initiatives | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1 Department ofEnergy Major

  17. Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-Cost Production ExMajor DOE Biofuels Project

  18. Major Management Challenges and Program Risks : Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-Cost Production ExMajor DOE Biofuels

  19. Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on Our National-Projects2008 Other Major Litigation

  20. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, April - June 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energy companies

  1. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, April - June 2004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energy companies

  2. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Fourth Quarter 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energy companiesFourth

  3. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, January - March 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energy

  4. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, January - March 2004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energy Companies

  5. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, July - September 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energy Companies9.0

  6. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, July - September 2004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energy

  7. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, October - December 2001

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energyFinancial News

  8. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, October - December 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energyFinancial

  9. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, October - December 2004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energyFinancialThe

  10. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Second Quarter 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major energyFinancialThe

  11. Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Third Quarter 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tanktwo major

  12. Major New Mexico employers sign STEM education proclamation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowellfor 2013 |Spherical TorusMajor New

  13. Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowellfor 2013 |Spherical TorusMajorCOLUMBIA

  14. This major allows students to call two departments home--the Department of Biological Sciences and the Department of Chemistry. This partnership results in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    instrumental techniques; error analysis, fractional distillation, extraction; chromatography; visible

  15. The effect of gravel size fraction on the distribution coefficients of selected radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Clayton, Ray E.; Glossbrenner, Ellwood T.

    2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript addresses the consequences of the common practice of assuming that the gravel fraction of sediments does not participate in sorption reactions and thus sorption quantified by the distribution coefficient (Kd) construct can be estimated from laboratory tests on sediments less than 2 mm size fraction. However, this common assumption can lead to inaccurate estimates of the mobility and sorption affinity of many radionuclides (e.g., Tc, U, and Np) on gravel dominated sediments at the Hanford Site and other locations. Laboratory batch sorption experiments showed that the distribution coefficients measured using only sediment less than 2 mm size fraction and correcting for inert gravel fraction were not in agreement with those obtained from the bulk sediments including gravel (larger than 2 mm size fraction), depending on the radionuclide. The least reactive radionuclide, Tc had Kd values for bulk sediment with negligible deviations from the inert gravel corrected Kd values measured on less than 2 mm size fraction. However, differences between measured Kd values using sediment less than 2 mm size fraction and the Kd values on the bulk sediment were significant for intermediately and strongly reactive radionuclides such as U and Np, especially on the sediment with gravel fractions that contained highly reactive sites. Highly reactive sites in the gravel fraction were attributed to the presence of Fe oxide coatings and/or reactive fracture faces on the gravel surfaces. Gravel correction factors that use the sum of the Kd,<2 mm and Kd,>2 mm values to estimate the Kd for the bulk sediment were found to best describe Kd values for radionuclides on the bulk sediment. Gravel correction factors should not be neglected to predict precisely the sorption capacity of the bulk sediments that contain more than 30% gravel. In addition, more detailed characterization of gravel surfaces should be conducted to identify whether higher reactive sorbents are present in the gravels.

  16. Radiation dose fractionation studies with hypoxic cell radiosensitizers using a murine tumor. [X-ray; mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, R.P.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of five nitroimidazoles, metronidazole (MET), misonidazole (MISO), desmethymisonidazole (DMM), SR 2508 and SR 2555, to sensitize the KHT sarcoma to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-1.5 g/Kg. Single radiation doses or two different daily fractionation schedules (4 fractions of 5 Gy each or 7 fraction of 3 Gy each) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using either an in vivo or in vitro colony assay. Each radiation (100 kVp X rays at 11 Gy/min) treatment was given locally, 60-70 min (MET) or 30-40 min (other drugs) after either intraperitoneal (MET, MISO, DMM) or intraveous (SR 2508, SR 2555) injection of the drugs; these times have been shown to be optimum for this tumor. For the single doses and both fractionation schedules the tumor cell survival, following the irradiation treatment, declined as the drug dose increased in the range 0 to 0.75 g/Kg for all the drugs, but above this dose level a plateau was reached and the amount of sensitization remained essentially constant. In this plateau region the reduction in survival achieved was similar for single doses and 5 Gy fraction but was less for 3 Gy fractions, indicating that sensitization was smaller for the smaller dose fractions. For the 4 x 5 Gy fractionation schedule the plateau level of survival was lowest for MISO, DMM and SR 2508, slightly higher for SR 2555 and much higher for MET. For the 3 Gy fractions SR 2508 appeared slightly less effective than MISO and DMM.

  17. Elemental Modes of Occurrence in an Illinois #6 Coal and Fractions Prepared by Physical Separation Techniques at a Coal Preparation Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.; Seidu, L; Shah, N; Huffman, G; Honaker, R; Kyger, J; Higgins, B; Robertson, J; Pal, S; Seehra, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to gain better insight into elemental partitioning between clean coal and tailings, modes of occurrence have been determined for a number of major and trace elements (S, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, As, Se, Pb) in an Illinois No.6 coal and fractions prepared by physical separation methods at a commercial coal preparation plant. Elemental modes of occurrence were largely determined directly by XAFS or Moessbauer spectroscopic methods because the concentrations of major minerals and wt.% ash were found to be highly correlated for this coal and derived fractions, rendering correlations between individual elements and minerals ambiguous for inferring elemental modes of occurrence. Of the major elements investigated, iron and potassium are shown to be entirely inorganic in occurrence. Most (90%) of the iron is present as pyrite, with minor fractions in the form of clays and sulfates. All potassium is present in illitic clays. Calcium in the original coal is 80-90% inorganic and is divided between calcite, gypsum, and illite, with the remainder of the calcium present as carboxyl-bound calcium. In the clean coal fraction, organically associated Ca exceeds 50% of the total calcium. This organically-associated form of Ca explains the poorer separation of Ca relative to both K and ash. Among the trace elements, V and Cr are predominantly inorganically associated with illite, but minor amounts (5-15% Cr, 20-30% V) of these elements are also organically associated. Estimates of the V and Cr contents of illite are 420 ppm and 630 ppm, respectively, whereas these elements average 20 and 8 ppm in the macerals. Arsenic in the coal is almost entirely associated with pyrite, with an average As content of about 150 ppm, but some As ({approx} 10%) is present as arsenate due to minor oxidation of the pyrite. The mode of occurrence of Zn, although entirely inorganic, is more complex than normally noted for Illinois basin coals; about 2/3 is present in sphalerite, with lesser amounts associated with illite and a third form yet to be conclusively identified. The non-sulfide zinc forms are removed predominantly by the first stage of separation (rotary breaker), whereas the sphalerite is removed by the second stage (heavy media). Germanium is the only trace element determined to have a predominantly organic association.

  18. Financial statistics major US publicly owned electric utilities 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1996 edition of The Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 5 years (1992 through 1996) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. 2 figs., 32 tabs.

  19. Theoretical principles of use of coal fractions with different densities for combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.G. Gagarin; A.M. Gyul'maliev [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is reasonable to complement the conventional preparation of steam coal involving the removal of ash components and pyritic sulfur by the isolation of the lightest organic fractions, which possess enhanced performance characteristics. These fractions are smoothly saleable both on the domestic and world markets for effective pulverized-coal combustion via new combustion technologies. Heavier (inertinite) fractions of the coal preparation concentrate marketed at lower prices can be considered appropriate fuel for burning in circulating fluidized-bed combustion systems. 13 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Estimation of 6 groups of effective delayed neutron fraction based on continuous energy Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nauchi, Y.; Kameyama, T. [Central Research Inst., Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-Kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New method is proposed to estimate effective fraction of delayed neutrons radiated from precursors categorized into 6 groups of decay constant. Instead of adjoint flux {Phi}*, an expected number of fission neutrons in next generations, M, is applied as a weight function [1]. Introduction of M enables us to calculate the fraction based on continuous energy Monte Carlo method. For the calculation of the fraction, an algorithm is established and implemented into the MCNP-5 code. The method is verified using reactor period data obtained in reactivity measurements. (authors)

  1. Composition of the wax fraction of bitumen from methylated brown coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.I. Zherebtsov; A.I. Moiseev [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation). Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in the group and individual compositions of the wax fractions of bitumen in the course of brown coal methylation were studied. With the use of IR and NMR spectroscopy and chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was found that the esters of methylated coal waxes consisted of the native esters of fatty acids and the methyl esters of these acids formed as a result of an alkylation treatment. Esterification and transesterification were predominant among the reactions of aliphatic fraction components. A positive effect of methanol alkylation on an increase in the yield of the aliphatic fractions was found.

  2. Fractional Euler-Bernoulli beams: theory, numerical study and experimental validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Sumelka; Tomasz Blaszczyk; Christian Liebold

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam (CEBB) theory is reformulated utilising fractional calculus. Such generalisation is called fractional Euler-Bernoulli beams (FEBB) and results in non-local spatial description. The parameters of the model are identified based on AFM experiments concerning bending rigidities of micro-beams made of the polymer SU-8. In experiments both force as well as deflection data were recorded revealing significant size effect with respect to outer dimensions of the specimens. Special attention is also focused on the proper numerical solution of obtained fractional differential equation.

  3. Combination of Vessel-Targeting Agents and Fractionated Radiation Therapy: The Role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Fu, Sheng-Yung [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ying-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chi-Shiun, E-mail: cschiang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ji-Hong, E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate vascular responses during fractionated radiation therapy (F-RT) and the effects of targeting pericytes or bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) on the efficacy of F-RT. Methods and Materials: Murine prostate TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in control mice or mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein-tagged bone marrow (GFP-BM), and irradiated with 60 Gy in 15 fractions. Mice were also treated with gefitinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) or AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist) to examine the effects of combination treatment. The responses of tumor vasculatures to these treatments and changes of tumor microenvironment were assessed. Results: After F-RT, the tumor microvascular density (MVD) was reduced; however, the surviving vessels were dilated, incorporated with GFP-positive cells, tightly adhered to pericytes, and well perfused with Hoechst 33342, suggesting a more mature structure formed primarily via vasculogenesis. Although the gefitinib+F-RT combination affected the vascular structure by dissociating pericytes from the vascular wall, it did not further delay tumor growth. These tumors had higher MVD and better vascular perfusion function, leading to less hypoxia and tumor necrosis. By contrast, the AMD3100+F-RT combination significantly enhanced tumor growth delay more than F-RT alone, and these tumors had lower MVD and poorer vascular perfusion function, resulting in increased hypoxia. These tumor vessels were rarely covered by pericytes and free of GFP-positive cells. Conclusions: Vasculogenesis is a major mechanism for tumor vessel survival during F-RT. Complex interactions occur between vessel-targeting agents and F-RT, and a synergistic effect may not always exist. To enhance F-RT, using CXCR4 inhibitor to block BM cell influx and the vasculogenesis process is a better strategy than targeting pericytes by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor.

  4. Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments using DRAGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. B. Ma; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; W. L. Zhong; F. P. An

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulation to predict reactor rates. First, DRAGON was developed to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions,235U,238U,239Pu and141Pu, and it was validated for PWRs using the Takahama benchmark. The fission fraction calculation function was validated through comparing our calculation results with MIT's results. we calculate the fission fraction of the Daya Bay reactor core, and compare its with those calculated by the commercial reactor simulation program SCIENCE, which is used by the Daya Bay nuclear power plant, and the results was consist with each other. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was studied, and the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

  5. Production cross section and topological decay branching fractions of the ? lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new measurements of the production cross section for the reaction e(+)e(?)??(+)?(?) at s?=29 GeV, as well as the topological decay branching fractions of the ? lepton. The data were taken with the High Resolution ...

  6. Statistical comparison of two-phase flow, void fraction fluctuations in a microgravity environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Jae Ho

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identifier. Results show that slug flows exhibit both unimodal distribution and multi-modal distribution in the probability density function while annular flows have unimodal distribution with a peak at high void fractions. It was found that the variance...

  7. Branching fractions and charge asymmetries in charmless hadronic decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of branching fraction, polarization and charge asymmetry in charmless hadronic B decays with {eta}, {eta}{prime}, {omega}, and b{sub 1} in the final state. All the results use the final BABAR dataset.

  8. The use of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict protein fractions in free-ranging cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitley, Evan Micah

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted to assess the feasibility of using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) technology to predict fractional protein utilization in cattle on forage based diets. Forage samples were obtained from esophageal and ruminal...

  9. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui Abstract Five species of freshwater green algae, including three strains of Botryococcus braunii (two in the algae, including alkadienes, botryococcenes, heptadecenes, fatty acids, and phytadiene, were measured

  10. Start-up flow of a viscoelastic fluid in a pipe with fractional Maxwell's model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Yang; Ke-Qin Zhu

    2010-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Unidirectional start-up flow of a viscoelastic fluid in a pipe with fractional Maxwell's model is studied. The flow starting from rest is driven by a constant pressure gradient in an infinite long straight pipe. By employing the method of variable separations and Heaviside operational calculus, we obtain the exact solution, from which the flow characteristics are investigated. It is found that the start-up motion of fractional Maxwell's fluid with parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$, tends to be at rest as time goes to infinity, except the case of $\\beta=1$. This observation, which also can be predicted from the mechanics analogue of fractional Maxwell's model, agrees with the classical work of Friedrich and it indicates fractional Maxwell's fluid presents solid-like behavior if $\\be\

  11. Practical delay modeling of externally recirculated burned gas fraction for Spark-Ignited Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . INTRODUCTION AND COMPARISON WITH DIESEL EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION To prevent the malicious knock phenomenon. Scheme of the intake burned gas fraction dynamics. In the seemingly similar context of automotive Diesel

  12. Running Footline: INSULIN RELEASE AND PLATEAU FRACTIONS CORRELATIONS OF RATES OF INSULIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pernarowski, Mark

    by rapid membrane voltage oscillations and the silent phase by slow voltage changes. The plateau fraction) in excitable cells is associated with rapid action potential­like oscillations of the membrane potential

  13. New Results in Stability, Control, and Estimation of Fractional Order Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Bong Su

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of control and estimation, even for systems where fractional order models do not arise “naturally”. This dissertation is aimed at further building of the base methodology with a focus on robust feedback control and state estimation. By setting...

  14. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.6±0.5(stat.)±0.3(syst.)±0.6(fs))×10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)B¯s(*) in bb¯ events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.1×10-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organic fractions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: aquatic organic fractions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Animal Ecology 2009, 78, 338345 doi: 10.1111j.1365-2656.2008.01498.x 2008 The Authors. Journal...

  16. Development of Approach to Estimate Volume Fraction of Multiphase Material Using Dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Ick

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    without any assumptions. Also, the system identification was used iteratively to solve for dielectric parameters and volume fraction at each step. As the validation performed to verify the viability of the new approach using soil mixture and portland...

  17. assay-directed fractionation combined: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically. P. Merlatti; G. Sabella 2001-01-11 395 The Geometry of Fractional D1-branes HEP - Theory (arXiv) Summary: We...

  18. adipose-derived stromo-vascular fraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically. P. Merlatti; G. Sabella 2001-01-11 342 The Geometry of Fractional D1-branes HEP - Theory (arXiv) Summary: We...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - average void fraction Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The gamma... such as those shown in figure 10 indeed show an increase in the average void fraction in the flow passage. 4... for a tube in an array liquid gap, Reynolds ... Source:...

  20. Review of tribological sinks in six major industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

  1. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1992 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 4 years (1989 through 1992) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Four years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, {open_quotes}Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities.{close_quotes} Public electric utilities file this survey on a fiscal year, rather than a calendar year basis, in conformance with their recordkeeping practices. In previous editions of this publication, data were aggregated by the two most commonly reported fiscal years, June 30 and December 31. This omitted approximately 20 percent of the respondents who operate on fiscal years ending in other months. Accordingly, the EIA undertook a review of the Form EIA-412 submissions to determine if alternative classifications of publicly owned electric utilities would permit the inclusion of all respondents.

  2. Knowing mathematics for teaching: a case study of teacher responses to students' errors and difficulties in teaching equivalent fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Meixia

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to Student Errors and Difficulties (TRED) in teaching equivalent fractions with an eye on students’ cognitive gains as the assessment of teaching effects. This research used a qualitative paradigm. Classroom videos concerning equivalent fractions from six...

  3. Declaring/Pre-Declaring Economics as a Major Students who want to major in economics are urged to complete the required courses for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    " DARS, selecting: "UG Harpur" for the school "Interest in Economics" for the major (near the bottom of the list). Do NOT select "BA in Economics"! 3. Bring the "Declaration of Major Form" and the "What If" DARS

  4. Apparatus and method for rapid separation and detection of hydrocarbon fractions in a fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sluder, Charles S.; Storey, John M.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for rapid fractionation of hydrocarbon phases in a sample fluid stream are disclosed. Examples of the disclosed apparatus and method include an assembly of elements in fluid communication with one another including one or more valves and at least one sorbent chamber for removing certain classifications of hydrocarbons and detecting the remaining fractions using a detector. The respective ratios of hydrocarbons are determined by comparison with a non separated fluid stream.

  5. Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive...

  6. Energy Department Takes Major Steps to Increase U.S. Energy Productivi...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Department Takes Major Steps to Increase U.S. Energy Productivity and Manufacturing Energy Department Takes Major Steps to Increase U.S. Energy Productivity and...

  7. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas (September 2014) Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan...

  8. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gaustad, Krista; Gaustad, Krista; McFarlane, Sally; McFarlane, Sally

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  9. An Alternative Method for Solving a Certain Class of Fractional Kinetic Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. K. Saxena; A. M. Mathai; H. J. Haubold

    2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative method for solving the fractional kinetic equations solved earlier by Haubold and Mathai (2000) and Saxena et al. (2002, 2004a, 2004b) is recently given by Saxena and Kalla (2007). This method can also be applied in solving more general fractional kinetic equations than the ones solved by the aforesaid authors. In view of the usefulness and importance of the kinetic equation in certain physical problems governing reaction-diffusion in complex systems and anomalous diffusion, the authors present an alternative simple method for deriving the solution of the generalized forms of the fractional kinetic equations solved by the aforesaid authors and Nonnenmacher and Metzler (1995). The method depends on the use of the Riemann-Liouville fractional calculus operators. It has been shown by the application of Riemann-Liouville fractional integral operator and its interesting properties, that the solution of the given fractional kinetic equation can be obtained in a straight-forward manner. This method does not make use of the Laplace transform.

  10. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L. (8448 Allison Ct., Arvada, CO 80005); Black, Stuart K. (4976 Raleigh St., Denver, CO 80212); Diebold, James P. (57 N. Yank Way, Lakewood, CO 80228); Kreibich, Roland E. (4201 S. 344th, Auburn, WA 98001)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  11. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  12. Identification and Selection of Major Carbon Dioxide Stream Compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Schmick, Mary T.

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical component in the assessment of long-term risk from geologic sequestration of CO2 is the ability to predict mineralogical and geochemical changes within storage reservoirs due to rock-brine-CO2 reactions. Impurities and/or other constituents selected for co-sequestration can affect both the chemical and physical (e.g. density, viscosity, interfacial tension) behavior of CO2 in the deep subsurface. These impurities and concentrations are a function of both the industrial source(s) of the CO2, as well as the carbon capture technology used to extract the CO2 and produce a concentrated stream for geologic sequestration. This report summarizes the relative concentrations of CO2 and other constituents in exhaust gases from major non-energy related industrial sources of CO2. Assuming that carbon-capture technology would remove most of the incondensable gases N2, O2, and Ar, leaving SO2 and NOx as the main impurities, we selected four test fluid compositions for use in geochemical experiments. These included: 1) a pure CO2 stream representative of food grade CO2 used in most enhanced oil recovery projects: 2) a test fluid composition containing low concentrations (0.5 mole %) SO2 and NOx (representative of that generated from cement production), 3) a test fluid composition with higher concentrations (2.5 mole %) of SO2, and 4) and test fluid composition containing 3 mole % H2S.

  13. Fitting Single Particle Energies in $sdgh$ Major Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dikmen, E; Cengiz, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed two kinds of non-linear fitting procedures to the single-particle energies in the $sdgh$ major shell to obtain better shell model results. The low-lying energy eigenvalues of the light Sn isotopes with $A=103-110$ in the $sdgh$-shell are calculated in the framework of the nuclear shell model by using CD-Bonn two-body effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The obtained energy eigenvalues are fitted to the corresponding experimental values by using two different non-linear fitting procedures, i.e., downhill simplex method and clonal selection method. The unknown single-particle energies of the states $2s_{1/2}$, $1d_{3/2}$, and $0h_{11/2}$ are used in the fitting methods to obtain better spectra of the $^{104,106,108,110}$Sn isotopes. We compare the energy spectra of the $^{104,106,108,110}$Sn and $^{103,105,107,109}$Sn isotopes with/without a nonlinear fit to the experimental results.

  14. Fitting Single Particle Energies in $sdgh$ Major Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Dikmen; O. Öztürk; Y. Cengiz

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed two kinds of non-linear fitting procedures to the single-particle energies in the $sdgh$ major shell to obtain better shell model results. The low-lying energy eigenvalues of the light Sn isotopes with $A=103-110$ in the $sdgh$-shell are calculated in the framework of the nuclear shell model by using CD-Bonn two-body effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The obtained energy eigenvalues are fitted to the corresponding experimental values by using two different non-linear fitting procedures, i.e., downhill simplex method and clonal selection method. The unknown single-particle energies of the states $2s_{1/2}$, $1d_{3/2}$, and $0h_{11/2}$ are used in the fitting methods to obtain better spectra of the $^{104,106,108,110}$Sn isotopes. We compare the energy spectra of the $^{104,106,108,110}$Sn and $^{103,105,107,109}$Sn isotopes with/without a nonlinear fit to the experimental results.

  15. Synoptic comparison of major US and UK simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, D.B.; Oxenham, D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The six simulations considered include two from the United Kingdom: The United Kingdom Extended Air Defence Test Bed (UKEADTB) and the Air Defence Test Bed (ADTB). There are two from the Test Bed Product Office of the US Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (USASSDC) in Huntsville, Alabama: The Extended Air Defense Test Bed (EADTB) and the Extended Air Defense Simulation (EADSIM). There are two from the National Test Facility in Colorado Springs, Colorado: The Test Planning Tool (TPT) and the Human in Control Test Bed (HICTB). A seventh, the Brilliant Eyes Simulator (BESim) -- an element simulation and a close family member of the system level TPT -- is included along with TPT by noting exceptions where necessary. The comparisons are designed to be compact and comprehensible, with no table occupying more than a single page. The present report is organized with the tables on the odd numbered pages and some commentary on the facing even numbered pages. While the effort reported is extensive, it needs to be further developed as planned as the Subpanel`s next major undertaking. Analogously with simulations themselves, there remains the question of validation or accreditation. Also analogously, these depend upon the question being served. That is, the responses reported here, while extensive and interesting, need to be explicitly reviewed in the light of any given serious application. Unfortunately, and again analogously with simulations, this accreditation can not be done in the abstract or once and for all.

  16. AN ANALYSIS OF THE DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION OF STAR-FORMING CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, R. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Kirk, H. M. [Origins Institute, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)] [Origins Institute, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Shirley, Y. L., E-mail: friesen@di.utoronto.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a pointed survey of N{sub 2}D{sup +} 2-1 and N{sub 2}D{sup +} 3-2 emission toward 64 N{sub 2}H{sup +}-bright starless and protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope and Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. We find a mean deuterium fractionation in N{sub 2}H{sup +}, R{sub D} = N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}), of 0.08, with a maximum R{sub D} = 0.2. In detected sources, we find no significant difference in the deuterium fractionation between starless and protostellar cores, nor between cores in clustered or isolated environments. We compare the deuterium fraction in N{sub 2}H{sup +} with parameters linked to advanced core evolution. We only find significant correlations between the deuterium fraction and increased H{sub 2} column density, as well as with increased central core density, for all cores. Toward protostellar sources, we additionally find a significant anticorrelation between R{sub D} and bolometric temperature. We show that the Perseus cores are characterized by low CO depletion values relative to previous studies of star-forming cores, similar to recent results in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We suggest that the low average CO depletion is the dominant mechanism that constrains the average deuterium fractionation in the Perseus cores to small values. While current equilibrium and dynamic chemical models are able to reproduce the range of deuterium fractionation values we find in Perseus, reproducing the scatter across the cores requires variation in parameters such as the ionization fraction or the ortho-to-para-H{sub 2} ratio across the cloud, or a range in core evolution timescales.

  17. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaprealian, Tania [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Speight, Joycelyn L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I.-Chow, E-mail: IHsu@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score {>=}7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

  18. How to Use This Catalog....................................................................................................... 2 Directory of Undergraduate Programs/Majors.................................................................. 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    ....................................................................................................... 2 Directory of Undergraduate Programs/Majors.................................................................. 3 Directory of Undergraduate Minors.............................................................................................................. 9 Student Services Directory

  19. Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (<260 C boiling point). Carboxylic acid content of all of the high oxygen content fractions was likely too high for these materials to be considered as fuel blendstocks although potential for blending with crude oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

  20. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.)

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.