Sample records for maize cell walls

  1. Identification and genetic characterization of maize cell wall variation for improved biorefinery feedstock characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, Markus [UC Berkeley] [UC Berkeley; Hake, Sarah [USDA Albany] [USDA Albany

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this program are to 1) characterize novel maize mutants with altered cell walls for enhanced biorefinery characteristics and 2) find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to biorefinery characteristics by taking advantage of the genetic diversity of maize. As a result a novel non-transgenic maize plant (cal1) has been identified, whose stover (leaves and stalk) contain more glucan in their walls leading to a higher saccharification yield, when subjected to a standard enzymatic digestion cocktail. Stacking this trait with altered lignin mutants yielded evene higher saccharification yields. Cal-1 mutants do not show a loss of kernel and or biomass yield when grown in the field . Hence, cal1 biomass provides an excellent feedstock for the biofuel industry.

  2. Maize variety and method of production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pauly, Markus; Hake, Sarah; Kraemer, Florian J

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a maize plant, seed, variety, and hybrid. More specifically, the disclosure relates to a maize plant containing a Cal-1 allele, whose expression results in increased cell wall-derived glucan content in the maize plant. The disclosure also relates to crossing inbreds, varieties, and hybrids containing the Cal-1 allele to produce novel types and varieties of maize plants.

  3. Rumen microbial degradation of the top internode of maize Co125 and maize W401 observed by scanning electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rumen microbial degradation of the top internode of maize Co125 and maize W401 observed by scanning, respectively. Observations before and after degradation in the rumen of the top and the bottom of the upper on the tissues were observed. Cell- wall degradation began in the parenchyma and the phloem from the bottom of Co

  4. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  5. Anisotropic Expansion of the Plant Cell Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskin, Tobias

    solar panels of leaves to the coiled grap- pling hooks of tendrils. Thompson (1917) re- alized of a unit area of cell wall is characterized by the direction and degree of anisotropy. The direction

  6. Evidence of programmed cell death in maize suspension cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu-Shan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an active cell death process involved in the selective elimination of unwanted cells, and it is found throughout animal and plant kingdoms. The term apoptosis usually refers to a morphological type often observed...

  7. architecture cell wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    architecture cell wall First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Distinct Cell Wall Architectures...

  8. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  9. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de, E-mail: nico.derooij@epfl.ch [Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Laboratory (SAMLAB), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence (LTF), Institut de Physique, Université de Neuchâtel, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140?°C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  10. Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon...

  11. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall synthesis pathway genes are induced by removal of cell wall, some cell wall synthesis apparatus must be shared in both cases. The cell wall re-synthesis mechanism may have broad application because our preliminary assay indicates that the cell wall characteristics are highly different from those produced during cytokinesis. A thorough understanding on the regulation of cell wall re-synthesis may lead to improvement of cell wall characteristics. b) Removal of cell wall results in chromatin decondensation Another interesting observation was that removal of cell wall was associated with substantial chromatin change. Our DNA DAPI stain, chromatin MNase digestion, histone modification proteomics, protein differential expression analysis, and DNA oligo array studies all supported that substantial chromatin change was associated with removal of cell wall treatment. It is still under investigation if the chromatin change is associated with activation of cell wall synthesis genes, in which chromatin remodeling is required. Another possibility is that the cell wall is required for stabilizing the chromatin structure in plant cells. Given that spindle fiber is directly connected with both chromatin structure and cell wall synthesis, it is possible that there is an intrinsic connection between cell wall and chromatin.

  12. Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

  13. Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Applications of PyrolysisGas Chromatography / Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Genomics Applications of Pyrolysis­Gas Chromatography / Mass, Umeå 2012 #12;Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Genomics Applications of Pyrolysis.4.1 The Basic Tool-set 27 1.5 Wood Formation and Functional Genomics 31 2 Objectives 33 3 Methodological

  14. Development of building-integrated PV modules using color solar cells for various exterior walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, N.; Kanai, M.; Hide, I. [Daido Hoxan Inc. (Japan). Chitose Labs.] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have been developing building-material-integrated PV modules used as exterior walls of building using color solar cells with an emphasis on design. Mainly the authors developed four types of modules, glass curtain walls, precast-concrete (PC)-incorporated-type, slanted wall-type and renovation-type modules. They constructed the demonstration test facilities of those modules and evaluated the performance of building-material-integrated modules for various types of exterior walls. No problems were observed at an outdoor demonstration test facility. The authors confirmed the color and shape of those modules can be harmonized with the design of the building.

  15. 2012 PLANT CELL WALLS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, AUGUST 4-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Jocelyn

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The sub-theme of this year’s meeting, ‘Cell Wall Research in a Post-Genome World’, will be a consideration of the dramatic technological changes that have occurred in the three years since the previous cell wall Gordon Conference in the area of DNA sequencing. New technologies are providing additional perspectives of plant cell wall biology across a rapidly growing number of species, highlighting a myriad of architectures, compositions, and functions in both "conventional" and specialized cell walls. This meeting will focus on addressing the knowledge gaps and technical challenges raised by such diversity, as well as our need to understand the underlying processes for critical applications such as crop improvement and bioenergy resource development.

  16. Lignin biosynthesis perturbations affect secondary cell wall composition and saccharification yield in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Acker, Rebecca; Vanholme, Ruben; Storme, Véronique; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Dupree, Paul; Boerjan, Wout

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    be used for the production of liquid biofuels, such as bioethanol [2]. However, the enzymatic processing of plant biomass into fermentable sugars, called saccharifi- cation, is hampered by the complexity of the secondary cell wall structure...

  17. In Situ Chemical Imaging of Plant Cell Walls Using CARS/SRS Microscopy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Y.; Liu, Y. S.; Saar, B. G.; Xie, X. S.; Chen, F.; Dixon, R. A.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding S. Y.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster demonstrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering of plant cell walls. It includes simultaneous chemical imaging of lignin and cellulose (corn stover) during acidic pretreatment.

  18. CNT-SI HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELLS WITH STRUCTURE-CONTROLLED SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBE FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    CNT-SI HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELLS WITH STRUCTURE- CONTROLLED SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBE FILMS solar cells. We proposed a water-vapor treatment to build up SWNTs to a self-assembled micro- honeycomb network for the application of solar cells [1]. The micro-honeycomb network consists of vertical

  19. CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell with single-walled carbon nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell with single-walled carbon nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama Department solar cells. We proposed a water vapor treatment to build up SWNTs to a self-assembled micro-honeycomb network for the application of solar cells [1]. The micro- honeycomb network consists of vertical

  20. Controlled Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Controlled Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell Shigeo two different SWNT assemblies for SWNT-Si heterojuction solar cells. We proposed a water vapor treatment to build up SWNTs to a self-assembled micro-honeycomb network for the application of solar cells

  1. CVD growth control and solar cell application of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    CVD growth control and solar cell application of single-walled carbon nanotubes ( CVD ) #12;#12; Doctoral Dissertation CVD Growth Control and Solar Cell Application of Single is supposed to be a very promising candidate for next-generation solar cell applications. However, three main

  2. 2009 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Research Conference-August 2-7,2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra Mohnen

    2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant cell walls are a complex cellular compartment essential for plant growth, development and response to biotic and abiotic stress and a major biological resource for meeting our future bioenergy and natural product needs. The goal of the 2009 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Research Conference is to summarize and critically evaluate the current level of understanding of the structure, synthesis and function of the whole plant extracellular matrix, including the polysaccharides, proteins, lignin and waxes that comprise the wall, and the enzymes and regulatory proteins that drive wall synthesis and modification. Innovative techniques to study how both primary and secondary wall polymers are formed and modified throughout plant growth will be emphasized, including rapid advances taking place in the use of anti-wall antibodies and carbohydrate binding proteins, comparative and evolutionary wall genomics, and the use of mutants and natural variants to understand and identify wall structure-function relationships. Discussions of essential research advances needed to push the field forward toward a systems biology approach will be highlighted. The meeting will include a commemorative lecture in honor of the career and accomplishments of the late Emeritus Professor Bruce A. Stone, a pioneer in wall research who contributed over 40 years of outstanding studies on plant cell wall structure, function, synthesis and remodeling including emphasis on plant cell wall beta-glucans and arabinogalactans. The dwindling supply of fossil fuels will not suffice to meet our future energy and industrial product needs. Plant biomass is the renewable resource that will fill a large part of the void left by vanishing fossil fuels. It is therefore critical that basic research scientists interact closely with industrial researchers to critically evaluate the current state of knowledge regarding how plant biomass, which is largely plant cell walls, is synthesized and utilized by the plant. A final goal of the meeting is to bring together academic, research center, and industrial scientists to identify the most crucial and fundamental basic research questions and directions that will supply the information needed to understand, modify and use plant biomass for human industrial and energy needs.

  3. ISOLATION OF THREE BRUCELLA ABORTUS CELL-WALL ANTIGENS PROTECTIVE IN MURINE EXPERIMENTAL BRUCELLOSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the exponential phase. The cells were harvested by centrifugation and washed in distilled water. B. abortus 544 (S water and lyophilized. The fraction was then delipided twice by chloroform- methanol extraction (2/1, v found in either complex soluble or insoluble fractions extracted from the brucella cell-wall (Roux, 1972

  4. PHYSIOLOGY OP DIGESTION AND FEEDING BEHAVIOUR Influence of the nature of cell wall carbohydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    essentially by the nature of the cell wall carbohydrates coming either from dried lucerne (40 p. 100 p. 100) with the lucerne diet. As compared with the latter, the pulp diet induced a hypertrophy) on the motility of the digestive tract and on the feeding pattern were compared with a dried lucerne diet (low H

  5. Original article Comparison of in situ degradation of cell-wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    linked to cell walls for fresh lucerne and 2 lucerne silages J Aufrère, D Boulberhane D Graviou C degradation was studied on fresh lucerne and 2 silages prepared from fresh for- age, one without added degradations of 2 lucerne silages, one without preservative and the other with added formic acid were compared

  6. Potential digestibilities and digestion kinetics of forage cell wall components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tauskey, William Henry

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ); and lignin (L) . Between species comparison of forage composition indicated a higher percent neutral detergent extract (cell solubles) and cellulose for Sorghums. The coefficients of digestibility for all fractions were higher for the Sorghums.... There was a significant correlation (P&. 05) between the ratio of neutral detergent extract/NDF ratio and digest- ibility. The lignin/cellulose ratio in forage composition ranged from 1 to 5 for Bermudas and 1 to 7. 5 for Sorghums. The same rati. o...

  7. Cell Wall Recipe: A Lesson on Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desert SouthwestofDepartment ofSeparatorandCell

  8. Formation of thin walled ceramic solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claar, Terry D. (Tisle, IL); Busch, Donald E. (Hinsdale, IL); Picciolo, John J. (Lockport, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce thermal stress and improve bonding in a high temperature monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), intermediate layers are provided between the SOFC's electrodes and electrolyte which are of different compositions. The intermediate layers are comprised of a blend of some of the materials used in the electrode and electrolyte compositions. Particle size is controlled to reduce problems involving differential shrinkage rates of the various layers when the entire structure is fired at a single temperature, while pore formers are provided in the electrolyte layers to be removed during firing for the formation of desired pores in the electrode layers. Each layer includes a binder in the form of a thermosetting acrylic which during initial processing is cured to provide a self-supporting structure with the ceramic components in the green state. A self-supporting corrugated structure is thus formed prior to firing, which the organic components of the binder and plasticizer removed during firing to provide a high strength, high temperature resistant ceramic structure of low weight and density.

  9. Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resch, M.; Donohoe, B.; Katahira, R.; Ashutosh, M.; Beckham, G.; Himmel, M.; Decker, S.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fungal free enzymes and bacterial complexed cellulosomes deconstruct biomass using different physical mechanisms. Free enzymes, which typically contain a large proportion of GH7 cellobiohydrolase, diffuse throughout the substrate and hydrolyze primarily from the cellulose reducing end, resulting in 'sharpened' macrofibrils. In contrast, complexed cellulosomes contain a diverse array of carbohydrate binding modules and multiple catalytic specificities leading to delamination and physical peeling of the cellulose macrofibril structures. To investigate how cellulose structure contributes to recalcitrance, we compared the deconstruction of cellulose I, II, and III; using free and complexed enzyme systems. We also evaluated both systems on Clean Fractionation and alkaline pretreated biomass, which remove much of the lignin, to determine the impact on enzyme loading reduction. Free fungal enzymes demonstrated a swelling of the outer surface of the plant cell walls while removing localized disruptions, resulting in a smooth surface appearance. Cellulosomes produced cell wall surfaces with localized areas of disruption and little surface layer swelling. These studies contribute to the overall understanding of biomass recalcitrance and how combining different enzymatic paradigms may lead to the formulation of new enzyme cocktails to reduce the cost of producing sugars from plant cell wall carbohydrates.

  10. Bioinformatics The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brendel, Volker

    relationships; and to provide an array of computational tools that address biological questions in an easyBioinformatics The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database. The Community Resource for Access, Development and Cell Biology (C.J.L., V.B.), and Department of Statistics (V.B.), Iowa State University, Ames

  11. Disrupting the wall accumulation of human sperm cells by artificial corrugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. A. Guidobaldi; Y. Jeyaram; C. A. Condat; M. Oviedo; I. Berdakin; V. V. Moshchalkov; L. C. Giojalas; A. V. Silhanek; V. I. Marconi

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Many self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamics in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Swimming along walls is beneficial for directing and sorting cells, but may be detrimental if homogeneous populations are desired, such as in counting microchambers. In this work, we characterize the motion of human sperm cells $60 \\mu m$ long, strongly confined to $25 \\mu m$ shallow chambers. We investigate the nature of the cell trajectories between the confining surfaces and their accumulation near the borders. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and bottom surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion in between the two surfaces, as confirmed by depth resolved confocal microscopy studies. We show that the introduction of artificial petal-shaped corrugation in the lateral boundaries removes the tendency of cells to accumulate near the borders, an effect which we hypothesize may be valuable for microfluidic applications in biomedicine.

  12. Uptake and cytotoxic effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.j [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Kanno, Sanae [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are cytotoxic to several cell types. However, the mechanism of CNT toxicity has not been fully studied, and dosimetric analyses of CNT in the cell culture system are lacking. Here, we describe a novel, high throughput method to measure cellular uptake of CNT using turbimetry. BEAS-2B, a human bronchial epithelial cell line, was used to investigate cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and inflammatory effects of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT). The cytotoxicity of MWCNT was higher than that of crocidolite asbestos in BEAS-2B cells. The IC{sub 50} of MWCNT was 12 {mu}g/ml, whereas that of asbestos (crocidolite) was 678 {mu}g/ml. Over the course of 5 to 8 h, BEAS-2B cells took up 17-18% of the MWCNT when they were added to the culture medium at a concentration of 10 {mu}g/ml. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 2, 5, or 10 {mu}g/ml of MWCNT, and total RNA was extracted for cytokine cDNA primer array assays. The culture supernatant was collected for cytokine antibody array assays. Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 increased in a dose dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) also increased in the culture supernatant in response to MWCNT. A phosphokinase array study using lysates from BEAS-2B cells exposed to MWCNT indicated that phosphorylation of p38, ERK1, and HSP27 increased significantly in response to MWCNT. Results from a reporter gene assays using the NF-{kappa}B or AP-1 promoter linked to the luciferase gene in transiently transfected CHO-KI cells revealed that NF-{kappa}B was activated following MWCNT exposure, while AP-1 was not changed. Collectively, MWCNT activated NF-{kappa}B, enhanced phosphorylation of MAP kinase pathway components, and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines in human bronchial epithelial cells.

  13. Narrowing of the coherent population trapping resonance under zone pumping in cells with different characteristics of the wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazakov, G A; Litvinov, A N; Matisov, B G [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that when coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance is excited by a narrow laser beam, the presence of elastic collisions with the cell wall significantly affects the line shape of the CPT-resonance. We have constructed a theoretical model, which is based on averaging over the random Ramsey sequences of the atom dwell time in the beam and dark zones and takes into account the probability of elastic bounce of an atom from the wall.

  14. Down-regulation of four putative arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes from family PF02458 reduces ester-linked ferulate content in rice cell walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piston, Fernando; Uauy, Cristobal; Fu, Lianhai; Langston, James; Labavitch, John; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cell wall in grasses. Keywords Biofuels Á Digestibility Áa broader adaptation of biofuels. One of the limitations foryield and composition for biofuels. Crop Sci 47:2211–2227

  15. Disrupting the wall accumulation of human sperm cells by artificial corrugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. A. Guidobaldi; Y. Jeyaram; C. A. Condat; M. Oviedo; I. Berdakin; V. V. Moshchalkov; L. C. Giojalas; A. V. Silhanek; V. I. Marconi

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamics in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Swimming along walls is beneficial for directing and sorting cells, but may be detrimental if homogeneous populations are desired, such as in counting microchambers. In this work, we characterize the motion of human sperm cells $\\sim$60$\\mu$m long, strongly confined to $\\sim$20$\\mu$m shallow chambers. We investigate the nature of the cell trajectories between the confining surfaces and their accumulation near the borders. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and bottom surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion in between the two surfaces. We show that the introduction of artificial petal-shaped corrugation in the lateral boundaries limits the accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. The steady state limit is achieved over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate based on the assumption that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our predictions also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the corrugated chambers than in the non-corrugated ones, which is another practical reason to prefer the former for microfluidic applications in biomedicine.

  16. 1997 Gordon Research Conference on Plant Cell Walls. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehelin, A.

    1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Plant Cell Walls was held at Tilton School, Tilton, New Hampshire, July 18-22, 1997. The conference was well attended with 106 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. In addition to these formal interactions, free time was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  17. Effect of auxin on Golgi-mediated cell wall synthesis in pea stem segments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brummell, D.A.; Maclachlan, G.A.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stem segments of 7 day-old etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings were abraded using carborundum powder. Batches of segments were pulsed in (/sup 3/H) glucose followed by a chase in cold glucose in the presence or absence of 1AA, then homogenized by chopping with a razor blade. A rate-zonal centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient was used to separate dictyosomes and secretory vesicles, and membrane-bound radioactivity determined as a measure of Golgi material in the cytoplasm. The amount of membrane-bound radioactivity was increased in tissues treated with 1AA for 30 min, indicative of an enhanced Golgi content in such segments. This increase thus precedes the sustained increase in auxin-stimulated growth of stem segments which occurs around 35-45 min after exposure to auxin and which is thought to be due to increased cell wall synthesis.

  18. Systems Level Engineering of Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis to Improve Biofuel Feedstock Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Samuel

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Our new regulatory model of cell wall biosynthesis proposes original network architecture with several newly incorporated components. The mapped set of protein-DNA interactions will serve as a foundation for 1) understanding the regulation of a complex and integral plant component and 2) the manipulation of crop species for biofuel and biotechnology purposes. This study revealed interesting and novel aspects of grass growth and development and further enforce the importance of a grass model system. By functionally characterizing a suite of genes, we have begun to improve the sparse model for transcription regulation of biomass accumulation in grasses. In the process, we have advanced methodology and brachy molecular genetic tools that will serve as valuable community resource.

  19. Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption onto natural microbial mats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption Received 8 May 2004; received in revised form 7 January 2005; accepted 15 February 2005 Abstract Adsorption. The occurrence of M-type tetrad effect suggests that REE form inner sphere complexes during their adsorption onto

  20. Improved CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell with structured single-walled carbon nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Improved CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell with structured single-walled carbon nanotubes Shigeo of Tokyo, Japan 113-8656 2 Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, Finland 3, mechanical, and thermal properties are expected to be the most promising materials for next-generation energy

  1. Gene expression and enzyme activity of cell wall degrading enzymes in the latex of opium poppy Papaver somniferum L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilatzke, Innes Flora Christina

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of pharmaceuticals. The continuous network allows large volumes of the latex to be released from the plant upon wounding, and is the preferred method for collecting the latex for the illegal drug trade. By studying the process of laticifer cell wall degradation...

  2. Controlled Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Application to CNT-Si Heterojunction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Controlled Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Application to CNT-Si Heterojunction Solar assembly of SWNTs for SWNT-Si heterojunction solar cells will be discussed. We found the reversible to be encapsulated diatomic N2 molecules interior of SWNTs with the content of 1 at %. We address that the nitrogen

  3. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property study of complex biological cell walls. A unique feature of this approach is that both microscopes allow the biological samples to be examined in their natural fluid (water) environment.

  4. New Combined Laser Ablation Platform Determines Cell Wall Chemistry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has designed and developed a combined laser ablation/pulsed sample introduction/mass spectrometry platform that integrates pyrolysis and/or laser ablation with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Using this apparatus, we can measure the cell wall chemical composition of untreated biomass materials. Understanding the chemical composition of untreated biomass is key to both the biochemical and thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels. In the biochemical conversion process, the new technique provides a better understanding of the chemistry of lignin and will improve accessibility to plant sugars. In thermochemical conversion, the information provided by the new technique may help to reduce the formation of unwanted byproducts during gasification. NREL validated the ability of the system to detect pyrolysis products from plant materials using poplar, a potentially high-impact bioenergy feedstock. In the technique, biomass vapors are produced by laser ablation using the 3rd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (355 nm). The resulting vapors are entrained in a free jet expansion of helium, then skimmed and introduced into an ionization region. REMPI is used to ionize the vapors because it is highly sensitive for detecting lignin and aromatic metabolites. The laser ablation method was used to selectively volatilize specific plant tissues and detect lignin-based products from the vapors with enhanced sensitivity. This will allow the determination of lignin distribution in future biomass studies.

  5. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klopffleisch, Karsten [University of Cologne; Phan, Nguyen [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Panstruga, Ralph [Max-Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research; Uhrig, Joachim [University of Cologne; Jones, Alan M [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of G{alpha}, G{beta}, and G{gamma} subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification.

  6. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  7. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  8. Application of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes as Transparent Electrodes in Cu(In,Ga)Se2-Based Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, M.; Barnes, T.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Rumbles, G.; Coutts, T. J.; Weeks, C.; Glatkowski, P.; Levitsky, I.; Peltola, J.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new thin-film solar cell structure in which the traditional transparent conductive oxide electrode (ZnO) is replaced by a transparent conductive coating consisting of a network of bundled single-wall carbon nanotubes. Optical transmission properties of these coatings are presented in relation to their electrical properties (sheet resistance), along with preliminary solar cell results from devices made using CuIn1-xGaxSe2 thin-film absorber materials. Achieving an energy conversion efficiency of >12% and a quantum efficiency of {approx}80% demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. A discussion of the device structures will be presented considering the physical properties of the new electrodes comparing current-voltage results from the new solar cell structure and those from standard ZnO/CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Mo solar cells.

  9. Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

  10. Characterization of a bifunctional cell wall hydrolase in the mobile genetic element ICEBsJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Tyler A. (Tyler Anderson)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) are mobile genetic elements that are normally found stably integrated into bacterial chromosomes, but under certain situations can excise and transfer to a recipient cell through ...

  11. Self-Assembled Micro-Honeycomb Network of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    exploited for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells encompassing all aspects,4-17 e.g. photocurrent solution,26,27 of which the complicated solution preparation induces defects and degradation of SWNTs. #12

  12. Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glass, N Louise [UC Berkeley

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    N. Louise Glass from the University of California, Berkeley, presents a talk titled "Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  13. Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, N Louise [UC Berkeley] [UC Berkeley

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    N. Louise Glass from the University of California, Berkeley, presents a talk titled "Systems Biology Approaches to Dissecting Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Poplus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  14. Single-walled carbon nanotube assemblies for solar cells Kehang Cui 1, Shohei Chiashi1, Esko I. Kauppinen2, Shigeo Maruyama1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Single-walled carbon nanotube assemblies for solar cells Kehang Cui 1, Shohei Chiashi1, Esko I Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, Finland The unique nanoscale physical and chemical generation energy and electronics. However, the much inferior micro/macroscale properties have been hindering

  15. Role of Sulfhydryl Sites on Bacterial Cell Walls in the Biosorption, Mobility and Bioavailability of Mercury and Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myneni, Satish C.; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Fein, Jeremy

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this exploratory study is to provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of the impact of bacterial sulfhydryl groups on the bacterial uptake, speciation, methylation and bioavailability of Hg and redox changes of uranium. The relative concentration and reactivity of different functional groups present on bacterial surfaces will be determined, enabling quantitative predictions of the role of biosorption of Hg under the physicochemical conditions found at contaminated DOE sites.The hypotheses we propose to test in this investigation are as follows- 1) Sulfhydryl groups on bacterial cell surfaces modify Hg speciation and solubility, and play an important role, specifically in the sub-micromolar concentration ranges of metals in the natural and contaminated systems. 2) Sulfhydryl binding of Hg on bacterial surfaces significantly influences Hg transport into the cell and the methylation rates by the bacteria. 3) Sulfhydryls on cell membranes can interact with hexavalent uranium and convert to insoluble tetravalent species. 4) Bacterial sulfhydryl surface groups are inducible by the presence of metals during cell growth. Our studies focused on the first hypothesis, and we examined the nature of sulfhydryl sites on three representative bacterial species: Bacillus subtilis, a common gram-positive aerobic soil species; Shewanella oneidensis, a facultative gram-negative surface water species; and Geobacter sulfurreducens, an anaerobic iron-reducing gram-negative species that is capable of Hg methylation; and at a range of Hg concentration (and Hg:bacterial concentration ratio) in which these sites become important. A summary of our findings is as follows- ? Hg adsorbs more extensively to bacteria than other metals. Hg adsorption also varies strongly with pH and chloride concentration, with maximum adsorption occurring under circumneutral pH conditions for both Cl-bearing and Cl-free systems. Under these conditions, all bacterial species tested exhibit almost complete removal of Hg from the experimental solutions at relatively low bacterial concentrations. ? Synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopic studies of these samples indicate that the structure and the coordination environment of Hg surface complexes on bacterial cell walls change dramatically- with sulfhydryls as the dominant Hg-binding groups in the micromolar and submicromolar range, and carboxyls and phosphoryls dominating at high micromolar concentrations. ? Hg interactions change from a trigonal or T-shaped HgS{sub 3} complex to HgS or HgS{sub 2} type complexes as the Hg concentration increases in the submicromolar range. Although all bacterial species studied exhibited the same types of coordination environments for Hg, the relative concentrations of the complexes change as a function of Hg concentration.

  16. Nutritional evaluation of tortillas and chips form quality protein maize and food grade maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sproule, Anastasia Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    food grade maize and quality protein maize was determined. Amino acid composition of the original grains was deter- mined using an ion exchange chromatography method with a modified Beckman model 120'C amino acid analyzer (Spackman et al, 1958...NUTRITIONAL EVALUATION OF TORTILLAS AND CHIPS FROM QUALITY PROTEIN MAIZE AND FOOD GRADE MAIZE A Thesis by ANASTASIA MARIE SPROULE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  17. Fertility Relationships in Maize-Teosinte Hybrids. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John S. (John Sinclair)

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fertility Relationships in Maize-Teosinte Hybrids JOHN S. ROGERS Department of Agronomy LIBRARY n & M. COLLEGE OF TEXAS Digest This bulletin reports the degree of fertility found in crosses of maize with several different varieties... of teosinte. The teosintes used were the Mexican varieties Durango, Chalco, Nobogame and New, and the Guatemalan varieties Huixta and Florida. Hybrids of the Mexican teosinte varieties with maize exhibit approximaiely normal fertility, although...

  18. Geometric frequency shift for electric dipole searches with trapped spin-1/2 particles in general fields and measurement cells of arbitrary shape with smooth or rough walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Steyerl; C. Kaufman; G. Müller; R. Golub

    2015-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The important role of geometric phases in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron, using Ramsey separated oscillatory field nuclear magnetic resonance, was first investigated by Pendlebury $\\textit{et al.}$ [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{70}$, 032102 (2004)]. Their analysis was based on the Bloch equations. In subsequent work using the spin density matrix Lamoreaux and Golub [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{71}$, 032104 (2005)] showed the usual relation between the frequency shifts and the correlation functions of the fields seen by trapped particles in general fields (Redfield theory). More recently we presented a solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for spin-$1/2$ particles in circular cylindrical traps with smooth walls and exposed to arbitrary fields [Steyerl $\\textit{et al.}$, Phys.Rev. A $\\mathbf{89}$, 052129 (2014)]. Here we extend this work to show how the Redfield theory follows directly from the Schr\\"odinger equation solution and include wall roughness, cylindrical trap geometry with arbitrary cross section, and field perturbations that do not, in the frame of the moving particles, average to zero in time and which, therefore, do not satisfy the prerequisites of the statistical approach based on the spin-density matrix. We show by direct, detailed, calculation the agreement of the results from the Schr\\"odinger equation with the Redfield theory for the cases of a rectangular cell with specular walls and of a circular cell with diffuse reflecting walls.

  19. Characterization of RopGEFs in maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ah Young

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dedicator of Cytokinesis) proteins lack the conventional DHThe lack of correspondence between maize proteins recognizedlack of chaperones leading to incorrect folding of proteins

  20. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

  1. Fertility Relationships in Maize-Teosinte Hybrids.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John S. (John Sinclair)

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variety reveals that the maize parent has a pronounced effect on the degree of sterility, and that a definite linkage exists between sterility and marker genes on chromosome 4. These results indicate that some factor or factors on the fourth chromosome... hybrids were backcrossed to recessive maize stocks. In this manner, by classification of the backcross progenies, any linkage of pollen sterility with marker genes on particular chromosomes might be determined. All chromosomes, with the exception...

  2. Controlled CVD Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Application to CNT-Si Heterojunction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Solar Cells Shigeo Maruyama Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo 113 controlled assembly of SWNTs for SWNT-Si heterojunction solar cells will be discussed. We found was found to be encapsulated diatomic N2 molecules interior of SWNTs with the content of 1 at %. We address

  3. V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for endocytic recycling of a yeast cell wall stress sensor, Wsc1p

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Kazuma; Saito, Mayu; Nagashima, Makiko; Kojima, Ai; Nishinoaki, Show [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Toshima, Junko Y., E-mail: yama_jun@aoni.waseda.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Wakamatsu-cho 2-2, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Research Center for RNA Science, RIST, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Toshima, Jiro, E-mail: jtosiscb@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan) [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Research Center for RNA Science, RIST, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan)

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •A targeted genome screen identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p recycling. •V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for Wsc1p recycling. •Activity of V-ATPase might be required for cargo recognition by the retromer complex. -- Abstract: Wsc1p is a major cell wall sensor protein localized at the polarized cell surface. The localization of Wsc1p is maintained by endocytosis and recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface, but changes to the vacuole when cells are subjected to heat stress. Exploiting this unique property of Wsc1p, we screened for yeast single-gene deletion mutants exhibiting defects in Wsc1p trafficking. By expressing 3GFP-tagged Wsc1p in mutants with deleted genes whose function is related to intracellular trafficking, we identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p trafficking, impaired respectively in endocytic internalization, multivesicular body sorting, the GARP complex, endosomal maturation/vacuolar fusion, and V-ATPase. Interestingly, deletion of the VPH1 gene, encoding the V{sub o} subunit of vacuolar-type H{sup +}-ATPase (V-ATPase), led to mis-localization of Wsc1p from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. In addition, disruption of other V-ATPase subunits (vma mutants) also caused defects of Wsc1p trafficking and vacuolar acidification similar to those seen in the vph1? mutant. Moreover, we found that deletion of the VPS26 gene, encoding a subunit of the retromer complex, also caused a defect in Wsc1p recycling and mis-localization of Wsc1p to the vacuole. These findings clarified the previously unidentified Wsc1p recycling pathway and requirement of V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification for Wsc1p recycling.

  4. An in-vivo study of electrical charge distribution on the bacterial cell wall by Atomic Force Microscopy in vibrating force mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Marliere; Samia Dhahri

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an in-vivo electromechanical Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study of charge distribution on the cell wall of Gram plus Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria, naturally adherent to a glass substrate, in physiological conditions. The method presented in this paper relies on a detailed study of AFM approach-retract curves giving the variation of the interaction force versus distance between tip and sample. In addition to classical height and mechanical (as stiffness) data, mapping of local electrical properties, as bacterial surface charge, was proved to be feasible at a spatial resolution better than few tens of nanometers. This innovative method relies on the measurement of the cantilever's surface stress through its deflection far from (higher than 10nm) the repulsive contact zone. The variations of surface stress come from modification of electrical surface charge of the cantilever (as in classical electrocapillary measurements) likely stemming from its charging during contact of both tip and sample electrical double layers. This method offers an important improvement in local electrical and electrochemical measurements at the solid-liquid interface particularly in high-molarity electrolytes when compared to technics focused on the direct use of electrostatic force. It thus opens a new way to directly investigate in-situ biological electrical surface processes involved in numerous practical and fundamental problems as bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, microbial fuel cell, etc.

  5. Evaluation of Argentine maize hybrids and exotic x temperate testcrosses across environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochs, Brett Allen

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is grown in a wide range of environments and altitudes worldwide. Maize has transitioned from open pollinated varieties to single cross hybrids over the last century. While maize production and genetic gain has increased, genetic...

  6. Evaluation of Argentine maize hybrids and exotic x temperate testcrosses across environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochs, Brett Allen

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is grown in a wide range of environments and altitudes worldwide. Maize has transitioned from open pollinated varieties to single cross hybrids over the last century. While maize production and genetic gain has increased, genetic...

  7. Genetic Combining Analysis of Food-Grade Maize: Colored and Quality Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahan, Adam Lyle

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Maize genetic diversity includes an array of kernel colors (red, blue, purple) with blue concentrated in the aleurone and red primarily in the pericarp. Quality protein maize (QPM) is improved over normal maize in regards to grain concentration...

  8. The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cone, Karen

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference was held February 27 - March 2, 2008 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. As the golden anniversary of the Conference and coinciding with the release of a draft of the maize genome sequence, this was a special meeting. To publicize this unique occasion, meeting organizers hosted a press conference, which was attended by members of the press representing science and non-science publications, and an evening reception at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, where the draft sequence was announced and awards were presented to Dr. Mary Clutter and Senator Kit Bond to thank them for their outstanding contributions to maize genetics and genomics research. As usual, the Conference provided an invigorating forum for exchange of recent research results in many areas of maize genetics, e.g., cytogenetics, development, molecular genetics, transposable element biology, biochemical genetics, and genomics. Results were shared via both oral and poster presentations. Invited talks were given by four distinguished geneticists: Vicki Chandler, University of Arizona; John Doebley, University of Wisconsin; Susan Wessler, University of Georgia; and Richard Wilson, Washington University. There were 46 short talks and 241 poster presentations. The Conference was attended by over 500 participants. This included a large number of first-time participants in the meeting and an increasingly visible presence by individuals from underrepresented groups. Although we do not have concrete counts, there seem to be more African American, African and Hispanic/Latino attendees coming to the meeting than in years past. In addition, this meeting attracted many participants from outside the U.S. Student participation continues to be hallmark of the spirit of free exchange and cooperation characteristic of the maize genetics community. With the generous support provided by DOE, USDA NSF, and corporate/private donors, organizers were able to defray lodging and meal costs for 133 graduate and undergraduate students and 66 postdocs

  9. A major gene for leaf cadmium accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soric, Roberta; Loncaric, Zdenko; Kovacevic, Vlado; Brkic, Ivan; Simic, Domagoj

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    programs to select low Cd accumulators in maize. This can beselection for high Cd (hyper)accumulators in maize can be of

  10. A laboratory screening technique for evaluating the reaction of selected maize cultivars (Zea mays L.) to maize rayado fino virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, Glenn Earl

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s L. ) to Maize Rayado Fino Virus. (December 1979) Glenn Earl Skinner, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Anton J. Bockholt Fifty inbred lines and 8 single-cross maize hybrids (Zea m~as L. ) were inoculated with maize... or newly developed varieties (7) . Th '. tt* th ill ' gp g 1 ll th tyl 1th l~l 'ourna l. Attempts have been made to gain information on the performance of U. S. maize germplasm in areas with a high incidence of MRFV, but these attempts have not been...

  11. Gene expression in physically impeded maize roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ying-Fei

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Physical Impedance: Overview. Significance in agriculture. Morphological changes of cmp roots in response to physical impedance Plant hormones and physical hnpedance. Ca2+, Sitpud Transduction and Physical Impedance. . . . . III MATERIALS AND METHODS.... , 1994; Allen and Tiwari 1991) and calsequestrin (Chou et al. , 1989; Krause et al. , 1989). CHAPTER IH MATERIALS AND METHODS Germination and Growth Conditions Plant material Maize (Zea mays L. ) cv TX 5855 was used as the research material. Seeds...

  12. Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using statistical estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, E.

    This study estimates statistical models emulating maize yield responses to changes in temperature and

  13. Original article Foliar senescence in maize plants grown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Foliar senescence in maize plants grown under different water regimes Arturo) Abstract - The leaf ontogeny of potted maize plants subjected to severe water stress was carried out and water-stressed plants received 100 and 50 % of the water evapotranspired, respectively. After 30 days

  14. Influence of maize genotype on rate of ruminal starch degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of maize genotype on rate of ruminal starch degradation B Michalet-Doreau1 M Champion2). These varying degradation rates in the rumen can be attributed not only to the chemical nature of the starch influence ruminal starch degradation. The trial was performed on two maize cultivars characterised

  15. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  16. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Oliver E. (Cross Plains, WI); Pan, David (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  17. Preharvest aflatoxin in maize genotypes under inoculation with Aspergillus flavus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Kerry L.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................... 94 Discussion and Conclusions............................................ 119 VI SUMMARY .............................................................................. 121 REFERENCES... of variance for aflatoxin concentration of maize hybrids inoculated with A. flavus isolates at three locations in 2004.................. 94 5-2 Analysis of variance for aflatoxin concentration of maize hybrids inoculated with A. flavus isolates across...

  18. Biol 458 Cell Wall p. 1 THE PLANT CELL WALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constabel, Peter

    , flax, hemp) - health and dietary fiber (Ã?-glucans and cholesterol, insulin) - source of solar energy

  19. Enhancement of the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell with multi-wall carbon nanotubes/polypyrrole composite counter electrodes prepared by electrophoresis/electrochemical polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Jun; Niu, Hai-jun; Wen, Hai-lin [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Department of Macromolecular Material and Engineering, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150086 (China); Wu, Wen-jun; Zhao, Ping [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Cheng; Bai, Xu-duo [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Department of Macromolecular Material and Engineering, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150086 (China); Wang, Wen, E-mail: haijunniu@hotmail.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The overall energy conversion efficiency of the DSSC employing the MWCNT/PPy CE reached 3.78%. Compared with a reference DSSC using single MWCNT film CE with efficiency of 2.68%, the energy conversion efficiency was increased by 41.04%. Highlights: ? MWCNT/PPy composite film prepared by electrodeposition layer by layer was used as counter electrode in DSSC. ? The overall energy conversion efficiency of the DSSC was 3.78% by employing the composite film. ? The energy conversion efficiency increased by 41.04% compared with efficiency of 2.68% by using the single MWCNT film. ? We analyzed the mechanism and influence factor of electron transfer in the composite electrode by EIS. - Abstract: For the purpose of replacing the precious Pt counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with higher energy conversion efficiency, multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polypyrrole (PPy) double layers film counter electrode (CE) was fabricated by electrophoresis and cyclic voltammetry (CV) layer by layer. Atom force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) demonstrated the morphologies of the composite electrode and Raman spectroscopy verified the PPy had come into being. The overall energy conversion efficiency of the DSSC employing the MWCNT/PPy CE reached 3.78%. Compared with a reference DSSC using single MWCNT film CE with efficiency of 2.68%, the energy conversion efficiency was increased by 41.04%. The result of impedance showed that the charge transfer resistance R{sub ct} of the MWCNT/PPy CE had the lowest value compared to that of MWCNT or PPy electrode. These results indicate that the composite film with high conductivity, high active surface area, and good catalytic properties for I{sub 3}{sup ?} reduction can potentially be used as the CE in a high-performance DSSC.

  20. Rajaram Maize Products RMP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Raghuraji AgroRajaram Maize Products RMP

  1. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Maize Starch Branching Isoforms: Modulation of Starch Branching Enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiltinan, Mark J.; Thompson, Donald

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of Starch Branching enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties.

  2. Covering Walls With Fabrics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TDOC . Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1227 WALLS with ;FABRICS Texas Agricultural Extension Service . The Texas A&M University System Daniel C. Pfannstiel, Director, College Station, Texas Covering Walls with Fabrics* When tastefully applied, fabrics... it is applied, fabric-covered walls improve the sound-absorbing acoustical properties of a room. Also, fabrics can be used for covering walls of either textured gypsum board or wood paneling. Home decorating magazines are good sources for ideas about fabric...

  3. aged maize seed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants best adapted to an area are native ones growing... Welch, Tommy G.; Hafercamp, Marshall R. 2001-01-04 31 COMPARISON OF THREE CEREALS : WHEAT, MAIZE, BARLEY AND...

  4. Characterization of maize testing locations in eastern and southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maideni, Francis W.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ???????..?...?.??. 15 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ??????????..??. 26 SUMMARY????????????????????... 52 III PHENOTYPIC AND GENETIC ANALYSIS OF MAIZE TESTING EVALUATIONS IN EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA????????????.?..................................... 94... INTRODUCTION????????????.???..??? 94 REVIEW OF LITERATURE????????..???.??.. 96 MATERIALS AND METHODS???????..?...?.??.. 98 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ???........................................ 100 SUMMARY??????????????????????. 158 IV...

  5. Characterization of maize testing locations in eastern and southern Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maideni, Francis W.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The region of eastern and southern Africa is very diverse in environments and agronomic practices. The region has one of the highest per capita consumption of maize (Zea mays. L), which is predominantly produced by smallholder ...

  6. Evaluation of iron-deficiency stress response of maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Yim Hong

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nutrient solution system with siliceous ferrihydrite as the Fe source was developed to screen 20 maize cultivars in a growth chamber for their Fe-deficiency stress tolerances. The Fe-supplying power of the siliceous ferrihydrite was compared...

  7. Food quality and properties of quality protein maize.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leal Diaz, Ana Maria

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    grade maize (W-FGM)??????????.. 49 14 Pericarp removal of corn alkaline-cooked 20 min with no steeping and cooked at optimum cooking time???????... 53 15 Masa subjective evaluation for machinability, hardness and stickiness... and has the highest genetic yield potential of all the cereal grains (CIMMYT 2001). In the year 2002, corn was the leading cereal crop with 29.7% of the world cereal production followed by rice and wheat (FAOSTAT 2003). Maize protein has deficiencies...

  8. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  9. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  10. Geometric frequency shift for electric dipole searches with trapped spin-1/2 particles in general fields and measurement cells of arbitrary shape with smooth or rough walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyerl, A; Müller, G; Golub, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The important role of geometric phases in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron, using Ramsey separated oscillatory field nuclear magnetic resonance, was first investigated by Pendlebury $\\textit{et al.}$ [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{70}$, 032102 (2004)]. Their analysis was based on the Bloch equations. In subsequent work using the spin density matrix Lamoreaux and Golub [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{71}$, 032104 (2005)] showed the usual relation between the frequency shifts and the correlation functions of the fields seen by trapped particles in general fields (Redfield theory). More recently we presented a solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for spin-$1/2$ particles in circular cylindrical traps with smooth walls and exposed to arbitrary fields [Steyerl $\\textit{et al.}$, Phys.Rev. A $\\mathbf{89}$, 052129 (2014)]. Here we extend this work to show how the Redfield theory follows directly from the Schr\\"odinger equation solution and include wall roughness, cylindrical trap geometry with arbitra...

  11. Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. — Aphids populations on maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. — Aphids populations on maize Sulaiman HAMID Sind Sugar Industry Research Institute, 14/A, Latifabad III, Hyderabad Sind, Pakistan SUMMARY Maize in Pakistan is attacked by Myzus obtusirostris David, Narayanan & Rajasingh, Rhopalosiphum

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Little fertilizer response but high N loss risk of maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of biogas. The production and use of maize for biogas is more cost efficient compared with other crops and the cultivation, harvest and storage of maize is well established with farmers. Consequently, the biogas boom has

  13. PEP-carboxylase activity supports organic acid metabolism of maize (Zea mays) under salt stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatzig, Sarah Vanessa; Kumar, Ashwani; Neubert, Anja; Schubert, Sven

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    physical basis for improving salt resistance in maize. Inand their expression under salt stress. J. Plant Physiol.may have a function for the salt resistance of maize during

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent maize tolerance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MaizeGDB, the community database for maize genetics and genomics Summary: are also necessary for many industries where corn content is less apparent....

  15. Webs of Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minoru Eto; Youichi Isozumi; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Webs of domain walls are constructed as 1/4 BPS states in d=4, N=2 supersymmetric U(Nc) gauge theories with Nf hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation. Web of walls can contain any numbers of external legs and loops like (p,q) string/5-brane webs. We find the moduli space M of a 1/4 BPS equation for wall webs to be the complex Grassmann manifold. When moduli spaces of 1/2 BPS states (parallel walls) and the vacua are removed from M, the non-compact moduli space of genuine 1/4 BPS wall webs is obtained. All the solutions are obtained explicitly and exactly in the strong gauge coupling limit. In the case of Abelian gauge theory, we work out the correspondence between configurations of wall web and the moduli space CP^{Nf-1}.

  16. Tokamak reactor first wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

    1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

  17. Diameter Dependence of Vertically-Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Use as Counter Electrodes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Use as Counter Electrodes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Ronald Hobson,1,2,3 Kehang Cui,1 Chiba TakaakiJapan Program, Rice University, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are electrochemical. In comparison to conventional Si-based solar cells, the manufacturing cost of DSSCs are substantially low

  18. Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

  19. Rammered Earth Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    FIELD MEASUREMENT OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON RETAINING WALLS A Thesis by Michael Riggins Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Civil Engineering FIELD MEASUREMENT OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON RETAINING WALLS A Thesis by Michael Riggins Approved as to style and content by: Cha rman of Committee Memb r Head of Departm t P Etc Member August 1974 ABSTRACT...

  20. Energetics of maize C4 physiology under light limiting conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellasio, Chandra

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C4 plants have a biochemical carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) that increases CO2 concentration around Rubisco in the bundle sheath (BS). Maize CCM has two CO2 delivery pathways to the Bundle Sheath (BS) (respectively via malate, MAL or aspartate...

  1. New retaining wall design criteria based on lateral earth pressure measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, William Vincent

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on full scale retaining walls. The first year ( 3 ) was devoted to selecting earth pressure cells which would provide both accuracy and long term reliability. Nine cell types were considered. Four types were field tested. Two types, Terra Tec... and Geonor, were selected for installa- tion in the cantilever test wall during the second year ( 4 ) of the study. Terra Tec cells were selected for installation in the precast panel wall during the third year ( 7 ) of the study. The instrumenta- tion...

  2. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  3. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daido, Ryuji; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, $m \\simeq 10^8 -10^{13}$ GeV and $f \\simeq 10^{13} - 10^{16}$ GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  4. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  5. Thin porridges (atoles) prepared from maize and sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivas Rodriguez, Nancy Esther

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ". Traditionally atoles are prepared from maize; however, they are also made from oats, rice, wheat and occasionally, barley. Atole, a creamy and free-flowing product, is prepared from wet milled pastes or dry milled flours (mostly endosperm fractions) which...; rice-like products; noodles; and snacks (Rooney and Murty 1982). It can also be used for production of many non-food items. For example, some industrial uses include aluminium ore refining, building materials, charcoal bri quettes and foundry...

  6. THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S E

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  7. Vol. 82, No. 4, 2005 431 Phosphorus Concentrations and Flow in Maize Wet-Milling Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gluten meal (CGM) and corn gluten feed (CGF) is important to the maize wet-milling industry. High [CGM]). CGF is produced from mixing heavy steep- water with maize fiber (Fig. 1); it has high fiber and CGM is important to the economic viability of the wet-milling industry because it partially offsets

  8. 96 Journal of Student Research in Environmental Science at Appalachian Genetically Modified Maize (Bt corn) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    to produce their own pesticides or insecticides. The engineering of genetically modified food is a rel96 Journal of Student Research in Environmental Science at Appalachian Genetically Modified Maize the short-term effects of genetically modified (GM) maize, specifically MON810 and MON863, on laboratory

  9. Estimating a Nucleotide Substitution Rate for Maize from Polymorphism at a Major Domestication Locus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doebley, John

    Estimating a Nucleotide Substitution Rate for Maize from Polymorphism at a Major Domestication To estimate a rate for single nucleotide substitutions for maize (Zea mays ssp. mays), we have taken advantage ge- nealogy, we have derived estimates for the nucleotide substitution rate for the tb1 intergenic

  10. PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATION OF MAIZE -!-SOYA-BEAN DIETS IN LARGE WHITE AND HYPOR PIGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SUMMARY PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATION OF MAIZE -!- SOYA-BEAN DIETS IN LARGE WHITE AND HYPOR PIGS Using maize + cooked soya-bean diets containing y.5 p. 100 crude protein and o.96 p. 100 lysine, two types nécessaires pour déceler les causes de sa moins bonne utilisation. SUMMARY UTILIZATION OF HORSE-BEANS

  11. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other model elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  12. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Semenoff; V. Semenoff; Fei Zhou

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  13. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semenoff, G W; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  14. Liquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    with existing technology · Size of plasma devices and power plants can be substantially reduced High PoloidalLiquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets Mohamed Abdou Professor, Mechanical as part of the US Restructured Fusion Program Strategy to enhance innovation · Natural Questions

  15. Oven wall panel construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

    1980-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  16. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  17. Product Sheet Wall Mount Lift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Product Sheet Wall Mount Lift Ergotron® Neo-FlexTM 870-05-061, rev. 12/11/07 www. Less effort. Feel the difference. Add greater range of movement to your LCD display or TV with the Neo-Flex Wall Mount Lift! CF patented lift-and-pivot motion technology adjusts with a light touch. Raise

  18. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall.

  19. Photovoltaic modules integrated with a metal curtain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshino, M.; Nakada, N.; Mori, T.; Yamagishi, K.; Yoshida, S. [YKK Corp., Kurobe, Toyama (Japan); Higashi, Y.; Shirasawa, K. [KYOCERA Corp., Yohkaichi, Shiga (Japan)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated photovoltaic system for buildings has many advantages. To realize building integration of photovoltaics, the authors have initially designed a PV module integrated with a metal curtain wall. PV modules are installed as spandrel panels and consist of long and slender PV sub-modules. These sub-modules have an encapsulated structure consisting of: glass, EVA, solar cells, EVA, aluminum base plate. The authors also present initial PV performance data from the experimental wall. In this wall, almost the same maximum P{sub max} of 64 W/m{sup 2} was obtained and the module temperature was approximately 10 C lower compared with conventional superstrate-type PV modules which have 1.3 times the solar cells of this module. Moreover, aesthetic requirements for this module are discussed in this paper.

  20. Engineering Biomaterials for Stem Cell Culture through the Identification of Novel Peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Lauren Elizabeth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a rotating-wall vessel bioreactor. In Vitro Cell Dev Biolin a cell- collagen-bioreactor culture system. Brain Res Devrotating wall vessel bioreactor. In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim

  1. Farmers' Subjective Valuation of Subsistence Crops: The Case of Traditional Maize in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Aslihan; Taylor, J. Edward

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    genetica del maiz en Mexico. Programa de Estudios del Cambioin lowland tropical Mexico. World Development, 34(1):113–Central Valleys of Oaxaca, Mexico. Human Ecology, 34(2):249–

  2. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different corn hybrids (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lammoglia Villagomez, Agustin

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different agronomic and grain quality characteristics of 106 corn hybrids. A randomized split-plot design with 3 replications was used. The virus isolate obtained...

  3. Price discovery in the wholesale markets for maize and beans in Uganda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuteesa, Annette

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , as a result of competition between markets, is not known and questions of market effectiveness still stand. This study examines market efficiency based upon response to price signals across Ugandan markets. We focus on information exchange for maize...

  4. Training agricultural scientists at the International Center for the Improvement of Maize and Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote?, Michael E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRAINING AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND WHEAT A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael E. Cote Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE August 1986 Major Subject: Agricultural Development Department of Agricultural Education TRAINING AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND WHEAT A...

  5. Construction Guide: Energy Efficient, Durable Walls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Labs | Upper Marlboro, Md High Performance Walls || CZ 3-5 2 INTRODUCTION Low market penetration of energy efficient walls Construction Guide - energy efficient,...

  6. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  7. DefectDomain Wall Interactions in Trigonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Defect­Domain Wall Interactions in Trigonal Ferroelectrics Venkatraman Gopalan,1 Volkmar Dierolf,2 walls in the trigonal ferroelectrics lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. It is shown that extrinsic questions re- garding intrinsic widths, defect­domain wall interactions, and static versus dynamic wall

  8. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  9. Effective Supergravity for Supergravity Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cvetic; N. D. Lambert

    2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the low energy effective action for the Bosonic and Fermionic zero-modes of a smooth BPS Randall-Sundrum domain wall, including the induced supergravity on the wall. The result is a pure supergravity in one lower dimension. In particular, and in contrast to non-gravitational domain walls or domain walls in a compact space, the zero-modes representing transverse fluctuations of domain wall have vanishing action.

  10. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is the preferred method, as it combines manipulation and readout of the domain-wall state. The electrons that take part in the process of readout and manipulation of the domain-wall structure in the nanowire do so through the so-called spin transfer torque: When spin-polarized electrons in the ferromagnet nanowire pass through the domain wall they experience a nonuniform magnetization, and they try to align their spins with the local magnetic moments. The force that the electrons experience has a reaction force counterpart that 'pushes' the local magnetic moments, resulting in movement of the domain wall in the direction of the electron flow through the spin-transfer torque. The forces between the electrons and the local magnetic moments in the ferromagnet also create additional electrical resistance for the electrons passing through the domain wall. By measuring resistance across a segment of the nanowire, one determines if a domain wall is present; i.e., one can read the stored information. The interaction of the spin-polarized electrons with the domain wall in the ferromagnetic nanowire is not very efficient. Even for materials achieving high polarization of the free electrons, it is very difficult to move the magnetic domain wall. Several factors contribute to this problem, with imperfections of the ferromagnetic nanowire that cause domain-wall pinning being the dominant one. Permalloy nanowires, one of the best candidates for domain-wall-based memory and logic devices, require current densities of the order of 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2} in order to move a domain wall from a pinning well. Considering that this current has to pass through a relatively long wire, it is not very difficult to imagine that most of the energy will go to Joule heating. The efficiency of the process - the ratio of the energy converted to domain-wall motion to the total energy consumed - is comparable to that of an incandescent light bulb converting electricity to light. A step towards more efficient domain-wall-based memory devices is the advance of using alternating currents or curren

  11. Lactational responses to postruminal infusions of amino acids in dairy cows fed maize silage, hay or grass silage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lactational responses to postruminal infusions of amino acids in dairy cows fed maize silage, hay-Gilles, 35590 L'Hermitage, France Duodenal infusions of methionine and ly- sine have been shown to increase milk responses of dairy cows to methionine and lysine infusions with 3 other diets based on either maize silage

  12. Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L.) SUN-domain protein gene family: evidence for the existence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Hank W.

    Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L.) SUN- domain protein gene family: evidence for the existence of two divergent classes of SUN proteins in plants Murphy et al. Murphy et al. BMC Plant Biology Access Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L.) SUN-domain protein gene family: evidence

  13. Induction of mutations resistant to maize dwarf mosaic virus in Sorghum bicolor using gamma radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pye, Quentin Niel

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nucleus, surrounded by a double nuclear membrane and containing dark chromatin material and light nuclear sap, snd two grsnal chloroplasts. A pit field (P) is obvious in the cell wall (CW). I aguification: X 26, 040 - . An ultrathin section of 1'G... and is interrupted in three. places by nuclear pores (np). The nuclear sap (ns) can be seen as a lightly staining particulate entity. The orgsnisa- tion of the chloroplast can be seen clearly. Stromsl (sl) and grsnal (gl) lamellae snd osmophilic grsnules (og...

  14. Ratings of Commercial Grain Sorghum Hybrids to the Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, C. Wendell; Frederiksen, Richard A.; Toler, Robert W.; Trampota, Jerry D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Cargill 5665 Intermediate 57. Horizon H -840 Tolerant 14. Cargill 6658 Tolerant 58. Horizon H-850 Intermediate 15. Cargill C 55 Susceptible 59. Horizon H -940 Susceptible 16. Cargill C 60 Tolerant 60. Horizon H-95G Tolerant 17. Cargill 0 70... Susceptible 81. Northrup King 2670 Susceptible 44. OeKalb M-565 Intermediate 82. Richardson Y-100 A Tolerant Maize dwarf Maize dwarf Number / company /hybrid mosaic virus Number/company /hybrid mosaic virus 83. Richardson Y-300 D Tolerant 116. Taylor...

  15. Magnetic domain walls driven by interfacial phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emori, Satoru

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A domain wall in a ferromagnetic material is a boundary between differently magnetized regions, and its motion provides a convenient scheme to control the magnetization state of the material. Domain walls can be confined ...

  16. Analysis of ultra-narrow ferromagnetic domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Paul, David

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    New materials with high magnetic anisotropy will have domains separated by ultra-narrow ferromagnetic walls with widths on the order of a few unit cells, approaching the limit where the elastic continuum approximation often used in micromagnetic simulations is accurate. The limits of this approximation are explored, and the static and dynamic interactions with intrinsic crystalline defects and external driving #12;elds are modeled. The results developed here will be important when considering the stability of ultra-high-density storage media.

  17. Effect of electron temperature anisotropy on near-wall conductivity in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Fengkui, E-mail: fengkuizhang@163.com, E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn; Kong, Lingyi; Zhang, Xueyi; Li, Wei [College of Aerospace and Civil Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Yu, Daren, E-mail: fengkuizhang@163.com, E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn [College of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron velocity distribution in Hall thrusters is anisotropic, which not only makes the sheath oscillate in time, but also causes the sheath to oscillate in space under the condition of low electron temperatures. The spatial oscillation sheath has a significant effect on near-wall transport current. In this Letter, the method of particle-in-cell (2D?+?3?V) was adopted to simulate the effect of anisotropic electron temperatures on near-wall conductivity in a Hall thruster. Results show that the electron-wall collision frequency is within the same order in magnitude for both anisotropic and isotropic electron temperatures. The near-wall transport current produced by collisions between the electrons and the walls is much smaller than experimental measurements. However, under the condition of anisotropic electron temperatures, the non-collision transport current produced by slow electrons which reflected by the spatial oscillation sheath is much larger and closes to measurements.

  18. EFFECT OF HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT ON THE PHYSICAL AND RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF MAIZE STARCHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Technologies Agro-Industrielles" Avenue Michel Crépeau 17042 La Rochelle - France Tel : (33) 05 46 45 86 15 Fax and processing time, on the structural and rheological properties of the native maize starches were described formulated foodstuffs. It constitutes an important source of energy and contributes to the structure

  19. Studies on pests and their natural enemies in maize and sorghum in Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sequeira, Ronaldo Antonio

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the production of maize and sorghum in Honduras (Navarro et al. 1979). Fall armyworm (shel, ~S odo ter ~ frurri e ~ de IJ E. Smith), is the ' et pest in both crops in Honduras (Andrews 1980, 1984) . The neotropical cornstalk borer. (NCB), 0 iatraea 1 ineo 1...

  20. Adaptation of US Maize to Temperature Variations Ethan E. Butler1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    @fas.harvard.edu High temperatures are associated with reduced crop yields1,2 , and predictions for future warming3 have maize is locally adapted to hot temperatures across U.S. counties. Using this spatial adaptation. This result does not ac- count for possible changes in temperature variability or water resources, nor does

  1. Original article Grape marc and maize cobs in heavy lamb diets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    experiment and MCo, MC30 and MC60 in the second. For each diet, the voluntary intake and live weight gain in the second experiment, but in diets MC30 and MC60 the digestibility of GE was lower (P MCO result was obtained with the MC30 diet (70 gld higher than MCO). grape marc I maize cob I heavy lamb I

  2. agronomie: agriculture and environment Nitrogen uptake capacities of maize and sorghum crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    agronomie: agriculture and environment Nitrogen uptake capacities of maize and sorghum crops to a larger quantity of intercepted radiation. The efficiency of transforming intercepted energy into aerial nitrogen input should enable this species to grow in extensive cropping conditions. Moreover, the higher N

  3. Erratum to: Neonicotinoid insecticides translocated in guttated droplets of seed-treated maize and wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erratum to: Neonicotinoid insecticides translocated in guttated droplets of seed-treated maize Gasur and the fungicide Efa of the treated seed in triticale have to be reduced by the factor 100 (which corresponds to the recommended application rate): Seeds of triticale were treated with a combination

  4. Gene galaxies in the maize genome Virginia Walbot* and Dmitri A. Petrov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrov, Dmitri

    Commentary Gene galaxies in the maize genome Virginia Walbot* and Dmitri A. Petrov Department of higher eukary- otic genomes yielded the surprise that despite hundreds of millions of years in gene number, eukaryotic genome size varies over 5 orders of magnitude (4), a paradoxical feature

  5. Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

  6. Analysis of Rotating Collectors from the Private Region of JET with Carbon Wall and Metallic ITER-Like Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Rotating Collectors from the Private Region of JET with Carbon Wall and Metallic ITER-Like Wall

  7. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  8. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  9. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  10. Use of poultry manure for amendment of oil-polluted soils in relation to growth of maize (Zea mays L. )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amadi, A. (Rivers State Univ. of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt (Nigeria)) Ue Bari, Y. (Univ. of Ibadan (Nigeria))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of poultry manure for amelioration of oil-polluted soil was investigated by growing maize (Zea mays L.) under two experimental conditions: increasing the poultry manure rate from 0-20 kg ha{sup {minus}1} at 0.03 L/kg oil treatment level; and increasing the rate of oil treatment from 0-0.2 between the rate of poultry manure added and the enhancement of maize growth. But only a 16-kg ha{sup {minus}1} poultry manure rate and above exerted some beneficial effects on the maize growth relative to the unpolluted, unamended soil. Conversely, increasing oil concentration, regardless of the poultry manure level added, depressed maize growth, but only at oil levels of 0.03 L/kg. A positive correlation was recorded between maize height and leaf area growing in oil-treated soil amended with different poultry manure rates and growing in oil-treated amended with 20 kg ha{sup {minus}1} poultry manure. Amending oil-contaminated soils with poultry manure, should possibly improve soil fertility and maize production.

  11. A new closing method for wall flow diesel particulate filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stobbe, P.; Petersen, H.G.; Sorenson, S.C.; Hoej, J.W.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method has been developed to close the ends of a wall flow filter used for removing particulate matter from diesel engine exhaust. In this method, the ends of the honeycomb structure are capped by deforming and closing the ends of the channel walls between the extrusion and firing stages of production. The method increases the amount of filtration area per filter volume for a given cell geometry compared to the traditional plugging method, since the entire length of the honeycomb channels is used for filtration purposes. In addition, use of the capping method has a beneficial effect on the pressure loss characteristics of a filter with a given filtration area. These benefits are illustrated through experimental results.

  12. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  13. Field measurements of lateral earth pressures on a pre-cast panel retaining wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prescott, David Monroe

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    t Member August 1973 ABSTRACT FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON A PRE-CAST PANEL RETAINING WALL. (AUGUST 1973) David Monroe Prescott, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. Harry M. Coyle Terra Tec pneumatic earth pressure... Typical Calibration Curve for Terra Tec Cell 10 15 6 Typical Field Relationsihp Between Zero Gage Reading and Temperature-Pressure Cell 7 Measured Pressure Versus Time, Upper Row of Cells . . . . . . , , . . . . . . . . . . . 16 19 8 Measured...

  14. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  15. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, Henry S. (Cranbury, NJ); Budny, Robert V. (Princeton, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Buttonwood, CT)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

  16. Textural break foundation wall construction modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Steven J. (Kennewick, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

  17. Multiple moving wall dry coal extrusion pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump for transporting particulate material includes a passageway defined on each side between an inlet and an outlet by a moving wall.

  18. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

  19. Multiple cell radiation detector system, and method, and submersible sonde

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Larry O. (Island Park, ID); McIsaac, Charles V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lawrence, Robert S. (Shelley, ID); Grafwallner, Ervin G. (Arco, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple cell radiation detector includes a central cell having a first cylindrical wall providing a stopping power less than an upper threshold; an anode wire suspended along a cylindrical axis of the central cell; a second cell having a second cylindrical wall providing a stopping power greater than a lower threshold, the second cylindrical wall being mounted coaxially outside of the first cylindrical wall; a first end cap forming a gas-tight seal at first ends of the first and second cylindrical walls; a second end cap forming a gas-tight seal at second ends of the first and second cylindrical walls; and a first group of anode wires suspended between the first and second cylindrical walls.

  20. Original article Variability of digestibility criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Variability of digestibility criteria in maize elite hybrids submitted of various in vitro digestibility criteria used to estimate genotypic variation in silage maize elite hybrids and in vitro digestibility of whole-plant and cell-walls were pre- dicted by near infra-red reflectance

  1. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  2. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  3. Two Approaches to Evaluate Drought Tolerance in Maize: Seedling Stress Response and Epicuticular Wax Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeks, Meghyn

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Drought Tolerance in Maize: Seedling Stress Response and Epicuticular Wax Accumulation. (December 2010) Meghyn Brianne Meeks, B.S., Tarleton State University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Seth Murray We wanted to develop rapid and cost... Texas the epicenter of drought in the US (National Climatic Data Center, 2010). National losses in 2008 were an estimated $2.0 billion and more than $5.0 billion in 2009 (National Climatic Data Center, 2010b). Since national agriculture production...

  4. Characterization of slow rusting components in maize (Zea mays) inbreds and single crosses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngoko

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gompertz model The logistic model Materials and methods Results Discussion CHAPTERIII INHERITANCE OF SLOW RUSTING IN MAIZE Introduction Materials and methods Results Discussion CHAPTERIV IDENTIFICATION OF THE COMPONENTS OF SLOW RUSTING... (30) working with oats, found out that the Gompertz transformation was more consistent at detecting degrees of slow rusting than the logistic model. Vanderplank (61) stressed the concept of disease increase as a function of time. This theory implies...

  5. Training agricultural scientists at the International Center for the Improvement of Maize and Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote?, Michael E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agricultural production" (World Food Conference, 1974). At a meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) held at CIMMYT in Mexico during October, 1975, the consensus of those...TRAINING AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND WHEAT A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael E. Cote Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  6. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of response to aflatoxin and secondary traits in maize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Melanie Love

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    GENOTYPIC AND PHENOTYPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF RESPONSE TO AFLATOXIN AND SECONDARY TRAITS IN MAIZE A Dissertation by MELANIE LOVE EDWARDS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by MELANIE LOVE EDWARDS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Javier F. Betr?n Committee Members...

  7. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  8. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  9. Evolution of string-wall networks and axionic domain wall problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi, E-mail: hiramatz@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: saikawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the cosmological evolution of domain walls bounded by strings which arise naturally in axion models. If we introduce a bias in the potential, walls become metastable and finally disappear. We perform two dimensional lattice simulations of domain wall networks and estimate the decay rate of domain walls. By using the numerical results, we give a constraint for the bias parameter and the Peccei-Quinn scale. We also discuss the possibility to probe axion models by direct detection of gravitational waves produced by domain walls.

  10. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  11. You have remarkable ideas. share them at the Falling Walls lab!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    of the falling wallS lab + conference berlin 8/9 nov 2012 aPPlYnoW!www.falling-walls.com/lab THE FALLING WALLS

  12. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High-R Walls Case Study Analysis Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis This report considers a number of promising wall systems with improved...

  13. Domain wall cosmology and multiple accelerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon [CQUeST, Sogang University, Seoul, Korea 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Wonwoo; Nam, Siyoung; Park, Chanyong [CQUeST, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We classify the cosmological behaviors of the domain wall under junctions between two spacetimes in terms of various parameters: cosmological constants of bulk spacetime, a tension of a domain wall, and mass parameters of the black-hole-type metric. Especially, we consider the false-true vacuum-type junctions and the domain wall connecting between an inner AdS space and an outer AdS Reissner-Nordstroem black hole. We find that there exists a solution to the junction equations with multiple accelerations.

  14. Highway noise reduction by barrier walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Murray F

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's Variables 3. Noise Reduction and Noise Reduction Factor 4. Relationship Between Noise Attenuation and d 5. Rettinger's Variables 6. Relationship of Sound-Level Reduction and v 7. Basic Principles in Sound-Transmission Loss 8. The Mass Law Relationship... that the barrier wall is acoustically opaque (i. e. , impermeable to sound waves). Purcell (8) found that the noise transmission loss of a wall was a measure of the ratio of the acoustical energy transmitted through the wall to the acoustical energy incident...

  15. Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions and minerals. Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions and minerals....

  16. Security Walls, LLC, January 14-18, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    their contributions to health and safety at Security Walls. Security Walls uses the Job Hazard Analysis process to address protective force hazards and develop controls. Subject...

  17. Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency Studies Using Laboratory Generated Particles. Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency...

  18. Beautify Your Windows and Glass Walls.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tompkins, Charlotte

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -utside? How do your dqkrie outside of your house? 2 IlnKY color affect , Coloor, De~kn and Tex When choosing draperies to har- monize with a room, consider the room, proportions, exposure, view, walls, floors, furnishings, accessories...

  19. See through walls with Wi-Fi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adib, Fadel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wi-Fi signals are typically information carriers between a transmitter and a receiver. In this thesis, we show that Wi-Fi can also extend our senses, enabling us to see moving objects through walls and behind closed doors. ...

  20. See through walls with WiFi!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adib, Fadel M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wi-Fi signals are typically information carriers between a transmitter and a receiver. In this paper, we show that Wi-Fi can also extend our senses, enabling us to see moving objects through walls and behind closed doors. ...

  1. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagmann, C A

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall} {approx} 1-100 (f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  2. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagmann, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-59, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall{approx}}1-100(f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  3. INTOR impurity control and first wall system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highlights of the recent INTOR effort on examining the key issues of the impurity control/first wall system are summarized. The emphasis of the work was an integrated study of the edge-region physics, plasma-wall interaction, materials, engineering and magnetic considerations associated with the poloidal divertor and pump limiter. The development of limiter and divertor collector plate designs with an acceptable lifetime was a major part of the work.

  4. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  5. The effect of the time of inoculation with Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus on grain sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batte, Robert Dan

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effect of the time of inoculation with Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus on some agronomic charac- teristics of a tolerant and a susceptible grain sorghum hybrid. A completely randomized block design with three replications was util- ized, Mass inoculation... of the plants was accomplished through use of' t' he artist's air'brush procedure. The virus was found to cause reductior: in yield, delay in ma- turity, stunting snd. lowering of test weights of hot'n hybrids. Additional effects on the susceptible hyb. . d...

  6. Molecular characterization of genes regulating fumonisin biosynthesis and development in maize pathogen fusarium verticilliodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagaram, Uma Shankar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    that relative water activity in maize kernels has more direct effect on fumonisin production whereas the effect of temperature seems to be dependent on a W (Mar?n et al., 1999; Samapundo et al., 2005). Nitrogen limitation, ambient pH, and carbon nutrient... that acidic pH (3.0 ? 4.0) under well- aerated conditions enhanced FB 1 biosynthesis in F. proliferatum. In a later study, it was determined that acidic pH is critical for FB 1 production which prompted the investigation of F. verticillioides pH regulator...

  7. MESOSCALE THEORY OF GRAINS AND CELLS: POLYCRYSTALS & PLASTICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethna, James P.

    MESOSCALE THEORY OF GRAINS AND CELLS: POLYCRYSTALS & PLASTICITY A Dissertation Presented RIGHTS RESERVED #12;MESOSCALE THEORY OF GRAINS AND CELLS: POLYCRYSTALS & PLASTICITY Surachate Limkumnerd, continuum explanation for the evolution of dislocations into sharp walls. We present here a mesoscale theory

  8. Near-wall modeling of an isothermal vertical wall using one-dimensional turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DesJardin, Paul E.

    [5]. The challenge in modeling this class of flows is the coupling between the heat transfer approaches are considered for describing the heat transfer from a vertical isothermal wall. In this approach at the wall surface and the generation of turbulence from buoyancy forces, which in turn, affect

  9. RESEARCH PAPER Cell wall metabolism during the development of chilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    for 3 d to induce chilling injury. With increasing cold storage the incidence and severity of mealiness. Chelator-soluble polyuronides from mealy fruit were partially depolymerized during cold storage in a man showed only minor differences between juicy and mealy fruit. After cold storage and ripening

  10. A study of the molecular mechanics of wood cell walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, David, S.M. (David C.). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood is the original structural material, developed by nature to support tall plants. Every advantageous feature of wood as used in artificial structures is rooted in the plant's evolved capability to withstand the conditions ...

  11. arterial wall cells: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties, Resonant Contact-AFM 1. INTRODUCTION Wood is produced in successive cylindrical layers during the radial secondary growth of a tree Paris-Sud XI,...

  12. Complementary mechanisms of plant cell wall deconstruction by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    m echanisms o f plant c ell w all d econstruc5on by f ree a nd complexed e nzyme systems Energy I nnova5on P ortal's A ccelera5ng I nnova5on W ebinar Dr. M ichael R esch Research...

  13. Influence of mefluidide on sorghum cell wall components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stair, David William

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and cellulase digestibility. All morphological studies indicated a reducton in plant height when mefluidide was applied to an early-to-mid vegetative stage in sorghum. Secondary basal tillering was initiated earlier.... However, the hemicellulose content of sorghum was not affected by treatment with mefluidide. The lignin content of all plants was constant over the entire study period, though it was reduced in the treated plants. The cellulase digestibility...

  14. Microfluidic cell culture chambers with nanoporous walls for chemical communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Zhifei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals that so far only a tiny fraction of microbial diversity has been cultured in the laboratory. One major reason behind this "unculturability" is ...

  15. Cell Wall Chemistry of Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSS LetterStateDepartment ofEquality

  16. Modification of Lignin Content of Plant Cell Walls - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. William HirstLong-TermPossibility ofPortal

  17. Education Module 2007: Cell Wall Chemistry of Biomass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributionsreduction system isAmerica's Education Module

  18. A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested through lower severity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to convert into biofuels. Part of the high production cost of cellulosic biofuels is the relatively poor into biofuels. Key Result Through expression of a single gene derived from bacteria, transgenic maize. Transgenic Plants Lower the Costs of Cellulosic Biofuels NREL Highlights SCIENCE E1 cellulase expression

  19. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate conditions for the states of Iowa, Illinois phases also had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities

  20. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States and soybeans to cooler, drier, and darker conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities and industrial

  1. Maize Weevil: A Search for Resistance in Converted Exotic Sorghum Kernels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teetes, G.L.; Johnson, Chantrasorn, W.; Johnson, J.W.; Granovsky, T.A.; Rooney, L.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    f o r r e s i s t a n c e t o t h e maize weev i l , S i t o p h i l u s zeamais Motsch., u t i l i z i n g f ree -cho ice and no-choice s c r e e n i n g tech- n iques . The c r i t e r i a used f o r i n i t i a l e v a l u a t i o... n of samples o f each l i n e were a t t r a c t i v e n e s s t o maize weev i l a d u l t s and t h e number o f emerged progeny ob ta ined . D e s p i t e c o n s i d e r a b l e v a r i a b i l i t y , r e s u l t s o f t h i...

  2. Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

  3. INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Arney, Ph.D.

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

  4. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  5. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogberashvili, Merab [Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 6 Tamarashvili Street, Tbilisi 0177 (Georgia); Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi 0128 (Georgia); California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Myrzakul, Shynaray [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Gumilev Eurasian National University, Astana, 010008 (Kazakhstan); California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Singleton, Douglas [California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow 117198 (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of 'stiff' matter, i.e., matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era, the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact nonlinear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  6. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, Scott D. (Broomfield, CO); Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  7. Non-Abelian Webs of Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minoru Eto; Youichi Isozumi; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Domain wall junctions are studied in N=2 supersymmetric U(Nc) gauge theory with Nf(>Nc) flavors. We find that all three possibilities are realized for positive, negative and zero junction charges. The positive junction charge is found to be carried by a topological charge in the Hitchin system of an SU(2) gauge subgroup. We establish rules of the construction of the webs of walls. Webs can be understood qualitatively by grid diagram and quantitatively by associating moduli parameters to web configurations.

  8. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  9. Transcriptional dynamics during cell wall removal and regeneration reveals key genes involved in cell wall development in rice.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rita; Tan, Feng; Jung, Ki-Hong; Sharma, Manoj K; Peng, Zhaohua; Ronald, Pamela C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stress Salt stress Heat stress Fig. 4 Bar of pie chartdehydration, salt and heat stress), with 6% genes respondingheat shock to 14-day-old seedlings and, cold, salt and dehydration stress

  10. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  11. Genomic Analysis of Natural Variation for Seed and Plant Size in Maize ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaeppler, Shawn [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Shawn Kaeppler from the University of Wisconsin-Madison on "Genomic Analysis of Biofuel Traits in Maize and Switchgrass" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  12. Genomic Analysis of Natural Variation for Seed and Plant Size in Maize ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kaeppler, Shawn [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Shawn Kaeppler from the University of Wisconsin-Madison on "Genomic Analysis of Biofuel Traits in Maize and Switchgrass" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  13. THE CHINESE WALL LATTICE Ravi Sandhu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    of interest class #12;4 CHINESE WALL EXAMPLE BANKS OIL COMPANIESBANKS OIL COMPANIES A B X Y #12;5 READ ACCESS A Bank B Oil Company X Oil Company XOil Company X Oil Company X · cooperating Trojan Horses can transfer Bank A information to Bank B objects, and vice versa, using Oil Company X objects as intermediaries #12

  14. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O Foda; M Wheeler; M Zuparic

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that the partition function of the six vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP tau function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization).

  15. Liquid Walls Innovative High Power Density Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Surface Heat Flux > 2 MW/m2 2. High Power Conversion Efficiency (> 40%) 3. High Availability -Lower rrr ×= V r J r PV r B r 1P 2P g r + - V r #12;V(initial momentum) g rFluidIn FluidOutBackingWall 2Dsurfaceturbulence · Poloidal Pumping + - J r - flowpoloidal direction - Enhancesurfaceheat transferwith2D turbulence

  16. Solitons and Domain Walls in Odd Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; G. W. Gibbons

    2000-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the existance of smooth soliton solutions which interpolate between supersymmetric vacua in odd-dimensional theories. In particular we apply this analysis to a wide class of supergravities to argue against the existence of smooth domain walls interpolating between supersymmetric vacua. We find that if the superpotential changes sign then any Goldstino modes will diverge.

  17. Design of wetted wall bioaerosol concentration cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Youngjin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    wall bioaerosol cyclone concentrators that consume very low power and are capable of delivering very small liquid effluent flow rate of highly-concentrated hydrosol. The aerosol-to-aerosol penetration cutpoint for the cyclones is about 1µm. The aerosol...

  18. ROOM AIR CONDITIONER WALL MOUNTED type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SPLIT TYPE ROOM AIR CONDITIONER WALL MOUNTED type Reciprocating Compressor Models Indoor unit.6 - 11.4 ----- MOISTURE REMOVAL ( / hr) 2.0 1.8 2.7 2.7 4.3 3 AIR CIRCULATION - Hi (m / hr) 800 800 1

  19. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  20. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowring, D.L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON A CAVITY WITH BERYLLIUM WALLS FOR MUON IONIZATION COOLINGFabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigatepillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate

  1. Electrical signature of magnetic domain-wall dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y.; Tretiakov, O. A.; Abanov, Artem.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current-induced domain-wall dynamics is studied in a thin ferromagnetic nanowire. The domain-wall dynamics is described by simple equations with four parameters. We propose a procedure to unambiguously determine these parameters by all...

  2. Concrete Masonry Wall Retrofit Systems for Blast Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Carol Faye

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    unit (CMU) infill walls, commonly used in reinforced concrete or steel framed structures, are particularly vulnerable to blast loads. Facilities that incorporate CMU walls must either be hardened or retrofitted for explosive events. Conventional...

  3. Interaction between Drilled Shaft and Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghahadi Forooshani, Mohammad

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilled shafts under horizontal loads are being constructed within Mechanically Stabled Earth (MSE) walls in the reinforced zone especially in overpass bridges and traffic signs. The interaction between the drilled shafts and the MSE wall...

  4. Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites Z. Ounaiesa of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) reinforced polyimide composites were investigated as a function nanotube; Composites 1. Introduction Polyimides are widely used in applications ranging from

  5. TBU-0061- In the Matter of Misti Wall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Misti Wall (the complainant or Wall), appeals the dismissal of her complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. As...

  6. Engineering the fusion reactor first wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurden, Glen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Willms [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and magnetohydrodynamics. While work to date has been quite valuable, no blanket concept has been built and operated in anything approaching a realistic fusion reactor environment. Rather, work has been limited to isolated experiments on first wall components and paper studies. The need now is to complete necessary R&D on first wall components, assemble components into a practical design, and test the first wall in a realistic fusion environment. Besides supporting work, major prototype experiments could be performed in non-nuclear experiments, as part of the ITER project and as part of the Component Test Facility. The latter is under active consideration and is a proposed machine which would use a driven plasma to expose an entire first wall to a fusion environment. Key US contributors to first wall research have been UCLA, UCSD, U of Wisconsin, LANL, ORNL, PNNL, Argonne and Idaho National Lab. Current efforts have been coordinated by UCLA. It is recognized that when this work progresses to a larger scale, leadership from a national laboratory will be required. LANL is well-prepared to provide such leadership.

  7. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  8. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  9. STEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    , University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260. #12;plate shear wall design and use of light-gage cold form platesSTEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH Michel Bruneau, P.E. 1 Dr areas. This paper provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art in steel plate shear wall design

  10. Building Cathedrals and Breaking down Reinforced Concrete Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broué, Michel - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    Building Cathedrals and Breaking down Reinforced Concrete Walls Michel Brou´e Institut Henri distinction between great mathematicians Concrete walls breakers Michel Brou´e (Institut Henri Poincar´e) John Concrete walls breakers Cathedrals builders Michel Brou´e (Institut Henri Poincar´e) John Thompson

  11. Designing Precast Concrete Cross Wall Joints Against Progressive Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Designing Precast Concrete Cross Wall Joints Against Progressive Collapse Researcher: Mohamad concrete cross wall constructions. Ronan Point Collapse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronan_Point) #12;Due gap is listed as follows: · Limited number of studies for designing precast concrete cross wall

  12. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howson, P.E.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  13. Light quark masses using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the one-loop self-energy correction to the massive domain wall quark propagator. Combining this calculation with simulations at several gauge couplings, we estimate the strange quark mass in the continuum limit. The perturbative one-loop mass renormalization is comparable to that for Wilson quarks and considerably smaller than that for Kogut-Susskind quarks. Also, scaling violations appear mild in comparison to other errors at present. Given their good chiral behavior and these features, domain wall quarks are attractive for evaluating the light quark masses. Our preliminary quenched result is m_s(2 GeV) = 82(15) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme.

  14. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

  15. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WALL DRYING IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES Kimdolyn Boone Theresa Weston, PhD Xuaco Pascual Product Development Engineer Building Scientist Field Services Engineer E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company Richmond, VA ABSTRACT... time based on the varying weather conditions. Constant interior conditions of 70?F and 55% RH were chosen. This corresponds to typical interior temperatures and a high level of moisture production within the house. This was chosen as a worse...

  16. Soft wall model for a holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afonin, S S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the soft wall holographic model from hadron physics to a description of the high-$T_c$ superconductivity. In comparison with the existing bottom-up holographic superconductors, the proposed approach is more phenomenological. On the other hand, it is much simpler and has more freedom for fitting the conductivity properties of the real high-$T_c$ materials. We demonstrate some examples of emerging models and discuss a possible origin of the approach.

  17. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  18. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

  19. Experimental and theoretical study on effects of magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Daren; Li Hong; Ning Zhongxi; Yan Guojun [Laboratory of Plasma Propulsion, Mail Box 458, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu Zhiwen [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment has been made to investigate the effect of curved magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in the ion acceleration region of Hall thrusters. The experimental results show that the electron current due to near wall conductivity is of the minimum in the case of focused topology and increases in the cases of both less-focus and over-focus topologies. This finding cannot be explained properly by the magnetic mirror effect, which is the one and only reported effect related to the magnetic field curvature so far. Based on the analysis of interaction between the plasma and the wall, a new physical effect is proposed. The difference of magnetic field topology causes different electric potential distribution, leads to different ion flux to the wall, results in the change of sheath property and secondary electron emission, and finally affects the electron current due to near wall conductivity. This effect is further justified by the agreement between the experiment and simulation which is performed with a particle-in-cell model. Therefore, we conclude that the ion flow injection is a significant effect to near wall conductivity in the scope of curved magnetic field topology besides the magnetic mirror effect. Moreover, we find that the focus topology of magnetic field is favorable to obtain a high thruster performance from both the ion acceleration aspect and the electron conduction aspect and so is useful practically for thruster optimization.

  20. Cutting assembly including expanding wall segments of auger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treuhaft, Martin B. (San Antonio, TX); Oser, Michael S. (San Antonio, TX)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  1. Effect of elasticity of wall on diffusion in nano channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tankeshwar, K., E-mail: tankesh@pu.ac.in [Computer Centre, Panjab University Chandigarh,- 160014 (India); Srivastava, Sunita [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Confining walls of nano channel are taken to be elastic to study their effect on the diffusion coefficient of fluid flowing through the channel. The wall is elastic to the extent that it responses to molecular pressure exerted by fluid. The model to study diffusion is based on microscopic considerations. Results obtained for fluid confining to 20 atomic diameter width contrasted with results obtained by considering rigid and smooth wall. The effect of roughness of wall on diffusion can be compensated by the elastic property of wall.

  2. Aflatoxin resistance in selected maize (Zea mays L.) varieties as affected by corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea [Boddie]) infestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uphoff, Michael Donald

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) in preharvest corn is a severe problem in some parts of the U. S. An experiment was designed to determine if the corn earworm (Heli~cov ~ yea a[Boddie]) was an effective vector of g. ~a and if damage caused by the insect predisposed maize varieties.... No differences among overall treatments were found. Apparently, treatment with corn earworm eggs was not effective in causing an increased amount of ear damage. Results showed there were statistically significant differences among varieties for inoculated...

  3. Control of magnetohydrodynamic modes with a resistive wall above the wall stabilization limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, John M. [T-15, Plasma Theory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies are shown of control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in the presence of a resistive wall, below and above the regime for which stabilization is possible with a perfectly conducting wall, i.e., in and above the ideal wall limit. The results show that resistive plasma (tearing-like) modes can be feedback stabilized for current profiles which are unstable above the ideal wall limit, both for tokamak-like and reversed field pinch (RFP)-like profiles. However, above the limit for wall stabilization of ideal plasma modes, resonant or nonresonant, the feedback scheme cannot provide stabilization. The control scheme senses both normal and tangential components of the perturbed magnetic field, and the feedback is proportional to a linear combination of the two. Neither plasma rotation nor complex gain is included. A cylindrical reduced MHD model, in resistive or ideal form, is used, with tokamak-like profiles [increasing profile of q(r)] or RFP-like profiles [decreasing q(r)]. The possible relevance to RFPs and tokamaks is discussed.

  4. Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fong, James T. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

  5. Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Smith and S.C. Jardin

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: ??? = ??? ?. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

  6. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  7. Melting Instantons, Domain Walls, and Large N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. B. Thacker

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo studies of $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models have shown that the structure of topological charge in these models undergoes a sharp transition at $N=N_c\\approx 4$. For $NN_c$ it is dominated by extended, thin, 1-dimensionally coherent membranes of topological charge, which can be interpreted as domain walls between discrete quasi-stable vacua. These vacua differ by a unit of background electric flux. The transition can be identified as the delocalization of topological charge, or "instanton melting," a phenomenon first suggested by Witten to resolve the conflict between instantons and large $N$ behavior. Implications for $QCD$ are discussed.

  8. Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpage JumpWaikane,(Redirected from WalkerWalkerton,Wall,

  9. Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump to:

  10. CXD 4606, 9831 Wall Construction Project (4606)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r8.0 -CURRICULUM9831 Wall Construction

  11. Living Walls | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin ZhongdiantouLichuan CityLiqcrytech LLCLiuzhou MinghuiLiving Walls

  12. Thermal performance of steel-framed walls. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, E. [NAHB Research Center, Inc., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Goodrow, J. [Holometrix, Inc., Bedford, MA (United States); Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In wall construction, highly conductive members spaced along the wall, which allow higher heat transfer than that through less conductive areas, are referred to as thermal bridges. Thermal bridges in walls tend to increase heat loss and, under certain adverse conditions, can cause dust streaking (``ghosting``) on interior walls over studs due to temperature differentials, as well as condensation in and on walls. Although such adverse conditions can be easily avoided by proper thermal design of wall systems, these effects have not been well understood and thermal data has been lacking. Therefore, the present study was initiated to provide (1) a better understanding of the thermal behavior of steel-framed walls, (2) a set of R-values for typical wall constructions, and (3) information that could be used to develop improved methods of predicting R-values. An improved method for estimating R-value would allow an equitable comparison of thermal performance with other construction types and materials. This would increase the number of alternative materials for walls available to designers, thus allowing them to choose the optimum choice for construction. Twenty-three wall samples were tested in a calibrated hot box (ASTM C9761) to measure the thermal performance of steel-framed wall systems. The tests included an array of stud frame configurations, exterior sheathing and fiberglass batt insulations. Other studies have not included the use of insulating sheathing, which reduces the extent of the thermal bridges and improves total thermal performance. The purpose of the project was to provide measured R-values for commonly used steel-framed wall configurations and to improve R-value estimating methods. Test results were compared to R-value estimates using the parallel path method, the isothermal planes method and the ASHRAE Zone method. The comparison showed that the known procedures do not fully account for the three-dimensional effects created by steel framing in a wall.

  13. Yeast Immunofluorescence Prepare Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    H2O. Wash once with SPC buffer. 8. Digest yeast cell wall. Resuspend yeast with 0.5 ml SPC buffer. Add 20 µl of freshly made 10 mg/ml Zymolyase 100T in SPC buffer. Or, add 20 µl of 50 mg/ml freshly made Zymolyase 20T in SPC buffer. Incubate at room temperature on rotator for 10 minutes. SPC buffer

  14. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE MEASURE OF THE FUNCTIONALITY OF FRAME WALLS ENHANCED WITH PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evers, Angela C.

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Frame walls enhanced with phase change materials (paraffin-based, hydrated salt-based, and eutectic) mixed in cellulose insulation were developed and tested. The frame walls were heated and allowed to cool in a dynamic wall simulator that replicated...

  16. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Bruno S. [UNR] [UNR; Fuelling, Stephan [UNR] [UNR

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  17. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  18. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  19. Design studies of an aluminum first wall for INTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Yu, W.S.; Hsieh, S.Y.; Pearlman, H.; Kramer, R.; Franz, E.; Craig, A.; Farrell, K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Besides the high erosion rates (including evaporation) expected for INTOR, there may also be high heat fluxes to the first wall, e.g., approx. 9 (Case I) to 24 (Case II) W/cm/sup 2/, from two sources - radiation and charge exchange neutrals. There will also be internal heat generation by neutron and gamma deposition. An aluminum first wall design is analyzed, which substantially reduces concerns about survivability of the first wall during INTOR's operating life.

  20. Regulation by nitrate of protein synthesis and translation of RNA in maize roots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClure, P.R.; Bouthyette, P.Y.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roots of maize seedlings were exposed to /sup 35/S-methionine in the presence or absence of nitrate. Using SDS-PAGE, nitrate-induced changes in labeled polypeptides were noted in the soluble (at 92, 63 and 21kD) and organellar(at 14kD) fractions, as well as in a membrane fraction of putative tonoplast origin (at 31kD). No nitrate-induced changes were noted in a plasmamembrane-enriched fraction or in a membrane fraction of mixed origin. Total RNA from nitrate-treated and control roots was translated in a rabbit reticulocyte system. Five translation products (94, 63, 41, 39 and 21kD) were identified as nitrate-inducible by comparative gel electrophoresis. Changes in protein synthesis and translation of mRNA were apparent within 2-3 h after introduction of nitrate. Within 4-6 h after removal of nitrate, the level of nitrate-inducible translation products diminished to that of control roots. In contrast, the 31kD tonoplast polypeptide was still labeled 26 h after removal of external nitrate and /sup 35/S-methionine. The results will be discussed in relation to the nitrate induction of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the nitrate uptake system.

  1. Oscillating light wall above a sunspot light bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shuhong; Jiang, Fayu; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the high tempo-spatial \\emph{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} 1330 {\\AA} images, we find that many bright structures are rooted in the light bridge of NOAA 12192, forming a \\emph{light wall}. The light wall is brighter than the surrounding areas, and the wall top is much brighter than the wall body. The New Vacuum Solar Telescope H$\\alpha$ and the \\emph{Solar Dynamics Observatory} 171 {\\AA} and 131 {\\AA} images are also used to study the light wall properties. In 1330 {\\AA}, 171 {\\AA}, and 131 {\\AA}, the top of the wall has a higher emission, while in the H$\\alpha$ line, the wall top emission is very low. The wall body corresponds to bright areas in 1330 {\\AA} and dark areas in the other lines. The top of the light wall moves upward and downward successively, performing oscillations in height. The deprojected mean height, amplitude, oscillation velocity, and the dominant period are determined to be 3.6 Mm, 0.9 Mm, 15.4 km s$^{-1}$, and 3.9 min, respectively. We interpret the oscillations of the lig...

  2. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based on the material testing data of concrete cylinders inDESIGN, TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLDESIGN, TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL

  3. Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

  4. air circulation wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary air Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Accepted...

  5. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  6. Self-assembling functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. Wang (2007). "Storage of hydrogen in single-walled carbongravimetric storage capacity of hydrogen in a diamond-shapedfor energy storage applications such as hydrogen absorption.

  7. aligned single wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Printed Multilayer Superstructures of Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Materials Science Websites Summary: Printed Multilayer Superstructures of Aligned...

  8. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  9. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Slender Reinforced Concrete Walls”. Structural Journal,T. (1975). “Reinforced Concrete Structures”. John Wiley &Design of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings”. John

  10. artery wall thickness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CCA-IMT) were measured using ultrasonography. Gait 22 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Physics Websites Summary: to reduce...

  11. Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  12. arabidopsis secondary cell: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a putative xylan acetyl transferase (Xiong et al. 2013). Mutants in RWAs and in TBL29 lead to dwarfing, that is likely due, at least in part, to collapse of secondary cell wall...

  13. The height of watermelons with wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Feierl

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive asymptotics for the moments as well as the weak limit of the height distribution of watermelons with p branches with wall. This generalises a famous result of de Bruijn, Knuth and Rice on the average height of planted plane trees, and results by Fulmek and Katori et al. on the expected value, respectively the higher moments, of the height distribution of watermelons with two branches. The asymptotics for the moments depend on the analytic behaviour of certain multidimensional Dirichlet series. In order to obtain this information we prove a reciprocity relation satisfied by the derivatives of one of Jacobi's theta functions, which generalises the well known reciprocity law for Jacobi's theta functions.

  14. Light-shining-through-walls with lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friederike Januschek

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-shining-through-walls experiments are the search experiments for weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs) with the smallest model dependence. They have the advantage that not only the detection, but also the production of the WISPs takes place in the laboratory and can thus be controlled. Using lasers is the preferred option for most of the mass region and has led to the world's most stringent laboratory limits (ALPS I) there. At CERN, OSQAR promises to surpass these and at DESY ALPS II is currently set up, which is planning to probe the axion-like particle to photon coupling down to $|g_{a\\gamma}|\\gtrsim 2\\cdot10^{-11}$ GeV$^{-1}$, which is in a region favored by many astrophysical hints.

  15. High power density fuel cell comprising an array of microchannels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopchak, David A; Morse, Jeffrey D; Upadhye, Ravindra S; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell according to one embodiment includes an array of microchannels defined by a porous electrolyte support structure extending between bottom and upper support layers, the microchannels including fuel and oxidant microchannels; fuel electrodes formed along some of the microchannels; and air electrodes formed along other of the microchannels. A method of making a phosphoric acid fuel cell according to one embodiment includes etching an array of microchannels in a substrate, thereby forming walls between the microchannels; processing the walls to make the walls porous, thereby forming a porous electrolyte support structure; forming anode electrodes along some of the walls; forming cathode electrodes along other of the walls; and filling the porous electrolyte support structure with a phosphoric acid electrolyte. Additional embodiments are also disclosed.

  16. Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liska, Richard

    Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1 R. LISKA,2 AND F.B. ROSMEJ3,4 1 Institute, France (RECEIVED 30 August 2009; ACCEPTED 21 September 2009) Abstract Jets of laser­generated plasma surfaces (walls). The pilot experiments carried out on the iodine laser system (5­200 J, 0.44 mm, 0

  17. Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Majeski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Kaita, a R. Majeski, a S. Luckhardt, b R. Doerner, b M ABSTRACT The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used

  18. TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP From: Anter El-Azab (anter@seas.ucla.edu) Re with Lithium will can not work and this concept should be terminated. For the case of vanadium alloy on this concept should be terminated. #12;TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT Best Regards, Anter #12;

  19. An analytic description of thick-wall bubbles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jooyoo

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approximation scheme to the false-vacuum decay is suggested. In this scheme the bounce solutions can be obtained in an explicit and analytic way even for thick-wall bubbles. The result is compared with Coleman`s thin-wall description, which shows that is nicely comprises the result of the latter prescription. Some applications are also discussed.

  20. The prospects for highbeta tokamaks with Li walls 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    . Why Li walls ? 2. Magnetic propulsion of liquid Li. 3. Plasma profiles in the non­recycling regime. 4 can be magnetically propulsed along the plasma facing surfaces in the tokamak chamber. This allows the stabilizing wall right at the plasma boundary. 2. Intense (V ' 20 m=sec) magnetic propulsion allows to keep Li

  1. High power density fuel cell comprising an array of microchannels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell according to one embodiment includes a porous electrolyte support structure defining an array of microchannels, the microchannels including fuel and oxidant microchannels; fuel electrodes formed along some of the microchannels; and oxidant electrodes formed along other of the microchannels. A method of making a fuel cell according to one embodiment includes forming an array of walls defining microchannels therebetween using at least one of molding, stamping, extrusion, injection and electrodeposition; processing the walls to make the walls porous, thereby creating a porous electrolyte support structure; forming anode electrodes along some of the microchannels; and forming cathode electrodes along other of the microchannels. Additional embodiments are also disclosed.

  2. Principal maize viruses in Mediterranean countries D Ivanovi&jadnr; R Osler N Katis M Ivanovi&jadnr; D lgnjatovi&jadnr;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    yellow dwarf viruses (BYDVs) (PAV- and RPV-like) were used in these tests. A higher disease incidence.7 and 11 % of individual Greek samples were positive for PAV- and RPV- respectively, while, 17.5 and 5% of Yugoslav samples were positive for PAV- and RPV- respectively. Phragmites sp, a perennial maize weed

  3. Technology reviews: Dynamic curtain wall systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize die state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  4. Pneumatic wall-locking geophone system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Harland L. (Minneapolis, MN); Cumerlato, Calvin L. (Minneapolis, MN); Tweeton, Daryl R. (Apple Valley, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic signal receiving system is provided for use in boreholes to receive seismic waves in carrying out geophysical investigations. The system includes three pairs of opposed plates, each of the pairs of plates including oppositely facing outer surfaces for engagement with opposite sides of a borehole. A seismic receiver is mounted on the inner surface of each of the plates for receiving seismic signals. A double-acting, fluid-operated actuator selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates away from each other to provide expansion thereof so as to enable the plates to engage the walls of a borehole and selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates toward each other to provide retraction thereof so as to enable the system to be removed from a borehole. The pairs of plates each comprise a relatively long plate and a relatively short plate. An expandable linkage interconnects the long plates at the distal ends thereof. The plates are mechanically biassed into the retracted state so that the plates return to this state in the event of a system failure.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; George, R.A.; Shockling, L.A.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  7. C. Grnwald et al.Differentiation of xylem cells in rolC aspen Original article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    C. Grünwald et al.Differentiation of xylem cells in rolC aspen Original article Differentiation of xylem cells in rolC transgenic aspen trees ­ a study of secondary cell wall development Claudia 2001; accepted 21 January 2002) Abstract ­ Xylem cell differentiation of 35S-rolC transgenic aspen

  8. ICRF Specific Plasma Wall Interactions in JET with the ITER-Like Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany; Arnoux, G. [EURATOM, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon England] [EURATOM, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon England; Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany] [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Coenen, J. W. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany] [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Clever, M. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany] [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany; Czarnecka, A. [Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Warsaw, Poland] [Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Warsaw, Poland; Braun, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Huber, Alexander [EURATOM / FZ-Juelich, Germany] [EURATOM / FZ-Juelich, Germany; Jacquet, P. [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK] [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL] [ORNL; Lerche, E. [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium] [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium; Maggi, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Marcotte, F. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France] [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Maslov, M. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK] [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK; Matthews, G. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK] [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK; Mayoral, M.-L. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK] [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; McCormick, K. D. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Meigs, A. G. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK] [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino] [Politecnico di Torino; Monakhov, I. [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK] [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK; Neu, Rudolf [EURATOM / IPP Garching, Germany] [EURATOM / IPP Garching, Germany; Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Putterich, Th. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasma Physik, Garching, Germany; Rimini, F. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK] [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK; Rooj, G. Van [Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein, Netherlands] [Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein, Netherlands; Sergienko, G. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany] [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Germany; Van Eester, D. [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium] [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of plasma wall interactions (PWIs) during operation of the so-called A2 ICRF antennas is observed in JET with the ITER-like wall. Amongst effects of the PWIs, the W content increase is the most significant, especially at low plasma densities. No increase of W source from the main divertor and entrance of the outer divertor during ICRF compared to NBI phases was found by means of spectroscopic and WI (400.9 nm) imaging diagnostics. In contrary, the W flux there is higher during NBI. Charge exchange neutrals of hydrogen isotopes could be excluded as considerable contributors to the W source. The high W content in ICRF heated limiter discharges suggests the possibility of other W sources than the divertor alone. Dependencies of PWIs to individual ICRF antennas during q95-scans, and intensification of those for the 90 phasing, indicate a link between the PWIs and the antenna near-fields. The PWIs include heat loads and Be sputtering pattern on antenna limiters. Indications of some PWIs at the outer divertor entrance are observed which do not result in higher W flux compared to the NBI phases, but are characterized by small antenna-specific (up to 25% with respect to ohmic phases) bipolar variations of WI emission. The first TOPICA calculations show a particularity of the A2 antennas compared to the ITER antenna, due to the presence of long antenna limiters in the RF image current loop and thus high near-fields across the most part of the JET outer wall.

  9. New confining force solution of QCD axion domain wall problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Barr; Jihn E. Kim

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The serious cosmological problems created by the axion-string/axion-domain-wall system in standard axion models are alleviated by positing the existence of a new confining force. The instantons of this force can generate an axion potential that erases the axion strings long before QCD effects become important, thus preventing QCD-generated axion walls from ever appearing. Axion walls generated by the new confining force would decay so early as not to contribute significantly to the energy in axion dark matter.

  10. Calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a first calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions. This paper contains an overview of the domain wall discretization and a pedagogical presentation of the perturbative calculation necessary for computing the mass renormalization. We combine the latter with numerical simulations to estimate the strange quark mass. Our final result in the quenched approximation is 95(26) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme at a scale of 2 GeV. We find that domain wall fermions have a small perturbative mass renormalization, similar to Wilson quarks, and exhibit good scaling behavior.

  11. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

  12. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Huang, Yin-Yan (Evanston, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

  13. antibody-functionalized single-walled carbon: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermal Kono, Junichiro 2 Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Nanoelectronics Materials Science Websites Summary: CHAPTER 6 Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for...

  14. aligned multi-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Structural annealing of carbon coated aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets Materials Science Websites Summary: Structural annealing of carbon coated aligned multi-walled...

  15. aligned double-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reinhard 2 Atomistic Simulations of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (DWCNTs) as Materials Science Websites Summary: Atomistic Simulations of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...

  16. Penetration through a wall: Is it reality?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ivlev

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A tennis ball is not expected to penetrate through a brick wall since a motion under a barrier is impossible in classical mechanics. With quantum effects a motion of a particle through a barrier is allowed due to quantum tunneling. According to usual theories of tunneling, the particle density decays inside a classical barrier resulting in an extremely slow pentration process. However, there are no general laws forbidding fast motion through classical barriers. The problem addressed is investigation of unusual features o quantum tunneling through a classic static barrier which is at least two-dimensional. Here we show that penetration through such barrier can be not slow. When the barrier satisfies the certain conditions, a regime of quantum lens is possible with formation of caustics. De Broglie waves are reflected from the caustics, interfere, and result in a not small flux from under the barrier. This strongly contrasts to the usual scenario with a decaying under-barrier density. We construct a particular example of fast motion through a classical barrier. One can unexectedly conclude that, in principle, nature allows fast penetration through classical barriers which against common sense. The phenomenon may be responsible for a variety of processes in labs and nature. For example, tunneling in solids may occur with a different scenario, in biophysics and chemistry one can specify conditions for unusual reactions, and evanescent optical waves may strongly change their properties. In condensed matter and cosmic physics there are phenomena with misterious reasons of an energy emission, for instance, gamma-ray bursts. One can try to treat them in the context of fast escape from under some barriers.

  17. YMGI Through-the-Wall Air Conditioner Determined Noncompliant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on October 11, 2012, to YMGI Group, LLC (YMGI) regarding through-the-wall split system central air conditioner basic model TTWC-18K-31B. DOE enforcement testing revealed that...

  18. Computational Study of Catalyzed Growth of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jin

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis process called CoMoCAT yields single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)s of controlled diameter and chirality, making them extremely attractive for technological ...

  19. Characterization of double walled carbon nanotubes-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Atheer Mohammad

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main objectives of this thesis is to disperse double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix, and to characterize the resulting composite using electrical, thermal, and mechanical ...

  20. alternately rotating walls: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chiral molecules act as propellers. When the axis is blocked at the lateral walls of the trough, the accumulated rotation inside creates huge splays and bends. We discuss the...

  1. Computational Study of Catalyzed Growth of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jin

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis process called CoMoCAT yields single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)s of controlled diameter and chirality, making them extremely attractive for technological applications...

  2. Near wall cooling for a highly tapered turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall connected at chordally spaced leading and trailing edges to define a cooling cavity. Pressure and suction side inner walls extend radially within the cooling cavity and define pressure and suction side near wall chambers. A plurality of mid-chord channels extend radially from a radially intermediate location on the blade to a tip passage at the blade tip for connecting the pressure side and suction side near wall chambers in fluid communication with the tip passage. In addition, radially extending leading edge and trailing edge flow channels are located adjacent to the leading and trailing edges, respectively, and cooling fluid flows in a triple-pass serpentine path as it flows through the leading edge flow channel, the near wall chambers and the trailing edge flow channel.

  3. Analysis of calibrated hot box data for three concrete walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three walls constructed of concrete with different densities were tested in a calibrated hot box at the Construction Technology Laboratories of the Portland Cement Association. The observed dynamic performance of these walls was not in good agreement with analytical solutions based on the assumption of linear heat conduction through the walls. Several sources of potential errors in the data from the hot box were explored. While some of these errors do appear to be real, they do not fully explain the discrepancy between experimental and analytical results. The experimentally determined values of the specific heats for the three concrete walls were identified as the most likely cause for the discrepancies. This report presents the analysis of the data from the hot box experiments and suggestions for future investigation.

  4. Interactions between Liquid-Wall Vapor and Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of liquid walls for fusion reactors could help solve problems associated with material erosion from high plasma heat-loads and neutronic activation of structures. A key issue analyzed here is the influx of impurity ions to the core plasma from the vapor of liquid side-walls. Numerical 2D transport simulations are performed for a slab geometry which approximates the edge region of a reactor-size tokamak. Both lithium vapor (from Li or SnLi walls) and fluorine vapor (from Flibe walls) are considered for hydrogen edge-plasmas in the high- and low-recycling regimes. It is found that the minimum influx is from lithium with a low-recycling hydrogen plasma, and the maximum influx occurs for fluorine with a high-recycling hydrogen plasma.

  5. Turbulent drag reduction by constant near-wall forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JIN XU, SUCHUAN DONG, MARTIN R. MAXEY and GEORGE E. KARNIADAKIS

    2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of high molecular weight polymer solutions or gas in the near-wall region of a liquid boundary layer can result in turbulent drag reduction of more than ...

  6. abdominal wall safe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T. Yanagida; Norimi Yokozaki 2014-07-16 265 Hygrothermal Performance of a Masonry Wall CiteSeer Summary: A 4-storey masonry building was retrofitted and converted to offices....

  7. Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Trombe Wall Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, experiments with a passive solar building with Trombe wall in the north cold climate are carried out and discussed, and the natural convection heat transfer process has been investigated. The relativity of the factors affecting indoor...

  8. Axion-Dilaton Domain Walls and Fake Supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Sonner; Paul K. Townsend

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical systems methods are used to investigate domain-wall solutions of a two-parameter family of models in which gravity is coupled to an axion, and to a dilaton with an exponential potential of either sign. A complete global analysis is presented for (i) constant axion and (ii) flat walls, including a study of bifurcations and a new exact domain-wall solution with non-constant axion. We reconsider `fake supergravity' issues in light of these results. We show, by example, how domain walls determine multi-valued superpotentials that branch at stationary points that are not stationary points of the potential, and we apply this result to potentials with anti-de Sitter vacua. We also show by example that `adapted' truncation to a single-scalar model is sometimes inconsistent, and we propose a `generalized' fake supergravity formalism that applies in some such cases.

  9. Axion cosmology with long-lived domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toyokazu, E-mail: hiramatz@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: saikawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: sekiguti@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the cosmological constraints on axion models where the domain wall number is greater than one. In these models, multiple domain walls attached to strings are formed, and they survive for a long time. Their annihilation occurs due to the effects of explicit symmetry breaking term which might be raised by Planck-scale physics. We perform three-dimensional lattice simulations and compute the spectra of axions and gravitational waves produced by long-lived domain walls. Using the numerical results, we estimated relic density of axions and gravitational waves. We find that the existence of long-lived domain walls leads to the overproduction of cold dark matter axions, while the density of gravitational waves is too small to observe at the present time. Combining the results with other observational constraints, we find that the whole parameter region of models are excluded unless an unacceptable fine-tuning exists.

  10. Method and apparatus for constructing an underground barrier wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Willis E. (W. Richland, WA); Dwyer, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for constructing a underground barrier wall structure using a jet grout injector subassembly comprising a pair of primary nozzles and a plurality of secondary nozzles, the secondary nozzles having a smaller diameter than the primary nozzles, for injecting grout in directions other than the primary direction, which creates a barrier wall panel having a substantially uniform wall thickess. This invention addresses the problem of the weak "bow-tie" shape that is formed during conventional jet injection when using only a pair of primary nozzles. The improvement is accomplished by using at least four secondary nozzles, of smaller diameter, located on both sides of the primary nozzles. These additional secondary nozzles spray grout or permeable reactive materials in other directions optimized to fill in the thin regions of the bow-tie shape. The result is a panel with increased strength and substantially uniform wall thickness.

  11. ancient egyptian wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    monopoles. It represents a domain wall between a vacuum region and a region of constant energy density, and it is the smoothed-out version of the planar sheet of Dirac monopoles...

  12. angle influences wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 HYGROTHERMAL BEHAVIOUR OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: INFLUENCE OF SORPTION MODELLING Computer Technologies and Information...

  13. assessing tube wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tube drawing is a metal Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 35 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Physics Websites Summary: to reduce...

  14. airway wall thickness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Physics Websites Summary: to reduce...

  15. Determining heat fluxes from temperature measurements made in massive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is described for determining heat fluxes at the surfaces of masonry walls or floors using temperature data measured at two points within the wall, usually near the surfaces. The process consists of solving the heat diffusion equation in one dimension using finite difference techniques given two measured temperatures as input. The method is fast and accurate and also allows for an in-situ measurement of wall thermal diffusivity if a third temperature is measured. The method is documented in sufficient detail so that it can be readily used by the reader. Examples are given for heat flow through walls. Annual results for two cases are presented. The method has also been used to determine heat flow into floors.

  16. FREE CONVECTIVE LAMINAR FLOW WITHIN THE TROMBE WALL CHANNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NM 87545, pp. 201-222. J.D. Balcomb, J.C. Hedstrom, R.D.wall have been measured by Balcomb, et al [2J. The problem

  17. Field measurement of lateral earth pressures on retaining walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riggins, Michael

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The measured pressures are compared with the computed Coulomb and Rankine pressures for the active case. The measured pressures on the cantilever wall are in close agreement with the theoretical pressures on the upper half of the wall, but the measured... Pressure Variance with Time and Temperature. INTRODUCTION Present Status of the Question -- The latera1 earth pressure theories developed by Coulomb in 1776 and Rankine in 1S57 are known as the classical earth pressure theories (5)*. The basic equation...

  18. Domain Walls and Anchoring Transitions Mimicking Nematic Biaxiality in the Oxadiazole Bent-Core Liquid Crystal C7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-ki Kim; Greta Cukrov; Jie Xiang; Sung-Tae Shin; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangential-tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. The study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrate yet another mechanism (formation of secondary disclinations) by which a uniaxial nematic can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  19. Experimental and numerical analysis of pre-compressed masonry walls in two-way-bending with second order effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milani, Gabriele, E-mail: milani@stru.polimi.it [Department of Architecture, Built Environment and Construction Engineering (ABC), Politecnico diMilano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Olivito, Renato S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile - Università della Calabria Via P Bucci 39 B - 87036 RENDE (CS) (Italy); Tralli, Antonio [Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The buckling behavior of slender unreinforced masonry (URM) walls subjected to axial compression and out-of-plane lateral loads is investigated through a combined experimental and numerical homogenizedapproach. After a preliminary analysis performed on a unit cell meshed by means of elastic FEs and non-linear interfaces, macroscopic moment-curvature diagrams so obtained are implemented at a structural level, discretizing masonry by means of rigid triangular elements and non-linear interfaces. The non-linear incremental response of the structure is accounted for a specific quadratic programming routine. In parallel, a wide experimental campaign is conducted on walls in two way bending, with the double aim of both validating the numerical model and investigating the behavior of walls that may not be reduced to simple cantilevers or simply supported beams. Panels investigated are dry-joint in scale square walls simply supported at the base and on a vertical edge, exhibiting the classical Rondelet’s mechanism. The results obtained are compared with those provided by the numerical model.

  20. LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

  1. ELM-Induced Plasma Wall Interactions in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudakov, D L; Boedo, J A; Yu, J H; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Hollmann, E M; Lasnier, C J; McLean, A G; Moyer, R A; Stangeby, P C; Tynan, G R; Wampler, W R; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Wong, C C; Zeng, L; Bastasz, R J; Buchenauer, D; Whaley, J

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense transient fluxes of particles and heat to the main chamber components induced by edge localized modes (ELMs) are of serious concern for ITER. In DIII-D, plasma interaction with the outboard chamber wall is studied using Langmuir probes and optical diagnostics including a fast framing camera. Camera data shows that ELMs feature helical filamentary structures localized at the low field side of the plasma and aligned with the local magnetic field. During the nonlinear phase of an ELM, multiple filaments are ejected from the plasma edge and propagate towards the outboard wall with velocities of 0.5-0.7 km/s. When reaching the wall, filaments result in 'hot spots'--regions of local intense plasma-material interaction (PMI) where the peak incident particle and heat fluxes are up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those between ELMs. This interaction pattern has a complicated geometry and is neither toroidally nor poloidally symmetric. In low density/collisionality H-mode discharges, PMI at the outboard wall is almost entirely due to ELMs. In high density/collisionality discharges, contributions of ELMs and inter-ELM periods to PMI at the wall are comparable. A Midplane Material Evaluation Station (MiMES) has been recently installed in order to conduct in situ measurements of erosion/redeposition at the outboard chamber wall, including those caused by ELMs.

  2. Static load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cherry, Jeffery L.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block used in constructing the wall are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBAP), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that statically loaded wall segments to compare the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of 12 tests were conducted, three with the Arquin method using a W5 reinforcing wire, three with the traditional method of construction using a number 3 rebar as reinforcing, three with the Arquin method using a W2 reinforcing wire, and three with the traditional construction method but without rebar. The results of the tests showed that the walls constructed with the Arquin method and with a W5 reinforcing wire withstood more load than any of the other three types of walls that were tested.

  3. Wall recession rates in cavity-growth modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grens, E.A. II; Thorsness, C.B.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The predictions of resource utilization obtained from cavity-growth models depend on the methods used to represent the recession rates of the walls of the cavity. Under many circumstances the cavity is largely filled with a bed char rubble. Examination of the mechanisms for recession at walls adjacent to these char beds indicates that the recession rates are controlled by convective heat transfer from the bed to the walls coupled with the thermomechanical breakdown of the walls. A recession-rate representation has been developed, based on this concept, for use in cavity-growth simulation programs. This representation characterizes wall breakdown by either a failure temperature or by a thickness of char layer at failure, and determines rates from a model of heat transfer under these conditions. It gives recession rates that are functions of gas temperature and mass flow rate in the cavity, and depend on effective particle size in the char bed. Wall recession rates calculated for WIDCO, Hoe Creek, and Hanna coals are in the range of 0.1 to 0.8 m/day at a 1300 K cavity temperature, and are consistent with the general rates observed for field tests. 27 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  4. DETERMINING THE OPTIMUM PLACEMENT OF A PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS (PCM) THERMAL SHIELD INSIDE FRAME WALLS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reshmeen, Silvia

    2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This thesis presents the results of an experimental study to determine the optimum placement and the thermal performance of a Phase Change Materials (PCMs) thermal shield incorporated into frame wall insulation systems for the purpose...

  5. Improved Confinement in JET High {beta} Plasmas with an ITER-Like Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challis, C D; Beurskens, M; Buratti, P; Delabie, E; Drewelow, P; Frassinetti, L; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N; Hobirk, J; Joffrin, E; Keeling, D; King, D B; Maggi, C F; Mailloux, J; Marchetto, C; McDonald, D; Nunes, I; Pucella, G; Saarelma, S; Simpson, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The replacement of the JET carbon wall (C-wall) by a Be/W ITER-like wall (ILW) has affected the plasma energy confinement. To investigate this, experiments have been performed with both the C-wall and ILW to vary the heating power over a wide range for plasmas with different shapes.

  6. Finite element analysis of the Arquin-designed CMU wall under a dynamic (blast) load.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Carlos; Petti, Jason P.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arquin Corporation designed a CMU (concrete masonry unit) wall construction and reinforcement technique that includes steel wire and polymer spacers that is intended to facilitate a faster and stronger wall construction. Since the construction method for an Arquin-designed wall is different from current wall construction practices, finite element computer analyses were performed to estimate the ability of the wall to withstand a hypothetical dynamic load, similar to that of a blast from a nearby explosion. The response of the Arquin wall was compared to the response of an idealized standard masonry wall exposed to the same dynamic load. Results from the simulations show that the Arquin wall deformed less than the idealized standard wall under such loading conditions. As part of a different effort, Sandia National Laboratories also looked at the relative static response of the Arquin wall, results that are summarized in a separate SAND Report.

  7. Switchable cell trapping using superparamagnetic beads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, M. T.; Smith, K. H.; Real, M. E.; Bashir, M. A.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Schrefl, T.; Allwood, D. A.; Haycock, J. W.

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} microwires are investigated as the basis of a switchable template for positioning magnetically-labeled neural Schwann cells. Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy and micromagnetic modeling show that magnetic domain walls can be created or removed in zigzagged structures by an applied magnetic field. Schwann cells containing superparamagnetic beads are trapped by the field emanating from the domain walls. The design allows Schwann cells to be organized on a surface to form a connected network and then released from the surface if required. As aligned Schwann cells can guide nerve regeneration, this technique is of value for developing glial-neuronal co-culture models in the future treatment of peripheral nerve injuries.

  8. 99 Bottles of beer on the wall 99 Bottles of beer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    99 Bottles of beer on the wall 99 Bottles of beer Take one down and pass it around 98 Bottles of beer on the wall 98 Bottles of beer on the wall 98 Bottles of beer Take one down and pass it around 97 Bottles of beer on the wall 97 Bottles of beer on the wall 97 Bottles of beer Take one down and pass

  9. A determination of thermal surface resistance of interior walls in intermittently heated buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, John Edmund

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?I. 0' ILDlUG G(, NDITION"' G C . ;DIIIOIID ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ou&Xs' Y ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ LIT?'"w&FUIm CIT''D ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ M LIST 07 FIOUBES 1, I Model wall with smooth surfaoe 8 ~ II tlodel wall with painted surfaoe... ~ ~ C 5. III Lfodel wall faoing interior and exterior room walls ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Page 4. IV Looation of heater with respeot to the mode 1 wall e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 21 5. Graph I iiverage unit surfaoe oonduotanoe fox smooth surfaoe...

  10. Quantum Fusion of Strings (Flux Tubes) and Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider formation of composite strings and domain walls as a result of fusion of two elementary objects (elementary strings in the first case and elementary walls in the second) located at a distance from each other. The tension of the composite object T_2 is assumed to be less than twice the tension of the elementary object T_1, so that bound states are possible. If in the initial state the distance d between the fusing strings or walls is much larger than their thickness and satisfies the conditions T_1 d^2 >> 1 (in the string case) and T_1 d^3 >> 1 (in the wall case), the problem can be fully solved quasiclassically. The fusion probability is determined by the first, "under the barrier" stage of the process. We find the bounce configuration and its extremal action S_B. In the wall problem e^{-S_B} gives the fusion probability per unit time per unit area. In the string case, due to a logarithmic infrared divergence, the problem is well formulated only for finite-length strings. The fusion probability per unit time can be found in the limit in which the string length is much larger than the distance between two merging strings.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of thin layers of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick.

  12. Evaluation of six cycles of mass selection composites of six maize germplasms for resistance to downy mildew and the effect on agronomic characters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickramasinghe, Indrangani Preethi

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studied had an increase in resistance over the six cycles of mass selection. At the same time a gradual reduction in susceptibility was observed. The pop- ulation which did not show a response to the mass selection procedure was believed to be due... to the lack of genetic variability existing in the initial population. While the primary selection pressure on these six maize populations was for increasing resistance to sorghum downy mildew, some correlated responses occurred in plant and ear height...

  13. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  14. Crossed-ratchet effects and domain wall geometrical pinning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Marconi; A. B. Kolton; J. A. Capitan; J. A. Cuesta; A. Perez-Junquera; M. Velez; J. I. Martin; J. M. R. Parrondo

    2010-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of a domain wall in a two dimensional medium is studied taking into account the internal elastic degrees of freedom of the wall and geometrical pinning produced both by holes and sample boundaries. This study is used to analyze the geometrical conditions needed for optimizing crossed ratchet effects in periodic rectangular arrays of asymmetric holes, recently observed experimentally in patterned ferromagnetic films. Geometrical calculations and numerical simulations have been used to obtain the anisotropic critical fields for depinning flat and kinked walls in rectangular arrays of triangles. The aim is to show with a generic elastic model for interfaces how to build a rectifier able to display crossed ratchet effects or effective potential landscapes for controlling the motion of interfaces or invasion fronts.

  15. Simulations of Alpha Wall Load in ITER. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsson, Johan

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The partially DOE funded International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will produce massive amounts of energetic charged alpha particles, which are imperfectly confined by a strong magnetic field. The wall of the experiment is designed to withstand an estimated wall load from these fusion alpha particles, but the accuracy of this estimate needs to be improved to avoid potentially catastrophic surprises when the experiment becomes operational. We have added a more accurate, gyro-dynamic model of particle motion to the existing drift-dynamic model in the DELTA5D simulation software used for the project. We have also added the ability to load a detailed engineering model of the wall and use it in the simulations.

  16. Wall Adhesion and Constitutive Modelling of Strong Colloidal Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel R. Lester; Richard Buscall; Anthony D. Stickland; Peter J. Scales

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall adhesion effects during batch sedimentation of strongly flocculated colloidal gels are commonly assumed to be negligible. In this study in-situ measurements of colloidal gel rheology and solids volume fraction distribution suggest the contrary, where significant wall adhesion effects are observed in a 110mm diameter settling column. We develop and validate a mathematical model for the equilibrium stress state in the presence of wall adhesion under both viscoplastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. These formulations highlight fundamental issues regarding the constitutive modeling of colloidal gels, specifically the relative utility and validity of viscoplastic and viscoelastic rheological models under arbitrary tensorial loadings. The developed model is validated against experimental data, which points toward a novel method to estimate the shear and compressive yield strength of strongly flocculated colloidal gels from a series of equilibrium solids volume fraction profiles over various column widths.

  17. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P. (Intermet Corp., Lynchburg, VA)

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The automotive industry is seeking to replace current car parts made of aluminum and iron castings with thin wall (down to 2 mm) iron castings to reduce the cost and weight of automobiles. The mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings are affected strongly by the thickness of the castings. The thinner castings cool at a faster rate, and microstructural features that form during solidification, and subsequently, transform in the solid state, are strongly dependent on a geometrical parameter related to the ratio of surface area-to-volume of the casting. As this ratio becomes larger, castings cool faster. As a result, the nodule count on the observation plane of the specimens increases dramatically (>2000 nodules/mm2 in most specimens), i.e. as the thickness of castings decreases. Also, the matrix of the thin walled ductile iron castings becomes more ferritic as the ratio of surface area-to-volume decreases.

  18. Penetration of the LCLS Injector Shield Wall at Sector 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Penetrations through the LCLS injector shield wall are needed for the alignment of the accelerator, a diagnostic laser beam and utilities, and are shown in figure 1. The 1-inch diameter LCLS injector beam tube is blocked by the PPS stopper when the injector side of the wall is occupied. The two 3-inch diameter penetrations above and to the left of the beam tube are used by Precision Alignment and will be open only during installation of the injector beamline. Additional 3-inch diameter penetrations are for laser beams which will be used for electron beam diagnostics. These will not be plugged when the injector occupied. Other penetrations for the RF waveguide and other utilities are approximately 13-inch from the floor and as such are far from the line-of-sight of any radiation sources. The waveguide and utility penetrations pass only through the thicker wall as shown in the figure. The principal issue is with the two laser penetrations, since these will be open when the linac is operating and people are in the LCLS injector area. A principal concern is radiation streaming through the penetrations due to direct line-of sight of the PEP-2 lines. To answer this, fans of rays were traced through the 3-inch diameter laser penetrations as shown in Figures 2 and 3. Figure 2 gives the top view of the shield walls, the main linac and PEP-2 lines, and the ray-fans. The fans appear to originate between the walls since their angular envelope is defined by the greatest angle possible when rays are just on the 3-inch diameter at the inner most and outermost wall surfaces. The crossovers of all possible rays lie half way between these two surfaces. As the end-on view of Figure 3 clearly shows, there is no direct line-of-sight through the laser penetrations of the PEP-2 or linac beamlines.

  19. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y. S., E-mail: ypark@pppl.gov; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York 10027 (United States); Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable ?{sub N} close to the ideal with-wall limit, ?{sub N}{sup wall}, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n?=?1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at ?{sub N} up to 86% of ?{sub N}{sup wall} but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of ?{sub N}{sup wall} without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  20. Stability of winding cosmic wall lattices with X type junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Carter

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work confirms the stability of a class of domain wall lattice models that can produce accelerated cosmological expansion, with pressure to density ratio $w=-1/3$ at early times, and with $w=-2/3$ at late times when the lattice scale becomes large compared to the wall thickness. For walls of tension $T_{I}$, the relevant X type junctions could be unstable (for a sufficiently acute intersection angle $\\alpha$) against separation into a pair of Y type junctions joined by a compound wall, only if the tension $T_{II}$ of the latter were less than $2T_{I}$ (and for an approximately right-angled intersection if it were less that $\\sqrt{2} T_{I}$) which can not occur in the class considered here. In an extensive category of multicomponent scalar field models of forced harmonic (linear or non-linear) type it is shown how the relevant tension -- which is the same as the surface energy density $U$ of the wall -- can be calculated as the minimum (geodesic) distance between the relevant vacuum states as measured on the space of field values $\\Phi^i$ using a positive definite (Riemannian) energy metric $dU^2=\\tilde G_{ij} d\\Phi^i d\\Phi^j$ that is obtained from the usual kinetic metric (which is flat for a model with ordinary linear kinetic part) by application of a conformal factor proportional to the relevant potential function $V$. For suitably periodic potential functions there will be corresponding periodic configurations -- with parallel walls characterised by incrementation of a winding number -- in which the condition for stability of large scale bunching modes is shown to be satisfied automatically. It is suggested that such a configuration -- with a lattice lengthscale comparable to intergalactic separation distances -- might have been produced by a late stage of cosmological inflation.

  1. Earth melter with rubble walls and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Chris C. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improvement to the earth melter described and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,618. The improvement is the use of rubble for retaining walls. More specifically, the retaining walls rest on ground level and extend above ground level piling rubble around a melt zone. A portion of the melter may be below grade wherein sidewalls are formed by the relatively undisturbed native soil or rock, and the rubble may be used as a backfill liner for the below grade sidewalls.

  2. Avoiding the dangers of a soft-wall singularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien P. George; Marieke Postma

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We critically analyse the nature of the infrared singularity in Randall-Sundrum soft-wall models, where the extra dimension is dynamically compactified by the formation of a curvature singularity. Due to the Israel junction conditions, this singularity can only be shielded by a time-independent black-hole horizon if there is ghost matter on the UV brane. For this construction the spectrum of 4D states is shown to be similar to the original soft-wall case. We point out, however, that no such shielding is needed, as the singularity satisfies unitary boundary conditions.

  3. Saffron Crocus and Yellow Garments in Aegean Wall-Painting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehak, Paul

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rehak - Colours Conf. Sep 9-11, 2001 - 1 "Saffron Crocus and Yellow Garments in Aegean Wall-Painting" PAUL REHAK DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS Abstract: The discovery of well-preserved frescoes at Akrotiri on Thera has vastly... in the Pompe of Ptolemy II). word count: 250 Rehak - Colours Conf. Sep 9-11, 2001 - 2 "Saffron Crocus and Yellow Garments in Aegean Wall-Painting" PAUL REHAK Text: INTRODUCTION In most human societies, both ancient to modern, color in costume serves...

  4. Domain Wall Formation In The Post-Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Lalak; S. Thomas

    1993-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the evolution of the probability distribution $\\pp (\\chi ,\\chib, \\t)$, associated with an inhomogeneous light scalar field $\\chi$ in the Robertson-Walker Universe, where the inhomogeneities are produced by quantum fluctuations during an earlier inflationary epoch. For a specific choice of scalar potential which occurs in models of so called late-time phase transitions in which domain walls are produced, $\\pp$ is shown to evolve from a Gaussian to a non-Gaussian distribution. The structure of the latter justifies the recent use of 3-dimensional percolation theory to describe the initial distribution of domain walls in these models.

  5. Behavior of a full scale tieback wall in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Moonkyung

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEHAVIOR OP A PULL SCALE TIEBACK WALL IN SAND A Thesis by MOONKYUNG CHUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering BEHAUIOR OF A FULL SCALE TIEBACR WALL IN SAND A Thesis MOONKYUNG CHUNG Approved as to style and content by ean-Louis Briaud hair of Committee) Derek V. Morris (Member) Christo her C. Mathewson (Member) Jam T. P. ao...

  6. Passive test-cell experiments during the winter of 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, J.C.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the winter of 1979-80 the performance of a variety of passive solar heating configurations in 14 passive test cells were monitored. The cells included attached greenhouses, masonry and water walls with black-chrome absorber surfaces, night insulation, and phase-change thermal storage walls. The results of these side-by-side tests were used to make quantitative comparisons of the delivered performance of these configurations for the conditions under which they were tested.

  7. Method of controlling the side wall thickness of a turbine nozzle segment for improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane extending therebetween. Each band has a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band has an inturned flange defining with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The outer surface of the side wall is provided with a step prior to welding the cover to the side wall. A thermal barrier coating is applied in the step and, after the cover is welded to the side wall, the side wall is finally machined to a controlled thickness removing all, some or none of the coating.

  8. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Philip A. (Moore, ID); Manhart, Larry K. (Pingree, ID)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  9. Heat transfer and friction in a square channel with one-wall or two-wall rib turbulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jie Joy

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION IN A SQUARE CHANNEL WITH ONE-WAIL OR TWO-WAII RIB TURBULATORS A Thesis by JIE JOY HUANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of Commit tee) D. Rhode (Member) . A. Hassan (Member) I W. Bradley (Head of Department) December 1991 ABSTRACT Heat Transfer and Friction in a Square Channel with One-Wall or Two-Wall Rib Turbulators. (December 1991) Jie Joy Huang, B. S...

  10. Lift and down-gradient shear-induced diffusion in Red Blood Cell suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xavier Grandchamp; Gwennou Coupier; Aparna Srivastav; Christophe Minetti; Thomas Podgorski

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of Red Blood Cells in a confined channel flow is inhomogeneous and shows a marked depletion near the walls due to a competition between migration away from the walls and shear-induced diffusion resulting from interactions between particles. We investigated the lift of RBCs in a shear flow near a wall and measured a significant lift velocity despite the tumbling motion of cells. We also provide values for the collective and anisotropic shear-induced diffusion of a cloud of RBCs, both in the direction of shear and in the direction of vorticity. A generic down-gradient subdiffusion characterized by an exponent 1/3 is highlighted.

  11. Faster motion of double 360° domain walls system induced by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, Q. Y.; Mu, C. P.; Zheng, Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, Q. F.; Wang, J. B., E-mail: wangjb@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Applied Magnetics, Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated a double 360° domain walls system in two parallel nanowires. Two domain walls are coupled to each other via magnetostatic interaction. When a spin-polarized current is applied to only one nanowire or both nanowires with the same direction, the two domain walls propagate along nanowires together. The critical velocity of such system is obviously higher than that of a single 360° domain wall. The interaction between the two domain walls can be modeled as two bodies that connected by a spring, and we analyzed the coupling characteritics of the double 360° domain walls at last.

  12. Between Facebook and JPMorgan, Wall St. woes By PALLAVI GOGOI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Between Facebook and JPMorgan, Wall St. woes mount By PALLAVI GOGOI The Associated Press Updated: 5 public offering of Facebook stock last week, which was fumbled by the banks that managed the deal against Facebook and Morgan Stanley, the bank that shepherded the IPO, over reports that it withheld

  13. Magnetic Wall Climbing Robot for Thin Surfaces with Specific Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Magnetic Wall Climbing Robot for Thin Surfaces with Specific Obstacles W. Fischer¹, F. Tâche high magnetic forces The main optimization criterion for this robot was to design it as light@ethz.ch Summary. This paper describes a novel solution to a mobile climbing robot on mag- netic wheels, designed

  14. Characterization of Solution-Processed Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    ductility was retained.[4] Po¨tschke et al. reported a significant increase in the conductivity and the dielectric constant of a polycarbonate composite by adding multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs).[5 it is conductive, was calculated to be 1.0 wt.-% for the MWNTs. Ounaies Full Paper Dispersion of CNTs in polymers

  15. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

    1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument is described for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A packet production line model is also described. 3 figures.

  16. arterial wall dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wall dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Viscoelastic Models for Passive Arterial...

  17. Observational Constraints on Varying-alpha Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. P. Avelino; L. Sousa

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility that current hints of a spatial variation of the fine structure constant at high redshift could be due to a biased domain wall network described by a scalar field non-minimally coupled to the electromagnetic field. We show that in order to be cause of the reported spatial variation of the fine structure constant without being in conflict with the observed anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background, the characteristic scale of the network would have to be of the order of the Hubble radius and the fractional contribution of the domain wall network to the energy density of the Universe would need to be in the range $10^{-10} temperature distribution of the cosmic microwave background detected by Planck and WMAP and provide a significant contribution to the excess B-mode polarisation power detected by BICEP2. Since the domain wall contribution to the cosmic energy budget only becomes important at late times, domain wall networks cannot play a significant role as a seed for large scale structure formation and primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies.

  18. Liquid Wall Science in other Scientific Pursuits and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    /sheet/ribbon/sphere casting, flood/jet soldering, ocean waves, hull design, ocean/river hydraulic engineering, surfing, liquid, wetted-wall absorbers/chemical reactor, condensers, vertical tube evaporator, film cooling of turbine vortices; ·Low Joule and Viscous dissipation; ·Insignificant effect on the hydraulic drag. 2-D turbulence

  19. Vector dark domain wall solitons in a fiber ring laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Zhang; D. Y. Tang; L. M. Zhao; R. J. Knize

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe a novel type of vector dark soliton in a fiber ring laser. The vector dark soliton consists of stable localized structures separating the two orthogonal linear polarization eigenstates of the laser emission and is visible only when the total laser emission is measured. Moreover, polarization domain splitting and moving polarization domain walls (PDWs) were also experimentally observed.

  20. Energy-momentum balance in particle - domain wall perforating collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Gal'tsov; E. Yu. Melkumova; P. A. Spirin

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the energy-momentum balance in the perforating collision of a point particle with an infinitely thin planar domain wall within the linearized gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Since the metric of the wall increases with distance, the wall and the particle are never free, and their energy-momentum balance involves not only the instantaneous kinetic momenta, but also the non-local contribution of gravitational stresses. However, careful analysis shows that the stresses can be unambiguously divided between the colliding objects leading to definition of the gravitationally dressed momenta. These take into account for gravity in the same way as the potential energy does in the non-relativistic theory, but our treatment is fully relativistic. Another unusual feature of our problem is the non-vanishing flux of the total energy-momentum tensor through the lateral surface of the world tube. In this case the zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor does not imply conservation of the total momentum defined as the integral over the space-like section of the tube. But one can still define the conservation low infinitesimally, passing to time derivatives of the momenta. Using this definition we establish the momentum balance in terms of the dressed particle and wall momenta.

  1. Thermal instability caused by plasma-wall interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marenkov, E. D. [National Research Nuclear University Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California (United States); Pisarev, A. A.; Tsvetkov, I. V. [National Research Nuclear University Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional model describing recycling of hydrogen isotopes in fusion reactors is proposed. The dispersion relation for thermal instability caused by plasma-wall interaction is derived, and conditions under which it develops are determined. It is shown analytically and numerically that this instability can develop under typical tokamak conditions.

  2. accelerator wall materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerator wall materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Summary of SLAC'S SEY...

  3. Functionalized Few-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie

    Functionalized Few-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Mechanical Reinforcement of Polymeric Composites Ye the application of such materials as reinforcing fillers in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- based composites. The results-polymer composites has remained elusive. In this study, free-standing carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer composite films

  4. The height and range of watermelons without wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Feierl

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the weak limit of the distribution of the random variables "height" and "range" on the set of p-watermelons without wall restriction as the number of steps tends to infinity. Additionally, we provide asymptotics for the moments of the random variable "height".

  5. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN); Fine, H. Alan (Lexington, KY)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head.

  6. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (117 Oklahoma Ave., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Thacker, Louis H. (3727 Frostwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37921); Fine, H. Alan (949 Wishbone Cir., Lexington, KY 40502)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head 18 to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum Within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A packet production line model is also described.

  7. SpinybotII: Climbing Hard Walls with Compliant Microspines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    of these approaches is suitable for porous and typically dusty exterior surfaces such as brick, concrete, stucco, hard vertical surfaces including concrete, brick, stucco and masonry without using suction or adhesives demonstrated on brick and concrete walls [11] with considerable success. However, this approach consumes

  8. Heat exchanger with leak detecting double wall tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieberbach, George (Tampa, FL); Bongaards, Donald J. (Seminole, FL); Lohmeier, Alfred (Tampa, FL); Duke, James M. (St. Petersburg, all of, FL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A straight shell and tube heat exchanger utilizing double wall tubes and three tubesheets to ensure separation of the primary and secondary fluid and reliable leak detection of a leak in either the primary or the secondary fluids to further ensure that there is no mixing of the two fluids.

  9. Quantum rotation of hydrogen in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildirim, Taner

    be widely used as an energy carrier. Current hydrogen storage technologies, in partic- ular, are inadequate Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction It is desirable to develop hydrogen-based energyQuantum rotation of hydrogen in single-wall carbon nanotubes C.M. Brown a,b , T. Yildirim b , D

  10. Spring Flicks 2008 Winners Audience Award, Winner: THIN WALLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Spring Flicks 2008 Winners Audience Award, Winner: THIN WALLS Audience Award, First Runner-Up: HIStory Audience Award Second Runner-up: PASSENGER SEAT Jury Award, Best Short Winner: PASSENGER SEAT Jury Award, Best Director, Winner: Jerry and Mike Thompson, PASSENGER SEAT Jury Award, Best Director, First

  11. Early Recognition of Lung's Air Sacs Wall Collapsing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Early Recognition of Lung's Air Sacs Wall Collapsing M. EMAM, J-F RENAUD de la Faverie, N. GHARBI discusses the possibility of applying a non- liner analysis approach on air density distribution within lung airways tree at any level of branching1. Computed Tomography (CT) 2 source images of the lung

  12. Vibrational properties of double-walled carbon J. Maultzsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    , University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia Abstract. We study the vibrational properties, the change in phonon frequencies due to the wall interaction is larger for the high-energy optical phonon. Total energy per carbon atom after relaxation of the atomic positions. Etot eV/atom radius Å Etot e

  13. Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

    2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

  14. Gas mixing in the wall layer of a CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterneus, J.; Johnsson, F. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer-gas measurements were carried out in the transport zone of a 12 MW CFB boiler with special emphasis on the wall-layer flow. Helium (He) was used as tracer gas and a mass spectrometer was used to determine the He-concentrations. The primary gas velocity, U{sub 0}, was 1.2, 2.6 and 4.3 m/s (no secondary air) and the bed material was silica sand with an average particle diameter of 0.32 mm. Tracer gas was injected at different distances from one of the furnace walls and sampled above and below the injection level. In the wall layer, tracer-gas concentrations were detected above (C{sub above}) as well as below (C{sub below}) the injection height for all operating conditions, i.e., the gas flows both up and down from the injection point. The data show that the net flow of tracer gas in the wall layer depends on the operating conditions, and the concentration ratio of the down- and up-flowing gas, {psi} = C{sub below}/C{sub above}, decreases with increased gas velocity ({psi} > 1 for U{sub 0} = 1.2 m/s, {psi} {approx} 1 for U{sub 0} = 2.6 m/s and {psi} < 1 for U{sub 0} = 4.3 m/s). There exists a gas exchange between the core region and the wall-layer. A plug flow model applied to the core region gives a radial dispersion coefficient, D{sub r}, in the range of 0.015--0.025 m{sup 2}/s which is higher than the D{sub r} values reported in literature which are below 0.01 m{sup 2}/x. However, the latter values were obtained in tall and narrow risers.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water between Metal Walls under Electric Field: Dielectric Response and Dynamics after Field Reversal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyohei Takae; Akira Onuki

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study water between parallel metal walls under applied electric field accounting for the image effect at $T=298$ K. The electric field due to the surface charges serves to attract and orient nearby water molecules, while it tends to a constant determined by the mean surface charge density away from the walls. We find Stern boundary layers with thickness about $5$ $\\rm \\AA$ and a homogeneously polarized bulk region. The molecules in the layers more sensitively respond to the applied field than in the bulk. As a result, the potential drop in the layers is larger than that in the bulk unless the cell length exceeds 10 nm. We also examine the hydrogen bonds, which tend to make small angles with respect to the walls in the layers even without applied field. The average local field considerably deviates from the classical Lorentz field and the local field fluctuations are very large in the bulk. If we suppose a nanometer-size sphere around each molecule, the local field contribution from its exterior is nearly equal to that from the continuum electrostatics and that from its interior yields the deviation from the classical Lorentz field. As a nonequilibrium problem, we investigate the dynamics after a reversal of applied field, where the relaxation is mostly caused by large-angle rotational jumps after 1 ps due to the presence of the hydrogen bond network. The molecules undergoing these jumps themselves form hydrogen-bonded clusters heterogeneously distributed in space.

  16. Thermal conductor for high-energy electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal conductor for use with an electrochemical energy storage device is disclosed. The thermal conductor is attached to one or both of the anode and cathode contacts of an electrochemical cell. A resilient portion of the conductor varies in height or position to maintain contact between the conductor and an adjacent wall structure of a containment vessel in response to relative movement between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cell and conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cell and thermally conductive and electrically resistive material disposed between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may be fabricated to include a resilient portion having one of a substantially C-shaped, double C-shaped, Z-shaped, V-shaped, O-shaped, S-shaped, or finger-shaped cross-section. An elastomeric spring element may be configured so as to be captured by the resilient conductor for purposes of enhancing the functionality of the thermal conductor. The spring element may include a protrusion that provides electrical insulation between the spring conductor and a spring conductor of an adjacently disposed electrochemical cell in the presence of relative movement between the cells and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may also be fabricated from a sheet of electrically conductive material and affixed to the contacts of a number of electrochemical cells.

  17. Domain wall mobility in nanowires: transverse versus vortex walls R. Wieser, U. Nowak and K. D. Usadel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usadel, K. D.

    Arrays of magnetic nanowires are possible candidates for patterned magnetic storage media [1, 2]. For these nanowires and also for other future magneto­electronic devices the understanding of domain wall motion and mobility is important for the controlled switching of the nanostructure. In a recent experiment

  18. Importance of Wall Collisions for Particle-Particle Detachment in Dry Powder Inhalers, and Advanced Wall Collision Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    for the normal force developed by Thornton and coworkers2 ; and · Coulomb's law of friction. From the simulationImportance of Wall Collisions for Particle-Particle Detachment in Dry Powder Inhalers, and Advanced Fractions generated inside Dry Powder Inhalers, by analysing detachment of drug particles from carrier

  19. The ultrastructure and histochemistry of epidermal mucilage cells in Tragia ramosa Torr. (Euphorbiaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Johnny Lee

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the laminar and stipular portions of the leaves. Mucilage cells were also found to occur in the outer ovary wall layer. Mucilage cells have been found to occur in the epidermal layers of the above tissues, and only in mature stipules is mucilage found... outside the cells in the intercellular spaces of the mesophyll. Ultrastructurally, the mucilage is fibrillar and reticulated in appearance and in many areas the fibrils of the mucilage appear to be continuous with the fibrils of the cell wall...

  20. Current-driven Domain Wall Dynamics And Its Electric Signature In Ferromagnetic Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study current-induced domain wall dynamics in a thin ferromagnetic nanowire. We derive the effective equations of domain wall motion, which depend on the wire geometry and material parameters. We describe the procedure to determine...

  1. Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigations Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-51324 Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics leading to partial recovery of heat conducted through the wall. The Infiltration Heat Recovery (IHR) factor was introduced to quantify the heat recovery and correct the conventional calculations

  2. Analytical Modeling of Wood Frame Shear Walls Subjected to Vertical Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyendinh, Hai

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    referred to as Analytical Model of wood frame SHEar walls subjected to Vertical load (AMSHEV) is based on the kinematic behavior of wood frame shear walls and captures significant characteristics observed from experimental testing through appropriate...

  3. The Analysis of Dynamic Thermal Performance of Insulated Wall and Building Cooling Energy Consumption in Guangzhou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, L.; Li, X.; Li, L.; Gao, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ST. The simulation predictions indicate that reductions in the cooling load and maximum cooling demand are obtained when the insulation is added in the wall, but the potential of energy saving is quite limited when the wall only is insulated....

  4. Modeling the Impact of Agricultural Terrace Walls on Spatial Patterns of Erosion and Landscape Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaubius, Jennifer

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the Impact of Agricultural Terrace Walls on Spatial Patterns of Erosion and Landscape Evolution Jennifer Glaubius Department of Geography University of Kansas Research Objectives 2 1. Implement terrace walls within a landscape evolution...

  5. Material Characterization and Design Recommendations for Mechanically Stabilized Earth Retaining Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantal, Vishal

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its appearance in 1970s, mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) walls have become a majority among all types of retaining walls due to their economics and satisfactory performance. The Texas Department of Transportation has primarily adopted...

  6. Massively Parallel Spectral Element Large Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Channel Using Wall Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabau, Joshua I

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows are prevalent in engineering and industrial applications. Walls greatly affect turbulent characteristics in many ways including production and propagation of turbulent stresses. While computational fluid dynamics can...

  7. Analytical Modeling of Cyclic Shear - Flexure Interaction in Reinforced Concrete Structural Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolozvari, Kristijan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the wall lateral strength, followed by in- plane buckling ofand buckling of longitudinal reinforcement at the north wall boundary causing the laterallateral instability of the boundary zone (out-of-plane buckling)

  8. Apparatus for impingement cooling a side wall adjacent an undercut region of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and vanes therebetween. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. Slots are formed through the inturned flange along the nozzle side wall. A plate having through-apertures extending between opposite edges thereof is disposed in each slot, the slots and plates being angled such that the cooling medium exiting the apertures in the second cavity lie close to the side wall for focusing and targeting cooling medium onto the side wall.

  9. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 115210 (2011) Spin torque and charge resistance of ferromagnetic semiconductor 2 and domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transport across the domain wall is possible, such as for magnetic semiconductor domain walls (whose walls model of a magnetic semiconductor, whose electronic structure is described with a Stoner model and whose

  10. Effects of Framing on the Thermal Performance of Wood and Steel-Framed Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosny, J.; Yarbrough, D. W.; Childs, P.; Mohiuddin, S. A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the consequences of installation imperfections in cavity insulation on thermal performance are analyzed. The results of the study demonstrated significant sensitivity in some configurations of residential walls to the framing factor and insulation installation... imperfections. Keywords R-value, Framing Factor, Cavity Insulation, Framing Effect Coefficient, Steel Frame walls, Wood-frame walls TERMINOLOGY OF THE WHOLE WALL R-VALUE PROCEDURE USED IN THIS PAPER The following list of thermal performance...

  11. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  12. Behavior of Laterally Loaded Shafts Constructed Behind the Face of a Mechanically Stabilized Earth Block Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierson, Matthew Charles

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    for all the failure mechanisms of conventional retaining walls. In addition, MSE walls must be designed for modes of failure unique to MSE walls. Failure of an MSE wall can occur several ways: sliding of layers, pullout of the reinforcement, elongation... lagging and panels, and wrapped sheets of geosynthetics? (FHWA, 1996). Most MSE systems use either a galvanized or epoxy coated steel reinforcement, or synthetic reinforcement like high density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene, or polyester yarn...

  13. Comment on “Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 032506 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakharov, Leonid E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Li, Xujing [Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper gives the derivation of the MHD boundary condition for the plasma flow to the wall during disruptions.

  14. Computational studies of the effect of wall temperature on hypersonic shock-induced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the infrared thermography images. Reinartz et al [2] focussed upon assessment of the role of wall temperature

  15. One-loop fluctuation-dissipation formula for bubble-wall velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The limiting bubble-wall velocity during a first-order electroweak phase transition is of interest in scenarios for electroweak baryogenesis. Khlebnikov has recently proposed an interesting method for computing this velocity based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. I demonstrate that at one-loop order this method is identical to simple, earlier techniques for computing the wall velocity based on computing the friction from particles reflecting off or transmitting through the wall in the ideal gas ( thin-wall'') limit.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorn Woods, IL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  18. Sustainable wall construction and exterior insulation retrofit technology process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, Arun (Bethesda, MD)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost process for exterior wall insulation retrofit, or new wall construction by stacking layers of fabric tube filled with insulating material against a wall and covering them with mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

  19. Appendix D-1 Abutment--A concrete wall that supports the end of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    motion in wall- bounded turbulent flows and particle deposition onto solid walls were performed to accumulate near the wall region and mix more efficiently along the longitudinal direction, while particles and then drifted back to the main stream, which is called particle resuspension. Yao et.al. [7] also investigated

  20. STABILIZATION OF KINK INSTABILITIES BY EDDY CURRENTS IN A SEGMENTED WALL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    STABILIZATION OF KINK INSTABILITIES BY EDDY CURRENTS IN A SEGMENTED WALL AND COMPARISON WITH IDEAL and measured equi- librium wall eddy currents. The stability analysis of these equilibria predicts patterns of instability induced eddy currents for a model wall that is continuous and perfectly conducting

  1. A UNIFIED MODEL FOR ION DEPOSITION AND THERMOMECHANICAL RESPONSE IN DRY WALL LASER IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    . INTRODUCTION In order to permit the design of an economically viable IFE power plant, we require a chamber wall reach the wall. These threats, consisting of x- rays, ions, and neutrons, can lead to wall failure associated with the IFE threats. In some cases, these inertial effects lead to stress waves that can lead

  2. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct-drive target proposed by NRLDry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition Lifetime is a key issue for the IFE dry chamber wall configuration. Past studies, such as SOMBRERO

  3. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    provided a more detailed assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct much faster than the ions and would reach the chamber wall within about 20 ns in the case without protective gas. The ions take longer to reach the chamber wall. As an example, a simple estimate of the ion

  4. Protective interior wall and attaching means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, R.D.; Upham, G.A.; Anderson, P.M.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wall basically consists of an array of small rectangular plates attached to the existing walls with threaded fasteners. The protective wall effectively conceals and protects all mounting hardware beneath the plate array, while providing a substantial surface area that will absorb plasma energy.

  5. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to reduce climate change as photosynthesis-mediated carbon sequestration and carbonation serve to reduce sequestration and carbonation. Moreover the increase in the wall's thermal resistance with wall thickness atmospheric carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis is performed on three criteria: wall thickness, renewal

  6. Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

  7. On Lithium Wall and Performance of Magnetic Fusion Device S. I. Krasheninnikov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    On Lithium Wall and Performance of Magnetic Fusion Device S. I. Krasheninnikov1 , L. E. Zakharov2 It is shown that lithium walls resulting in zero recycling conditions at the edge of magnetic fusion device strong impact of fully absorbing lithium walls on the performance of magnetic fusion devices have been

  8. Accepted Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Accepted Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary Date: 22 January 2014 Please cite this article as: L.G. Lauredan, H. Florian, D. Jean, A wall heat;1 A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled- rotary kilns with secondary air flow and recycled

  9. Flowfield and wall pressure characteristics downstream of a boundary layer suction device.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    Flowfield and wall pressure characteristics downstream of a boundary layer suction device. Meagan A-dimensional slit can significantly reduce the fluctuating wall pressure immediately downstream of the suction slit momentum regions of the flow with the wall at the downstream edge of the suction slit. The third region

  10. Four-wall turbine airfoil with thermal strain control for reduced cycle fatigue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cambell, Christian X

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil (20B) with a thermal expansion control mechanism that increases the airfoil camber (60, 61) under operational heating. The airfoil has four-wall geometry, including pressure side outer and inner walls (26, 28B), and suction side outer and inner walls (32, 34B). It has near-wall cooling channels (31F, 31A, 33F, 33A) between the outer and inner walls. A cooling fluid flow pattern (50C, 50W, 50H) in the airfoil causes the pressure side inner wall (28B) to increase in curvature under operational heating. The pressure side inner wall (28B) is thicker than walls (26, 34B) that oppose it in camber deformation, so it dominates them in collaboration with the suction side outer wall (32), and the airfoil camber increases. This reduces and relocates a maximum stress area (47) from the suction side outer wall (32) to the suction side inner wall (34B, 72) and the pressure side outer wall (26).

  11. Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects of in vivo elastase treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects of in vivo elastase P. Ingenito, and Be´la Suki. Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects behavior of the alveolar walls and the macroscopic mechanical properties of the whole lung in an in vivo

  12. Steel Plate Shear Walls From Research to Codification Jeffrey W. Berman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    of steel plate shear wall(s) (SPSW) design as these systems can be an attractive option for lateral load, the design limit state for SPSW was considered to be out-of-plane buckling of the infill panel. To prevent buckling, engineers designed steel walls with heavily stiffened infill plates that were not economically

  13. Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Doerner; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; S. Luckhardt; et al

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. Sputtering and erosion tests are currently underway in the PISCES device at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). To complement this effort, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry will be addressed by a proposed new groundbreaking experiment in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The CDX-U plasma is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used for the first time with a toroidal plasma. Since CDX-U is a small ST, only approximately1 liter or less of lithium is required to produce a toroidal liquid lithium limiter target, leading to a quick and cost-effective experiment.

  14. Mesoporous organosilica nanotubes containing a chelating ligand in their walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiao; Goto, Yasutomo; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Shinji, E-mail: inagaki@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)/ACT-C, Nagakute, Aichi, 480-1192 (Japan); Ohsuna, Tetsu [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the synthesis of organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2?-bipyridine chelating ligands within their walls, employing a single-micelle-templating method. These nanotubes have an average pore diameter of 7.8 nm and lengths of several hundred nanometers. UV-vis absorption spectra and scanning transmission electron microscopy observations of immobilized nanotubes with an iridium complex on the bipyridine ligands showed that the 2,2?-bipyridine groups were homogeneously distributed in the benzene-silica walls. The iridium complex, thus, immobilized on the nanotubes exhibited efficient catalytic activity for water oxidation using Ce{sup 4+}, due to the ready access of reactants to the active sites in the nanotubes.

  15. Finite element analyses for seismic shear wall international standard problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two identical reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls, which consist of web, flanges and massive top and bottom slabs, were tested up to ultimate failure under earthquake motions at the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation`s (NUPEC) Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, Japan. NUPEC provided the dynamic test results to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) for use as an International Standard Problem (ISP). The shear walls were intended to be part of a typical reactor building. One of the major objectives of the Seismic Shear Wall ISP (SSWISP) was to evaluate various seismic analysis methods for concrete structures used for design and seismic margin assessment. It also offered a unique opportunity to assess the state-of-the-art in nonlinear dynamic analysis of reinforced concrete shear wall structures under severe earthquake loadings. As a participant of the SSWISP workshops, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed finite element analyses under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Three types of analysis were performed, i.e., monotonic static (push-over), cyclic static and dynamic analyses. Additional monotonic static analyses were performed by two consultants, F. Vecchio of the University of Toronto (UT) and F. Filippou of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). The analysis results by BNL and the consultants were presented during the second workshop in Yokohama, Japan in 1996. A total of 55 analyses were presented during the workshop by 30 participants from 11 different countries. The major findings on the presented analysis methods, as well as engineering insights regarding the applicability and reliability of the FEM codes are described in detail in this report. 16 refs., 60 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Performance limits of fusion first-wall structural materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D. L.; Majumdar, S.; Billone, M.; Mattas, R. F.

    1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Key features of fusion energy relate primarily to potential advantages associated with safety and environmental considerations and the near endless supply of fuel. However, it is generally concluded that high performance fusion power systems will be required in order to be economically competitive with other energy options. As in most energy systems, structural materials operating limits pose a primary constraint to the performance of fusion power systems. It is also recognized that for the case of fusion power, the first-wall/blanket system will have a dominant impact on both the economic and safety/environmental attractiveness of fusion energy. The first-wall blanket structure is particularly critical since it must maintain high integrity at relatively high temperatures during exposure to high radiation levels, high surface heat fluxes, and significant primary stresses. The performance limits of the first-wall/blanket structure will be dependent on the structural material properties, the coolant/breeder system, and the specific design configuration. Key factors associated with high performance structural materials include (1) high temperature operation, (2) a large operating temperature window, and (3) a long operating lifetime. High temperature operation is necessary to provide for high power conversion efficiency. As discussed later, low-pressure coolant systems provide significant advantages. A large operating temperature window is necessary to accommodate high surface heating and high power density. The operating temperature range for the structure must include the temperature gradient through the first wall and the coolant system AT required for efficient energy conversion. This later requirement is dependent on the coolant/breeder operating temperature limits. A long operating lifetime of the structure is important to improve system availability and to minimize waste disposition.

  17. A Helical Coolant Channel Design for the Solid Wall Blanket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mogahed, E.A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A helical coolant channel scheme is proposed for the APEX solid wall blanket module. The self-coolant breeder in this system is FLIBE (LiF)2(BeF2). The structural material is the nanocomposited alloy 12YWT. The neutron multiplier used in the current design is either stationary or slow moving liquid lead. The purpose of this study is to design a blanket that can handle a high wall loading (5 MW/m{sup 2}). In the mean time the design provides means to attain the maximum possible blanket outlet temperature and meet all engineering limits on temperature of structural material and liquids. An important issue for such a design is to optimize the system for minimum pressure loss. For advanced ferritic steel (12YWT) an upper temperature limit of 800 deg. C is expected, and a limit of 700 deg. C at the steel/FLIBE interface is recommended.The blanket module is composed of two main continuous routes. The first route is three helical rectangular channels side-by-side that surround a central box. The helical channels are fed from the bottom and exit at the top to feed the central channels in the central box. The coolant helical channels have a cross sectional area with a length of about 10 cm and a width that changes according to the position around the central box. For instance: the width of the coolant channels facing the plasma is the narrowest while it is the widest in the back (farthest from the plasma).In this design the coolant runs around the central box for only 5 turns to cover the total height of the first wall (6.8 m). The design is optimized with the FW channel width as a parameter with the heat transfer requirements at the first wall as the constraints.

  18. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  19. Characterization of double walled carbon nanotubes-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Atheer Mohammad

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF DOUBLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES- POLYVINYLIDENE FLUORIDE NANOCOMPOSITES A Thesis by ATHEER MOHAMMAD ALMASRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... MOHAMMAD ALMASRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Zoubeida Ounaies...

  20. Investigation of the Wall Effect in the long Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Rudenko, E.M. (Inst. of Metal Physics of the Ukrainian Academy of Science, Kiev 252142 (SU))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the long Josephson junctions with edge current injection and shortened control line studied experimentally. It is found that the wall effect is connected with the blockade of vortices entry into the junction by control current, as well as with the existence of the energy barrier for the vortices at the boundary between a projection region and the remainder part of the junction. The significant enhancement of supercurrent due to the blockade was found.

  1. Methanation in catalyst-sprayed tube wall reactors: a review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H. W.; Schehl, R. R.; Haynes, W. P.; Forney, A. J.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and operation of catalyst-sprayed tube wall reactors for methanation are discussed. Reactor tubes were either coated on the inner surface or on the outer surface with a Raney nickel catalyst. A liquid coolant, which was opposite the catalyst-reactant gas-side, removed the heat of methanation. Catalyst performance, reactor operating conditions, spent catalyst analyses, and other results are presented for five PDU tests.

  2. Vortex energy and 360 Neel walls in thinfilm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel walls in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

  3. Quantum reflection and Liouville transformations from wells to walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Dufour; Romain Guérout; Astrid Lambrecht; Serge Reynaud

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Liouville transformations map in a rigorous manner one Schr\\"odinger equation into another, with a changed scattering potential. They are used here to transform quantum reflection of an atom on an attractive well into reflection of the atom on a repulsive wall. While the scattering properties are preserved, the corresponding semiclassical descriptions are completely different. A quantitative evaluation of quantum reflection probabilities is deduced from this method.

  4. Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-6-5 Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls Di Liu Guangfa Tang Fuyun Zhao Doctoral Professor.... INTRODUCTION It has become evident that building products are major contributors to the pollution of the indoor air environment with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [1]. The indoor airflow and temperature distributions also have influence on the emission...

  5. Vortex energy and 360 Neel wall in thinfilm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignat, Radu

    .Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel wall in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

  6. ORNL facilities for testing first-wall components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.C.; Becraft, W.R.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Menon, M.M.; Stirling, W.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future long-impulse magnetic fusion devices will have operating characteristics similar to those described in the design studies of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), the Fusion Engineering Device (FED), and the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). Their first-wall components (pumped limiters, divertor plates, and rf waveguide launchers with Faraday shields) will be subjected to intense bombardment by energetic particles exhausted from the plasma, including fusion products. These particles are expected to have particle energies of approx.100 eV, particle fluxes of approx.10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/, and heat fluxes of approx.1 kW/cm/sup 2/ CW to approx.100 kW/cm/sup 2/ transient. No components are available to simultaneously handle these particle and heat fluxes, survive the resulting sputtering erosion, and remove exhaust gas without degrading plasma quality. Critical issues for research and development of first-wall components have been identified in the INTOR Activity. Test facilities are needed to qualify candidate materials and develop components. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), existing neutral beam and wave heating test facilities can be modified to simulate first-wall environments with heat fluxes up to 30 kW/cm/sup 2/, particle fluxes of approx.10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/, and pulse lengths up to 30 s, within test volumes up to approx.100 L. The characteristics of these test facilities are described, with particular attention to the areas of particle flux, heat flux, particle energy, pulse length, and duty cycle, and the potential applications of these facilities for first-wall component development are discussed.

  7. Lyapunov stability of flowing magnetohydrodynamic plasmas surrounded by resistive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasso, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Throumoulopoulos, G. N. [Association Euratom-Hellenic Republic, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A general stability condition for plasma-vacuum systems with resistive walls is derived by using the Frieman Rotenberg Lagrangian stability formulation [Rev. Mod. Phys. 32, 898 (1960)]. It is shown that the Lyapunov stability limit for external modes does not depend upon the gyroscopic term but upon the sign of the perturbed potential energy only. In the absence of dissipation in the plasma such as viscosity, it is expected that the flow cannot stabilize the system.

  8. Counter-ions at single charged wall: Sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladislav Samaj

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For inhomogeneous classical Coulomb fluids in thermal equilibrium, like the jellium or the two-component Coulomb gas, there exists a variety of exact sum rules which relate the particle one-body and two-body densities. The necessary condition for these sum rules is that the Coulomb fluid possesses good screening properties, i.e. the particle correlation functions or the averaged charge inhomogeneity, say close to a wall, exhibit a short-range (usually exponential) decay. In this work, we study equilibrium statistical mechanics of an electric double layer with counter-ions only, i.e. a globally neutral system of equally charged point-like particles in the vicinity of a plain hard wall carrying a fixed uniform surface charge density of opposite sign. At large distances from the wall, the one-body and two-body counter-ion densities go to zero slowly according to the inverse-power law. In spite of the absence of screening, all known sum rules are shown to hold for two exactly solvable cases of the present system: in the weak-coupling Poisson-Boltzmann limit (in any spatial dimension larger than one) and at a special free-fermion coupling constant in two dimensions. This fact indicates an extended validity of the sum rules and provides a consistency check for reasonable theoretical approaches.

  9. Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector.

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  11. X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

  12. Pinning induced by inter-domain wall interactions in planar magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, T.J.; Bryan, M.T.; Fry, P.W.; Fundi, P.M.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D.A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated pinning potentials created by inter-domain wall magnetostatic interactions in planar magnetic nanowires. We show that these potentials can take the form of an energy barrier or an energy well depending on the walls' relative monopole moments, and that the applied magnetic fields required to overcome these potentials are significant. Both transverse and vortex wall pairs are investigated and it is found that transverse walls interact more strongly due to dipolar coupling between their magnetization structures. Simple analytical models which allow the effects of inter-domain wall interactions to be estimated are also presented.

  13. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of chromosome 10S in maize (Zea mays L.) linked to resistance to Southern rust (Puccinia polysora)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakey, Cynthia Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. James D. Smith F, seedling populations of the maize inbred crosses B73 x B37R, Mo17 x B37R, and Tx5855 x B37R were examined for linkage of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) to the Rpp9 allele from the B37R parent, which... REFERENCES . APPENDIX 1 APPENDIX 2 APPENDIX 3. . VITA Page 1V Vill 16 17 . . . 47 LISl' OF TABLES Table 1. Table 2. Results of reciprocal translocation linkage studies. . . . Probe/Enzyme combinations which yield readable RFLP polymorphisms...

  14. Field measurements of earth pressure on a cantilever retaining wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Larry Wayne

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cells Configuration of Conduit for Pressure Cell Loads Profile of Backfill Material Location of Borings Boring - Sl Boring - S2 . Boring - 53 . Measured Pressure Versus Time Cross Section of a Terra Tec Pressure Cell Movement Measuring System... and key were instrumented with seven Terra Tec pneumatic pressure cells. Due to extreme construction delays, the stem of the above mentioned retaining walI was not instrumented until the third year of the pro- ject. The stem was instrumented with five...

  15. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100 centimeters squared (cm2) beta/gamma. Removable beta/gamma contamination levels seldom exceeded 1,000 dpm/100 cm2, but, in railroad trenches on the reactor pad containing soil on the concrete pad in front of the shield wall, the beta dose rates ranged up to 120 milli-roentgens per hour from radioactivity entrained in the soil. General area dose rates were less than 100 micro-roentgens per hour. Prior to demolition of the reactor shield wall, removable and fixed contaminated surfaces were decontaminated to the best extent possible, using traditional decontamination methods. Fifth, large sections of the remaining structures were demolished by mechanical and open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). Mechanical demolition methods included the use of conventional demolition equipment for removal of three main buildings, an exhaust stack, and a mobile shed. The 5-foot (ft), 5-inch (in.) thick, neutron-activated reinforced concrete shield was demolished by CED, which had never been performed at the NTS.

  16. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane therebetween. Each band includes a nozzle wall, a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and the nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The impingement plate has a turned flange welded to the inturned flange. A backing plate overlies the turned flange and aligned apertures are formed through the backing plate and turned flange to direct and focus cooling flow onto the side wall of the nozzle segment.

  17. The Function of the Early Trichomes Gene in Arabidopsis and Maize.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Poethig

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Lateral organ polarity in Arabidopsis is regulated by antagonistic interactions between genes that promote either adaxial or abaxial identity, but the molecular basis of this interaction is largely unknown. We show that the adaxial regulator ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (AS2) is a direct target of the abaxial regulator KANADI1 (KAN1), and that KAN1 represses the transcription of AS2 in abaxial cells. Mutation of a single nucleotide in a KAN1 binding site in the AS2 promoter causes AS2 to be ectopically expressed in abaxial cells, resulting in a dominant, adaxialized phenotype. We also show that the abaxial expression of KAN1 is mediated directly or indirectly by AS2. These results demonstrate that KAN1 acts as a transcriptional repressor and that mutually repressive interactions between KAN1 and AS2 contribute to the establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity in plants. A screen for mutations that affect the expression of a GFP reporter for KANADI2 produced mutations in two genes, CENTER CITY (CCT) and GRAND CENTRAL (GCT). Mutations in GCT and CCT delay the specification of central and peripheral identity and the globular-to-heart transition, but have little or no effect on the initial growth rate of the embryo. Mutant embryos eventually recover and undergo relatively normal patterning, albeit at an inappropriate size. GCT and CCT were identified as the Arabidopsis orthologs of MED12 and MED13--evolutionarily conserved proteins that act in association with the Mediator complex to negatively regulate transcription. The predicted function of these proteins combined with the effect of gct and cct on embryo development suggests that MED12 and MED13 regulate pattern formation during Arabidopsis embryogenesis by transiently repressing a transcriptional program that interferes with this process. Their mutant phenotype reveals the existence of a previously unknown temporal regulatory mechanism in plant embryogenesis.

  18. Catalytic membranes for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Bolingbrook, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell of the present invention comprises a cathode and an anode, one or both of the anode and the cathode including a catalyst comprising a bundle of longitudinally aligned graphitic carbon nanotubes including a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally and atomically distributed throughout the graphitic carbon walls of said nanotubes. The nanotubes also include nitrogen atoms and/or ions chemically bonded to the graphitic carbon and to the transition metal. Preferably, the transition metal comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and Cr.

  19. PIV flow measurements for heat transfer characterization in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90 ribbed walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    -pass square channel with a smooth wall and a 90° rib-roughened wall. Detailed averaged velocity distributions enhancements for both smooth and ribbed wall two-pass square channels. The rib-induced flow turbulence distribution in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90° ribbed walls. Han and Zhang [3] studied the effect

  20. Experimental study of a fiber absorber-suppressor modified Trombe wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhury, D; Birkebak, R C

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study has been conducted to ascertain the effects of introducing fiber bed absorbers on Trombe wall passive solar collectors. Two identical, Trombe wall passive solar units were constructed that incorporate the basic components of masonry collector-storage walls: glazings, masonry and thermal insulation. Both units were extensively instrumented with thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and insolation are also measured. In the first part of the study the two Trombe wall units were tested with a single glass cover. The thermal performance of both units was found to be virtually identical. In the second part of the study a single cover Trombe wall unit was compared with a double cover unit and the latter was found to have higher air gap and masonry wall temperatures and heat fluxes. In the final phase of the experiment, an absorbing, scattering and emitting fiberglass-like material was placed in the air gap of the single gazed wall. Tests were conducted to compare the solar-thermal performance, heat loss and gain characteristics between the units with and without the fiber absorber-suppressor. This experiment showed that the fiber bed served to decouple the wall at night from its exterior environment and to reduce the heat losses. The modified Trombe wall with the fiber absorber-suppressor out-performed the double glazed Trombe wall system by approximately ten percent gain in useable thermal energy. Also, the fiber bed eliminates one glazing thereby reducing system cost as well.

  1. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    can be calculated as M = ?nullN 2 tanh( ?nullB 0 2kT ) (2.3) In a biological sample that contains about 1mL of water, there are about 10 22 hydrogen nuclei, and at the room... population that is frequently in need of quality tomographic images for the assessment of congenital heart defects. MRI can characterize myocardial function through the use of cine MRI and tagged MRI. The latter provides a means to assess wall motion...

  2. Wall conditioning experiments on TFTR using impurity pellet injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, J.D.; Mansfield, D.K.; Bell, M.G. [and others

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes experiments intended to optimize the limiter conditioning for TFTR supershots. It is shown that deposition of thin layers of lithium on the limiters by impurity pellet injection changes the plasma-wall interaction and improves supershot performance. Series of up to ten Ohmic plasmas each with two lithium pellets were useful in preconditioning the limiter. Generally, plasma performance increased with the amount of lithium deposited up to the maximal amount which could be deposited. Experiments were performed with different materials being deposited (carbon, boron and lithium) and with different methods of deposition.

  3. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Schewe, E.C.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Simplified Methods project of the US NRC-funded Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has as its goal the development of a methodology to perform routine seismic probabilistic risk assessments of commercial nuclear power plants. The study reported here develops calibration factors to relate best estimate response to design values accounting for approximations and simplifications in SSI analysis procedures. Nineteen cases were analyzed and in-structure response compared. The structure of interest was a typical shear wall structure. 6 references, 44 figures, 22 tables.

  4. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  5. Operating and maintenance benefits of automated oven wall temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leuchtmann, K.P. [Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik GmbH, Bochum (Germany); Hinz, D.; Bergbau, D. [Ruhrkohle Bergbau AG, Bottrop (Germany). Prosper Coking Plant; Platts, M. [Thyssen Still Otto Technical Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For a very long time and regardless of all shortcomings associated with it, the manual measurement of the heating flue temperature has been the only method of monitoring the temperature prevailing in a coke oven battery and discovering weak points in the heating system. In the course of the last few years a number of automated temperature measuring systems have been developed that are intended to replace or supplement the manual heating flue measurement system. These measuring systems and their advantages/disadvantages are briefly described in this paper. Additionally, operational experience gathered with the oven chamber wall temperature measuring system is discussed in detail.

  6. Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtilityInformation Waiver of PreferentialWall Lake

  7. Characterizing the Plasma of the Resistive Wall Machine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating Wall Machine by David A.

  8. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic

  9. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in

  10. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall Depinning inStochastic

  11. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall Depinning

  12. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-Wall DepinningStochastic

  13. City of Wall Lake, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation Smyrna Beach,Stuart, Iowa (UtilityCity ofCityCityWall Lake,

  14. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well...

  15. BiFeO3 Domain Wall Energies and Structures: A Combined Experimental and Density Functional Theory+U Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yi; Nelson, Chris; Melville, Alexander; Winchester, Benjamin; Shang, Shunli; Liu, Zi-Kui; Schlom, Darrell G.; Pan, Xiaoqing; Chen, Long-Qing

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined the atomic structures and energies of 109°, 180°, and 71° domain walls in BiFeO3, combining density functional theory+U calculations and aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy images. We find a substantial Bi sublattice shift and a rather uniform Fe sublattice across the walls. The calculated wall energies (?) follow the sequence ?109 180 71 for the 109°, 180°, and 71° walls. We attribute the high 71° wall energy to an opposite tilting rotation of the oxygen octahedra and the low 109° wall energy to the opposite twisting rotation of the oxygen octahedra across the domain walls.

  16. Cell Stem Cell Clinical Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Cell Stem Cell Clinical Progress Rapid Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Automated of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada 6McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network

  17. Micro-Honeycomb Network Structure of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Heterojunction Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    as insulating layer and Pd as electrode. By using the hot water technique [7], the removal of micro-way to the electrode. Part of this work was financially supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (22226006

  18. NREL: News Feature - NREL's CelA Catalyzes Plant Cell Walls Faster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    led by Michael Himmel aren't resting on their laurels, or their patents. They're examining the other enzymes secreted by the organism. They're also using what they've...

  19. Evaluation of Yeast Cell Wall on Early Production Laying Hen Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashim, Mohammed Malik Hashim 1981-

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and Roberfroid, 1995). Prebiotics tend 3 to be undigested carbohydrates that may be fermented by intestinal microbes (Bauer et al., 2006). In this paper, we review the use of prebiotics and their influence on the poultry industry with regards... hens between 36 and 51 weeks old (Bozkurt et al., 2012b). They reported that these enhancements in egg quality might be because of the influence of the prebiotic on the metabolic activity of the intestinal microflora which improves the absorption...

  20. Breakdown of Cell Wall Nanostructure in Dilute Acid Pretreated Sai Venkatesh Pingali,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by terrestrial plants has the potential to be an abundant, renewable feedstock for the production of ethanol feedstocks for production of ethanol and other fuels, herbaceous crops, particularly grasses, offer a number of glucose for fermentative ethanol production, but must be first depolymerized by enzy- matic or chemical

  1. 3D Electron Tomography of Switchgrass Cell Wall Deconstruction by Clostridium cellulolyticum (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, T.; Donohoe, B.; Wei, H.; Yang, Y.; Keller, M.; Himmel, M.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster describes research about biomass-digesting microorganisms that produce structured biomass-degrading enzyme complexes.

  2. Discovery of Fungal Cell Wall Components Using Evolutionary and Functional Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Divya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    profiling and comparative genomics approaches." Eukaryotcerevisiae." Comp Funct Genomics 2(3): 124-42. Dinsdale, E.profiling and comparative genomics approaches." Eukaryot

  3. Effect of acetate and other cell wall components on enzymatic hydrolysis of aspen wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Fanran

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , or OAc was the only component reacting with such a dilute KOH solution and consumed KOH. OAc is the easiest 25 '0 ~O Wlo QMI0GOCO IOV Q0ICOIAmO 4 cPOcv 0 O O Yl III Vl Vl Vl O IOIOd COOM III Yl H Pl ~ ~ O O 0 0 0 QOt l IAIAV)Q O O ~ l III O 4...

  4. The plant cell wall decomposing machinery underlies the functional diversity of forest fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastwood, Daniel C.; Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Majcherczyk, Andrzej; Schneider, Patrick; Aerts, Andrea; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Baker, Scott E.; Barry, Kerrie; Bendiksby, Mika; Blumentritt, Melanie; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Cullen, Dan; Vries, Ronald P. de; Gathman, Allen; Goodell, Barry; Henrissat, Bernard; Ihrmark, Katarina; Kauserud, Hä; vard; Kohler, Annegret; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lavin, José; L.; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lindquist, Erika; Lilly, Walt; Lucas, Susan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Oguiza, José; A.; Park, Jongsun; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Riley, Robert; Rosling, Anna; Salamov, Asaf; Schmidt, Olaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Skrede, Inger; Stenlid, Jan; Wiebenga, Ad; Xie, Xinfeng; Kü; es, Ursula; Hibbett, David S.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Hö; gberg, Nils; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Watkinson, Sarah C.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brown rot decay removes cellulose and hemicellulose from wood?residual lignin contributing up to 30percent of forest soil carbon?and is derived from an ancestral white rot saprotrophy in which both lignin and cellulose are decomposed. Comparative and functional genomics of the ?dry rot? fungus Serpula lacrymans, derived from forest ancestors, demonstrated that the evolution of both ectomycorrhizal biotrophy and brown rot saprotrophy were accompanied by reductions and losses in specific protein families, suggesting adaptation to an intercellular interaction with plant tissue. Transcriptome and proteome analysis also identified differences in wood decomposition in S. lacrymans relative to the brown rot Postia placenta. Furthermore, fungal nutritional mode diversification suggests that the boreal forest biome originated via genetic coevolution of above- and below-ground biota

  5. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan M.

    S Booker2 , Jose R Botella4 , Nicholas C Carpita5 , Tyrell Carr2 , Jin-Gui Chen6 , Thomas Ryan Cooke7 , Ralph Panstruga11,13, *, Joachim F Uhrig1, * and Alan M Jones2,14, * 1 Botanical Institute, University: Department of Botany, University of Delhi, Delhi, India * Corresponding authors. R Panstruga, Institute

  6. Three Cell Wall Mannoproteins Facilitate the Uptake of Iron in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botstein, David

    for publication, September 24, 2001, and in revised form, October 19, 2001 Published, JBC Papers in Press, October-dependent transcrip- tion factor in yeast. FIT1, FIT2, and FIT3 (for facilitator of iron transport) were more highly active allele of AFT1, was expressed. Northern blot analysis confirmed that FIT1, FIT2, and FIT3 m

  7. Roles of Clostridium difficile cell wall and flagellar proteins in pathogenicity and innate immunity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehlawi, Saied Waheed

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The number of cases of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been increasing globally. CDI is the main cause of nosocomial diarrhoea, which may be life-threatening in complicated cases, and also costs the health care ...

  8. Video Article Comprehensive Compositional Analysis of Plant Cell Walls (Lignocellulosic biomass)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Markus

    for a thorough characterization of plant biomass feedstocks. Here we describe a comprehensive analytical

  9. Video Article Comprehensive Compositional Analysis of Plant Cell Walls (Lignocellulosic biomass)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Markus

    and optimized. This fact underpins the need for a thorough characterization of plant biomass feedstocks. Here we

  10. Plasmodesmal receptor-like kinases identified through analysis of rice cell wall extracted proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003; Searle et al. 2003; Chinchilla et al. 2007; Wan et al.Arabidopsis. Plant Mol Biol Chinchilla D, Zipfel C, Robatzek

  11. Complementary mechanisms of plant cell wall deconstruction by free and complexed enzyme systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010About UsComplementary m echanisms

  12. NREL's CelA Catalyzes Plant Cell Walls Faster - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NREL Refines Method tofor SolarNREL's CelA

  13. Degradation of Algal Cell Walls by Enzymes and Dyes - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal Decision Support forDeep

  14. Studying plant cell walls for better biofuels | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation, search NameFlorida: Energy Resources

  15. Evaluation of integrated wall systems incorporating electrochromic windows [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sbar, Neil L.

    2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Billions of dollars are spent annually in the U.S. on energy lost through the use of inefficient windows. Even wall systems with advanced static glazings and moveable shading devices are not optimal because they can't effectively respond to changing solar conditions. Electrochromic (EC) smart windows can dynamically control the amount of solar light and heat entering a building. The energy saving performance of fully dynamic wall systems containing EC windows was compared with that of static systems using the DOE 2.1E building simulation program. Total costs for different scenarios were computed. SAGE demonstrated the capability to produce double pane EC windows in which the transmittance repeatedly varied between 2-58%. Relative impact of EC glazings in buildings compared to static is 10-20% energy savings across all climatic regions investigated. Significant life cycle cost savings are predicted for SAGE's EC windows when compared to conventional solar control windows over an estimated product lifetime of 20 years.

  16. Proton decay matrix elements with domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; C. Dawson; J. Noaki; A. Soni

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadronic matrix elements of operators relevant to nucleon decay in grand unified theories are calculated numerically using lattice QCD. In this context, the domain-wall fermion formulation, combined with non-perturbative renormalization, is used for the first time. These techniques bring reduction of a large fraction of the systematic error from the finite lattice spacing. Our main effort is devoted to a calculation performed in the quenched approximation, where the direct calculation of the nucleon to pseudoscalar matrix elements, as well as the indirect estimate of them from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements, are performed. First results, using two flavors of dynamical domain-wall quarks for the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are also presented to address the systematic error of quenching, which appears to be small compared to the other errors. Our results suggest that the representative value for the low energy constants from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are given as |alpha| simeq |beta| simeq 0.01 GeV^3. For a more reliable estimate of the physical low energy matrix elements, it is better to use the relevant form factors calculated in the direct method. The direct method tends to give smaller value of the form factors, compared to the indirect one, thus enhancing the proton life-time; indeed for the pi^0 final state the difference between the two methods is quite appreciable.

  17. Mechanical properties of thin-wall ductile iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P. (Intermet Corp., Lynchburg, VA)

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of cast iron in automotive applications in this era of increasing fuel efficiency requires the ability to cast very thin sections (2-7 mm). Although thin-wall iron castings have been produced, difficulty arises in predicting the mechanical properties of these castings because mechanical behavior is closely related to thickness, which in turn is a direct consequence of the section cooling rate. Experiments relating casting thickness with ultimate tensile strength, elongation, reduction in area, and hardness were performed. An inverse relationship was found between ultimate tensile strength and thickness. Elongation was found to depend only on the thickness of the sample and approached zero as the thickness of the sample decreased below 1.5 mm. Percent reduction in area was found to depend linearly on thickness. Although average hardness also correlated with the inverse of thickness, it was not found to be a useful measure of ultimate tensile strength. The results of this study show that cooling rate of the thin wall casting very much affects the mechanical properties.

  18. Giant adsorption of microswimmers: duality of shape asymmetry and wall curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysocki, Adam; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of shape asymmetry of microswimmers on their adsorption capacity at confining channel walls is studied by a simple dumbbell model. For a shape polarity of a forward-swimming cone, like the stroke-averaged shape of a sperm, extremely long wall retention times are found, caused by a non-vanishing component of the propulsion force pointing steadily into the wall, which grows exponentially with the self-propulsion velocity and the shape asymmetry. A direct duality relation between shape asymmetry and wall curvature is proposed and verified. Our results are relevant for the design microswimmer with controlled wall-adhesion properties. In addition, we confirm that pressure in active systems is strongly sensitive to the details of the particle-wall interactions.

  19. Post-cast EDM method for reducing the thickness of a turbine nozzle wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Raymond Joseph (Duanesburg, NY); Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy (Schenectady, NY); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (Galway, NY); Schotsch, Margaret Jones (Clifton Park, NY); Rajan, Rajiv (Guilderland, NY); Wei, Bin (Mechanicville, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A post-cast EDM process is used to remove material from the interior surface of a nozzle vane cavity of a turbine. A thin electrode is passed through the cavity between opposite ends of the nozzle vane and displaced along the interior nozzle wall to remove the material along a predetermined path, thus reducing the thickness of the wall between the cavity and the external surface of the nozzle. In another form, an EDM process employing a profile as an electrode is disposed in the cavity and advanced against the wall to remove material from the wall until the final wall thickness is achieved, with the interior wall surface being complementary to the profile surface.

  20. Local wall heat flux/temperature meter for convective flow and method of utilizing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Ronald D.; Ekhlassi, Ali; Cofie, Penrose

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a method includes providing a conduit having a fluid flowing therethrough, disposing a plurality of temperature measurement devices inside a wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices proximate an inside surface of the wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices at different radial positions at the same circumferential location within the wall, measuring a plurality of temperatures of the wall with respective ones of the temperature measurement devices to obtain a three-dimensional temperature topology of the wall, determining the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of the conduit, and determining a multi-dimensional thermal characteristic of the inside surface of the wall of the conduit based on extrapolation of the three-dimensional temperature topology and the temperature dependent thermal conductivities.

  1. On gas desorption from the tokamak first wall during edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marenkov, E. D., E-mail: edmarenkov@gmail.com [National Nuclear Research University Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California, San Diego (United States)] [University of California, San Diego (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of gas desorption from the tokamak first wall on the pedestal recovery in the H-mode after an edge-localized-mode burst is considered. Results of FACE code simulations of hydrogen desorption from a beryllium wall are presented. It is found that the wall has a significant effect on plasma processes only at sufficiently low temperatures (of about 400 K), which agrees with qualitative estimates obtained earlier in the zero-dimensional approximation.

  2. Kinesin-4 functions in vesicular transport on cortical microtubules and regulates cell wall mechanics during cell elongation in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Zhaosheng; Ioki, Motohide; Braybrook, Siobhan; Li, Shundai; Ye, Zheng-Hua; Lee, Yuh-Ru Julie; Hotta, Takashi; Chang, Anny; Tian, Juan; Wang, Guangda; Liu, Bo

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    along MTs in the cytosol. Conventional kinesins carry cargoes and walk along the MT track by using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis after their ATPase activity is activated by MT-binding. Therefore, it is unclear how these kinesins would... , and SALK_124215 at the Kinesin-4A/FRA1, Kinesin-4B, and Kinesin-4C loci were acquired from the Arabidopsis Biological Research Center at the Ohio State University. Standard genetic crosses were carried out between mutants and wild-type plants and among...

  3. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems...

  4. Qualitative Reliability Issues for In-Vessel Solid and Liquid Wall Fusion Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Nygren, R. E.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study of the qualitative aspects of plasma facing component (PFC) reliability for actively cooled solid wall and liquid wall concepts for magnetic fusion reactor vessels. These two designs have been analyzed for component failure modes. The most important results of that study are given here. A brief discussion of reliability growth in design is included to illustrate how solid wall designs have begun as workable designs and have evolved over time to become more optimized designs with better longevity. The increase in tolerable heat fluxes shows the improvement. Liquid walls could also have reliability growth if the designs had similar development efforts.

  5. Go No-Go Decision: Pure, Undoped, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This document provides information about the go/no-go decision on pure, undoped single walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  6. Experimental damage-gas flow correlations for cyclically loaded reinforced concrete walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soppe, Travis E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of work focused on testing reinforced concrete panels underof work focused on testing reinforced concrete panels underfocuses on testing nine reinforced concrete wall panels

  7. Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of minute hollow spherical shells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinman, D.A.

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of hollow microspheres or shells wherein terminal velocities of shells traveling in fluid-filled conduits of differing diameters are measured. A wall-effect factor is determined as a ratio of the terminal velocities, and shell outside diameter may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of wall-effect factor. For shells of known outside diameter, wall thickness may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of terminal velocity in either conduit.

  8. Calculation of heat flux through a wall containing a cavity: comparison of several models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the calculation of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Results from five test cases are presented. The first four represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using an improvement to the Implicit-Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm of Harlow and Amsden. An algorithm is described to efficiently couple the fluid flow calculations to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Results indicate that conduction through still plates contributes less than 2% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  9. Hybrid Simulation of the Seismic Response of Squat Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Catherine Alexandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACI Symposium on Reinforced Concrete Structures in SeismicStudies of Reinforced Concrete Walled Bents under Static2009. Update to ASCE/SEI 41 Concrete Provisions, PEER Report

  10. Experimental damage-gas flow correlations for cyclically loaded reinforced concrete walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soppe, Travis E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vessels. ” Cement and Concrete research, 32, XTRACT (2007).of air permeability in a concrete shear wall subjected tocharacteristics in cracked concrete. ” Nuclear Engineering

  11. aligned single-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Printed Multilayer Superstructures of Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Materials Science Websites Summary: Printed Multilayer Superstructures of Aligned...

  12. acid multi-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES Materials Science Websites Summary: SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF...

  13. acid-treated multi-walled carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES Materials Science Websites Summary: SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF...

  14. Glass-coating and cleaning system to prevent carbon deposition on coke oven walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahira, Takuya; Ando, Takeshi; Kasaoka, Shizuki; Yamauchi, Yutaka [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Mizushima, Kurashiki (Japan). Mizushima Works

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The new technology for protecting the coking chamber bricks from damage by hard-pushing is described. The technology consists of the glass coating on the wall bricks and a wall cleaner to blow deposited carbon. For the glass coating, a specially developed glaze is sprayed onto the wall bricks by a spraying device developed to completely spray one coking chamber in a few minutes. The wall cleaner is installed on a pusher ram in the facility to automatically blow air at a sonic speed during coke pushing. The life of the glazed layer is estimated to be over two years.

  15. Transformation of Yeast 1. Grow cells in liquid culture to mid-logarithmic stage (0.5-0.8 ODU/ml)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odorizzi, Greg

    Transformation of Yeast 1. Grow cells in liquid culture to mid-logarithmic stage (0.5-0.8 ODU/ml) *cells at stationary phase have a thicker cell wall and are more difficult to transform 2. Centrifuge 5 for 5 min, chill on ice for 5 min, and vortex prior to using) 10. Add DNA to be transformed: *if

  16. Photovoltaic devices based on high density boron-doped single-walled carbon nanotube/n-Si heterojunctions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saini, Viney; Li, Zhongrui; Bourdo, Shawn; Kunets, Vasyl P.; Trigwell, Steven; Couraud, Arthur; Rioux, Julien; Boyer, Cyril; Nteziyaremye, Valens; Dervishi, Enkeleda; et al

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple and easily processible photovoltaic device has been developed based on borondoped single-walled carbon nanotubes (B-SWNTs) and n-type silicon (n-Si) heterojunctions. The single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were substitutionally doped with boron atoms by thermal annealing, in the presence of B2O3. The samples used for these studies were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The fully functional solar cell devices were fabricated by airbrush deposition that generated uniform B-SWNT films on top of the n-Si substrates. The carbon nanotube films acted as exciton-generation sites, charge collection and transportation, whilemore »the heterojunctions formed between B-SWNTs and n-Si acted as charge dissociation centers. The current-voltage characteristics in the absence of light and under illumination, as well as optical transmittance spectrum are reported here. It should be noted that the device fabrication process can be made amenable to scalability by depositing direct and uniform films using airbrushing, inkjet printing, or spin-coating techniques.« less

  17. Photovoltaic devices based on high density boron-doped single-walled carbon nanotube/n-Si heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saini, Viney [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Li, Zhongrui [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Bourdo, Shawn [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kunets, Vasyl P. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States); Trigwell, Steven [ASRC Aerospace Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States); Couraud, Arthur [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States) and Ecole d'Ingenieurs de CESI-EIA, La Couronne (France); Rioux, Julien [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States) and Ecole d'Ingenieurs du CESI-EIA, La Couronne (France); Boyer, Cyril [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States) and Ecole d'Ingenieurs du CESI-EIA, La Couronne (France); Nteziyaremye, Valens [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Dervishi, Enkeleda [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, Alexandru R. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Salamo, Gregory J. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States); Viswanathan, Tito [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, Alexandru S. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple and easily processible photovoltaic device has been developed based on borondoped single-walled carbon nanotubes (B-SWNTs) and n-type silicon (n-Si) heterojunctions. The single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were substitutionally doped with boron atoms by thermal annealing, in the presence of B2O3. The samples used for these studies were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The fully functional solar cell devices were fabricated by airbrush deposition that generated uniform B-SWNT films on top of the n-Si substrates. The carbon nanotube films acted as exciton-generation sites, charge collection and transportation, while the heterojunctions formed between B-SWNTs and n-Si acted as charge dissociation centers. The current-voltage characteristics in the absence of light and under illumination, as well as optical transmittance spectrum are reported here. It should be noted that the device fabrication process can be made amenable to scalability by depositing direct and uniform films using airbrushing, inkjet printing, or spin-coating techniques.

  18. Photovoltaic devices based on high density boron-doped single-walled carbon nanotube/n-Si heterojunctions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saini, Viney [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Li, Zhongrui [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Bourdo, Shawn [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kunets, Vasyl P. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States); Trigwell, Steven [ASRC Aerospace Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States); Couraud, Arthur [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States) and Ecole d'Ingenieurs de CESI-EIA, La Couronne (France); Rioux, Julien [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States) and Ecole d'Ingenieurs du CESI-EIA, La Couronne (France); Boyer, Cyril [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States) and Ecole d'Ingenieurs du CESI-EIA, La Couronne (France); Nteziyaremye, Valens [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Dervishi, Enkeleda [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, Alexandru R. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Salamo, Gregory J. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States); Viswanathan, Tito [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, Alexandru S. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple and easily processible photovoltaic device has been developed based on borondoped single-walled carbon nanotubes (B-SWNTs) and n-type silicon (n-Si) heterojunctions. The single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were substitutionally doped with boron atoms by thermal annealing, in the presence of B2O3. The samples used for these studies were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The fully functional solar cell devices were fabricated by airbrush deposition that generated uniform B-SWNT films on top of the n-Si substrates. The carbon nanotube films acted as exciton-generation sites, charge collection and transportation, while the heterojunctions formed between B-SWNTs and n-Si acted as charge dissociation centers. The current-voltage characteristics in the absence of light and under illumination, as well as optical transmittance spectrum are reported here. It should be noted that the device fabrication process can be made amenable to scalability by depositing direct and uniform films using airbrushing, inkjet printing, or spin-coating techniques.

  19. High-Resolution CT and Angiographic Evaluation of NexStent Wall Adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemes, Balazs, E-mail: nembal@freemail.hu; Lukacs, Levente; Balazs, Gyoergy [Semmelweis University, Cardiovascular Center (Hungary); Dosa, Edit; Berczi, Viktor [Semmelweis University, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Hungary); Huettl, Kalman [Semmelweis University, Cardiovascular Center (Hungary)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carotid stenting is a minimally invasive treatment for extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Stent design may affect technical success and complications in a certain subgroup of patients. We examined the wall adaptability of a new closed-cell carotid stent (NexStent), which has a unique rolled sheet design. Forty-one patients had 42 carotid arteries treated with angioplasty and stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis. The mean patient age was 65 {+-} 10 years. All patients underwent high-resolution computed tomographic angiography after the stent implantation. Data analysis included pre- and postprocedural stenosis, procedure complications, plaque calcification, and stent apposition. We reviewed the angiographic and computed tomographic images for plaque coverage and stent expansion. All procedures were technically successful. Mean stenosis was reduced from 84 {+-} 8% before the procedure to 15.7 {+-} 7% after stenting. Two patients experienced transient ischemic attack; one patient had bradycardia and hypotension. Stent induced kinking was observed in one case. Good plaque coverage and proper overlapping of the rolled sheet was achieved in all cases. There was weak correlation between the residual stenosis and the amount of calcification. The stent provides adequate expansion and adaptation to the tapering anatomy of the bifurcation.

  20. Translational Genomics for the Improvement of Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpita, Nicholas; McCann, Maureen

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Our objectives were to apply bioinformatics and high throughput sequencing technologies to identify and classify the genes involved in cell wall formation in maize and switchgrass. Targets for genetic modification were to be identified and cell wall materials isolated and assayed for enhanced performance in bioprocessing. We annotated and assembled over 750 maize genes into gene families predicted to function in cell wall biogenesis. Comparative genomics of maize, rice, and Arabidopsis sequences revealed differences in gene family structure. In addition, differences in expression between gene family members of Arabidopsis, maize and rice underscored the need for a grass-specific genetic model for functional analyses. A forward screen of mature leaves of field-grown maize lines by near-infrared spectroscopy yielded several dozen lines with heritable spectroscopic phenotypes, several of which near-infrared (nir) mutants had altered carbohydrate-lignin compositions. Our contributions to the maize genome sequencing effort built on knowledge of copy number variation showing that uneven gene losses between duplicated regions were involved in returning an ancient allotetraploid to a genetically diploid state. For example, although about 25% of all duplicated genes remain genome-wide, all of the cellulose synthase (CesA) homologs were retained. We showed that guaiacyl and syringyl lignin in lignocellulosic cell-wall materials from stems demonstrate a two-fold natural variation in content across a population of maize Intermated B73 x Mo7 (IBM) recombinant inbred lines, a maize Association Panel of 282 inbreds and landraces, and three populations of the maize Nested Association Mapping (NAM) recombinant inbred lines grown in three years. We then defined quantitative trait loci (QTL) for stem lignin content measured using pyrolysis molecular-beam mass spectrometry, and glucose and xylose yield measured using an enzymatic hydrolysis assay. Among five multi-year QTL for lignin abundance, two for 4-vinylphenol abundance, and four for glucose and/or xylose yield, not a single QTL for aromatic abundance and sugar yield was shared. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) for lignin abundance and sugar yield of the 282-member maize Association Panel provided candidate genes in the eleven QTL and showed that many other alleles impacting these traits exist in the broader pool of maize genetic diversity. The maize B73 and Mo17 genotypes exhibited surprisingly large differences in gene expression in developing stem tissues, suggesting certain regulatory elements can significantly enhance activity of biomass synthesis pathways. Candidate genes, identified by GWAS or by differential expression, include genes of cell-wall metabolism, transcription factors associated with vascularization and fiber formation, and components of cellular signaling pathways. Our work provides new insights and strategies beyond modification of lignin to enhance yields of biofuels from genetically tailored biomass.