National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for major end-use services

  1. End-Use Sector Flowchart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This system of energy intensity indicators for total energy covers the economy as a whole and each of the major end-use sectors—transportation, industry, commercial and residential—identified in Figure 1. By clicking on any of the boxes with the word "Sector" in the title will reveal the more detailed structure within that sector.

  2. End Use and Fuel Certification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–B: End Use and Fuel Certification John Eichberger, Vice President of Government Relations, National Association for Convenience Stores

  3. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  4. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 11:05:14 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  5. ,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  6. End-use taxes: Current EIA practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-17

    There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

  7. ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 6:36:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  8. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 11:05:20 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  9. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel

  10. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel

  11. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas ...

  12. Preliminary CBECS End-Use Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For the past three CBECS (1989, 1992, and 1995), we used a statistically-adjusted engineering (SAE) methodology to estimate end-use consumption. The core of the SAE methodology...

  13. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net

  14. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source:...

  15. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural

  16. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural

  17. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for

  18. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for

  19. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report describes the NREL partnership with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, which can be used to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  20. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

    2012-05-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

  1. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. ...

  2. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate ...

  3. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil ...

  4. Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. ...

  5. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel ...

  6. Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil ...

  7. Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate ...

  8. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate ...

  9. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  10. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or ...

  11. Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel ...

  12. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  13. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  14. Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about the implementation of emerging technologies to maximize end-use efficiency in buildings.

  15. Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses This tip sheet outlines alternative strategies for low-pressure end uses as a pathway to reduced compressed air energy costs. COMPRESSED AIR TIP SHEET #11 Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses (August 2004) (246.6 KB) More Documents & Publications Eliminate Inappropriate Uses of Compressed Air Compressed Air System Control Strategies Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency

  16. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: ...

  17. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: ...

  18. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  19. Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The relative magnitude of the energy consumption of different end uses can be a starting point for prioritizing energy investments and action, whether the scope under consideration involves new metering, targeted energy audits, or end-use equipment upgrades.

  20. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Publications » Market Studies » Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3)

  1. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire ...

  2. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island ...

  3. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in the way that variables such as building age and employment density could interact with the engineering estimates of end-use consumption. The SAE equations were...

  4. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Estimates The end-use estimates had two main sources: the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system....

  5. Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Review compressed air end uses and determine the required level of air pressure. * Review the compressed air end ...

  6. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Full Report Tables National estimates and analysis of energy consumption by fuel (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district...

  7. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End-Use Analyst Contact: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager URL: http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercialdataarchivecbecscbec-eu1.html separater bar If...

  8. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  9. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  10. Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Maximum Efficiency (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Maintaining System Air Quality Compressed Air Storage Strategies Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses

  11. Estimating Methods for Determining End-Use Water Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Building Metering Guidance specifies buildings with water using processes and whole building water consumption that exceeds 1,000 gallons per day must have a water meter installed. Below are methods for estimating daily water use for typical end-uses that drive building-level, end-use water consumption.

  12. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    as buildings of the 1980's. In this section, intensities are based upon the entire building stock, not just those buildings using a particular fuel for a given end use. This...

  13. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 10:31:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  14. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End

  15. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net

  16. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End

  17. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Alternative Fuels » Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research Biofuels offer Americans viable domestic, environmentally sustainable alternatives to gasoline and diesel. Learn about the basics, benefits, and issues to consider related to biodiesel and ethanol on the Alternative Fuels Data Center. The Vehicle Technologies Office supports research to increase our knowledge of the effects of biofuels on engines and

  19. Distribution Infrastructure and End Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distribution Infrastructure and End Use Distribution Infrastructure and End Use The expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) created under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 requires 36 billion gallons of biofuels to be blended into transportation fuel by 2022. Meeting the RFS2 target introduces new challenges for U.S. infrastructure, as modifications will be needed to transport and deliver renewable fuels that are not compatible with existing petroleum infrastructure. The

  20. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  1. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  2. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  3. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net

  4. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Net

  5. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","

  6. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  7. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for

  8. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for

  9. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"

  10. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net

  11. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"

  12. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net

  13. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6:35:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...2","N3035US2","N3025US2","N3045US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption ...

  14. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

  15. Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

  16. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 APPENDIX A FINAL EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case Presented to: U.S. Energy Information Administration Prepared by Navigant Consulting, Inc. 1200 19 St. NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 With SAIC 8301 Greensboro Drive McLean, VA 22102 March 2014 Final DISCLAIMER This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency

  17. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 APPENDIX B FINAL EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case Presented to: U.S. Energy Information Administration Prepared by Navigant Consulting, Inc. 1200 19 St. NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 With SAIC 8301 Greensboro Drive McLean, VA 22102 March 2014 Final DISCLAIMER This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency

  18. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 APPENDIX C EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case Presented to: U.S. Energy Information Administration Prepared by: Navigant Consulting, Inc. 1200 19th Street, NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 And SAIC 8301 Greensboro Drive McLean, VA 22102 December 19, 2012 Confidential and Proprietary, ©2012 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Do not distribute or copy Final DISCLAIMER This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by

  19. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 APPENDIX D EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case Presented to: U.S. Energy Information Administration Prepared by: Navigant Consulting, Inc. 1200 19th Street, NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 And SAIC 8301 Greensboro Drive McLean, VA 22102 December 19, 2012 Confidential and Proprietary, ©2012 Navigant Consulting, Inc. Do not distribute or copy Advanced Case Final DISCLAIMER This presentation was prepared as an account of work

  20. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiencies April 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiencies i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  1. REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

  2. United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Morrow, William R.; Masanet, Eric

    2012-05-11

    The United States Department of Energys (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducts the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) to provide detailed data on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector. The survey is a sample of approximately 15,000 manufacturing establishments selected from the Economic Census - Manufacturing Sector. MECS provides statistics on the consumption of energy by end uses (e.g., boilers, process, electric drives, etc.) disaggregated by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) categories. The manufacturing sector (NAICS Sector 31-33) consists of all manufacturing establishments in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. According to the NAICS, the manufacturing sector comprises establishments engaged in the mechanical, physical, or chemical transformation of materials, substances, or components into new products. The establishments are physical facilities such as plants, factories, or mills. For many of the sectors in the MECS datasets, information is missing because the reported energy use is less than 0.5 units or BTUs, or is withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual establishments, or is withheld because the standard error is greater than 50%. We infer what the missing information likely are using several approximations techniques. First, much of the missing data can be easily calculated by adding or subtracting other values reported by MECS. If this is not possible (e.g. two data are missing), we look at historic MECS reports to help identify the breakdown of energy use in the past and assume it remained the same for the current MECS. Lastly, if historic data is also missing, we assume that 3 digit NAICS classifications predict energy use in their 4, 5, or 6 digit NAICS sub-classifications, or vice versa. Along with addressing data gaps, end use energy is disaggregated beyond the specified MECS allocations using additional industry specific energy consumption data. The result is a completed

  3. Detailed End Use Load Modeling for Distribution System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.

    2010-04-09

    The field of distribution system analysis has made significant advances in the past ten years. It is now standard practice when performing a power flow simulation to use an algorithm that is capable of unbalanced per-phase analysis. Recent work has also focused on examining the need for time-series simulations instead of examining a single time period, i.e., peak loading. One area that still requires a significant amount of work is the proper modeling of end use loads. Currently it is common practice to use a simple load model consisting of a combination of constant power, constant impedance, and constant current elements. While this simple form of end use load modeling is sufficient for a single point in time, the exact model values are difficult to determine and it is inadequate for some time-series simulations. This paper will examine how to improve simple time invariant load models as well as develop multi-state time variant models.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai,

  5. End-Use Intensity in Commercial Buildings 1992 (TABLES)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 9 21 5 64 1 9 Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 43 53 9 37 28 116 17 1 5 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 88 32 11 128 52 30 6 15 41 Lodging . . . . . ....

  6. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    lighting intensities per lighted square foot-hour (Figure 23). * Food service and health care buildings had the highest water-heating intensities per square foot--more than...

  7. Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

  8. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  9. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  10. The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2007-11-27

    This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the

  11. Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Management provides many of the services that keep the Department of Energy Headquarters offices operational. Other Program Offices also provide services to the employees at...

  12. Developing an industrial end-use forecast: A case study at the Los Angeles department of water and power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mureau, T.H.; Francis, D.M.

    1995-05-01

    The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) uses INFORM 1.0 to forecast industrial sector energy. INFORM 1.0 provides an end-use framework that can be used to forecast electricity, natural gas or other fuels consumption. Included with INFORM 1.0 is a default date set including the input data and equations necessary to solve each model. LADWP has substituted service area specific data for the default data wherever possible. This paper briefly describes the steps LADWP follows in developing those inputs and application in INFORM 1.0.

  13. Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Engineering Services The Network OSCARS Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools The ESnet Engineering Team Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Engineering Services ESnet provides interoperable, effective, reliable, and high performance network communications infrastructure, and certain

  14. Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Human Capital Office offers benefit, new employee orientation and some learning & development related services to all DOE employees. Additionally the Office supplies employee and labor...

  15. ,"U.S. Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  16. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  17. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " ","

  18. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","

  19. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " ","

  20. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  1. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  2. Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ultimate objective of DOE's Project Management System is to deliver capital asset projects within the original performance baseline, on schedule, within budget, and fully capable of meeting mission requirements. The Resource Center consolidates and provides access to key tools and services for accomplishing this objective. The target audience is DOE’s Federal and Contractor Project Management community.

  3. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG

  4. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG

  5. April 30 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014. The first document includes the first presentation from the meeting: DOE Vision and Objectives. The second document includes all other presentations from the meeting: Terminology and Definitions; End-User and Grid Services; Physical Characterization Framework; Value, Benefits & Metrics.

  6. Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L.; Geller, H.; Nadel, S.

    1992-03-01

    In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

  7. End-Use Opportunity Analysis from Progress Indicator Results for ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Xie, YuLong

    2015-02-05

    This report and an accompanying spreadsheet (PNNL 2014a) compile the end use building simulation results for prototype buildings throughout the United States. The results represent he energy use of each edition of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (ASHRAE 2004, 2007, 2010, 2013). PNNL examined the simulation results to determine how the remaining energy was used.

  8. Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume details the end-use electricity demand and efficiency assumptions. The projection of electricity demand is an important consideration in determining the extent to which a predominantly renewable electricity future is feasible. Any scenario regarding future electricity use must consider many factors, including technological, sociological, demographic, political, and economic changes (e.g., the introduction of new energy-using devices; gains in energy efficiency and process improvements; changes in energy prices, income, and user behavior; population growth; and the potential for carbon mitigation).

  10. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014" "Alaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc","Cooperative",1219363,276627,129773,812963,0 2,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",1134527,513748,563581,57198,0 3,"Anchorage Municipal

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",38670...

  12. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

  13. Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

  14. Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go Into Service To Accept Contaminated Soil and Debris Months Ahead of Schedule and Millions Under Budget

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – Two new super cells are going into service to expand disposal capacity for contaminated soil and debris at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,"Southwestern Public Service Co","Investor-owned",5014741,1127323,1655334,2232084,0 3,"El Paso Electric Co","Investor-owned",1640996,651515,910681,78800,0 4,"City of Farmington - ...

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of NH","Investor-owned",3799020,2390026,1240068,168926,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",1008956,3870,1005086,0,0 3,"Constellation NewEnergy,

  17. July 11 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial And Residential Building End-Use Equipment And Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These documents contain the three slide decks presented at the public meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances, held on July 11, 2014 in Washington, DC.

  18. Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

  19. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

    2006-06-01

    This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Arizona Public Service Co","Investor-owned",27584533,12837752,12477518,2269263,0 2,"Salt River Project","Public",27548529,12293633,11099759,4155137,0 3,"Tucson Electric Power

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-owned",28671219,9008526,12886370,6712282,64041 2,"City of Colorado Springs - (CO)","Public",4477715,1425423,1097160,1955132,0 3,"Intermountain Rural Elec

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",3556542,40286,3515507,749,0 2,"Potomac Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",3015764,1733437,1282327,0,0 3,"WGL Energy Services,

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Commonwealth Edison Co","Investor-owned",18061768,9114941,7890441,1056386,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",10686139,5208659,5477480,0,0 3,"Homefield

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Baltimore Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",12270475,8927905,3147168,195402,0 2,"WGL Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",7202209,1077458,6124751,0,0 3,"Potomac Electric Power

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"DTE Electric Company","Investor-owned",41923906,14932840,16790364,10199382,1320 2,"Consumers Energy Co","Investor-owned",33253922,12593983,11045552,9614387,0 3,"Constellation Energy Services,

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Elec & Gas Co","Investor-owned",19571938,11374261,7430854,766823,0 2,"Jersey Central Power & Lt Co","Investor-owned",9957517,7264641,2445207,247669,0 3,"Direct Energy

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",24307160,8652606,9472917,6181637,0 2,"Public Service Co of Oklahoma","Investor-owned",17947669,6320906,6389387,5237376,0 3,"Grand River Dam

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Wisconsin Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",23909329,7778541,8832104,7298684,0 2,"Wisconsin Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",10646058,3533105,2424249,4688704,0 3,"Wisconsin Public Service

  9. Refining and end use study of coal liquids II - linear programming analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, C.; Tam, S.

    1995-12-31

    A DOE-funded study is underway to determine the optimum refinery processing schemes for producing transportation fuels that will meet CAAA regulations from direct and indirect coal liquids. The study consists of three major parts: pilot plant testing of critical upgrading processes, linear programming analysis of different processing schemes, and engine emission testing of final products. Currently, fractions of a direct coal liquid produced form bituminous coal are being tested in sequence of pilot plant upgrading processes. This work is discussed in a separate paper. The linear programming model, which is the subject of this paper, has been completed for the petroleum refinery and is being modified to handle coal liquids based on the pilot plant test results. Preliminary coal liquid evaluation studies indicate that, if a refinery expansion scenario is adopted, then the marginal value of the coal liquid (over the base petroleum crude) is $3-4/bbl.

  10. Understanding Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology, applications, and economics, for end-use workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, R.J.; McConnell, B.W.

    1993-06-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the state-of-the-art and to what extent existing SMES is a viable option in meeting the needs of utilities and their customers for improving electric service power quality. By defining and analyzing SMES electrical/mechanical performance characteristics, and comparing SMES application benefits with competitive stored energy systems, industry will be able to determine SMES unique applications and potential market penetration. Building on this information base, it would also be possible to evaluate the impact of high temperature superconductors (77 K and 20-35 K) on SMES technology applications. The authors of this report constructed a network of industry contacts and research consultants that were used to collect, update, and analyze ongoing SMES R&D and marketing activities in industries, utilities, and equipment manufacturers. These key resources were utilized to assemble performance characteristics on existing SMES, battery, capacitor, flywheel, and high temperature superconductor (HTS) stored energy technologies. From this information, preliminary stored energy system comparisons were accomplished. In this way, the electric load needs would be readily comparable to the potential solutions and applications offered by each aforementioned energy storage technology.

  11. Industrial end-use forecasting that incorporates DSM and air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tutt, T.; Flory, J.

    1995-05-01

    The California Energy Commission (CEC) and major enregy utilities in California have generally depended on simple aggregate intensity or economic models to forecast energy use in the process industry sector (which covers large industries employing basic processes to transform raw materials, such as paper mills, glass plants, and cement plants). Two recent trends suggests that the time has come to develop a more disaggregate process industry forecasting model. First, recent efforts to improve air quality, especially by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), could significantly affect energy use by the process industry by altering the technologies and processes employed in order to reduce emissions. Second, there is a renewed interest in Demand-Side Management (DSM), not only for utility least-cost planning, but also for improving the economic competitiveness and environmental compliance of the pro{minus}cess industries. A disaggregate forecasting model is critical to help the CEC and utilities evaluate both the air quality and DSM impacts on energy use. A crucial obstacle to the development and use of these detailed process industry forecasting models is the lack of good data about disaggregate energy use in the sector. The CEC is nearing completion of a project to begin to overcome this lack of data. The project is testing methds of developing detailed energy use data, collecting an initial database for a large portion of southern California, and providing recommendations and direction for further data collection efforts.

  12. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellog Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993 for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. The work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to characterize the coal liquids, develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids, and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PIMS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program, produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks, conduct engine emission tests, and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts during the reporting period, October through December 1996, were in the areas of Option 1 blending and Option 1 FCC production run.

  13. Restructuring local distribution services: Possibilities and limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duann, D.J.

    1994-08-01

    The restructuring of local distribution services is now the focus of the natural gas industry. It is the last major step in the ``reconstitution`` of the natural gas industry and a critical clement in realizing the full benefits of regulatory and market reforms that already have taken place in the wellhead and interstate markets. It could also be the most important regulatory initiative for most end-use customers because they are affected directly by the costs and reliability of distribution services. Several factors contribute to the current emphasis on distribution service restructuring. They include the unbundling and restructuring of upstream markets, a realization of the limitations of supply-side options (such as gas procurement oversight), and the increased diversity and volatility of gas demand facing local distribution companies. Local distribution service is not one but a series of activities that start with commodity gas procurement and extend to transportation, load balancing, storage, and metering and billing of services provided. There are also considerable differences in the economies of scale and scope associated with these various activities. Thus, a mixture of supply arrangements (such as a competitive market or a monopoly) is required for the most efficient delivery of local distribution services. A distinction must be made between the supply of commodity gas and the provision of a bundled distribution service. This distinction and identification of the best supply arrangements for various distribution service components are the most critical factors in developing appropriate restructuring policies. For most state public utility commissions the criteria for service restructuring should include pursuing the economies of scale and scope in gas distribution, differentiating and matching gas service reliability and quality with customer requirements, and controlling costs associated with the search, negotiation, and contracting of gas services.

  14. Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop, an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PICS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1994 were in the areas of: subcontract preparation and negotiation; and linear programming modeling.

  15. End-use load control for power system dynamic stability enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, J.E.; Winiarski, D.W.; Donnelly, M.K.

    1997-02-01

    Faced with the prospect of increasing utilization of the transmission and distribution infrastructure without significant upgrade, the domestic electric power utility industry is investing heavily in technologies to improve network dynamic performance through a program loosely referred to as Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS). Devices exploiting recent advances in power electronics are being installed in the power system to offset the need to construct new transmission lines. These devices collectively represent investment potential of several billion dollars over the next decade. A similar development, designed to curtail the peak loads and thus defer new transmission, distribution, and generation investment, falls under a category of technologies referred to as demand side management (DSM). A subset of broader conservation measures, DSM acts directly on the load to reduce peak consumption. DSM techniques include direct load control, in which a utility has the ability to curtail specific loads as conditions warrant. A novel approach has been conceived by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to combine the objectives of FACTS and the technologies inherent in DSM to provide a distributed power system dynamic controller. This technology has the potential to dramatically offset major investments in FACTS devices by using direct load control to achieve dynamic stability objectives. The potential value of distributed versus centralized grid modulation has been examined by simulating the western power grid under extreme loading conditions. In these simulations, a scenario is analyzed in which active grid stabilization enables power imports into the southern California region to be increased several hundred megawatts beyond present limitations. Modeling results show distributed load control is up to 30 percent more effective than traditional centralized control schemes in achieving grid stability.

  16. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    Bechtel, with South west research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with Process Industry Modeling System software. The objective of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major effort conducted during the fourth quarter of 1995 were in the areas of: IL catalytic cracking--microactivity tests were conducted on various wax blends; IL wax hydrocracking--a pilot plant run was conducted on a wax/petroleum blend; and DL2 characterization and fractionation.

  17. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

  19. Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts 1 ) Year By Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 3 Industrial 4 Electric Power 5 Other 6 Grid-Connected 2 Off-Grid 2 Centralized 7 Distributed 8 Domestic 9 Non-Domestic 10 Total Shipments of Photovoltaic Cells and Modules 11<//td> 1989 1,439 6,057 [R] 3,993 785 551 [12] 1,251 [12] 2,620 8,954 12,825 1990 1,701 8,062 [R] 2,817 826 432 [12] 469 [12] 3,097 10,271 13,837 1991 3,624 5,715 [R] 3,947

  20. Major Energy Electric Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56504 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location NPCC ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  1. Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

  2. EM Major Contracts Awarded Since 2006 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EM Major Contracts Awarded Since 2006 EM Major Contracts Awarded Since 2006 See details about EM's major contracts Awarded Major Contracts Since 2006 (34.32 KB) More Documents & Publications Major Contracts Summary Service Contract Inventory Acquisition Forecast Download

  3. Table 2.6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009 Appliance Year Change 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 1980 to 2009 Total Households (millions) 77 78 82 83 84 86 91 94 97 101 107 111 114 32 Percent of Households<//td> Space Heating - Main Fuel 1 Natural Gas 55 55 55 56 57 55 55 55 53 52 55 52 50 -5 Electricity 2 16 17 18 17 16 17 20 23 26 29 29 30 35 17 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 Distillate

  4. Table 3.6 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars 1) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 5,272 4,186 10,352 20,112 1,844 1,440 7,319 10,678 2,082 2,625 6,069 366 5,624 16,691 35,327 35,379 1971 5,702 4,367 11,589 21,934 2,060 1,574

  5. Energy Intensity Indicators: Indicators for Major Sectors | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy for Major Sectors Energy Intensity Indicators: Indicators for Major Sectors This system of energy intensity indicators for total energy covers the economy as a whole and each of the major end-use sectors - transportation, industry, commercial, and residential, as well as the electric power sector. These sectors are shown in Figure 1. Please go to the menu below the figure to see a more detailed discussion of historical trends in the energy intensity indicator for a particular sector.

  6. 2014-04-30 Public Meeting Presentation Slides: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

  7. 2014-04-30 Public Meeting Agenda: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the agenda for the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting being held on April 30, 2014.

  8. Agenda for Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the agenda below for the July 11 Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and  Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances.

  9. Hot Water Electric Energy Use in Single-Family Residences in the Pacific Northwest : Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Megan E., Ritland, Keith G., Pratt, R.G.

    1991-09-01

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration carriers out generation and conservation resource planning. The analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption is carried out by the office's End-Use Research Section. The End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side conservation planning, load forecasting, and conservation program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program, commonly known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was recently renamed the Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP) to reflect an emphasis on metering rather than analytical activities. REMP is designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings in the residential and commercial sectors and is conducted for Bonneville by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle). The detailed summary information in this report is on energy used for water heaters in the residential sector and is based on data collected from September 1985 through December 1990 for 336 of the 499 REMP metered homes. Specific information is provided on annual loads averaged over the years and their variation across residences. Descriptions are given of use as associated with demographic and energy-related characteristics. Summaries are also provided for electricity use by each year, month, and daytype, as well as at peak hot water load and peak system times. This is the second residential report. This report focuses on a specific end use and adds detail to the first report. Subsequent reports are planned on other individual end uses or sets of end uses. 15 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. The use of negotiated agreements to improve efficiency of end-use appliances: First results from the European experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoldi, P.; Bowie, R.; Hagen, L.

    1998-07-01

    The European Union is pursuing measures to improve end-use equipment efficiency through a variety of policy instruments, in particular for domestic appliances. One of the most effective methods to achieve market transformation is through minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS). However, after the difficulties and controversy following the adoption of legislation for MEPS for domestic refrigerators/freezers, a new policy instrument, i.e. negotiated agreements by manufacturers, has been investigated and tested for two type of appliances: domestic washing machines and TVs and VCRs. Based on the positive experience of the above two agreements, other products (e.g. dryers, dishwasher, electric water heaters, etc.) will be the subject of future negotiated agreements. Based on the results of the two negotiated agreements, this paper describes the energy efficiency potential, the procedures, and the advantages and disadvantages of negotiated agreements compared to legislated mandatory for MEPS, as developed in the European context. The paper concludes that negotiated agreements are a viable policy option, which allow flexibility in the implementation of the efficiency targets and therefore the adoption of cost-effective solutions for manufacturers. In addition, negotiated agreements can be implemented more quickly compared to mandatory MEPS and they allow a closer monitoring of the results. The main question asked in the paper is whether the negotiated agreements can deliver the results in the long term compared to what could be achieved through legislation. The European experience indicates that this instrument can deliver the results and that it offer a number of advantages compared to MEPS.

  11. Service Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic...

  12. Restructuring local distribution services in a competitive natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duann, D.J.; Costello, K.W.

    1995-12-31

    The restructuring of local distribution services is now the focus of the natural gas industry. It is viewed by some as the last major step in the {open_quotes}reconstitution{close_quotes} of the natural gas industry and a critical element in realizing the full benefits of regulatory and market reforms that have already taken place in the wellhead and interstate markets. It could also be the most important regulatory initiative for most end-use customers since they are affected directly by the costs and reliability of distribution services. Several factors contributed to the current emphasis on distribution service restructuring. They include the unbundling and restructuring of upstream markets, a realization of the limitations of supply-side options (such as gas procurement oversight), and the increased diversity and volatility of gas demand facing local distribution companies (LDCs). Overall, restructuring requires the LDC to transform itself from a franchised monopoly providing a uniform bundled service into a {open_quotes}competitive{close_quotes} enterprise delivering distinct unbundled services.

  13. Table 10.7 Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet) Year and Type By Market Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 1 Industrial 2 Electric Power 3 Other 4 Pool Heating Water Heating Space Heating Space Cooling Combined Heating 5 Process Heating Electricity Generation Total Shipments 6<//td> 2001 Total 10,125 1,012 17 1 35 10,797 274 70 0 12 34 2 11,189 Low 7 9,885 987 12 0 34 10,782 42 61 0 0 34 0 10,919 Medium 8 240 24 5 0 1 16

  14. The effect of efficiency standards on water use and water heating energy use in the US: A detailed end-use treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Dunham, C.; Lutz, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    Water heating is an important end-use, accounting for roughly 16% of total primary energy consumption in the US residential sector. Recently enacted efficiency standards on water heaters and hot water-using equipment (e.g., dishwashers, clothes washers, showerheads, and faucets) will substantially affect the energy use of water heaters in the future. Assessment of current and future utility programs and government policies requires that regulators, resource planners, and forecasters understand the effects of these regulations. In order to quantify these impacts, this paper presents a detailed end-use breakdown of household hot and cold water use developed for the US Department of Energy. This breakdown is based on both previous studies and new data and analysis. It is implemented in a spreadsheet forecasting framework, which allows significant flexibility in specifying end-use demands and linkages between water heaters and hot water-using appliances. We disaggregate total hot and cold water use (gallons per day) into their component parts: showers, baths, faucets (flow dominated and volume dominated), toilets, landscaping/other, dishwashers, and clotheswashers. We then use the end-use breakdown and data on equipment characteristics to assess the impacts of current efficiency standards on hot water use and water heater energy consumption.

  15. Major Components of Lending

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The major components of a clean energy financing program are described below, centered around the characteristics and sources of capital.

  16. Major Biomass Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Top Scientists, Industry and Government Leaders to Gather for Major Biomass Conference International gathering to focus on business successes, technology updates, facility tours ...

  17. Internships for Physics Majors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fermilab's IPM program offers ten-week summer internships to outstanding undergraduate physics majors. This program has been developed to familiarize students with opportunities at the frontiers of...

  18. Major Partner Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Major Test Partners Once a technology is ready to be tested at pilot or commercial scale, the cost of building a test facility becomes significant -- often beyond the funding ...

  19. MAJOR SITE CONTRACTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NON-NNSA MANAGEMENT and OPERATING and MAJOR SITE CONTRACTS # DOE OFFICE HEAD OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS SENIOR DOE SITE PROCUREMENT MANAGERS M&O CONTRACT MAJOR SITE & FACILITIES CONTRACT CONTRACTOR NAME 1 Chicago Office (Ames Site Office) Jennifer A. Stricker Ames National Laboratory Iowa State University 2 Chicago Office (Argonne Site Office) Sergio E. Martinez Argonne National Laboratory University of Chicago Argonne, LLC 3 Chicago Office (Berkeley Site Office)

  20. Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

  1. 1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

  2. Energy balances in the production and end use of alcohols derived from biomass. A fuels-specific comparative analysis of alternate ethanol production cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Considerable public interest and debate have been focused on the so-called energy balance issue involved in the conversion of biomass materials into ethanol for fuel use. This report addresses questions of net gains in premium fuels that can be derived from the production and use of ethanol from biomass, and shows that for the US alcohol fuel program, energy balance need not be a concern. Three categories of fuel gain are discussed in the report: (1) Net petroleum gain; (2) Net premium fuel gain (petroleum and natural gas); and (3) Net energy gain (for all fuels). In this study the investment of energy (in the form of premium fuels) in alcohol production includes all investment from cultivating, harvesting, or gathering the feedstock and raw materials, through conversion of the feedstock to alcohol, to the delivery to the end-user. To determine the fuel gains in ethanol production, six cases, encompassing three feedstocks, five process fuels, and three process variations, have been examined. For each case, two end-uses (automotive fuel use and replacement of petrochemical feedstocks) were scrutinized. The end-uses were further divided into three variations in fuel economy and two different routes for production of ethanol from petrochemicals. Energy requirements calculated for the six process cycles accounted for fuels used directly and indirectly in all stages of alcohol production, from agriculture through distribution of product to the end-user. Energy credits were computed for byproducts according to the most appropriate current use.

  3. Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11 Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11 October 31, 2014 by Francesca Verdier There will be a major NERSC maintenance on Tuesday, November 11, from 08:00 until 18:00 PST. Several systems and services will be unavailable during this time. Edison, Hopper, Data Transfer nodes, and Science Gateway (data portal) nodes will be unavailable 08:00 - 13:00. Carver/Dirac, PDSF, and Genepool will be unavailable 08:00 - 18:00. HPSS and web servers

  4. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

  5. Service Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Service Levels Service Levels NERSC Supported Services Model NERSC supports various services at various levels of support. This document outlines the different levels of support that can be expected for a given service. Production Services All production services at NERSC have the following characteristics: Monitored by NERSC Operations with automated tools (Nagios). Outages are announced on the MOTD and must follow the rules defined in System Outages document. User facing documentation

  6. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services Services shutterstock_106609430_jpg.jpg

  7. Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 1.06 1.54 6.51 2.10 0.75 0.90 [R] 6.09 1.97 0.45 0.38 0.98 1.59 2.99 0.84 2.31 2.31 1971 1.12 1.59 6.80 2.24 .80 1.02 6.44 2.15 .50 .41 1.05

  8. EFRC CMSNF Major Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Hurley; Todd R. Allen

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) has been to develop a first-principles-based understanding of thermal transport in the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2, in the presence of defect microstructure associated with radiation environments. The overarching goal within this mission was to develop an experimentally validated multiscale modeling capability directed toward a predictive understanding of the impact of radiation and fission-product induced defects and microstructure on thermal transport in nuclear fuel. Implementation of the mission was accomplished by integrating the physics of thermal transport in crystalline solids with microstructure science under irradiation through multi institutional experimental and computational materials theory teams from Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, the University of Florida, the University of Wisconsin, and the Colorado School of Mines. The Centers research focused on five major areas: (i) The fundamental aspects of anharmonicity in UO2 crystals and its impact on thermal transport; (ii) The effects of radiation microstructure on thermal transport in UO2; (iii) The mechanisms of defect clustering in UO2 under irradiation; (iv) The effect of temperature and oxygen environment on the stoichiometry of UO2; and (v) The mechanisms of growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation. The Center has made important progress in each of these areas, as summarized below.

  9. The examination of pretreatment and end use technologies for dirty fuels produced from coal gasification, coal pyrolysis, oil shale processing, and heavy oil recovery: Final technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raden, D.P.; Page, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify pretreatment (upgrading) and end use technologies which: (1) reduce environmental, health and safety impacts, (2) reduce pollution control costs, or (3) reduce upgrading costs of ''dirty fuels'' while producing higher value energy products. A comprehensive list of technologies was developed for upgrading the various dirty fuels to higher value and products. Fifty-two process flow concepts were examined and from these four process flow concepts were chosen for further development. These are: heavy oil recovery and in situ hydrotreating; wet air oxidation in a downhole reactor; total raw gas shift; and high density fuels via vacuum devolatilization. Each of these four process flow concepts described exhibit the potential for reducing environmental, health and safety impacts and/or pollution control costs. In addition these concepts utilize dirty fuels to produce an upgraded or higher value energy product. These concepts should be developed and evaluated in greater detail to assess their technical and economical viability. Therefore, it is recommended that a program plan be formulated and a proof-of-concept research program be performed for each process concept. 3 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Robert McKay recognized for dedicated service | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the NNSA Office of Air Delivered System Acquisitions for Major Modernization Programs, with a NNSA Certificate of Service in recognition of 20 years of dedicated federal service. ...

  11. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Contact User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment...

  12. Library Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Library Services The Research Library provides many services to LANL employees. We also offer limited services to members of the public. The Research Library is open to the public Monday-Friday, 9am to 4pm. Circulation The Research Library provides a large collection of print and electronic books, journals, reports, conference proceedings and many audio/visual materials. See the Circulation page for more information on circulation guidelines. Photocopies and Document Delivery The

  13. LACED Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services LACED Services The expertise, capabilities, and facilities at Los Alamos enable use to provide a full suite of services that caters to countering explosive threats. v At LACED, we believe that technological knowhow is best leveraged through top-tier industrial partners, federal agencies, and academic institutions. LACED offers a variety of partnering mechanisms that enable access to federally developed technologies and R&D capabilities. If you have a complex problem related to

  14. Service Forms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Service Forms Beamtime Request Form Deposition Request Form Exposure Request Form - pdf Fly Cutting Request Form Hot Embossing Request Form Metrology Request Form

  15. The National Fuel End-Use Efficiency Field Test: Energy Savings and Performance of an Improved Energy Conservation Measure Selection Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of an advanced residential energy conservation measure (ECM) selection technique was tested in Buffalo, New York, to verify the energy savings and program improvements achieved from use of the technique in conservation programs and provide input into determining whether utility investments in residential gas end-use conservation are cost effective. The technique analyzes a house to identify all ECMs that are cost effective in the building envelope, space-heating system, and water-heating system. The benefit-to-cost ratio (BCR) for each ECM is determined and cost-effective ECMs (BCR > 1.0) are selected once interactions between ECMs are taken into account. Eighty-nine houses with the following characteristics were monitored for the duration of the field test: occupants were low-income, houses were single-family detached houses but not mobile homes, and primary space- and water-heating systems were gas-fired. Forty-five houses received a mix of ECMs as selected by the measure selection technique (audit houses) and 44 served as a control group. Pre-weatherization data were collected from January to April 1988 and post-weatherization data were collected from December 1988 to April 1989. Space- and waterheating gas consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the two winters. A house energy consumption model and regression analysis were employed to normalize the space-heating energy savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and a 68 F indoor temperature. Space and water-heating energy savings for the audit houses were adjusted by the savings for the control houses. The average savings of 257 therms/year for the audit houses was 17% of the average pre-weatherization house gas consumption and 78% of that predicted. Average space-heating energy savings was 252 therms/year (25% of pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption and 85% of the predicted value) and average water-heating savings was 5 therms/year (2% of pre

  16. Service design in the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oren, S.S.; Smith, S.A.; Wilson, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    This essay reviews the basic concepts of product differentiation as they apply to service design in the electric power industry. Unbundling the quality attributes of service conditions benefits utilities as well as their customers. Each customer gains from new opportunities to match the quality and cost of service conditions to the characteristics of their end uses. A well designed product line of service conditions benefits every customer. The utility benefits from improved operating efficiency and from greater flexibility in meeting service obligations and competitive pressures. In addition, the utility obtains better information for planning investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. Together these features provide a foundation for a utility's business strategy. The basic principles of product design are described and a unified methodology for specifying and pricing service conditions is outlined. We also describe how the pricing of quality attributes enables the utility to price other service options systematically, such as long-term supply contracts, cogeneration, and standby service. 60 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Service Academies Research Associates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internships » SARA » SARA Service Academies Research Associates (SARA) The academies come to Los Alamos for a summer of science. Contact Jonathan S. Ventura Email application Program 2015-2016 Application Your Name Date of Birth SSN Home Address Phone Email Address at the Academy Academy Approver's Name Academy Approver's Phone Academy Approver's Email GPA (requires minimum 3.0) Academy Major Foreign Language(s) and Proficiency Preferred Work Environment (lab or office space) Dates Available

  18. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users...

  19. Energy Department Awards First Major Task Order Under Streamlined

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contracting System | Department of Energy First Major Task Order Under Streamlined Contracting System Energy Department Awards First Major Task Order Under Streamlined Contracting System October 17, 2005 - 11:59am Addthis New Mexico Firm Contracted for Ashtabula Clean-up WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a Task Order for an estimated $19.4 million to LATA-SHARP Remediation Services, LLC for the completion of clean-up activities at the Ashtabula Closure Project (ACP)

  20. Obama Administration Takes Major Step toward Advanced Vehicles with New

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fleet Management Practices and Launch of First Federal Electric Vehicle Pilot | Department of Energy Takes Major Step toward Advanced Vehicles with New Fleet Management Practices and Launch of First Federal Electric Vehicle Pilot Obama Administration Takes Major Step toward Advanced Vehicles with New Fleet Management Practices and Launch of First Federal Electric Vehicle Pilot May 24, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, General Services

  1. Obama Administration Officials to Announce Major Steps toward Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Fleet | Department of Energy Major Steps toward Federal Advanced Vehicle Fleet Obama Administration Officials to Announce Major Steps toward Federal Advanced Vehicle Fleet May 23, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - On May 24, 2011, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. General Services Administrator Martha Johnson and White House Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley, will announce next steps in moving the Federal fleet further towards

  2. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Author Guidelines User Services Print General Inquiries: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 (dial last four numbers from on-site phones) Location: Building 6 mezzanine, Room 6-2212 Office hours: Monday-Friday 8am - 5pm (new users should arrive before 4pm) Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Group Leader User Services Sue Bailey Prospective users, Industry users This e-mail address

  3. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Print General Inquiries: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 (dial last four numbers from on-site phones) Location: Building 6 mezzanine, Room 6-2212 Office hours: Monday-Friday 8am - 5pm (new users should arrive before 4pm) Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Group Leader User Services Sue Bailey Prospective users, Industry users This e-mail address is being protected from

  4. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Services General Inquiries: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 (dial last four numbers from on-site phones) Location: Building 6 mezzanine, Room 6-2212 Office hours: Monday-Friday 8am - 5pm (new users should arrive before 4pm) Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Group Leader User Services Sue Bailey Prospective users, Industry users This e-mail address is being protected from

  5. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Services Print General Inquiries: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 (dial last four numbers from on-site phones) Location: Building 6 mezzanine, Room 6-2212 Office hours: Monday-Friday 8am - 5pm (new users should arrive before 4pm) Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Group Leader User Services Sue Bailey Prospective users, Industry users This e-mail address is being protected

  6. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Print General Inquiries: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 (dial last four numbers from on-site phones) Location: Building 6 mezzanine, Room 6-2212 Office hours: Monday-Friday 8am - 5pm (new users should arrive before 4pm) Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Group Leader User Services Sue Bailey Prospective users, Industry users This e-mail address is being protected from

  7. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Services Print General Inquiries: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 (dial last four numbers from on-site phones) Location: Building 6 mezzanine, Room 6-2212 Office hours: Monday-Friday 8am - 5pm (new users should arrive before 4pm) Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Group Leader User Services Sue Bailey Prospective users, Industry users This e-mail address is being protected

  8. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Services Print General Inquiries: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 (dial last four numbers from on-site phones) Location: Building 6 mezzanine, Room 6-2212 Office hours: Monday-Friday 8am - 5pm (new users should arrive before 4pm) Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Group Leader User Services Sue Bailey Prospective users, Industry users This e-mail address is being protected

  9. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts for Users User Services Print General Inquiries: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 (dial last four numbers from on-site phones) Location: Building 6 mezzanine, Room 6-2212 Office hours: Monday-Friday 8am - 5pm (new users should arrive before 4pm) Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Group Leader User Services Sue Bailey Prospective users, Industry users This e-mail address

  10. Transmission Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Services BPA Clarifications on the DSO216 1 Document updated on 2242015 at 3:29:25 PM B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N BPA Clarifications on...

  11. Major Communications Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Major Communications Reports Major Communications Reports May 18, 2012 Green Button Data: More Power to You May 28, 2009 Major Communications Report May 28, 2009 May 7, 2009 Major Communications Report May 7, 2009 May 5, 2009 Major Communications Report May 5, 2009 April 30, 2009 Major Communications Report April 30, 2009 April 28, 2009 Major Communications Report April 28, 2009 April 17, 2009 Major Communications Report April 17, 2009 March 24, 2009 Major Communications Report March 24, 2009

  12. Major Conformed Contract Links | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conformed Contract Links Major Conformed Contract Links Links to conformed copies of EM's major contracts. Major Conformed Contract Links (302.59 KB) More Documents & Publications ...

  13. Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11 Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11 October 31, 2014 by Francesca Verdier There will be a major NERSC maintenance on Tuesday, ...

  14. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in all wholesale electricity markets.

  15. "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze

  16. Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. More computers, dedicated servers, printers, and photocopiers were used in office buildings than in...

  17. Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    369,739 330,914 288,802 332,068 332,073 307,946 1997-2014 Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 17 19 17 12 4 3 1983-2014 Pipeline & Distribution Use 20,846 15,447 13,158...

  18. Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    675,727 655,919 691,661 658,569 640,607 1997-2014 Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 39,489 40,819 43,727 45,581 50,621 1983-2014 Plant Fuel 23,238 24,938 27,809 32,119 ...

  19. ,"Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8817,1663,1627,2865,0,2661 41654,9350,2463,2128,2676,0,2083 41685,8446,2138,1696,2644,0,1968 41713,9361,1858,1502,2871,0,3129 41744,6829,825,740,2340,0,2924 41774,6637,496,615,2477...

  20. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusinm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  1. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusohm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  2. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusmim.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  3. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusmam.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  4. ,"Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusvtm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  5. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusarm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  6. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusiam.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  7. ,"Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusflm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  8. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusmnm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  9. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusilm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  10. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcushim.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  11. Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    66,422 57,410 49,673 39,929 NA NA 2001-2016 Residential 24,782 19,769 14,268 11,144 5,012 2,584 1989-2016 Commercial 15,417 13,091 9,179 7,139 4,535 3,134 1989-2016 Industrial 15,948 14,197 12,910 11,800 NA NA 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 11 10 11 11 13 12 2010-2016 Electric Power 10,264 10,342 13,305 9,836 9,830 11,626

  12. Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    40,243 34,191 28,634 22,307 20,896 19,116 2001-2016 Residential 13,190 10,164 6,736 4,552 2,108 1,120 1989-2016 Commercial 8,771 7,041 4,879 3,435 2,066 1,568 1989-2016 Industrial 16,580 15,443 15,476 13,370 14,096 14,144 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 2 2 2 2 2 2 2010-2016 Electric Power 1,700 1,542 1,541 948 2,624 2,281

  13. Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    50,460 46,930 39,433 34,409 29,847 26,912 2001-2016 Residential 20,032 18,664 14,183 10,379 5,800 2,893 1989-2016 Commercial 15,256 13,347 10,090 8,352 5,401 3,616 1989-2016 Industrial 5,486 5,065 4,491 4,080 3,114 2,792 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 77 70 77 75 68 66 2010-2016 Electric Power 9,608 9,783 10,592 11,523 15,463 17,545

  14. Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,465 7,453 NA NA 3,842 NA 2001-2016 Residential 3,276 2,376 2,083 1,336 968 534 1989-2016 Commercial 3,244 2,434 2,271 1,487 1,157 778 1989-2016 Industrial 2,128 1,911 NA NA 1,716 NA 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Electric Power 816 732 699 W W 798

  15. Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,575 71,690 68,266 64,091 60,661 1997-2014 Pipeline & Distribution Use 1,753 2,399 762 844 1,300 1997-2014 Volumes Delivered to Consumers 75,821 69,291 67,504 63,247 59,362 NA ...

  16. Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,607 2,627 2,619 2,689 2,855 2,928 1997-2014 Pipeline & Distribution Use 2 2 2 3 1 1 2004-2014 Volumes Delivered to Consumers 2,605 2,625 2,616 2,687 2,853 2,927 1997-2014...

  17. Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 0 0 0 0 * 1984-2014 Pipeline & Distribution Use 5,820 7,049 4,973 5,626 6,184 1997-2014 Volumes Delivered to Consumers 274,361 265,534 ...

  18. Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial 1,755 2,731 4,161 5,913 4,247 2,266 1989-2016 Industrial 8,738 8,919 11,086 11,471 9,114 8,667 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 1 1 1 1 1 1 2010-2016 Electric Power W W 804 725 ...

  19. Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    85,549 138,429 294,316 274,451 1997-2014 Volumes Delivered to Consumers 2,947,542 3,185,011 3,305,730 3,377,217 3,350,645 3,415,789 1997-2014 Residential 192,153 226,445 199,958...

  20. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcuskym.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngconssumdcuskym.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  1. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 39736,4922,738,610,3480,,94 39767,5595,1207,908,3394,,86 39797,7419,1929,1386,4005,,100 39828,7385,2040,1589,3639,,117 39859,6193,1754,1416,2927,,96 ...

  2. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    34196,,251,360 34227,,310,381 34257,,481,507 34288,,1159,947 34318,,2057,1543 34349,,1929,1510 34380,,1926,1457 34408,,1432,1121 34439,,1001,771 34469,,568,480 34500,,367,377 ...

  3. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    32978,,1820,1550 33008,,1476,1268 33039,,1206,1157 33069,,704,821 33100,,560,769 ... 37726,13784,3838,2544,5408,,1994 37756,12066,3058,2088,5382,,1537 ...

  4. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    33649,,1933,2372 33678,,1764,2319 33709,,1346,1935 33739,,1012,1597 33770,,628,1206 33800,,474,1084 33831,,438,1013 33862,,643,1252 33892,,1209,1790 33923,,1442,1928 ...

  5. ,"Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    33131,,450,347 33161,,1040,782 33192,,1694,1206 33222,,2673,1889 33253,,3533,2425 ...,3279,1081,737,1444,,16 38153,2725,856,647,1206,,16 38183,2154,553,456,1129,,16 ...

  6. ,"Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 38671,4236,102,416,513,,3205 38701,2234,170,664,563,,836 38732,3888,153,605,1206,,1923 38763,4850,166,636,1426,,2622 38791,5239,142,620,2121,,2355 38822,4090,87,355,124...

  7. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 35504,,3058,2114 35535,,1916,1532 35565,,1472,1305 35596,,926,1174 35626,,815,1206 35657,,761,1309 35688,,778,924 35718,,902,1224 35749,,2561,2027 35779,,4355,2937 ...

  8. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 40283,14937,4022,3553,7241,1,119 40313,11682,1468,2245,7020,1,948 40344,12260,1206,2041,6804,1,2209 40374,14350,1036,1878,6882,1,4553 40405,13862,956,1725,7350,1,3829 ...

  9. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 37118,14023,996,1238,910,,10878 37149,12067,1034,1655,858,,8520 37179,12854,1245,1383... 40954,22161,5815,3266,972,47,12062 40983,20389,4325,2888,1019,50,12107 ...

  10. Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  11. Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  13. Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  14. Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  15. Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  16. Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  17. Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  18. Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  19. Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  20. California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  1. Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  2. Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  3. Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  4. Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  5. Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  6. Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  7. Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  8. Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  9. Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  10. Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...