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1

Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetics Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetics Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 4,827.00482,700 centUSD 4.827 kUSD 0.00483 MUSD 4.827e-6 TUSD / mile Median Estimate (USD): 6,206.14620,614 centUSD 6.206 kUSD 0.00621 MUSD 6.20614e-6 TUSD / mile High-End Estimate (USD): 17,239.291,723,929 centUSD 17.239 kUSD 0.0172 MUSD 1.723929e-5 TUSD / mile Dictionary.png

2

Generalized Error Analysis for Conventional and Remote Reference Magnetotellurics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An error analysis which applies to both conventional and remote reference magnetotelluric impedance and tipper estimates is developed based on the assumption that noise in the field measurements is governed by a complex normal distribution. Under the assumed model of noise it is shown that the theoretical expressions for the variances and covariances derived recently by Gamble et al (1979b) specifically for remote reference estimates apply to conventional estimates as well. However, calculations are biased if the impedance or tipper functions are biased. The impedance and tipper functions are calculated as ratios of two random functions of noisy field measurements. The expressions for the variances and covariances account for noise in both the numerator and denominator of the estimates. They are useful provided the probability that the magnitude of the random error in the denominator exceeds the magnitude of its expected value is small. Expressions for the bias errors of the impedance and tipper functions are obtained in order to assess the relative contributions of random and bias errors to the man squared error of the estimates. The relative magnitude of both random and bias errors depends on the noise level and on the values of the sample coherencies between various pairs of the field measurements used to compute a particular estimate.

Stodt, John A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Magnetotelluric measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ideas of flux quantization and Josephson tunneling are reviewed, and the operation of the dc SQUID as a magnetometer is described. The SQUID currently used for magnetotellurics has a sensitivity of 10/sup -14/ T Hz/sup -1/2/, a dynamic range at 10/sup 7/ in a 1 Hz bandwidth, a frequency response from 0 to 40 kHz, and a slewing rate of 5 x 10/sup -5/T s/sup -1/. Recent improvements in sensitivity are discussed: SQUIDS are rapidly approaching the limit imposed by the uncertainty principle. The essential ideas of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements are outlined, and it is shown how the remote reference method can lead to major reductions in bias errors compared to more conventional schemes. The field techniques of the Berkeley group are described. The practical application of MT requires that amplitude and phase spectra of apparent resistivities be transformed into a geologically useful distribution of subsurface resistivities. In many areas where MT is being applied today, the technique may not provide the information needed because stations are too few and widely spaced, or because we are unable to interpret data influenced by complex 3-D resistivity features. The results of two surveys, one detailed, the other regional, over the Klamath Basin, Oregon, are examined. The detailed survey is able to resolve small (1 km wide) structural features that are missed or add a component of spatial aliasing to the regional data. On the other hand, the regional survey avoids truncation effects that may occur when the survey undersamples an area.

Clarke, J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetotellurics Details Activities (39) Areas (36) Regions (5) NEPA(8) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 522.2252,222 centUSD

5

Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Techniques Magnetotelluric Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Techniques:

6

REMOTE REFERENCE MAGNETOTELLURICS WITH SQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time Dependent Electrical Resistivity by Magnetotellurics:Because the electrical resistivities of different types ofto determine the electrical resistivity of the ground. This

Gamble, Thomas D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Definition: Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Magnetotellurics Magnetotellurics (MT) is a natural-source (i.e., passive), electromagnetic method that measures the ratio of earth's naturally varying electric and magnetic fields over a wide range of frequencies to determine the resistivity structure of the subsurface (Reynolds, 1997). View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms sustainability Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Magnetotellurics&oldid=502655" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services

8

Three dimensional magnetotelluric modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional (3D) volume integral equation solution was refined and adapted to magnetotelluric (MT) modeling. The refinement, incorporating an integro-difference scheme, increases the accuracy somewhat without increasing the computer time. Utilizing the two symmetry planes for a plane wave source decreases the computer storage by a factor of 8 and greatly reduces the computer time. Convergence checks and comparisons with other solutions show that our results are valid. Because of space charges at resistivity boundaries, low-frequency 3D responses are much different from 1D and 2D responses. Hence 3D models are required for interpreting MT data in the complex geothermal environment.

Hohmann, G.W.; Ting, S.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Magnetotelluric Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Methods Magnetotelluric Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Methods: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Document # Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal Area Lead Agency District Office Field Office Mineral Manager Surface Manager Development Phase(s) Techniques DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0070-CX CX US Navy Geothermal Program Office Dixie Valley Geothermal Area BLM BLM Carson City District Office BLM Stillwater Field Office BLM BLM Geothermal/Exploration Reflection Survey

10

Magnetotellurics At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Newberry Caldera Area...

11

Magnetotellurics At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Pueblo Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not...

12

Magnetotellurics At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE...

13

Magnetotellurics At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location New River Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

14

Audio-Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Audio-Magnetotellurics Audio-Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Audio-Magnetotellurics Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 1,118.26111,826 centUSD

15

Definition: Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Magnetotelluric Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Techniques Magnetotellurics is an electromagnetic geophysical method used to image the electrical resistivity structure of the subsurface through the measurement of electrical and magnetic fields at the earth's surface.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Magnetotellurics (MT) is an electromagnetic geophysical method of imaging the earth's subsurface by measuring natural variations of electrical and magnetic fields at the Earth's surface. Investigation depth ranges from 300m below ground by recording higher frequencies down to 10,000m or deeper with long-period soundings. Developed in Russia and

16

Electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetotelluric methods | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetotelluric methods Electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetotelluric methods Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetotelluric methods Abstract Application of electrical methods began with Robert W. Fox's 1830 observation of self potentials associated with copper vein deposits in Cornwall. Conrad Schlumberger introduced the direct current equal potential line resistivity method in 1912. Harry W. Conklin received the first patents on the electromagnetic (EM) method in 1917. From these beginnings, the history of the development of the resistivity induced-polarization (IP), magnetotelluric and EM methods are traced to the present time. It is of interest to note that application of electrical methods flourished from

17

Magnetotellurics At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

18

DOI-BLM-NV-B020-2010-0106-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-0106-CX -0106-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-B020-2010-0106-CX CX at Alum Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Sierra Geothermal Power Geothermal Area Alum Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Hyperspectral Imaging, Magnetic Techniques, Magnetotellurics, Slim Holes, Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetics Comments airborne thermal survey Time Frame (days) Application Time 182 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Battle Mountain Managing Field Office BLM Tonopah Field Office

19

Magnetotelluric studies in Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of detailed magnetotelluric soundings was initiated in 1974 in Green Valley, Nevada, as part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's major study of techniques for geothermal exploration in north central Nevada. The magnetotelluric program had three main goals; the determination of resistivity distribution at depths greater than that conveniently measured with other techniques; a comparison of the interpreted resistivity at shallow depth with the results of the other techniques; and the evaluation of the SQUID or Josephson effect magnetometer in practical field surveys. In addition, new numerical models were developed so that interpretation could be carried out in terms of fairly complex two-dimensional models.

Morrison, H.F.; Lee, K.H.; Oppliger, G.; Dey, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric results indicate deep low resistivity at the western edge of the caldera which may be associated with deep hot fluids. On the basis of geophysical and well data, we make three estimates of reservoir dimensions. Telluric profiles, magnetotelluric sounding, dc resistivity, and electromagnetic sounding surveys were all performed over the caldera in hopes of outlining deep drilling targets (Group 7 Inc., 1972; McPhar, 1973;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Magnetotellurics At Rio Grande Rift Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mark E. Ander (1981) A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMagnetote...

22

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3-D...

23

Magnetotellurics At Dixie Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "MT, EM sounding, SP?; SP data and reservoir model may be...

24

Magnetotellurics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "EM sounding, MT, CSAMT, dipole-dipole resistivity; reservoir...

25

Magnetotellurics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown...

26

Magnetotellurics At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

27

Audio-magnetotelluric station location map Breitenbush Known Geothermal Resource Area, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Telluric profiles and audio-magnetotelluric data logs are presented for various frequencies and stations. (MHR)

Senterfit, R.M.; Long, C.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Use magnetotelluric data to model the reservoir. Notes Magnetotelluric (MT) data from 101 tensor stations over the East Flank of the Coso geothermal field, southeastern California, were inverted on a PC using a 3-D Gauss-Newton regularization algorithm based on a staggered-grid, finite difference forward problem and jacobians. Static shifts at each MT site can be included as additional parameters and solved for simultaneously. Recent modifications to the algorithm developed here include the addition of an LU solver to calculate the model parameter

29

Magnetotellurics At Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Grass Valley Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The attempt to carry out a detailed interpretation of a magnetotelluric survey has demonstrated some fundamental problems that must be addressed in future surveys and in future research. (see paper conclusions) References H. Frank Morrison, K i Ha Lee, Gary Oppliger, Abhi jit De (1979) Magnetotelluric Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Magnetotellurics_At_Grass_Valley_Area_(Morrison,_Et_Al.,_1979)&oldid=387832"

30

Geophysics IV. Gravity, Magnetic, and Magnetotelluric Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric methods. Each of the 10 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: As a contribution to the EEC study of the potential contribution of electric and electromagnetic techniques to geothermal exploration, magnetotelluric studies have been undertaken with a sounding bandwidth ranging from 2 to 7 decades of period at more than 30 sites within the chosen test area of Travale. This area must be one of the most unfavourable for the application of electrical techniques on account both of the thickness (up to 2 km) of conducting (< 1 ohm / m in some locations) cover

32

Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Region Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Magnetotelluric soundings along a profile extending from the Raft River geothermal area in southern Idaho in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming reveal a highly anamalous crustal structure involving a conductive zone at depths that range from 18 km in the central part of the eastern Snake River Plain to 7 km beneath the Raft River thermal area and as little as 5 km in Yellowstone. Resistivities in this conductive zone are less than

33

Further Analysis of 3D Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Further Analysis of 3D Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the Coso Further Analysis of 3D Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Further Analysis of 3D Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: At last year's GRC annual meeting we presented initial results of a 3D investigation of the Coso Geothermal field utilizing a dense grid of magnetotelluric (MT) stations plus a single line of contiguous bipole array profiling over the east flank of the field (Newman et al., 2005). Motivation for this study is that electrical resistivity/ conductivity mapping can contribute to better improved understanding of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) by imaging the geometry, bounds and controlling

34

A Target-Oriented Magnetotelluric Inversion Approach For Characterizing The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Target-Oriented Magnetotelluric Inversion Approach For Characterizing The Target-Oriented Magnetotelluric Inversion Approach For Characterizing The Low Enthalpy Gross Schonebeck Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Target-Oriented Magnetotelluric Inversion Approach For Characterizing The Low Enthalpy Gross Schonebeck Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Electrical conductivity is a key parameter for the exploration and characterization of geothermal reservoirs as hot mineralized formation water of active geothermal areas usually exhibits significantly higher conductivity than the surrounding host rock. Here we present results of a magnetotelluric (MT) exploration experiment carried out in the vicinity of the Gross Schonebeck geothermal test site in Northern Germany, where a

35

Three-dimensional magnetotelluric characterization of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

magnetotelluric characterization of the Coso geothermal magnetotelluric characterization of the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Three-dimensional magnetotelluric characterization of the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A dense grid of 125 magnetotelluric (MT) stations plus a single line of contiguous bipole array profiling has been acquired over the east flank of the Coso geothermal system, CA, USA. Due to production related electromagnetic (EM) noise the permanent observatory at Parkfield, CA was used as a remote reference to suppress this cultural EM noise interference. These data have been inverted to a fully three-dimensional (3D) resistivity model. This model shows the controlling geological structures possibly

36

Magnetotellurics At Kilauea East Rift Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Kilauea East Rift Area (Laney, Magnetotellurics At Kilauea East Rift Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric Imaging, G. Michael Hoversten. The project title derived from its inception. The project however moved from the application of MT on Kilauea in 2003 to the use of combined SP and conductivity mapping (MT) in 2004. The beginning of 2004 saw the completions of the Kilauea MT experiment by the acquisition of an additional 45 MT stations on Kilauea. We therefore decided to use the funds available to work at the Fort Bidwell Indian reservation where characterization work could be done at relatively low cost. We decided to perform a time lapse SP survey during a flow test

37

Magnetotellurics At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owens, Et Al., 2005) Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes magneto-telluric surveys are pending for the near future when geochemical and surface geophysical surveys are complete. Results of this survey should verify the occurrence of low-resisitivity fluids and alteration at depth. References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Magnetotellurics_At_Socorro_Mountain_Area_(Owens,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=388765

38

Magnetotellurics At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Magnetotellurics At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Truckhaven Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The area of coverage for the DOE-funded geophysical surveys is shown in Figure 9. The 95 magnetotelluric (MT) soundings cover a central area of about 80 square kilometers. The 126 gravity stations extend over a broader area of about 150 square kilometers, centered on the same area covered by the MT soundings. A detailed description of the instrumentation and data acquisition procedures used for both surveys is provided in GSY-USA, Inc. (2003a). References Layman Energy Associates Inc. (2006) Final Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial

39

Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 1977 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric soundings along a profile extending from the Raft River geothermal area in southern Idaho in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming reveal a highly anomalous crustal structure involving a conductive zone at depths that range from 18 km in the central part of the eastern Snake River Plain to 7 km beneath the Raft River thermal area and as little as 5 km in Yellowstone. Resistivities in this conductive zone are less than 10 ohm-m and at some sites than 1 ohm-m. References Stanley, W.D.; Boehl, J.E.; Bostick, F.X.; Smith, H.W. (10 June

40

An Audio-Magnetotelluric Investigation In Terceira Island (Azores) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Audio-Magnetotelluric Investigation In Terceira Island (Azores) Audio-Magnetotelluric Investigation In Terceira Island (Azores) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Audio-Magnetotelluric Investigation In Terceira Island (Azores) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Ten audio-magnetotelluric soundings have been carried out along a profile crossing the Serra do Cume caldera in the eastern part of the Terceira Island (Azores). The main objectives of this investigation were to detect geoelectrical features related with tectonic structures and to characterize regional hydrological and hydrothermal aspects mainly those related to geothermal fluid dynamics. Three-dimensional numerical investigation showed that the data acquired at periods shorter than 1 s are not significantly affected by ocean effect. The data was analysed using the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis EGS potential of Coso Geothermal Region Notes A dense grid of magnetotelluric (MT) stations plus contiguous bipole array profiling centered over the east flank of the Coso geothermal system is being acquired. Acquiring good quality MT data in producing geothermal systems is a challenge due to production related electromagnetic (EM) noise and, in the case of Coso, due to proximity of a regional DC intertie power transmission line. To achieve good results, a remote reference completely outside the influence of the dominant source of EM noise must be

42

A Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A preliminary magnetotelluric study consisting of twenty measurements, in the frequency range 128-0.016 Hz, was undertaken on the active volcanic island of Nissyros. Two boreholes identify the existence of high enthalpy manifestations. The results correlate well with the borehole logs and delineate, in a 1-D approximation, the existence and symmetry of a possible geothermal reservoir. Some of the main faulting features were detected as well as an inferred highly conductive zone at the centre of the

43

Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Wilt & Haar,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric results indicate deep low resistivity at the western edge of the caldera which may be associated with deep hot fluids. On the basis of geophysical and well data, we make three estimates of reservoir

44

New approaches to estimation of magnetotelluric parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fully efficient robust data processing procedures were developed and tested for single station and remote reference magnetotelluric (Mr) data. Substantial progress was made on development, testing and comparison of optimal procedures for single station data. A principal finding of this phase of the research was that the simplest robust procedures can be more heavily biased by noise in the (input) magnetic fields, than standard least squares estimates. To deal with this difficulty we developed a robust processing scheme which combined the regression M-estimate with coherence presorting. This hybrid approach greatly improves impedance estimates, particularly in the low signal-to-noise conditions often encountered in the dead band'' (0.1--0.0 hz). The methods, and the results of comparisons of various single station estimators are described in detail. Progress was made on developing methods for estimating static distortion parameters, and for testing hypotheses about the underlying dimensionality of the geological section.

Egbert, G.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric mapping in and around the Coso Range, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric mapping in and around the Coso Range, California Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of geophysical surveys in and around the Coso Range, and in particular in the area surrounding Coso Hot Springs are reported. Electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area in the Coso rhyolite dome field and the large arcuate fracture system previously postulated to represent a stage of incipient caldera formation were studied. Six individual plates

46

Magnetotellurics At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et Magnetotellurics At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Truckhaven Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Truckhaven project, which is located on the west flank of the Salton Trough in southern California, is north and west of several existing geothermal power generation facilities in the trough. An extensive shallow geothermal anomaly is known to exist in this area and this region corresponds to a gravity high, which has been further delineated by the drilling of numerous shallow temperature gradient wells and one deep, abandoned, test well. Layman Energy Associates has performed Phase I exploration tasks to further constrain the anomaly, including a detailed

47

Magnetotelluric Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Magnetotelluric Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A program of detail magnetotelluric soundings was initiated in 1974 in Green Valley, Nevada, as part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's major study of techniques for geothermal exploration in north central Nevada. The magnetotelluric program had three main goals; the determination of resistivity distribution at depths greater than that conveniently measured with other techniques; a comparison of the interpreted resistivity at shallow depth with the results of the other techniques ; and the evaluation of the SQUID or Josephson effect magnetometer i n practical

48

Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, with Implications for Structural Controls and Hydrothermal Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, with Implications for Structural Controls and Hydrothermal Alteration Abstract A new generation MT array measurement system was applied in a contiguous bipole deployment at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey area are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single range front fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2) delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as

49

Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

50

Magnetotellurics At Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) Magnetotellurics At Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Stillwater Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity; 3), image the disposition of resistive, possible reservoir formations in

51

Magnetotellurics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric Imaging, G. Michael Hoversten. The project title derived from its inception. The project however moved from the application of MT on Kilauea in 2003 to the use of combined SP and conductivity mapping (MT) in 2004. The beginning of 2004 saw the completions of the Kilauea MT experiment by the acquisition of an additional 45 MT stations on Kilauea. We therefore decided to use the funds available to work at the Fort Bidwell

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Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

53

3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly In The Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly In The Llucmajor Aquifer System (Majorca, Spain) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly In The Llucmajor Aquifer System (Majorca, Spain) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In the Llucmajor aquifer system (Majorca Island, Spain) some geothermal evidences have appeared. This phenomenon is not isolated to Majorca and it is present in other areas, where it can be associated with structural conditions, especially to the extensional event suffered by the island after the Alpine Orogeny. However, the origin of this anomaly in Llucmajor is not well known, and there is no surface geological evidence of

54

Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2005) 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault

55

Magnetotellurics At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Laney, 2005) (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent

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Magnetotellurics At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "The 2009 MT survey detects a resistivity pattern typical of most economically viable geothermal reservoirs where a low resistivity, low permeability hydrothermal smectite alteration layer caps a higher temperature, permeable geothermal reservoir. The MT resistivity pattern indicates that a hydrothermally altered clay cap exists near the fumarole and probably overlies an outflow connection from the fumarole to the

57

2D Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Evaluation Of Low Enthalpy Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

58

A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration- The Mt-5-Ex Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration-...

59

Magnetotellurics At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

60

Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pritchett, 2004) Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general

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61

3D MAGNETOTELLURIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: 3D Magnetotelluric characterization of the COSO Geothermal Field Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Knowledge of the subsurface electrical resistivity/conductivity can contribute to a better understanding of complex hydrothermal systems, typified by Coso geothermal field, through mapping the geometry (bounds and controlling structures) over existing production. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion is now an emerging technology for characterizing the resistivity structures of complex geothermal systems. The method appears to hold great promise, but histories exploiting truly 3D inversion that demonstrate the advantages that can be gained by acquiring

62

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Audio-Magnetotellurics Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To investigate electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area Notes Audio-magnetotelluric geophysical surveys determined that the secondary low in the geothermal area, best defined by the 7.5-Hz AMT map and dc soundings, is caused by a shallow conductive zone (5--30 ohm m) interpreted to be hydrothermally altered Sierra Nevada basement rocks containing saline water of a hot water geothermal system. This zone of lowest apparent resistivities over the basement rocks lies within a closed contour of a

63

Magnetotelluric Responces of Three-Dimentional Bodies in Layered Earths  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electric and magnetic fields scattered by a three-dimensional inhomogeneity in a conducting earth result largely from current-gathering, a boundary polarization charge phenomenon that becomes increasingly important as frequency falls. Boundary charges cause normalized electric field magnitudes, and thus tensor apparent resistivities and magnitudes of vertical admittance elements, to remain anomalous as frequency approaches zero. However, these E-field distortions below certain frequencies are essentially in-phase with the incident electric field. In addition, secondary magnetic field amplitudes over a body ultimately decline in proportion to the layered host impedance. It follows that tipper element magnitudes and all MT function phases become minimally affected at low frequencies by an inhomogeneity. Resistivity structure in nature is a collection of inhomogeneities of various scales, and the small structures in this collection can have MT responses as strong as those of the large structures. Hence, a severe distortion due to current-gathering in any nearby, small-scale geological noise can be superimposed to arbitrarily low frequencies upon the apparent resistivities and vertical admittance magnitudes of buried targets. On the other hand, the MT responses of small and large bodies have frequency dependencies that are, in general, separated as the square of the geometric scale factor distinguishing the different bodies.

Wannamaker, Phillip E.; Ward, Stanley H.; Hohmann, Gerald W.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: With the aim of investigating the possibilities of magnetotelluric methods for the exploration of potential Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) sites in the Upper Rhine valley, a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) survey has been carried out on a 13 km long profile across the thermal anomaly in the area of the geothermal power plant of Soultz-sous-Forets in the winter 2007/08. Despite strong artificial noise, processing using remote referencing and Sutarno phase consistent smoothing

65

Three dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. Final: volume 77-15  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional (3D) volume integral equation solution was refined and adapted to magnetotelluric (MT) modeling. The refinement, incorporating an integro-difference scheme, increases the accuracy somewhat without increasing the computer time. Utilizing the two symmetry planes for a plane wave source decreases the computer storage by a factor of 8 and greatly reduces the computer time. Convergence checks and comparisons with other solutions show that our results are valid. Because of space charges at resistivity boundaries, low-frequency 3D responses are much different from 1D and 2D responses. Hence 3D models are required for interpreting MT data in the complex geothermal environment.

Hohmann, G.W.; Ting, S.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

2D Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Evaluation Of Low Enthalpy Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2D Joint Inversion Of DC And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Evaluation Of Low Enthalpy Geothermal Fields Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and resistivity (dc) surveys are often used in environmental, hydrological and geothermal evaluation. The separate interpretation of those geophysical data sets assuming two-dimensional models frequently produces ambiguous results. The joint inversion of AMT and dc data is advocated by several authors as an efficient method for reducing the ambiguity inherent to each of those

67

Three-Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC, Methodology  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC, Methodology Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC, Methodology and Applications to the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Three-Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC, Methodology and Applications to the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We describe here efforts in technology development to invert magnetotelluric (MT) data collected in geothermal settings for three-dimensional resistivity models using desktop PC's or small clusters. A finite difference scheme is utilized for the forward problem, with various options to compute the parameter Jacobians, and parameter step estimates are defined using an explicit Gauss-Newton step. The paper

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Application Of 3D Inversion To Magnetotelluric Data In The Ogiri Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of 3D Inversion To Magnetotelluric Data In The Ogiri Geothermal Of 3D Inversion To Magnetotelluric Data In The Ogiri Geothermal Area, Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Application Of 3D Inversion To Magnetotelluric Data In The Ogiri Geothermal Area, Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A stable inversion technique has been developed for threedimensional (3D) interpretation of magnetotelluric (MT) data. The inversion method is based on the Gauss-Newton (linearized least-squares) method with smoothness regularization. Static shifts are also treated as unknown parameters in the inversion. The forward modeling is done by using the staggered-grid finite difference method. A Bayesian criterion ABIC is applied to searching for the optimum trade-off among the minimization of

69

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Audio-Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes An audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) survey was also carried out in August 2005 covering about 3 km_3 km around the CHS. Using controlled-source audio-magnetotelluric (CSAMT) and natural-source audio-magnetotelluric (NSAMT) methods, 1D and 2D inversions of the data were subsequently performed (Reed and Liu, 2006). The AMT results did not show an obvious low-resistivity anomaly in the vicinity of the hot springs. References Kamil Erkan, Gwen Holdmann, Walter Benoit, David Blackwell (2008) Understanding The Chena Hot Springs, Alaska, Geothermal System Using

70

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey, Audio-Magnetotellurics At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Audio-Magnetotellurics At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Baltazor Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Audio-Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The 27 Hz AMT map (Fig. 5a) defines a resistivity low near the hot spring with minimum values of 2.5 ohm-m; the deeper probing 7.5 Hz map (Fig. 5b) defines a similar low with minimum values of 1.6 ohm-m. Both maps show a second low to the south apparently associated with the low-density Cenozoic sediments. Three telluric profiles across the KGRA also define a low of

71

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation was carried out for the magnetotelluric (MT) data obtained in a geothermal area in Indonesia. The inversion scheme was based on the linearized leastsquares method with smoothness regularization. In addition to the subsurface resistivity structure, static shifts were also included as unknown parameters in the inversion. Forward modeling was by the finite difference scheme. The sensitivity matrix was computed once for a homogeneous half space and used

72

Magnetotellurics At U.S. West Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aiken & Ander, 1981) Aiken & Ander, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At U.S. West Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Arizona, New Mexico, and southern Colorado References Carlos L.V. Aiken, Mark E. Ander (1981) A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Magnetotellurics_At_U.S._West_Region_(Aiken_%26_Ander,_1981)&oldid=389969" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

73

A Closely-Spaced Magnetotelluric Study Of The Ahuachapan-Chipilapa  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Closely-Spaced Magnetotelluric Study Of The Ahuachapan-Chipilapa Closely-Spaced Magnetotelluric Study Of The Ahuachapan-Chipilapa Geothermal Field, El Salvador Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Closely-Spaced Magnetotelluric Study Of The Ahuachapan-Chipilapa Geothermal Field, El Salvador Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The distribution of electrical conductivity beneath the Ahuachapan-Chipilapa geothermal area was simulated using 2-D models based on 126 closely-spaced magnetotelluric (MT) measurements. The observed MT response was interpreted as being produced by the superposition of two orthogonal geological structural systems: an approximately E-W regional trend associated with the Central Graben structure, which affects the longer period response, and a local and younger N-S fault system that is

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2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) survey has been carried out on a 13 km long profile across the thermal anomaly in the area of the geothermal power plant of Soultz-sous-Forets in the...

75

Station location map, and audio-magnetotelluric and telluric data for Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The audio-magnetotelluric data log for Breitenbush Known Geothermal Resource Area, Oregon is presented covering 12 different frequencies and several stations. (MHR)

O'Donnell, J.E.; Long, C.L.; Senterfit, R.M.; Brougham, G.W.; Martinez, R.; Christopherson, K.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUPPORT OF THE ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS CONCEPT: SURVEY PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUPPORT OF THE ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS CONCEPT: SURVEY PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Electrical resistivity may contribute to progress in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) by imaging the geometry, bounds and controlling structures in existing production, and by monitoring changes in the underground resistivity properties in the vicinity of injection due to fracture porosity enhancement. To these ends, we are acquiring a dense grid

77

A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The Mt-5-Ex Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The Mt-5-Ex Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The present paper describes a new method designed both at recording and processing levels for a practical solution of the overall problem of the Earth electromagnetism, in geophysics. Up to now, the random character of the natural signals prevented any measurement of reliable values of the phase shift between the various electromagnetic components at a given place. Hence it is impossible numerically to solve the general linear relations binding these components simply by using the processes of

78

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area Audio-Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Audio-Magnetotellurics Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To infer the structure and the general lithology underlying the valley Notes An area of low apparent resistivity values defined by the audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) survey appears to outline the extent of the geothermal reservoir even though the reservoir is deeper than the penetration of the survey. Self-potential anomalies relate to near surface hydrology. Upward leakage from the reservoir produces shallower effects that were measured by the AMT survey. References Mabey, D.R.; Hoover, D.B.; O'Donnell, J.E.; Wilson, C.W. (1

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Magnetotellurics At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Nw Basin & Range Region Magnetotellurics At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

80

Magnetotelluric models of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Roosevelt Hot Springs (RHS) thermal area, which includes a hotwater-dominated fracture zone prospect, near the eastern margin of the Basin-Range tectonic province, conceivably possesses a whole family of resistivity structures that includes the following: deep hot brine reservoirs, deep-seated partially molten heat sources in the crust or upper mantle that drive the convective system, near-surface hydrothermal alteration zones, wet sedimentary fill in valleys, and a regional, apparently one-dimensional resistivity profile of the crust and upper mantle. This complex resistivity makeup, particular to RHS but probably similar to that at other geothermal areas in the Great Basin, must be treated as being fully three-dimensional (3-D). In an attempt to understand these structures, broadband (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ Hz) tensor magnetotelluric (MT) data were obtained including apparent resistivities (rho/sub a/), impedance phases (phi) and vertical magnetic field transfer functions for 93 sites in the vicinity of this resource area.

Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

3D Magnetotelluric characterization of the COSO GeothermalField  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knowledge of the subsurface electrical resistivity/conductivity can contribute to a better understanding of complex hydrothermal systems, typified by Coso geothermal field, through mapping the geometry (bounds and controlling structures) over existing production. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion is now an emerging technology for characterizing the resistivity structures of complex geothermal systems. The method appears to hold great promise, but histories exploiting truly 3D inversion that demonstrate the advantages that can be gained by acquiring and analyzing MT data in three dimensions are still few in number. This project will address said issue, by applying 3D MT forward modeling and inversion to a MT data set acquired over the Coso geothermal field. The goal of the project is to provide the capability to image large geothermal reservoirs in a single self-consistent model. Initial analysis of the Coso MT data has been carried out using 2D MT imaging technology to construct an initial 3D resistivity model from a series of 2D resistivity images obtained using the inline electric field measurements (Zxy impedance elements) along different measurement transects. This model will be subsequently refined through a 3D inversion process. The initial 3D resistivity model clearly shows the controlling geological structures possibly influencing well production at Coso. The field data however, also show clear three dimensionality below 1 Hz, demonstrating the limitations of 2D resistivity imaging. The 3D MT predicted data arising from this starting model show good correspondence in dominant components of the impedance tensor (Zxy and Zyx) above 1Hz. Below 1 Hz there is significant differences between the field data and the 2D model data.

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, Michael; Gasperikova, Erika; Wannamaker, Philip E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1986, Unocal Geothermal Division released results from 158 time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings and, with Chevron Resources, a total of 77 magnetotelluric (MT) stations. Reinterpretations of the Unocal and Chevron data (Park and Torres-Verdin, 1988 ) and the recent public-domain MT studies (e.g. Hermance et al., 1988) outline similar shallow low-resistivity regions. At shallow depths in the caldera References Michael L. Sorey, Gene A. Suemnicht, Neil C. Sturchio, Gregg A. Nordquist (1991) New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley

83

Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

84

MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Large-scale 3D inversion of marine magnetotelluric data: Case study from the Gemini prospect, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collected by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography SIO in the Gemini prospect, Gulf of MexicoLarge-scale 3D inversion of marine magnetotelluric data: Case study from the Gemini prospect, Gulf of Mexico Michael S. Zhdanov1 , Le Wan1 , Alexander Gribenko1 , Martin Cuma1 , Kerry Key2 , and Steven

Constable, Steve

86

Estimation of subsurface temperatures in the Tattapani geothermal field, central India from limited volume of magnetotelluric data and borehole thermograms using a constructive back-propagation neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constructive back-propagation code which was designed to run as a single hidden layer, feed-forward neural network (SLFFNN) has been adapted and used to estimate subsurface temperature from a small volume of magnetotelluric (MT) derived ...

Anthony E. Akpan; Mahesh Narayanan; T. Harinarayana

87

Seismic and magneto-telluric imaging for geothermal exploration at Jemez pueblo in New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow geothermal reservoir in the Pueblo of Jemez in New Mexico may indicate a commercial-scale geothermal energy potential in the area. To explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo, seismic surveys are conducted along three lines for the purpose of imaging complex subsurface structures near the Indian Springs fault zone. A 3-D magneto-telluric (MT) survey is also carried out in the same area. Seismic and MT imaging can provide complementary information to reveal detailed geologic formation properties around the fault zones. The high-resolution seismic images will be used together with MT images, geologic mapping, and hydrogeochemistry, to explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo, and to determine whether a conunercial-scale geothermal resource exists for power generation or direct use applications after drilling and well testing.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albrecht, Michael [LOS ALAMOS GEOTHERMAL

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Toward assessing the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains volcanic complex: a telluric-magnetotelluric survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Telluric-magnetotelluric studies were performed in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico to characterize the total geothermal system of the Valles Caldera and to be integrated with an east-west regional survey supported by the United States Geological Survey. The data from the regional survey indicate that electrically the San Juan Basin to the west of the Jemez Mountains is rather homogeneous in contrast to the eastern side near Las Vegas where the presence of a broad heterogeneous structure is clearly sensed. The data from the Jemez Mountain area are strikingly similar to other Rio Grande rift data and suggest a conducting layer at a depth of approximately 15 km. The telluric data indicate that the hydrothermal system in the area is of a localized nature.

Hermance, J.F.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A data variance technique for automated despiking of magnetotelluric data with a remote reference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetotelluric method employs co-located surface measurements of electric and magnetic fields to infer the local electrical structure of the earth. The frequency-dependent 'apparent resistivity' curves can be inaccurate at long periods if input data are contaminated - even when robust remote reference techniques are employed. Data despiking prior to processing can result in significantly more reliable estimates of long period apparent resistivities. This paper outlines a two-step method of automatic identification and replacement for spike-like contamination of magnetotelluric data; based on the simultaneity of natural electric and magnetic field variations at distant sites. This simultaneity is exploited both to identify windows in time when the array data are compromised, and to generate synthetic data that replace observed transient noise spikes. In the first step, windows in data time series containing spikes are identified via intersite comparison of channel 'activity' - such as the variance of differenced data within each window. In the second step, plausible data for replacement of flagged windows is calculated by Wiener filtering coincident data in clean channels. The Wiener filters - which express the time-domain relationship between various array channels - are computed using an uncontaminated segment of array training data. Examples are shown where the algorithm is applied to artificially contaminated data, and to real field data. In both cases all spikes are successfully identified. In the case of implanted artificial noise, the synthetic replacement time series are very similar to the original recording. In all cases, apparent resistivity and phase curves obtained by processing the despiked data are much improved over curves obtained from raw data.

Kappler, K.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Multi-site magnetotelluric measurement system with real-time data analysis. Final technical report No. 210  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A magnetotelluric measurement system has been designed to provide a more cost effective electrical method for geothermal and mineral exploration. The theoretical requirements and sensitivities of the magnetotelluric inversion process were specifically addressed in determining system performance requirements. Significantly reduced instrument noise levels provide improved data quality, and simultaneous measurement at up to six locations provides reduced cost per site. Remotely located, battery powered, instrumentation packages return data to a central controlling site through a 2560 baud wire-line or radio link. Each remote package contains preamplifiers, data conditioning filters, and a 12-bit gain ranging A-D converter for frequencies from 0.001 Hz to 8 Hz. Data frequencies above 8 Hz are processed sequentially by a heterodyne receiver to reduce bandwidth to within the limits of the 2560 baud data link. The central data collection site provides overall control for the entire system. The system operator interacts with the system through a CRT terminal, and he receives hard copy from a matrix graphics printer. Data from the remote packages may be recorded in time sequence on a magnetic tape cartridge system, or an optional Hewlett-Packard 21MX minicomputer can be used to perform real-time frequency analysis. The results of this analysis provide feedback to the operator for improved evaluation of system performance and for selection of future measurement sites.

Becker, J.D.; Bostick, F.X. Jr.; Smith, H.W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

New approaches to estimation of magnetotelluric parameters. Final technical report, 1 August 1989--31 July 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fully efficient robust data processing procedures were developed and tested for single station and remote reference magnetotelluric (Mr) data. Substantial progress was made on development, testing and comparison of optimal procedures for single station data. A principal finding of this phase of the research was that the simplest robust procedures can be more heavily biased by noise in the (input) magnetic fields, than standard least squares estimates. To deal with this difficulty we developed a robust processing scheme which combined the regression M-estimate with coherence presorting. This hybrid approach greatly improves impedance estimates, particularly in the low signal-to-noise conditions often encountered in the ``dead band`` (0.1--0.0 hz). The methods, and the results of comparisons of various single station estimators are described in detail. Progress was made on developing methods for estimating static distortion parameters, and for testing hypotheses about the underlying dimensionality of the geological section.

Egbert, G.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Magnetotelluric investigations at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA and Mineral Mountains, Utah. Topical report 78-1701. a. 6. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-five magnetotelluric (MT) sites were monitored. Amongst other MT functions, the transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) apparent resistivity and impedance phase data were provided for the frequency range 3 x 10/sup -3/ Hz to 100 Hz. Some one-dimensional inversion results for this area yielded very low values of estimated true resistivity. Such values are unrealistic in light of established notions about conductivity mechanisms in earth materials. Furthermore, the assembly of such inversions to form a crude two-dimensional model has yielded a calculated 2-D pseudosection far removed from the observed pseudosection. Trial-and-error modeling has provided a better fit although strong differences between observed and modeled data remain and cannot be overcome by any purely two-dimensional model. The most noteworthy difficulty is the presence of exaggerated contrasts in apparent resistivity persisting to the lowest frequency of observation for both modes of wave excitation. Single-conductor, 2-D, TE and TM modeling may explain such problems in terms of three-dimensional effects. Electrical strike estimation may be a meaningless endeavour in a strongly three-dimensional area. The total fields do not decompose into the standard principal modes (TE and TM) and H/sub z/ depends on horizontal derivatives of both electric field components. Multiple symmetry axes result in multiple estimated strike directions depending upon wherethe observer is located. When derivatives of electric field are relatively small, noise may be the determining factor. The estimated strike directions for the Roosevelt stations are, however, quite consistent. The elongate resistive horst structure of the Mineral Mts. situated in conductive valley fill is felt to be the overwhelming reason for such a consistency.

Wannamaker, P.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Application of natural electromagnetic field methods (magnetotellurics/geomagnetic variations) to exploring for energy resources: development of a broad-band data acquisition/processing facility. Topical report, May 1, 1979-April 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is summarized in the following fields: a review of the present state of knowledge of the deep thermal regimes associated with major rift systems of the world, field studies of several major tectonomagmatic systems, and design and testing of new magnetotelluric/geomagnetic variation field system for studying thermal regimes in the continental crust. (MHR)

Hermance, J.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Investigation of the conductivity distribution in the vicinity of a cascade volcano  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnetotelluric and telluric data were acquired in the vicinity of Mount Hood Oregon as part of a multidisciplinary exploration program to evaluate the geothermal potential of this stratocone volcano. Eleven field components were acquired simultaneously over the frequency band of 50. to .001 hertz. These data consisted of one five component magnetotelluric base site, two sets of two component remote electric field measurements and one set of remote horizontal magnetic field measurements. The data were recorded digitally in the field and processed later using the remote electric and magnetic signals to obtain unbiased tensor impedance and geomagnetic transfer function (tipper) estimates.

Mozley, E.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Magnetotelluric Inverse Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15721592. Banks, R. , 1969: Geomagnetic variations and theThe inverse problem in geomagnetic induction. Z. Geophys. ,sound inferences from geomagnetic sounding, doi:10.1016/j.

Medin, Ashley E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The magnetotelluric inverse problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15721592. Banks, R. , 1969: Geomagnetic variations and theThe inverse problem in geomagnetic induction. Z. Geophys. ,sound inferences from geomagnetic sounding, doi:10.1016/j.

Medin, Ashley E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Continuous Profiling of Magnetotelluric Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. , 1984, Advanced Geomagnetic Sounding: Elsevier ScienceThe inverse 0roblem of geomagnetic induction: Geophys. J. ,1970, Inversion of the geomagnetic London, 315, 185-194.

Verdin, C.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

CX-007420: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Categorical Exclusion Determination 20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007420: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.2, B3.11 Date: 11/30/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office Bell Geospace, Inc. (BGI) would utilize DOE and cost share funds to (1) combine airborne full tensor gravity (FTG) and the z-axis tipper electromagnetic (ZTEM) deep penetrating, low frequency, passive electromagnetic exploration system onto one platform for simultaneous acquisition; (2) test the applicability of each of these technologies for geothermal exploration over a known geothermal deposit; (3) if the initial tests successfully show the usefulness of these combined technologies, test surveys would be acquired over a more "greenfield" area; and (4) use the

99

CX-008605: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05: Categorical Exclusion Determination 05: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008605: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.2, B3.11 Date: 07/19/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office Bell Geospace, Inc. (BGI) would utilize DOE and cost share funds to (1) combine airborne full tensor gravity (FTG) and the z-axis tipper electromagnetic (ZTEM) deep penetrating, low frequency, passive electromagnetic exploration system onto one platform for simultaneous acquisition; (2) test the applicability of each of these technologies for geothermal exploration over a known geothermal deposit; (3) if the initial tests successfully show the usefulness of these combined technologies, test surveys would be acquired over a more "greenfield" area; and (4) use the

100

Terrain effects in resistivity and magnetotelluric surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional finite element computer algorithm which can accommodate arbitrarily complex topography and subsurface structure, has been developed to model the resistivity response of the earth. The algorithm has undergone extensive evaluation and is believed to provide accurate results for realistic earth models. Testing included comparison to scale model measurements, analytically calculated solutions, and results calculated numerically by other independent means. Computer modeling experiments have demonstrated that it is possible to remove the effect of topography on resistivity data under conditions where such effects dominate the response. This can be done without resorting to lengthy and costly trial and error computer modeling. After correction, the data can be interpreted with confidence that the anomalies are due only to subsurface structure. The results of case studies on resistivity field data measured in high relief topography are discussed.

Holcombe, H.T.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Tasman Project Of Seafloor Magnetotelluric Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generating magnetic storms is the solar win~ a plasma mainlysfe (solar flare event) Principal Magnetic Storm Principalsolar plasma produce the initial phase of the storm (denoted

Ferguson, Ian James

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Tasman Project Of Seafloor Magnetotelluric Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

units (for example the volt which equals 1 A- I .kg.m2.s-3).C=coulomb D E R S p (j n V=volt Q=ohm S O.m S.m- l S=siemensunits of metres (m), seconds (s), volts (V), amperes (A) and

Ferguson, Ian James

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Definition: Audio-Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

higher frequencies down to 10,000m or deeper with long-period soundings. Developed in Russia and France during the 1950s, MT is now an international academic discipline and is...

104

Three-Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

additional parameters solved in the inversion. Initial inversion results for the Coso data set qualitatively resemble previous models from 2-D inversion stitches and from massively...

105

A Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Browse Latinoamrica Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy...

106

Three-dimensional magnetotelluric characterization of the Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

has been acquired over the east flank of the Coso geothermal system, CA, USA. Due to production related electromagnetic (EM) noise the permanent observatory at Parkfield, CA was...

107

3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

where it can be associated with structural conditions, especially to the extensional event suffered by the island after the Alpine Orogeny. However, the origin of this anomaly...

108

MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUPPORT OF THE ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS CONCEPT: SURVEY PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Jump to: navigation,...

109

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: Magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interpretation of geophysical/electromagnetic field data has been used to study dynamical processes in the crust beneath three of the major tectono-volcanic features in North America: the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex in eastern California, the Cascades Volcanic Belt in Oregon, and the Rio Grande Rift in the area of Socorro, New Mexico. Primary accomplishments have been in the area of creating and implementing a variety of 2-D generalized inverse computer codes, and the application of these codes to fields studies on the basin structures and he deep thermal regimes of the above areas. In order to more fully explore the space of allowable models (i.e. those inverse solutions that fit the data equally well), several distinctly different approaches to the 2-D inverse problem have been developed: (1) an overdetermined block inversion; (2) an overdetermined spline inverstion; (3) a generalized underdetermined total inverse which allows one to tradeoff certain attributes of their model, such as minimum structure (flat models), roughness (smooth models), or length (small models). Moreover, we are exploring various approaches for evaluating the resolution model parameters for the above algorithms. 33 refs.

Hermance, J.F.

1989-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

Hermance, J.F.

1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

111

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.6 ohm-m. Both maps show a second low to the south apparently associated with the low-density Cenozoic sediments. Three telluric profiles across the KGRA also define a low of...

112

Three-dimensional magnetotelluric characterization of the Coso ...  

south and southwest of Devils Kitchen to ... strike-slip motion between stable North America and the ... Production well 34-9RD2 grazes the eastern ...

113

Magnetotellurics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the funds available to work at the Fort Bidwell Indian reservation where characterization work could be done at relatively low cost. We decided to perform a time lapse SP survey...

114

3D Magnetotelluric characterization of the COSO Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model of the Coso geothermal field has been constructed. TheResistivity model of the Coso geothermal site compiled fromthe Department of Energy, Geothermal Program Office. MT data

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, Michael; Gasperikova, Erika; Wannamaker, Philip E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

3D Magnetotelluric characterization of the COSO Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the subsurface electrical resistivity/conductivity canfluid flow. Electrical resistivity/conductivity is a primary

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, Michael; Gasperikova, Erika; Wannamaker, Philip E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso Range, and in particular in the area surrounding Coso Hot Springs are reported. Electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's...

117

Further Analysis of 3D Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

over the east flank of the field (Newman et al., 2005). Motivation for this study is that electrical resistivity conductivity mapping can contribute to better improved...

118

Changes related to "A Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind View New Pages Recent Changes All...

119

Pages that link to "A Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History...

120

TheJournalofCellBiology The Rockefeller University Press, 0021-9525  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Z-axis position of microtubule plus ends during polymerization (Pol.) and depolymerization (de-Pol

Manstein, Dietmar J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Area selection for diamonds using magnetotellurics: Examples from southern Africa Alan G. Jones a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Witwatersrand, Jan Smuts Avenue, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa k ABB AB, HVDC, Ludvika, SE-77180, Sweden a b

Jones, Alan G.

122

SAGA Biennial Technical Meeting and Exhibition Short Paper Magnetotelluric imaging across a Neoproterozoic collision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Industrial Research, Address, sfourie@csir.co.za 11. ABB AB, HVDC, Ludvika, SE-77180, Sweden; 12. Other

Jones, Alan G.

123

SAGA Biennial Technical Meeting and Exhibition Short Paper Magnetotelluric study in northeastern Botswana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Witwatersrand, Jan Smuts Avenue, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa, WebbS@geosciences.wits.ac.za 11: ABB AB, HVDC

Jones, Alan G.

124

ARTIFACTS IN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FROM ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... We surmise that the symmetric susceptibility artifact is ... It has two components, the first handling material ... the positive z-axis, the z-component of the ...

125

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 63, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 1998); P. 816825, 10 FIGS. Marine magnetotellurics for petroleum exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drive, Austin, TX 78759. E-mail: 73321.3045@compuserve.com. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University buried salt, carbonate, and volcanic horizons that efficiently reflect and scatter acoustic energy

Constable, Steve

126

Audio-magnetotelluric data log and station location map for the Dixie Valley Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The station locations are mapped and the observed apparent resistivity in ohm-meters is tabulated for each location over the frequency range of 7.5 to 18,600 cycles/sec. (WHK)

Senterfit, R.M.; Hoover, D.; Tippens, C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including magnetotellurics), and electrical resistivity * involves extensive hands-on field experience * integrates...

128

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations - Subgroup and Full ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1, this leads to one of the three D 2d subgroups of T d . It is also possible to orient the CH 4 molecule differently, so that singling out the z axis leads ...

129

A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Regional Strategy For...

130

Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

released results from 158 time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings and, with Chevron Resources, a total of 77 magnetotelluric (MT) stations. Reinterpretations of the...

131

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, Nevada, Inferred from 3d Magnetotelluric Surveying Jump to: navigation, search...

132

Finding Hidden Geothermal Resources In The Basin And Range Using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Modeling-Computer...

133

Multi-criteria decision analysis for waste management in Saharawi refugee camps  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to compare different waste management solutions in Saharawi refugee camps (Algeria) and to test the feasibility of a decision-making method developed to be applied in particular conditions in which environmental and social aspects must be considered. It is based on multi criteria analysis, and in particular on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a mathematical technique for multi-criteria decision making (Saaty, T.L., 1980. The Analytic Hierarchy Process. McGraw-Hill, New York, USA; Saaty, T.L., 1990. How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process. European Journal of Operational Research; Saaty, T.L., 1994. Decision Making for Leaders: The Analytic Hierarchy Process in a Complex World. RWS Publications, Pittsburgh, PA), and on participatory approach, focusing on local community's concerns. The research compares four different waste collection and management alternatives: waste collection by using three tipper trucks, disposal and burning in an open area; waste collection by using seven dumpers and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using seven dumpers and three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill. The results show that the second and the third solutions provide better scenarios for waste management. Furthermore, the discussion of the results points out the multidisciplinarity of the approach, and the equilibrium between social, environmental and technical impacts. This is a very important aspect in a humanitarian and environmental project, confirming the appropriateness of the chosen method.

Garfi, M. [DICMA, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, I-40131 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: marianna.garfi@mail.ing.unibo.it; Tondelli, S. [DAPT, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Bonoli, A. [DICMA, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, I-40131 Bologna (Italy)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Experiences and Challenges Scaling PFLOTRAN, a PETSc-based Code for Subsurface Reactive Flow Simulations,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(x,y,z) and utilizes complex stratigraphy (Figure 1) mapped from the Hanford EarthVision database [6 of preconditioner is a very simple one, but we have been surprised at how well it has worked at scale on large.) CUG 2009 Proceedings 3 of 14 #12;Figure 1: Hanford 300 Area stratigraphy (z scale = 20x, z axis ranges

135

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, and ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, D.B.; Slutz, S.A.

1986-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

136

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Geothermal exploration technology. Annual report, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following programs: electrical and electromagnetic computer modeling techniques; minicomputer for in-field processing of magnetotelluric data; superconducting thin-film gradiometer and magnetometers for geophysical applications; magnetotellurics with SQUID magnetometers; controlled-source electromagnetic system; geothermal seismic field system development; Klamath Basin geothermal resource and exploration technique evaluation; Mt. Hood geothermal resource evaluation; East Mesa seismic study; seismological studies at Cerro Prieto; self-potential studies at Cerro Prieto; resistivity studies at Cerro Prieto; magnetotelluric survey at Cerro Prieto; and precision gravity studies at Cerro Prieto. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and...

140

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and Implications for District-Scale Resource Exploration, Inferred from Magnetotelluric (MT) Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and Implications for District-Scale Resource Exploration, Inferred from Magnetotelluric (MT) Resistivity Surveying Abstract Magnetotelluric (MT) profiling in northwestern Nevadais used to test hypotheses on the main sources of heat andhydrothermal fluid for the Dixie Valley-Central NevadaSeismic Belt area. The transect reveals families of resistivitystructures commonly dominated by steeply-dipping features,some of which may be of key geothermal significance. Mostnotably, 2-D inversion

143

A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: As part of the resource evaluation and exploration program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for the national Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, a regional magnetotelluric (MT) survey of New Mexico and Arizona is being performed. The MT lines are being located in areas where the results of analysis of residual gravity anomaly maps of Arizona and New Mexico, integrated with other geologic and geophysical studies indicate the greatest potential for HDR resources. The residual

144

Definition: Controlled Source Audio MT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Controlled Source Audio MT Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Controlled Source Audio MT Controlled Source Audio-Magnetotellurics (CSAMT) is an active source application of a magnetotelluric survey aimed at providing a more reliable signal and rapid acquisition time relative to a natural source MT measurement.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Magnetotellurics (MT) is an electromagnetic geophysical method of imaging the earth's subsurface by measuring natural variations of electrical and magnetic fields at the Earth's surface. Investigation depth ranges from 300m below ground by recording higher frequencies down to 10,000m or deeper with long-period soundings. Developed in Russia and

145

Property:DOI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI DOI Jump to: navigation, search Property Name DOI Property Type String Pages using the property "DOI" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth + 10.1016/j.crte.2010.04.001 + 3 3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A Back-Propagation Neural Network + 10.1016/j.jappgeo.2008.06.002 + 3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly In The Llucmajor Aquifer System (Majorca, Spain) + 10.1016/j.jappgeo.2008.05.006 + 4 40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France + 10.1016/j.geothermics.2010.09.005 + A A Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field + 10.1016/0375-6505(85)90040-9 +

146

W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Category:Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques page? For detailed information on Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques, click here. Category:Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Add.png Add a new Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. M [×] Magnetotelluric Techniques‎ 1 pages Pages in category "Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. M Magnetotelluric Techniques T Time-Domain Electromagnetics Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Electromagnetic_Sounding_Techniques&oldid=689837"

148

Fixture for supporting and aligning a sample to be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fixture is provided for supporting and aligning small samples of material on a goniometer for x-ray diffraction analysis. A sample-containing capillary is accurately positioned for rotation in the x-ray beam by selectively adjusting the fixture to position the capillary relative to the x and y axes thereof to prevent wobble and position the sample along the z axis or the axis of rotation. By employing the subject fixture relatively small samples of materials can be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus previously limited to the analysis of much larger samples.

Green, L.A.; Heck, J.L. Jr.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-THERMAL INFRARED BAND AND MAGNETOTELLURIC METHOD TO SIMULATE A GEOTHERMAL SITTING AT MT. CIREMAI, WEST JAVA at surface is crucial for geothermal exploration. Since field observations to map surface manifestation

Stanford University

150

Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Meteoritics & Planetary Science 39, Nr 6, 787790 (2004) Abstract available online at http://meteoritics.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exploratory program by PEMEX with intermittent core recovery and, more recently, by the National University, magnetotelluric and offshore seismic surveys, pre-existing boreholes of PEMEX and UNAM programs, site conditions of Yucatán, Hacienda Yaxcopoil, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, and PEMEX have provided financial and

Claeys, Philippe

152

Geological and geophysical studies in Grass Valley, Nevada. Preliminary open file report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geologic setting, geochemistry, and heat flow of the Leach Hot Springs area are discussed. Geophysical data is presented under the following section headings: survey lines; presentation of data; gravity survey; magnetic survey; self-potential; bipole-dipole apparent resistivity and apparent conductance; electric field ratio tellurics; dipole-dipole resistivity; magnetotellurics; seismological methods; seismic data and preliminary interpretation. (JGB)

Beyer, H.; Dey, A.; Liaw, A.; Majer, E.; McEvilly, T.V.; Morrison, H.F.; Wollenberg, H.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Photonic band gaps in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals with arbitrary magnetic declination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps and dispersion relations of one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals composed of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers with arbitrary magnetic declination are theoretically investigated for TM polarized wave based on transfer matrix method. As TM wave propagates in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals, the electromagnetic wave can be divided into two modes due to the influence of Lorentz force. The equations for effective dielectric functions of such two modes are theoretically deduced, and the transfer matrix equation and dispersion relations for TM wave are calculated. The influences of relative dielectric constant, plasma collision frequency, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency on transmission, and dispersion relation are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that plasma collision frequency cannot change the locations of photonic band gaps for both modes, and also does not affect the reflection and transmission magnitudes. The characteristics of photonic band gaps for both modes can be obviously tuned by relative dielectric constant, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency, respectively. These results would provide theoretical instructions for designing filters, microcavities, and fibers, etc.

Zhang Haifeng [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China); Liu Shaobin [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves of Southeast University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210096 (China); Kong Xiangkun [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

CX-007430: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30: Categorical Exclusion Determination 30: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007430: Categorical Exclusion Determination Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/01/2011 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Golden Field Office The University of Utah would utilize DOE and cost share funds to develop the framework and procedures required to relate reservoir permeabilities (from indicators of water-rock ratios), degree and type of clay alteration, and temperature to the electrical resistivities of geothermal systems as recorded by magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. Laboratory work would be conducted in the X-ray diffraction and fluid inclusion laboratories located at the Energy and Geoscience Institute (EGI ), 423 Wakara Way, Research

155

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The size and low resistivity of the clay cap associated with a geothermal system create a target well suited for electromagnetic (EM) methods and also make electrical detection of the underlying geothermal reservoir a challenge. Using 3-D numerical models, we evaluate four EM techniques for use in geothermal exploration: magnetotellurics (MT), controlled-source audio magnetotellurics (CSAMT), long-offset time-domain EM (LOTEM), and short-offset time-domain EM (TEM). Our results show that all of these techniques can delineate the clay cap, but none can be said to unequivocally detect the reservoir. We do find, however, that the EM

156

Category:Reference Materials | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Reference Materials (Redirected from Reference Materials) Jump to: navigation, search This is a deprecated subcategory. All Reference Materials will be converted to References. Pages in category "Reference Materials" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 2,265 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 1 10 CFR § 1021 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc 2D Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The Evaluation Of Low Enthalpy Geothermal Fields

157

CX-001422: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001422: Categorical Exclusion Determination A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource: Soda lake, Churchill County, Nevada CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 03/29/2010 Location(s): Soda Lake, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Magma Energy (United States) Corporation (Magma) would demonstrate the potential geothermal resource at the Soda Lake geothermal area in Churchill County, Nevada. In Phase I (exploration geophysics), Magma would collect and interpret resistivity data from both Magnetotelluric and Controlled-Source Audio-Magnetotelluric electrical surveys, and conduct

158

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below the Dixie  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below the Dixie Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, Nevada, Inferred from 3d Magnetotelluric Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, Nevada, Inferred from 3d Magnetotelluric Surveying Abstract Geothermal systems may occur in zones of structural dilatency which create the crustal plumbing that al-lows concentration of high-temperature fluids from surrounding volumes. While structural orientations of the U.S. Great Basin are dominated visually by the NNE-oriented horst-graben morphology, other alignments are apparent, perhaps principally a NNW-trending grain

159

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The 1st crater of Naka-dake, Aso volcano, is one of the most active craters in Japan, and known to have a characteristic cycle of activity that consists of the formation of a crater lake, drying-up of the

160

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0051-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0051-CX DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0051-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0051-CX CX at Soda Lake Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Magnetotelluric Survey at Soda Lake General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Global Magma Energy Group Geothermal Area Soda Lake Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotelluric Techniques Comments The Bureau of Reclamation has deferred surface management authority to the BLM for this project. Time Frame (days) Application Time 27 Participating Agencies Lead Agency Nevada Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CX-001731: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Categorical Exclusion Determination 31: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, Nevada CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 04/16/2010 Location(s): Churchill County, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Magma Energy (United States) Corporation (MEC) would demonstrate the potential geothermal resource at the McCoy geothermal area in Churchill County, Nevada (NV). In Phase 1 (exploration geophysics), Magma would collect and interpret resistivity data from both Magnetotelluric (MT) and Controlled-Source Audio-Magnetotelluric (CSAMT) electrical surveys, and

162

CX-001423: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001423: Categorical Exclusion Determination Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: An Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration, McCoy, Churchill County, Nevada CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 03/29/2010 Location(s): McCoy, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Magma Energy (United States) Corporation (Magma) would demonstrate the potential geothermal resource at the McCoy geothermal area in Churchill County, Nevada. In Phase I (exploration geophysics), Magma would collect and interpret resistivity data from both Magnetotelluric and Controlled-Source Audio-Magnetotelluric electrical surveys, and conduct

163

Interpretation of Geoelectric Structure at Hululais Prospect Area, South Sumatra  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Schlumberger resistivity surveys were conducted in 1993 as part of a combined geological, geophysical and geological program to investigate a geothermal prospect in the Hululais area, Southern Sumatra. These resistivity data resolved the upper conductive layer and were interpreted to define the shallow extent of a possible geothermal system. A follow-up magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out to probe deeper than the dc resistivity survey results achieved. However, the resistive sub-stratum below the conductive layer was still poorly resolved. Possible reasons for this include a preferential channeling of the telluric current within the thick shallow very conductive layer, thus limiting the penetration depth of the magnetotelluric signals and poor resolution due to high noise levels caused by significant rain and sferics.

Mulyadi

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Exploration of the El Hoyo-Monte Galan Geothermal Concession. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In January 1996 Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation (TGC) was granted a geothermal concession of 114 square kilometers from the Instituto Nicaragueense de Energie (INE) for the purpose of developing between 50 and 150 MWe of geothermal electrical generating capacity. The Concession Agreement required TGC to perform geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies as part of the development program. TGC commenced the geotechnical studies in January 1996 with a comprehensive review of all existing data and surveys. Based on this review, TGC formulated an exploration plan and executed that plan commencing in April, 1996. The ground magnetic (GM), self potential (SP), magnetotelluric/controlled source audio magnetotelluric (MT/CSAMT) and one-meter temperature surveys, data integration, and synthesis of a hydrogeologic model were performed. The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of all data gathered from the geophysical exploration program and to provide an integrated interpretation of that data.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Property:Abstract | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract Abstract Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Text. Pages using the property "Abstract" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth + With the aim of investigating the possibilities of magnetotelluric methods for the exploration of potential Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) sites in the Upper Rhine valley, a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) survey has been carried out on a 13 km long profile across the thermal anomaly in the area of the geothermal power plant of Soultz-sous-Forets in the winter 2007/08. Despite strong artificial noise, processing using remote referencing and Sutarno phase consistent smoothing revealed significant results from 10 out of 16 sites. Indication for 1-D structures was found in the shortest periods, 2-D effects in the periods up to 40 s, and 3-D effects in the long period range. Since 3-D effects were found in the longer periods, 2-D inversion was carried out for periods smaller than 40 s. The results of the inversion are consistent with the geology of the geothermal site and distinguish well the sediments from the granitic basement including the structures given by the faults. A conductive anomaly with a resistivity of about 3 Ωm has been found at a depth down to 2000 m in the area of the Soultz and Kutzenhausen faults, which is attributed to geothermal processes.

167

Self-force on an electric dipole in the spacetime of a cosmic string  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the electrostatic self-force on an electric dipole in the spacetime generated by a static, thin, infinite and straight cosmic string. The electric dipole is held fixed in different configurations, namely, parallel, perpendicular to the cosmic string and oriented along the azimuthal direction around this topological defect, which is stretched along the z axis. We show that the self-force is equivalent to an interaction of the electric dipole with an effective dipole moment which depends on the linear mass density of the cosmic string and on the configuration. The plots of the self-forces as functions of the parameter which determines the angular deficit of the cosmic string are shown for those different configurations.

C. R. Muniz; V. B Bezerra

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Vortex Ring Dyons of the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an axially symmetric vortex ring dyons solutions of the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory. These vortex rings carry electric charges that are determined by a parameter, -1{<=}{eta}{<=}1. They possess vanishing magnetic charge and are located at a ring centered around the z-axis where the Higgs field vanishes. These stationary vortex ring dyon solutions possess finite energy but they do not satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equations. In the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) limit where the Higgs field potential is zero, the time component of the gauge field is parallel to the Higgs field in isospace. The total energy, net electric charge and diameter of the vortex ring increase exponentially to infinity when {eta} approaches {+-}1. On the contrary, when {lambda} = 1, all these three values reach their critical value as {eta} approaches {+-}1.

Lim, Kok-Geng; Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia 11800 USM Penang (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Instabilities and generation of a quasistationary magnetic field by the interaction of relativistically intense electromagnetic wave with a plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the interaction of the superstrong laser radiation with an isotropic plasma leads to the generation of low frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves and in particular a quasistationary magnetic field. When the relativistic circularly polarized transverse EM wave propagates along z-axis, it creates a ponderomotive force, which affects the motion of particles along the direction of its propagation. On the other hand, motion of the particles across the direction of propagation is defined by the ponderomotive potential. The dispersion relation for the transverse EM wave using a special distribution function, which has an anisotropic form, is derived. The dispersion relation is subsequently investigated for a number of special cases. In general, it is shown that the growth rate of the EM wave strongly depends upon its intensity.

Gillani, S. S. A.; Shah, H. A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Tsintsadze, N. L. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Institute of Physics, Tbilisi 380077 (Georgia); Razzaq, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electrochemical Performance and Stability of the Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. I. Cross Validation of Polarization Measurements by Impedance Spectroscopy and Current-Potential Sweep  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to address three issues in solid oxide fuel cells: (1) cross-validation of the polarization of a single cell measured using both dc and ac approaches, (2) the precise determination of the total areal specific resistance (ASR), and (3) understanding cathode polarization with LSCF cathodes. The ASR of a solid oxide fuel cell is a dynamic property, meaning that it changes with current density. The ASR measured using ac impedance spectroscopy (low frequency interception with real Z axis of ac impedance spectrum) matches with that measured from a dc IV sweep (the tangent of dc i-V curve). Due to the dynamic nature of ASR, we found that an ac impedance spectrum measured under open circuit voltage or on a half cell may not represent cathode performance under real operating conditions, particularly at high current density. In this work, the electrode polarization was governed by the cathode activation polarization; the anode contribution was negligible.

Zhou, Xiao Dong; Pederson, Larry R.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

Laser-induced damage investigation at 1064 nmin KTiOPO4 crystals and its analogy with RbTiOPO4  

SciTech Connect

Bulk laser-induced damage at 1064 nm has been investigated in KTiOPO4 (KTP) and RbTiOPO4 (RTP) crystals with a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Both crystals belong to the same family. Throughout this study, their comparison shows a very similar laser-damage behavior. The evolution of the damage resistance under a high number of shots per site (10,000 shots) reveals a fatigue effect of KTP and RTP crystals. In addition, S-on-1 damage probability curves have been measured in both crystals for all combinations of polarization and propagation direction aligned with the principal axes of the crystals. The results show an influence of the polarization on the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), with a significantly higher threshold along the z axis, whereas no effect of the propagation direction has been observed. This LIDT anisotropy is discussed with regard to the crystallographic structure.

Hildenbrand, A.; Wagner, F. R.; Akhouayri, H.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Commandre, M.; Theodore, F.; Albrecht, H.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Manual Calibration System for Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has measured the last unknown neutrino mixing angle, {\\theta}13, to be non-zero at the 7.7{\\sigma} level. This is the most precise measurement to {\\theta}13 to date. To further enhance the understanding of the response of the antineutrino detectors (ADs), a detailed calibration of an AD with the Manual Calibration System (MCS) was undertaken during the summer 2012 shutdown. The MCS is capable of placing a radioactive source with a positional accuracy of 25 mm in R direction, 20 mm in Z axis and 0.5{\\deg} in {\\Phi} direction. A detailed description of the MCS is presented followed by a summary of its performance in the AD calibration run.

Hanxiong Huang; Xichao Ruan; Jie Ren; Chengjun Fan; Yannan Chen; Yinglong Lv; Zhaohui Wang; Zuying Zhou; Long Hou; Biao Xin; Chaoju Yu; Jiawen Zhang; Yinghong Zhang; Jingzhi Bai; Honglin Zhuang; Wei He; Jianglai Liu; Elizabeth Worcester; Harry Themann; Jeff Cherwinka; David M. Webber

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

173

Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Evaluation of electrical conductivity and equations of state of non-ideal plasma through microsecond timescale underwater electrical wire explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental and simulation results of underwater electrical Cu, Al, and W wire explosions in the microsecond timescale are presented. It was shown that the electrical conductivity results for Cu and Al agree well with modified Lee-More and quantum molecular dynamic models for temperatures above 10 kK. The equation of state (EOS) values based on SESAME tables for Cu and Al were slightly modified for intermediate temperatures in order to obtain fitting between experimental and simulated exploding wire radial expansion. Also, it was shown that the electrical conductivity results and the EOS evaluation differ significantly from the results obtained in nanosecond timescale experiments. Finally, it was found that underwater electrical W wire explosion is characterized by the appearance of non-uniformities along the z-axis of the wire. This phenomena adds uncertainty to the possibility of applying this type of experiments for evaluation of the electrical conductivity and EOS of W.

Sheftman, D.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A point-sensitive NMR imaging system (10) in which a main solenoid coil (11) produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils (PZ1 and PZ2) powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils (PX1, PX2; PY1, PY2) superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An RF generator (22) irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

Eberhard, Philippe H. (El Cerrito, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NVN-086285 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-086285 CU at Desert Peak Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Magma Energy Action Plan for Geophysical and Vibroseis Surveys General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant Magma Energy Geothermal Area Desert Peak Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotellurics Time Frame (days) Application Time 31 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 2008/10/31

177

NVN-087791 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVN-087791 NVN-087791 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-087791 CU at New York Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, New York Canyon Geothermal Exploration and Development General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant TGP Dixie Development Company Geothermal Area New York Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Lovelock, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotellurics Time Frame (days) Application Time 28 Participating Agencies Lead Agency Nevada Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM

178

NVN-89306 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVN-89306 NVN-89306 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-89306 CU at {{{GeothermalArea}}} for Geothermal/Exploration, Spring Gulch MT Survey General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant Terra Gen Dixie Valley Development Co Geothermal Area {{{GeothermalArea}}}"{{{GeothermalArea}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Project Location Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotellurics Comments MT Survey, Spring Gulch Project Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency Nevada Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM

179

Property:References | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References References Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Text. Subproperties This property has the following 43 subproperties: A Active Seismic Techniques Aeromagnetic Survey Airborne Gravity Survey Audio-Magnetotellurics C Chemical Logging Compound and Elemental Analysis Controlled Source Audio MT Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Direct-Current Resistivity Survey D cont. Downhole Techniques E Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques F Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey G Geodetic Survey Geophysical Techniques

180

Controlled Source Audio MT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlled Source Audio MT Controlled Source Audio MT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Controlled Source Audio MT Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 1,866.44186,644 centUSD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NVN-087930 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-087930 CU at Desert Queen Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant Magma Energy Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotelluric Methods Comments MT Survey Time Frame (days) Application Time 7 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 2009/09/09 Application Document Type NOI

182

NVN-086286 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-086286 CU at Desert Queen Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Magma Energy Action Plan for Geophysical and Vibroseis Surveys General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant Magma Energy Consultant RMT, Inc. Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotellurics Comments Desert Queen and Leach Hot Springs Time Frame (days) Application Time 31 Participating Agencies Lead Agency Nevada Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM

183

NVN-086761 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-086761 CU at {{{GeothermalArea}}} for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant Colado Project, LLC Geothermal Area {{{GeothermalArea}}}"{{{GeothermalArea}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Project Location Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotellurics Time Frame (days) Application Time 5 Participating Agencies Lead Agency Nevada Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 2009/02/19

184

Property:ExplorationSubGroup | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationSubGroup ExplorationSubGroup Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationSubGroup Property Type Page Description Exploration sub groups for exploration activities Pages using the property "ExplorationSubGroup" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe Survey + Data Collection and Mapping + A Acoustic Logs + Well Log Techniques + Active Seismic Methods + Seismic Techniques + Active Seismic Techniques + Seismic Techniques + Active Sensors + Active Sensors + Aerial Photography + Passive Sensors + Aeromagnetic Survey + Magnetic Techniques + Airborne Electromagnetic Survey + Electrical Techniques + Airborne Gravity Survey + Gravity Techniques + Analytical Modeling + Modeling Techniques + Audio-Magnetotellurics + Electrical Techniques +

185

NVN-084629 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

29 29 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-084629 CU at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, MT Survey at Patua Geothermal Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant Vulcan Energy Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotellurics Time Frame (days) Application Time 13 Participating Agencies Lead Agency Nevada Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 2008/01/22 Application Document Type NOI

186

NVN-087388 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVN-087388 NVN-087388 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-087388 CU at Salt Wells Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant Enel North America Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Audio-Magnetotellurics Comments Application via email with attached map and description of survey methodology and impacts. Time Frame (days) Application Time 1 Participating Agencies Lead Agency Stillwater Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager Stillwater Mineral Manager Stillwater

187

NVN-087811 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

87811 87811 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-087811 CU at New York Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, New York Canyon Geothermal Exploration and Development General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant TGP Dixie Development Co Geothermal Area New York Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Lovelock, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotellurics Time Frame (days) Application Time 21 Participating Agencies Lead Agency Nevada Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates

188

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program emphasizes both teaching of field methods and research related to basic science and a variety of applied problems. SAGE is hosted by the National Security Education Center and the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. * teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including magnetotellurics), and electrical resistivity * involves extensive hands-on field experience * integrates geophysical methods to solve real

189

Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The structural model is based on the role of subsurface igneous dikes providing a buttressing effect in a regional strain field such that permeability is greatly enhanced. The basic thermal anomaly at McCoy was defined by substantial U.S. Department of Energy-funded temperature gradient drilling and geophysical studies conducted during the period 1978 to 1982. This database will be augmented with modern magnetotelluric, controlled-source audio-magnetotelluric, and 2D/3D reflection seismic surveys to define likely fluid up-flow plumes that will be drilled with slant-hole technology. Two sites for production-capable wells will be drilled in geothermally prospective areas identified in this manner. The uniqueness of this proposal lies in the use of a full suite of modern geophysical tools, use of slant-hole drilling, and the extensive technical database from previous DOE funding.

190

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Klamath Basin, Oregon: Swan Lake and Klamath Hills area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synthesis and preliminary interpretation of predominantly geophysical information relating to the Klamath Basin geothermal resource is presented. The Swan Lake Valley area, northeast of Klamath Falls, and the Klamath Hills area, south of Klamath Falls, are discussed in detail. Available geophysical data, including gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, microearthquake, roving dipole resistivity, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and magnetotelluric (MT) data sets, are examined and reinterpreted for these areas. One- and two-dimensional modeling techniques are applied, and general agreement among overlapping data sets is achieved. The MT method appears well suited to this type of exploration, although interpretation is difficult in the complex geology. Roving dipole and AMT are useful in reconnaissance, while gravity and magnetics help in defining structure. For the Swan Lake Valley the data suggest buried electrically conductive zones beneath Meadow Lake Valley and Swan Lake, connected by a conductive layer at 1 kilometer depth. In the Klamath Hills area, the data suggest a conductive zone centered near the northwestern tip of Stukel Mountain, associated with a concealed northeast-trending cross-fault. Another conductive zone appears near some producing hot wells at the southwestern edge of the Klamath Hills. These conductive zones may represent geothermal reservoirs. Follow-up work is recommended for each target area.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Hege, H.; Wilt, M.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Geothermal resource exploration assessment and data interpretation, Klamath Basin, Oregon: Swan Lake and Klamath Hills area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synthesis and preliminary interpretation of predominantly geophysical information relating to the Klamath Basin geothermal resource is presented. The Swan Lake Valley area, northeast of Klamath Falls, and the Klamath Hills area, south of Klamath Falls, are discussed in detail. Available geophysical data, including gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, microseismic, roving dipole resistivity, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and magnetotelluric (MT) data sets, are examined and reinterpreted for these areas. One- and two-dimensional modeling techniques are applied, and general agreement among overlapping data sets is achieved. The MT method appears well suited to this type of exploration, although interpretation is difficult in the complex geology. Roving dipole and AMT are useful in reconnaissance, while gravity and magnetics help in defining structure. For the Swan Lake Valley the data suggest buried electrically conductive zones beneath Meadow Lake Valley and Swan Lake, connected by a conductive layer at 1 kilometer depth. In the Klamath Hills area, the data suggest a conductive zone centered near the northwestern tip of Stukel Mountain, associated with a concealed northeast-trending cross-fault. Another conductive zone appears near some producing hot wells at the southwestern edge of the Klamath Hills. These conductive zones may represent geothermal reservoirs. Specific types of follow-up work are recommended for each target area.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Hege, M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Superfluid and magnetic states of an ultracold Bose gas with synthetic three-dimensional spin-orbit coupling in an optical lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study ultracold bosonic atoms with the synthetic three-dimensional spin-orbit (SO) coupling in a cubic optical lattice. In the superfluidity phase, the lowest energy band exhibits one, two or four pairs of degenerate single-particle ground states depending on the SO-coupling strengths, which can give rise to the condensate states with spin-stripes for the weak atomic interactions. In the deep Mott-insulator regime, the effective spin Hamiltonian of the system combines three-dimensional Heisenberg exchange interactions, anisotropy interactions and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, we numerically demonstrate that the resulting Hamiltonian with an additional Zeeman field has a rich phase diagram with spiral, stripe, vortex crystal, and especially Skyrmion crystal spin-textures in each xy-plane layer. The obtained Skyrmion crystals can be tunable with square and hexagonal symmetries in a columnar manner along the z axis, and moreover are stable against the inter-layer spin-spin interactions in a large parameter region.

Dan-Wei Zhang; Ji-Pei Chen; Chuan-Jia Shan; Z. D. Wang; Shi-Liang Zhu

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Flux lattices reformulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the optical flux lattices produced for ultra-cold atoms subject to laser fields where both the atom-light coupling and the effective detuning are spatially periodic. We analyze the geometric vector potential and the magnetic flux it generates, as well as the accompanying geometric scalar potential. We show how to understand the gauge-dependent Aharonov-Bohm singularities in the vector potential, and calculate the continuous magnetic flux through the elementary cell in terms of these singularities. The analysis is illustrated with a square optical flux lattice. We conclude with an explicit laser configuration yielding such a lattice using a set of five properly chosen beams with two counterpropagating pairs (one along the x axes and the other y axes), together with a single beam along the z axis. We show that this lattice is not phase-stable, and identify the one phase-difference that affects the magnetic flux. Thus armed with realistic laser setup, we directly compute the Chern number...

Juzeli?nas, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

System for measuring the coordinates of tire surfaces in transient conditions when rolling over obstacles: Description of the system and performance analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a system for measuring surface coordinates (commonly known as ''shape measurements'') which is able to give the temporal evolution of the position of the tire sidewall in transient conditions (such as during braking, when there are potholes or when the road surface is uneven) which may or may not be reproducible. The system is based on the well-known technique of projecting and observing structured light using a digital camera with an optical axis which is slanted with respect to the axis of the projector. The transient nature of the phenomenon has led to the development of specific innovative solutions as regards image processing algorithms. This paper briefly describes the components which make up the measuring system and presents the results of the measurements carried out on the drum bench. It then analyses the performance of the measuring system and the sources of uncertainty which led to the development of the system for a specific dynamic application: impact with an obstacle (cleat test). The measuring system guaranteed a measurement uncertainty of 0.28 mm along the Z axis (the axial direction of the tire) with a measurement range of 250(X)x80(Y)x25(Z) mm{sup 3}, with the tire rolling at a speed of up to 30 km/h.

Castellini, Paolo; Di Giuseppe, Andrea [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Architecture and operation of the Z Pulsed Power Facility vacuum system.  

SciTech Connect

The Z Pulsed Power Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA is one of the world's premier high energy density physics facilities. The Z Facility derives its name from the z-pinch phenomena which is a type of plasma confinement system that uses the electrical current in the plasma to generate a magnetic field that compresses it. Z refers to the direction of current flow, the z axis in a three dimensional Cartesian coordinate system. The multiterawatt, multimegajoule electrical pulse the Facility produces is 100-400 nanoseconds in time. Research and development programs currently being conducted on the Z Facility include inertial confinement fusion, dynamic material properties, laboratory astrophysics and radiation effects. The Z Facility vacuum system consists of two subsystems, center section and load diagnostics. Dry roughing pumps and cryogenic high vacuum pumps are used to evacuate the 40,000 liter, 200 square meter center section of the facility where the experimental load is located. Pumping times on the order of two hours are required to reduce the pressure from atmospheric to 10{sup -5} Torr. The center section is cycled from atmosphere to high vacuum for each experiment. The facility is capable of conducting one to two experiments per day. Numerous smaller vacuum pumping systems are used to evacuate load diagnostics. The megajoules of energy released during an experiment causes damage to the Facility that presents numerous challenges for reliable operation of the vacuum system.

Riddle, Allen Chauncey; Petmecky, Don; Weed, John Woodruff

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The evaluation of Federal Fabrics-Fibers electrochemical capacitors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrochemical capacitor devices described in this report were deliverables from the US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) as part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) High Power Energy Storage Program. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has the responsibility for technical management, testing, and evaluation of high-power batteries and electrochemical capacitors under this Program. The DOE is currently developing various electrochemical capacitors as candidate power assist devices for the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) fast response engine requirement. This contract with Federal Fabrics-Fibers was intended to evaluate the use of their novel Z-axis carbon fiber materials as candidate electrodes for electrochemical capacitors. Deliverables were sent to the INEEL`s Energy Storage Technologies (EST) Laboratory for independent testing and evaluation. This report describes performance testing on four selected devices delivered over a 2-year period. Due to the highly experimental nature of the packages, life cycle testing was not conducted.

Wright, R.B.; Murphy, T.C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Application of Goubau Surface Wave Transmission Line for Improved Bench Testing of Diagnostic Beamline Elements  

SciTech Connect

In-air test fixtures for beamline elements typically utilize an X-Y positioning stage, and a wire antenna excited by an RF source. In most cases, the antenna contains a standing wave, and is useful only for coarse alignment measurements in CW mode. A surface-wave (SW) based transmission line permits RF energy to be launched on the wire, travel through the beamline component, and then be absorbed in a load. Since SW transmission lines employ travelling waves, the RF energy can be made to resemble the electron beam, limited only by ohmic losses and dispersion. Although lossy coaxial systems are also a consideration, the diameter of the coax introduces large uncertainties in centroid location. A SW wire is easily constructed out of 200 micron magnet wire, which more accurately approximates the physical profile of the electron beam. Benefits of this test fixture include accurate field mapping, absolute calibration for given beam currents, Z-axis independence, and temporal response measurements of sub-nanosecond pulse structures. Descriptions of the surface wave launching technique, transmission line, and instrumentation are presented, along with measurement data.

John Musson, Keith Cole, Sheldon Rubin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modular low aspect ratio-high beta torsatron  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fusion reactor device in which the toroidal magnetic field and at least a portion of the poloidal magnetic field are provided by a single set of modular coils. The coils are arranged on the surface of a low aspect ratio toroid in planes having the cylindrical coordinate relationship .phi.=.phi..sub.i +kz where k is a constant equal to each coil's pitch and .phi..sub.i is the toroidal angle at which the i'th coil intersects the z=o plane. The device may be described as a modular, high beta torsation whose screw symmetry is pointed along the systems major (z) axis. The toroid defined by the modular coils preferably has a racetrack minor cross section. When vertical field coils and preferably a toroidal plasma current are provided for magnetic field surface closure within the toroid, a vacuum magnetic field of racetrack shaped minor cross section with improved stability and beta valves is obtained.

Sheffield, George V. (Hopewell, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ)

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

199

UDC 651.511.32:551.511.6:651.657 A CLIMATOLOGY OF EPSILON (ATMOSPHERIC DISSIPATION)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kolmogorovs structure functions for the longitudinal and transverse components of locally homogeneous isotropic turbulence are combined vectorially to obtain an expression which permits the evaluation of E (atmospheric dissipation rate) from climatological data. This is used to derive climatological patterns of e in the free atmosphere from Crutchers upper wind statistics of the Northern Hemisphere. The latter are combined with Kungs boundarylayer values to estimate the distribution of total atmospheric dissipation over the Northern Hemisphere. I. EPSILON AS A FUNCTION OF CLIMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS In a recent review of the methods of evaluating e (the rate of kinetic energy dissipation in the atmosphere), it appeared that it could be determined from wind variability data. The theory for such an eva1.uation is provided by Kolmogorovs (1941a) second hypothesis of similarity of locally homogeneous isotropic turbulence. In such a field of turbulence and with the z axis along the mean vector wind, this gives for the wind components at points 1 and 2 a distance x apart and

Hugh W. Ellsaesser

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Wilt &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilt & Wilt & Haar, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Telluric profiles, magnetotelluric sounding, dc resistivity, and electromagnetic sounding surveys were all performed over the caldera in hopes of outlining deep drilling targets (Group 7 Inc., 1972; McPhar, 1973; Geonomics Inc., 1976). These data are used to help define the electrical structure in the reservoir region. Some of the data were reinterpreted using computer models, and interpretations from the various surveys were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1991) 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain Electromagnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1986, Unocal Geothermal Division released results from 158 time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings and, with Chevron Resources, a total of 77 magnetotelluric (MT) stations. Reinterpretations of the Unocal and Chevron data (Park and Torres-Verdin, 1988 ) and the recent public-domain MT studies (e.g. Hermance et al., 1988) outline similar shallow low-resistivity regions. At shallow depths in the caldera References Michael L. Sorey, Gene A. Suemnicht, Neil C. Sturchio, Gregg A.

202

A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In view of recent extensive investigation of shallow resistivity structure for active fault studies and geothermal exploration, we developed a portable magnetotelluric (MT) system for the extremely low frequency (ELF) range. The system aims primarily at making real-time analyses of MT data at the so-called Schumann resonance frequencies of ~ 8, 14 and 20 Hz.

203

Property:FieldProcedures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FieldProcedures FieldProcedures Jump to: navigation, search Property Name FieldProcedures Property Type Text Description Description of actions, equipment and footprint of the exploration activity Subproperties This property has the following 39 subproperties: A Active Seismic Techniques Airborne Gravity Survey Audio-Magnetotellurics C Controlled Source Audio MT Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Development Drilling Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Drilling Techniques E Earth Tidal Analysis Electrical Profiling Configurations Electromagnetic Techniques Exploration Drilling F FMI Log Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey

204

Ground Gravity Survey At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2009) Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Truckhaven Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The area of coverage for the DOE-funded geophysical surveys is shown in Figure 9. The 95 magnetotelluric (MT) soundings cover a central area of about 80 square kilometers. The 126 gravity stations extend over a broader area of about 150 square kilometers, centered on the same area covered by the MT soundings. A detailed description of the instrumentation and data acquisition procedures used for both surveys is provided in GSY-USA, Inc.

205

Ground Gravity Survey At Rio Grande Rift Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rio Grande Rift Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) Rio Grande Rift Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Rio Grande Rift Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Carlos L.V. Aiken, Mark E. Ander (1981) A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Gravity_Survey_At_Rio_Grande_Rift_Region_(Aiken_%26_Ander,_1981)&oldid=401473" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

206

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: INPUT airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were conducted during 1979 in five Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's). AEM work has not been significantly utilized in the past for geothermal purposes because it was thought that a shallow exploration technique would not be effective. Extensive audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) work by the USGS in KGRA's showed that many geothermal systems do have a near-surface electrical signature which should be detectable by an AEM system. INPUT responses in the form of

207

Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Activity Date 1979 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To show that AEM methods can be useful in exploration for and defining geothermal systems Notes Extensive audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) work by the USGS in KGRA's showed that many geothermal systems do have a near-surface electrical signature which should be detectable by an AEM system. References Christopherson, K.R.; Long, C.L.; Hoover, D.B. (1 September 1980) Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Airborne_Electromagnetic_Survey_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1979)&oldid=510231

208

Property:Document type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Document type Document type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Document type Property Type String Description The type of document as a string. This property is used by a variety of concepts including Reference Materials and may contain document types appropriate for multiple concepts. Allows Values Book;Book Review;Book Section;Conference Paper;Conference Proceedings;General;Info Graphic/Map/Chart;Journal Article;Legal;Memorandum;Periodical;Personal Communication;Poster;Report;Thesis/Dissertation;Web Site Pages using the property "Document type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth + Journal Article + 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits + Journal Article +

209

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Abstract Extended magnetotelluric (MT) profiling results over the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt area were recently completed to explore the hypothesis that fluid circulation to depths of 10 km or more is generating well temperatures in the field >280 C.This transect has revealed families of resistivity structures commonly dominated by high-angle

210

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0070-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C010-2012-0070-CX C010-2012-0070-CX CX at Dixie Valley Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant US Navy Geothermal Program Office Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotelluric Methods, Reflection Survey Time Frame (days) Application Time 115 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 4/30/2012 Revised Application Date 7/27/2012 Decision Document Date 8/23/2012 Relevant Numbers

211

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 24800 of 26,764 results. 91 - 24800 of 26,764 results. Download CX-007430: Categorical Exclusion Determination Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/01/2011 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007430-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007748: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integration of the Farm Power Misty Meadows Generating Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 01/11/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007748-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007862: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider

212

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To investigate electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area Notes 18 USGS Schlumberger soundings and 6 Schlumberger soundings by Furgerson (1973) were plotted and automatically processed and interpreted References Jackson, D.B. ODonnell, J.E.; Gregory, D. I. (1 January 1977) Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric mapping in and around the Coso Range, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=DC_Resistivity_Survey_(Schlumberger_Array)_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=591389

213

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

{~." ,.~ I {~." ,.~ I u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION REClPIENT: University of Utah Page 1 of2 STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE: Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk T hrough Integration of Water-rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOOS22 Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOO5S2 1 GFO-OOO5521-OO1 a Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NU MBER: Description: A91nformation gathering, analysis, and d issemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis

214

Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

215

Property:Author | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Author Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Author Property Type String Description The author of a document, resource, reference material or tool. Pages using the property "Author" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth + Johannes Geiermann +, Eva Schill + 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits + Peter W. Lipman +, O. A. Bogatikov +, A. A. Tsvetkov +, ... 2007 Annual Report + Enel + 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc + K. H. Rubin +, G. E. Wheller +, M. O. Tanzer +, ...

216

3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Electrical resistivity may contribute to progress in understanding geothermal systems by imaging the geometry, bounds and controlling structures in existing production, and thereby perhaps suggesting new areas for field expansion. To these ends, a dense grid of magnetotelluric (MT) stations plus a single line of contiguous bipole array profiling has been acquired over the east flank of the Coso geothermal system. Acquiring good quality MT data in producing geothermal systems is a challenge due to production related electromagnetic (EM) noise and, in the

217

Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Spontaneous Potential Well Log At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bidwell Area Exploration Technique Spontaneous Potential Well Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric Imaging, G. Michael Hoversten. The project title derived from its inception. The project however moved from the application of MT on Kilauea in 2003 to the use of combined SP and conductivity mapping (MT) in 2004. The beginning of 2004 saw the completions of the Kilauea MT experiment by the acquisition of an additional 45 MT stations on Kilauea. We therefore decided to use the funds available to work at the Fort Bidwell

218

Property:DataAcquisition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DataAcquisition DataAcquisition Jump to: navigation, search Property Name DataAcquisition Property Type Text Description Information on acquisition, including both collection and lists of data repositories. Subproperties This property has the following 27 subproperties: A Active Seismic Techniques Aeromagnetic Survey C Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Core Analysis D Direct-Current Resistivity Survey E Electrical Techniques F FLIR FMI Log Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey G Ground Gravity Survey Ground Magnetics H Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) I Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopic Analysis- Rock M Magnetotellurics Mud Logging P PSInSAR R Radar Reflection Survey R cont. Refraction Survey S SRT Self Potential Step-out Well Stereo Satellite Imagery T Telluric Survey Time-Domain Electromagnetics

219

Category:Geothermal References | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geothermal References Jump to: navigation, search Add a new Reference Pages in category "Geothermal References" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 323 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth 2007 Annual Report A A Case History of Injection Through 1991 at Dixie Valley, Nevada A Coordinated Exploration Program for Geothermal Sources on the Island of Hawaii A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field

220

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0021-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0021-CX DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0021-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0021-CX CX at Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant TGP Dixie Development LLC Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Churchill County, NV, Churchill County, NV Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotelluric Methods Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager Nevada Mineral Manager BLM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetotellurics z-axis tipper" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilt & Haar, 1986) Wilt & Haar, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Telluric profiles, magnetotelluric sounding, dc resistivity, and electromagnetic sounding surveys were all performed over the caldera in hopes of outlining deep drilling targets (Group 7 Inc., 1972; McPhar, 1973; Geonomics Inc., 1976). These data are used to help define the electrical structure in the reservoir region. Some of the data were reinterpreted using computer models, and interpretations from the various surveys were

222

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes

223

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

224

Property:Foaf/Page | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Foaf/Page Property Type URL Description Link to an external page discussing the same topic. (URL) It is equivalent to the well-known foaf:page property. Pages using the property "Foaf/Page" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 10 CFR § 1021 + http://en.openei.org/wiki/File:10CFRPart1021.pdf + 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth + http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1631071310001070 + 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits + http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VCS-48B5BV5-KK/2/a841cce0d247b754e5163bb62f72dc05 +

225

Exploration for Geothermal Resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Exploration for Geothermal Resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History Abstract After several years of reconnaissance geology in Nevada, an exploration program to evaluate the geothermal resource potential of Dixie Valley was begun in 1974. Between 1974 and 1978 Sunoco Energy Development Co. conducted two heat-flow drilling programs, a resistivity survey, a seismic emission study, a ground noise survey, two magnetotelluric surveys, a hydrology study, and a surface geology survey. The synthesis of the data resulting from these projects into the regional geologic framework led to the acquisition of geothermal resource leases from fee property owners,

226

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0022-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0022-CX DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0022-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0022-CX CX at Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Churchill County, NV, Churchill County, NV Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques, Magnetotelluric Techniques, Seismic Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 213 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided

227

CX-004109: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

109: Categorical Exclusion Determination 109: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004109: Categorical Exclusion Determination Phase 2 - A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones over a Known Geothermal Resource: Soda Lake, Churchill County, Nevada CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7 Date: 09/29/2010 Location(s): Soda Lake, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Magma Energy Corporation would demonstrate the potential geothermal resource at the Soda Lake geothermal area in Churchill County, Nevada. In Phase 1 (exploration geophysics), Magma collected and interpreted resistivity data from both Magnetotelluric and Controlled-Source Audio-Magnotelluric electrical surveys, and conduct detailed geologic

228

Category:Reference Materials | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Reference Materials Jump to: navigation, search This is a deprecated subcategory. All Reference Materials will be converted to References. Pages in category "Reference Materials" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 2,265 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 1 10 CFR § 1021 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc

229

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

230

Tuscarora area, Nevada: geothermal reservoir assessment case history, northern basin and range. Final report, 1 October 1978-9 September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tuscarora prospect is located at the north end of Independence Valley approximately 90 km north-northwest of Elko, Nevada. Geothermal exploration on the prospect consisted of an integrated program of geologic, hydrogeochemical and soil geochemistry studies. Geophysical exploration included heatflow studies, aeromagnetic, self-potential, gravity, dipole-dipole resistivity and magnetotelluric surveys. Exploration drilling includes thirty-two shallow thermal gradient holes, six intermediate depth temperature gradient wells and one 5454 foot test for discovery well. Shallow low-temperature reservoirs were encountered in the Tertiary rocks and in the Paleozoic rocks immediately beneath the Tertiary. Drilling problems forced the deep well to be stopped before the high-temperature reservoir was reached.

Pilkington, H.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Results of investigation at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field, El Salvador  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ahuachapan Geothermal Field (AGF) is a 95 megawatt geothemal-sourced power-plant operated by the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) of El Salvador. During the past decade, as part of an effort to increase in situ thermal reserves in order to realize the full generation capacity of the AGF, extensive surface geophysical coverage has been obtained over the AGF and the prospective Chipilapa area to the east. The geophysical surveys were performed to determine physical property characteristics of the known reservoir and then to search for similar characteristics in the Chipilapa area. A secondary objective was to evaluate the surface recharge area in the highlands to the south of the AGF. The principal surface electrical geophysical methods used during this period were DC resistivity and magnetotellurics. Three available data sets have been reinterpreted using drillhole control to help form geophysical models of the area. The geophysical models are compared with the geologic interpretations.

Fink, J.B. (HydroGeophysics, Tucson, AZ (United States))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 2. Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume II contains appendices for the following: (1) remote sensing and surface mapping techniques; (2) subsurface mapping methods for site characterization; (3) gravity technique; (4) audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique; (5) seismic refraction technique; (6) direct-current electrical resistivity method; (7) magnetic technique; (8) seismic reflection technique; (9) seismic crosshole method; (10) mechanical downhole seismic velocity survey method; (11) borehole geophysical logging techniques; (12) drilling and coring methods for precharacterization studies; (13) subsurface drilling methods for site characterization; (14) geomechanical/thermomechanical techniques for precharacterization studies; (15)geomechanical/thermal techniques for site characterization studies; (16) exploratory geochemical techniques for precharacterization studies; (17) geochemical techniques for site characterization; (18) hydrologic techniques for precharacterization studies; (19) hydrologic techniques for site characterization; and (20) seismological techniques.

NONE

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Deep resistivity structure in southwestern Utah and its geothermal significance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in southwestern Utah have yielded a model of resistivity structure in this area to a depth of about 100 km. The MT observations are strongly affected by Great Basin graben sedimentary fill, which constitutes conductive upper-crustal lateral inhomogeneity and requires simulation using two- and three-dimensional modeling algorithms before deeper portions of the resistivity section can be resolved. Included in the model is a layer of low resistivity (20 ..cap omega..-m) residing from 35 to 65 km depth. Sensitivity tests of the data to the structure weigh strongly against the top of this layer being as shallow as 25 km and against the conductivity and thickness of the layer being highly correlated. No intra-crustal low-resistivity layer is indicated by the MT data.

Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the controlled source audio frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (1) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (2) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the conate water of the production field; (3) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (4) mathematically comparing the maps from step (1) and step (3) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

McCoy Area, Nevada geothermal reservoir assessment case history - Northern Basin and Range. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The McCoy geothermal prospect is located in north-central Nevada at the junction of the Augusta Mountains, Clan Alpine Mountains and the New Pass Range. Geothermal exploration on the prospect consisted of an integrated program of geologic, geochemical and geophysical studies. The geochemical studies included hydrogeochemistry, soil geochemistry, and drill cuttings geochemistry. Geophysical exploration included heatflow studies, aeromagnetic, self-potential, gravity, passive seismic, dipole-dipole resistivity, electromagnetic and magnetotelluric surveys. Exploration drilling includes fifty-two (52) shallow thermal gradient holes and five (5) intermediate depth temperature gradient wells. Shallow low-temperature geothermal reservoirs were encountered in two areas. In the McCoy Mine area the resource was found in the Permo-Pennsylvanian rocks. In the southern part of the prospect a resource with temperatures of 100/sup 0/C was encountered in the basal conglomeratic sandstone of the Triassic section.

Pilkington, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tectonic controls on magmatism in The Geysers--Clear Lake region: Evidence from new geophysical models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to study magmatism and geothermal systems in the Geysers-Clear Lake region, the authors developed a detailed three-dimensional tomographic velocity model based on local earthquakes. This high-resolution model resolves the velocity structure of the crust in the region to depths of approximately 12 km. The most significant velocity contrasts in The Geysers-Clear Lake region occur in the steam production area, where high velocities are associated with a Quaternary granite pluton, and in the Mount Hannah region, where low velocities occur in a 5-km-thick section of Mesozoic argillites. In addition, a more regional tomographic model was developed using traveltimes from earthquakes covering most of northern California. This regional model sampled the whole crust, but at a lower resolution than the local model. No large silicic magma chamber is noted in either the local or regional tomographic models. A three-dimensional gravity model also has ben developed in the area of the tomographic imaging. The gravity model demonstrates that all density contrasts can be accounted for in the upper 5--7 km of the crust. Two-dimensional magnetotelluric models of data from a regional east-west profile indicate high resistivities associated with the granitic pluton in The Geysers production area and low resistivities in the low-velocity section of Mesozoic argillites near Mount Hannah. No indication of midcrustal magma bodies is present in the magnetotelluric data. The geophysical models, seismicity patterns, distribution of volcanic vents, heat flow, and other data indicate that small, young intrusive bodies that were injected along a northeast trend from The Geysers to Clear Lake probably control the thermal regime.

Stanley, W.D.; Benz, H.M.; Villasenor, A.; Rodriguez, B.D. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center; Walters, M.A. [CalEnergy Corp., Ridgecrest, CA (United States)] [CalEnergy Corp., Ridgecrest, CA (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nonuniform character of the population of spin projections K for a fissile nucleus at the scission point and anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the induced fission of nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the emergence of anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the spontaneous and induced fission of oriented actinide nuclei is possible only if nonuniformities in the population of the projectionsM (K) of the fissile-nucleus spin onto the z axis of the laboratory frame (fissile-nucleus symmetry axis) appear simultaneously in the vicinity of the scission point but not in the vicinity of the outer saddle point of the deformation potential. The possibilities for creating the orientation of fissile nuclei for spontaneous and induced fission and the effect of these orientations on the anisotropies under analysis are considered. The role of Coriolis interaction as a unique source of the mixing of different-K fissile-nucleus states at all stages of the fission process is studied with allowance for the dynamical enhancement of this interaction for excited thermalized states of the nucleus involved that is characterized by a high energy density. It is shown that the absence of thermalization of excited states of the fissile nucleus that appear because of the effect of nonadiabaticity of its collective deformation motion in the vicinity of the scission point is a condition of conservation of the influence that transition fission states formed at the inner and outer fission barriers exerts on the distribution of the spin projections K for lowenergy spontaneous nuclear fission. It is confirmed that anisotropies observed in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the fission of nuclei that is induced by fast light particles (multiply charged ions) are due to the appearance of strongly excited equilibrium(nonequilibrium) states of the fissile nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point that have a Gibbs (non-Gibbs) distribution of projections K.

Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Bunakov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kadmensky, S. S. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Application of Low-Cost Digital Elevation Models to Detect Change in Forest Carbon Sequestration Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This two-year study evaluated advanced multispectral digital imagery applications for assessment of forest carbon stock change. A series of bench and field studies in North Carolina and Ohio tested aerial assessments of forest change between two time periods using two software packages (ERDAS and TERREST) for Digital Elevation Model (DEM) creation, automated classification software (eCognition) for canopy segmentation and a multiple ranging laser designed to improve quality of elevation data. Results of the DEM software comparison showed that while TERREST has the potential to produce much higher resolution DEM than ERDAS, it is unable to resolve crucial canopy features adequately. Lab tests demonstrated that additional laser data improves image registration and Z-axis DEM quality. Data collected in the field revealed difficult challenges in correctly modeling the location of laser strike and subsequently determining elevations in both software packages. Automated software segmentation of tree canopies provided stem diameter and biomass carbon estimates that were within 3% of comparable ground based estimates in the Ohio site and produced similar biomass estimates for a limited number of plots in the Duke forest. Tree height change between time periods and canopy segmentation from multispectral imagery allowed calculation of forest carbon stock change at costs that are comparable to those for ground-based methods. This work demonstrates the potential of lower cost imagery systems enhanced with laser data to collect high quality imagery and paired laser data for forestry and environmental applications. Additional research on automated canopy segmentation and multi-temporal image registration is needed to refine these methods for commercial use.

Kenneth Glenn MacDicken

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Characterization of a low-pressure chlorine plasma column sustained by propagating surface waves using phase-sensitive microwave interferometry and trace-rare-gas optical emission spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase-sensitive microwave interferometry and trace-rare-gas optical emission spectroscopy were used to measure the line-integrated electron density, n{sub e}, and electron temperature, T{sub e}, in a high-density chlorine plasma sustained in a quartz discharge tube (inner diameter = 6 mm) by an electromagnetic surface wave at 2.45 GHz. For pressures in the 0.1-1 Torr range, n{sub e} decreased nearly linearly along the tube's z-axis down to the critical density for surface wave propagation, where the plasma decayed abruptly. At lower pressures (< 50 mTorr), however, the plasma extended well beyond this critical point, after which n{sub e} decreased quasiexponentially toward the end of the plasma column. The length of this expansion region increased with decreasing pressure, going from {approx}8 cm at 5 mTorr to {approx}1 cm at 50 mTorr. T{sub e} was nearly independent of the axial position in the main plasma region and strongly decreased in the expansion region at lower pressures. The Cl{sub 2} percent dissociation, {tau}{sub D}, obtained from the calibrated Cl{sub 2} (306 nm)-to-Xe (828 nm) emission ratio, displayed behavior similar to that of n{sub e} and T{sub e}. For example, at 5 mTorr, {tau}{sub D} was close to 100% near the wave launcher and {approx}70% at 0.5 cm from the end of the plasma column.

Mattei, S.; Boudreault, O.; Stafford, L. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Khare, R.; Donnelly, V. M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays  

SciTech Connect

Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Fine structure constant in the spacetime of a cosmic string  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the fine structure constant in the spacetime of a cosmic string. In the presence of a cosmic string the value of the fine structure constant reduces. We also discuss on numerical results. The gravitational properties of cosmic strings are strikingly different from those of non-relativistic linear distributions of matter. To explain the origin of the difference, we note that for a static matter distribution with energymomentum tensor, T ? = diag (?, ?p1, ?p2, ?p3) , (1) the Newtonian limit of the Einstein equations become ? 2 ? = 4?G (? + p1 + p2 + p3), (2) where ? is the gravitational potential. For non-relativistic matter, pi ? ? and ? 2 ? = 4?G?. Strings, on the other hand, have a large longitudinal tension. For a straight string parallel to the z-axis, p3 = ??, with p1 and p2 vanish when averaged over the string cross-section. Hence, the righthand side of Eq.(2) vanishes, suggesting that straight strings produce no gravitational forece on surrounding matter. This conclusion is confirmed by a full general-relativistic analysis. Another feature distinguishing cosmic strings from more familiar sources is their relativistic motion. As a result, oscillating loops of string can be strong emitters of gravitational radiation. A gravitating string is described by the combined system of Einstein, Higgs and guage field equations. The problem of solving these coupled equations is formidable and no exact solutions have been found to date. Fortunately, for most cosmological applications the problem can be made tractable by adopting two major simplifications. First, assuming that the string thickness is much smaller than all other relevant dimensions, the string can be 1

Forough Nasseri

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Photoionization of Ca in a static electric field  

SciTech Connect

We present a joint theoretical and experimental investigation for electric-field effects on ground-state photoionization of Ca. For an electric field with its direction along the z axis, the dominant field-free, doubly excited, odd-parity (i.e., 3dnp and/or 3dnf) resonances of the {sup 1,3}L{sub J=1}{sup o} (i.e., {sup 1,3}P{sub J=1}{sup o} and {sup 3}D{sub J=1}{sup o}) symmetries are coupled with the even-parity (i.e., 3dns, 3dnd, and/or 3dng) resonances of the {sup 1,3}L{sub J=0}{sup e} (i.e., {sup 1}S{sub J=0}{sup e} and {sup 3}P{sub J=0}{sup e}) and {sup 1,3}L{sub J=2}{sup e} (i.e., {sup 3}P{sub J=2}{sup e}, {sup 1,3}D{sub J=2}{sup e}, and {sup 3}F{sub J=2}{sup e}) symmetries. Using a B-spline-based complex-rotation method with spin-dependent interaction, our theoretically calculated spectrum is found to be in good agreement with the observed spectrum from a cross-beam photoionization experiment for field strengths up to 25 kV/cm. We present in detail a number of qualitative features of the field-induced level crossing and avoided crossing in energy between neighboring resonances, their corresponding changes in width, and the resulting variation in resonance structure profiles. A few ''hidden'' resonances due to strong overlap with more prominant resonances are also identified theoretically.

Fang, T. K. [Department of Physics, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan 242 (China); Lo, J. I.; Yih, T. S. [Department of Physics, National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan 32001 (China); Chang, T. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Property:Link | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Link Link Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type URL. Pages using the property "Link" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 10 CFR § 1021 + http://en.openei.org/wiki/File:10CFRPart1021.pdf + 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth + http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1631071310001070 + 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits + http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VCS-48B5BV5-KK/2/a841cce0d247b754e5163bb62f72dc05 + 2007 Annual Report + https://www.enel.com/en-GB/investors/financial_reports/annual/ + 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc + http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VCS-48B0DW7-F/2/8e2bc55d34022c3d13f71c2dd57cd45b +

244

A Reservoir Assessment of the Geysers Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Upon moderately dipping, fracture network. Condensed steam at the steep reservoir flank drains back to the hot water table. These flanks are defined roughly by marginally-producing geothermal wells. Field extensions are expected to be on the southeast and northwest. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably represent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resitivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. Monitoring gravity and geodetic changes with time and mapping microearthquake activity are methods that show promise for determining reservoir size, possible recharge, production lifetime, and other characteristics of the known stream field. Seismic reflection data may contribute to the efficient exploitation of the field by identifying fracture zones that serve as conduits for the steam. (DJE-2005)

Thomas, Richard P.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Dykstra, Herman; Stockton, A.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The scope of this three phase project includes tasks to validate a variety of innovative exploration and drilling technologies which aim to accurately characterize the geothermal site and thereby reduce project risk. Phase 1 exploration will consist of two parts: 1) surface and near surface investigations and 2) subsurface geophysical surveys and modeling. The first part of Phase 1 includes: a hyperspectral imaging survey (to map thermal anomalies and geothermal indicator minerals), shallow temperature probe measurements, and drilling of temperature gradient wells to depths of 1000 feet. In the second part of Phase 1, 2D & 3D geophysical modeling and inversion of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric datasets will be used to image the subsurface. This effort will result in the creation of a 3D model composed of structural, geological, and resistivity components. The 3D model will then be combined with the temperature data to create an integrated model that will be used to prioritize drill target locations.

246

Geothermal-resource assessment of the Steamboat-Routt Hot Springs area, Colorado. Resources Series 22  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the Steamboat Springs region in northwest Colorado was initiated and carried out in 1980 and 1981. The goal of this program was to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of the thermal waters (temperatures in excess of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C)) in this area at Steamboat Springs and 8 miles (12.8 km) north at Routt Hot Springs. Thermal waters from Heart Spring, the only developed thermal water source in the study area, are used in the municipal swimming pool in Steamboat Springs. The assessment program was a fully integrated program consisting of: dipole-dipole, Audio-magnetotelluric, telluric, self potential and gravity geophysical surveys, soil mercury and soil helium geochemical surveys; shallow temperature measurements; and prepartion of geological maps. The investigation showed that all the thermal springs appear to be fault controlled. Based on the chemical composition of the thermal waters it appears that Heart Spring in Steamboat Springs is hydrologically related to the Routt Hot Springs. This relationship was further confirmed when it was reported that thermal waters were encountered during the construction of the new high school in Strawberry Park on the north side of Steamboat Springs. In addition, residents stated that Strawberry Park appears to be warmer than the surrounding country side. Geological mapping has determined that a major fault extends from the Routt Hot Springs area into Strawberry Park.

Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Reservoir assessment of The Geysers Geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid in the field reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably respresent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resistivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. At the current generating capacity of 930 MWe, the estimated life of The Geysers Geothermal field reservoir is 129 years. The estimated reservoir life is 60 years for the anticipated maximum generating capacity of 2000 MWe as of 1990. Wells at The Geysers are drilled with conventional drilling fluid (mud) until the top of the steam reservoir is reached; then, they are drilled with air. Usually, mud, temperature, caliper, dual induction, and cement bond logs are run on the wells.

Thomas, R.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Dykstra, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study: Northern Basin and Range Province, Leach Hot Springs Area, Pershing County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-December 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study was conducted in the Leach Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area of Pershing County, Nevada. The case study included the drilling of twenty-three temperature gradient wells, a magnetotelluric survey, seismic data acquisition and processing, and the drilling of one exploratory well. Existing data from prior investigations, which included water geochemistry, gravity, photogeologic reports and a hydrothermal alteration study, was also provided. The exploratory well was drilled to total depth of 8565' with no significant mud losses or other drilling problems. A maximum temperature of 260/sup 0/F was recorded at total depth. The relatively low temperature and the lack of permeability (as shown by absence of mud loss) indicated that a current, economic geothermal resource had not been located, and the well was subsequently plugged and abandoned. However, the type and extent of rock alteration found implied that an extensive hot water system had existed in this area at an earlier time. This report is a synopsis of the case study activities and the data obtained from these activities.

Beard, G.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Efficient Inversion of Multi-frequency and Multi-source Electromagnetic Data: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BES grant DE-FG02-06ER15819 supported efforts at Oregon State University (OSU) to develop improved inversion methods for 3D subsurface electromagnetic (EM) imaging. Three interrelated activities have been supported by this grant, and its predecessor (DE-FG02-06ER15818): (1) collaboration with a former student of the PI, Dr. Weerachai Siripunvaraporn (now Professor at Mahidol University in Bangkok, Thailand) on developing and refining inversion methods for 3D Magnetotelluric (MT) data . (2) Development at Oregon State University of a new modular system of computer codes for EM inversion, and initial testing and application of this inversion on several large field data sets. (3) Research on more efficient approaches to multi-transmitter EM inverse problems, to optimize use of expensive data sensitivity calculations needed for gradient based inversion schemes. The last of these activities was the main motivation for this research project, but the first two activities were important enabling steps that produced useful products and results in their own right, including freely avaialable software for 3D inversion of EM geophysical data.

Gary D. Egbert

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Electrical structure of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

From the interpretation of magnetotelluric, transient electromagnetic, and Schlumberger resistivity soundings, the electrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is found to consist of four units. From the surface downward, the geoelectrical units are (1) very resistive, young, unaltered volcanic rock, (2) a conductive layer of older volcanic material composed of altered tuffs, (3) a thick resistive layer thought to be in part intrusive rocks, and (4) a lower-crustal conductor. This model is similar to the regional geoelectrical structure found through the Cascade Range. Inside the caldera, the conductive second layer corresponds to the steep temperature gradient and alteration minerals observed in the USGS Newberry 2 test hole. Drill hole information on the south and north flanks of the volcano (test holes GES N-1 and GEO N-3, respectively) indicates that outside the caldera the conductor is due to alteration minerals (primarily smectite) and not high-temperature pore fluids. On the flanks of Newberry the conductor is generally deeper than inside the caldera, and its deepens with distance from the summit.

Fitterman, D.V.; Stanley, W.D.; Bisdorf, R.J.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

Preliminary geological and geophysical evaluation of the Castle Dome HDR geothermal prospect, Southwestern Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Castle Dome HDR geothermal prospect is located in Yuma County, Arizona, in a region centered about 80 km north of Yuma along US Rte. 95. The area of interest is broadly defined by a negative residual Bouguer gravity anomaly which is about 45 km across, steep-sided in many places, and as much as 30 mgals in magnitude. The geology of this Basin and Range area is poorly known, but the few published reports and current Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) field studies indicate that the Castle Dome Mountains and adjacent ranges are chiefly a thick pile of welded ash-flow tuffs of probable mid-Tertiary age. The tuffs rest unconformably on Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks exposed only outside steep edges of the gravity low. This gravity anomaly may reflect the presence of a large caldera. A regional magnetotelluric study now in progress will define the depths to electrical conductors within the crust and upper mantle and contribute to understanding of crustal structure, the gravity anomaly, and the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area.

Gutmann, J.T.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Ander, M.E.; Laney, R.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Deep electromagnetic sounding in central Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixteen shallow and deep controlled source electromagnetic soundings were performed in Buena Vista Valley, near Winnemucca, Nevada, to investigate an intra-basement conductor previously detected with magnetotellurics. The survey was carried out with the LBL EM-60 system using a remote magnetic reference for low-frequency geomagnetic noise cancellation, 100-m- and 2.8-km-diameter transmitter loops, and a minicomputer for in-field processing. EM soundings were made at distances from 0.5 to 30 km from three loops over the frequency range 0.02 to 500 Hz. Data were interpreted by means of 1-D inversions and the resulting layered models were pieced together to yield an approximate 2-D geoelectric model along the N-S axis of the valley. The EM soundings and one MT sounding show a 3 to 7 ohm-m zone at a depth of four to seven km. The conductor appears to be deepest at the northern end of the valley and shallowest beneath a basement ridge that seems to divide Buena Vista Valley into two basinal structures. Similar intra-basement conductors are also reported 50 to 75 miles south in the Carson Sink-Fallon areas, suggesting a common source, probably related to an anomalously hot, thin crust.

Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Haught, J.R.; Morrison, H.F.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Controlled-source electromagnetic survey at Soda Lakes geothermal area, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The EM-60 system, a large-moment frequency-domain electromagnetic loop prospecting system, was operated in the Soda Lakes geothermal area, Nevada. Thirteen stations were occupied at distances ranging from 0.5-3.0 km from two transmitter sites. These yielded four sounding curves--the normalized amplitudes and phases of the vertical and radial magnetic fields as a function of frequency--at each station. In addition, two polarization ellipse parameters, ellipticity and tilt angle, were calculated at each frequency. The data were interpreted by means of a least-squares inversion procedure which fits a layered resistivity model to the data. A three-layer structure is indicated, with a near-surface 20 ohm-m layer of 100-400 m thickness, a middle 2 ohm-m layer of approximately 1 km thickness, and a basement of greater than 10 ohm-m. The models indicate a northwesterly structural strike; the top and middle layers seem to thicken from northeast to southwest. The results agree quite well with previous results of dipole-dipole and magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. The EM-60 survey provided greater depth penetration (1 to 1.5 km) than dipole-dipole, but MT far surpassed both in its depth of exploration. One advantage of EM in this area is its ease and speed of operation. Another advantage, its relative insensitivity to lateral inhomogeneities, is not as pronounced here as it would be in areas of more complex geology.

Stark, M.; Wilt, M.; Haught, J.R.; Goldstein, N.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Geothermal energy resource investigations in the Eastern Copper River Basin, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of a review of the geological, geochemical and geophysical data available for the Eastern Copper River basin with emphasis on the mud volcanoes, and the results of geophysical and geochemical studies carried out in the summers of 1982 and 1984. The purpose was to determine if there are geothermal energy resources in the Copper River Basin. The Eastern Copper River basin is situated on the flanks of a major volcano, Mt. Drum, which was active as late as 200,000 years ago and which is thought to have retained significant amounts of residual heat at high levels. Mt. Wrangell, farther to the east, has been volcanically active up to the present time. The 1982 geophysical and geochemical surveys located three principal areas of possible geothermal interest, one near Tazlina and two near the Klawasi mud volcanoes. The intensive survey work of 1984 was concentrated on those areas. We have integrated the results of soil helium, soil mercury, gravity, aeromagnetic, electrical, self-potential, and controlled-source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) surveys to evaluate the geothermal potential of the areas studied. 36 figs.

Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geophysical study of the crust and upper mantle beneath the central Rio Grande rift and adjacent Great Plains and Colorado Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the national hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, a regional deep magnetotelluric (MT) survey of Arizona and New Mexico was performed. The main objective of the MT project was to produce a regional geoelectric contour map of the pervasive deep electrical conductor within the crust and/or upper mantle beneath the Colorado Plateau, Basin and Range Province, and Rio Grande rift. Three MT profiles cross the Jemez lineament. Preliminary one-dimensional analysis of the data suggest the lineament is associated with anomalously high electrical conductivity very shallow in the crust. An MT/audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) study of a 161 km/sup 2/ HDR prospect was performed on the Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico. Two-dimensional gravity modeling of a 700-km gravity profile at 34/sup 0/30'N latitude was used to study the crust and upper mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. Several models of each of three consecutive layers were produced using all available geologic and geophysical constraints. Two short-wavelength anomalies along the gravity profile were analyzed using linear optimization techniques.

Ander, M.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Geothermal potential on Kirtland Air Force Base lands, Bernalillo County, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive sampling and geochemical analysis of groundwater in and near the base disclosed no significant geothermal parameters. However, structural conditions and current hydrologic regimes strongly suggest that thermal waters would be masked by near surface, low temperature meteoric water originating as rain and snowfall in the nearby mountains. Controlled source audio-magnetotelluric (CSAMT) electromagnetic techniques, refraction seismic experiments, and gravity traverses were utilized on the base. These, together with published geohysical information that presents evidence for a shallow magma body beneath the Albuquerque Basin; favorable terrestrial heat flow, water chemistry, and shallow temperature gradient holes on the nearby mesa west of the Rio Grande; interpretation of regional gravity data; and geological data from nearby deep wells tend to confirm structural, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions favorable for developing an extensive intermediate to high-temperature hydrothermal regime on portions of Kirtland AFB lands where intensive land use occurs. Two possible exploration and development scenarios are presented. One involves drilling a well to a depth of 3000 to 5000 ft (914 to 1524 m) to test the possibility of encountering higher than normal water temperatures on the basinward side of the faults underlying the travertine deposits. The other is to conduct limited reflection seismograph surveys in defined areas on the base to determine the depth to basement (granite) and thickness of the overyling, unconfined, water filled, relatively unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifer.

Grant, P.R. Jr.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

In-situ combustion project at Bartlett, Kansas. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing research program for enhanced oil recovery, the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, US Department of Energy, is in the process of developing petroleum-recovery techcniques for shallow, low-productivity, heavy-oil deposits in southeastern Kansas, southwestern Missouri and northeastern Oklahoma. Personnel at BETC designed and conducted an in-situ combustion experiment on the Link Lease in Labette County, near Bartlett, Kansas. The Nelson-McNeil calculation method was used to calculate oil recovery and predict production time for a 1.25 acre inverted five-spot. Two attempts to ignite the formation are described. The well completion methods, hydraulic fracturing, injection of air, workovers, production techniques, and well-monitoring methods of the process are described. Production results are shown for both combustion attempts. The progression of the burn and the final extent of the burn front were evaluated by the following methods: (1) controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique (CSAMT), (2) thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), (3) burn-front model, (4)geophysical log analysis, and (5) computer model study. 26 figures, 8 tables.

Miller, J.S.; Spence, K.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluation of hypotheses for the cause of the 1886 Charleston earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a geophysical/geological investigation of the earth's crust at seismogenic depths in the Charleston, South Carolina area. This investigation was made for the purpose of narrowing the range of theories that have been used to explain the historic 1886 Charleston earthquake. Since a number of these theories are based on only a portion of the available data, we have established a comprehensive data set in order to allow these hypotheses to be subjected to the entire data set. Specifically, we combined existing and new gravity, magnetic and topographic data in grids of 128 km, 256 km and 1028 km on a side centered on Charleston. Seismic, geologic and drilling data were collected and summarized. A magnetotelluric survey consisting of 12 soundings interpreted to depths of over 40 kilometers defined the bottom of the rigid crust with assistance from seismic reflection and other data. A geologic model of the crust in the area of Charleston was constructed and it defined the locations of Triassic/Jurassic basins Paleozoic plutons in greater detail than has previously been achieved. 102 refs., 75 figs.

White, R.M.; Long, L.T. (Law Environmental, Inc., Kennesaw, GA (USA); Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Alum Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Alum Innovative Exploration Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Phase 1 exploration will consist of two parts: 1) surface and near surface investigations and 2) subsurface geophysical surveys and modeling. The first part of Phase 1 includes: a hyperspectral imaging survey (to map thermal anomalies and geothermal indicator minerals), shallow (6 ft) temperature probe measurements, and drilling of temperature gradient wells to depths of 1000 feet. In the second part of Phase 1, 2D & 3D geophysical modeling and inversion of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric datasets will be used to image the subsurface. This effort will result in the creation of a 3D model composed of structural, geological, and resistivity components. The 3D model will then be combined with the temperature and seismic data to create an integrated model that will be used to prioritize drill target locations. Four geothermal wells will be drilled and geologically characterized in Phase 2. The project will use a coiled-tube rig to test this drilling technology at a geothermal field for the first time. Two slimwells and two production wells will be drilled with core collected and characterized in the target sections of each well. In Phase 3, extended flow tests will be conducted on the producible wells to confirm the geothermal resource followed by an overall assessment of the productivity of the Alum geothermal area. Finally, Phase 3 will evaluate the relative contribution of each exploration technique in reducing risk during the early stages of the geothermal project.

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261

Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 3. An evaluation of thermal water in the Weiser area, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Weiser area encompasses about 200 square miles in southwest Idaho and contains two thermal water areas: (1) the Crane Creek subarea, which is 12 miles east of Weiser, Idaho, and (2) the Weiser Hot Springs subarea, which is 5 miles northwest of Weiser. Volcanic and sedimentary rocks of Miocene to Pleistocene age have been faulted and folded to form the northwest-trending anticlines present in much of the area. Basalt of the Columbia River Group or underlying rocks are believed to constitute the reservoir for the hot water. Gravity and magnetic anomalies are present in both subareas. A preliminary audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a shallow conductive zone is associated with each thermal site. Above-normal ground temperatures measured at a depth of 1 metre below the land surface in the Weiser Hot Springs subarea correlate with relatively high concentrations of boron in underlying ground waters, which, in turn, are usually associated with thermal waters in the study area. Sampled thermal waters are of a sodium chloride sulfate or sodium sulfate type, having dissolved-solids concentrations that range from 225 to 1,140 milligrams per litre. Temperatures of sampled waters ranged from 13/sup 0/ to 92.0/sup 0/C. Minimum aquifer temperatures calculated from chemical analysis of water, using geochemical thermometers, were 170/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C in the Crane Creek and Weiser Hot Springs subareas, respectively. Estimated maximum temperatures ranged from 212/sup 0/ to 270/sup 0/C and 200/sup 0/ to 242/sup 0/C, respectively, in these subareas. The probable heat sources for both subareas are (1) young magmatic intrusive rocks underlying the basalt or (2) above-normal temperatures resulting from thinning of the earth's crust. Maps are included.

Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 2. An evaluation of thermal water in the Bruneau-Grand View area, southwest Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bruneau-Grand View area occupies about 1,100 square miles in southwest Idaho and is on the southern flank of the large depression in which lies the western Snake River Plain. The igneous and sedimentary rocks in the area range in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. The aquifers in the area have been separated into two broad units: (1) the volcanic-rock aquifers, and (2) the overlying sedimentary-rock aquifers. The Idavada Volcanics or underlying rock units probably constitute the reservoir that contains thermal water. An audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a large conductive zone having apparent resistivities approaching 2 ohm-meters underlies a part of the area at a relatively shallow depth. Chemical analysis of 94 water samples collected in 1973 show that the thermal waters in the area are of a sodium bicarbonate type. Although dissolved-solids concentrations of water ranged from 181 to 1,100 milligrams per litre (mg/1) in the volcanic-rock aquifers, they were generally less than 500 mg/1. Measured chloride concentrations of water in the volcanic-rock aquifers were less than 20 mg/1. Temperatures of water from wells and springs ranged from 9.5/sup 0/ to 83.0/sup 0/C. Temperatures of water from the volcanic-rock aquifers ranged from 40.0/sup 0/ to 83.0/sup 0/C, whereas temperatures of water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers seldom exceeded 35/sup 0/C. Aquifer temperatures at depth, as estimated by silica and sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, probably do not exceed 150/sup 0/C. The gas in water from the volcanic-rock aquifers is composed chiefly of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen. Methane gas (probably derived from organic material) was also found in some water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers.

Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.; Hoover, D.B.; Tippens, C.L.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Long-term monitoring of ULF electromagnetic fields at Parkfield, CA  

SciTech Connect

Electric and magnetic fields in the (10{sup -4}-1.0) Hz band were monitored at two sites adjacent to the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield and Hollister, California from 1995 to present. A data window [2002-2005], enclosing the September 28, 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake, was analyzed to determine if anomalous electric or magnetic fields, or changes in ground conductivity, occurred before the earthquake. The data were edited, removing intervals of instrument malfunction leaving 875 days in the four-year period. Frequent, spike-like disturbances were common, but were not more frequent around the time of the earthquake; these were removed before subsequent processing. Signal to noise amplitude spectra, estimated via magnetotelluric processing showed the behavior of the ULF fields to be remarkably constant over the period of analysis. These first-order plots make clear that most of the recorded energy is coherent over the spatial extent of the array. Three main statistical techniques were employed to separate local anomalous electrical or magnetic fields from the dominant coherent natural fields: transfer function estimates between components at each site were employed to subtract the dominant field, and look deeper at the 'residual' fields; the data were decomposed into principal components to identify the dominant coherent array modes; and the technique of canonical coherences was employed to distinguish anomalous fields which are spatially broad from anomalies which occur at a single site only, and furthermore to distinguish anomalies which are present in both the electric and magnetic fields from those which are present in only one field type. Standard remote reference apparent resistivity estimates were generated daily at Parkfield. A significant seasonal component of variability was observed suggesting local distortion due to variations in near surface resistance. In all cases, high levels of sensitivity to subtle electromagnetic effects were demonstrated, but no effects which can be reasonably characterized as precursors to the Parkfield earthquake were found.

Kappler, K.N.; Morrison, H.F.; Egbert, G.D.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Design and Control of a Compact 6-Degree-of-Freedom Precision Positioner with Linux- Based Real-Time Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents the design, control, and implementation of a compact highprecision multidimensional positioner. This precision-positioning system consists of a novel concentrated-field magnet matrix and a triangular single-moving part that carries three 3-phase permanent-magnet planar-levitation-motor armatures. Since only a single levitated moving part, namely the platen, generates all required fine and coarse motions, this positioning system is reliable and potentially cost-effective. The three planar levitation motors based on the Lorentz-force law not only produce the vertical force to levitate the triangular platen but also control the platen's position and orientation in the horizontal plane. Three laser distance sensors are used to measure vertical, x-, and yrotation motions. Three 2-axis Hall-effect sensors are used to determine lateral motions and rotation motion about the z-axis by measuring the magnetic flux density generated by the magnet matrix. This positioning system has a total mass of 1.52 kg, which is the minimized mass to produce better dynamic performance. In order to reduce the mass of the moving platen, it is made of Delrin with a mass density of 1.54 g/cm3 by Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) machining. The platen can be regarded a pure mass, and the spring and damping effects are neglected except for the vertical dynamic. Single-input single-output (SISO) digital lead-lag controllers and a multivariable Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller were designed and implemented. Real-time control was performed with the Linux-Ubuntu operating system OS. Real Time Application Interface (RTAI) for Linux works with Comedi and Comedi libraries and enables closed-loop real-time control. One of the key advantages of this positioning stage with Hall-effect sensors is the extended travel range and rotation angle in the horizontal mode. The maximum travel ranges of 220 mm in x and 200 mm in y were achieved experimentally. Since the magnet matrix generates periodical sinusoidal flux densities in the x-y plane, the travel range can be extended by increasing the number of magnet pitches. The rotation angle of 12 degrees was achieved in rotation around z. The angular velocities of 0.2094 rad/s and 4.74 rad/s were produced by a 200-mm-diameter circular motion and a 30-mm-diameter spiral motion, respectively. The maximum velocity of 16.25 mm/s was acquired from over one pitch motion. The maximum velocity of 17.5 mm/s in a 8-mm scanning motion was achieved with the acceleration of 72.4 m/s2. Step responses demonstrated a 10-um resolution and 6-um rms position noise in the translational mode. For the vertical mode, step responses of 5 um in z, 0.001 degrees in roation around x, and 0.001 degrees in rotation around y were achieved. This compact single-moving-part positioner has potential applications for precisionpositioning systems in semiconductor- manufacturing.

Yu, Ho

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Seed orientation and the impact of dosimetric anisotropy in stranded implants  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In postimplant dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy, dose is commonly calculated using the TG-43 1D formalism, because seed orientations are difficult to determine from CT images, the current standard for the procedure. However, the orientation of stranded seeds soon after implantation is predictable, as these seeds tend to maintain their relative spacing, and orient themselves along the implant trajectory. The aim of this study was to develop a method for determining seed orientations from reconstructed strand trajectories, and to use this information to investigate the dosimetric impact of applying the TG-43 2D formalism to clinical postimplant analysis. Methods: Using in-house software, the preplan to postimplant seed correspondence was determined for a cohort of 30 patients during routine day-0 CT-based postimplant dosimetry. All patients were implanted with stranded-seed trains. Spline curves were fit to each set of seeds composing a strand, with the requirement that the distance along the spline between seeds be equal to the seed spacing within the strand. The orientations of the seeds were estimated by the tangents to the spline at each seed centroid. Dose distributions were then determined using the 1D and 2D TG-43 formalisms. These were compared using the TG-137 recommended dose metrics for the prostate, prostatic urethra, and rectum. Results: Seven hundred and sixty one strands were analyzed in total. Defining the z-axis to be cranial-positive and the x-axis to be left-lateral positive in the CT coordinate system, the average seed had an inclination of 21 deg. {+-} 10 deg. and an azimuth of -81 deg. {+-} 57 deg. These values correspond to the average strand rising anteriorly from apex to base, approximately parallel to the midsagittal plane. Clinically minor but statistically significant differences in dose metrics were noted. Compared to the 2D calculation, the 1D calculation underestimated prostate V100 by 1.1% and D90 by 2.3 Gy, while overestimating V150 and V200 by 1.6% and 1.3%, respectively. Urethral and rectal dose quantifiers tended to be underestimated by the 1D calculation. The most pronounced differences were in the urethral D30 and rectal D2cc, which rose by 3.8 and 1.9 Gy, respectively, using the 2D calculation. The total volume of the 100% isodose region as a percentage of the prostate volume was found to increase by 0.4%. Conclusions: Stranded seeds in the supine patient are not oriented in a uniformly random manner, nor are they aligned along the axis of the CT scanner. Instead, this study identified a consistent anterior pitch that is likely attributable to differences in patient pose between implant and CT imaging. The angle of the ultrasound probe with respect to the patient during implant may have also been a contributing factor. The dose metrics derived using the 1D formalism were found to be within 2%, on average, of those derived using the 2D formalism. For greater accuracy, 2D dosimetry can be pursued using the strand-fitting method described in this work. If a 1D representation is used, integrating over the empirically determined seed orientation density reported here may be more appropriate than assuming that seed inclinations are distributed uniformly.

Chng, Nicholas; Spadinger, Ingrid; Rasoda, Rosey; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, 600 West 10th, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, 5500-2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, 600 West 10th, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, 5500-2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,9002,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this sedimentary section is sand-rich, suggesting good potential for a sediment-hosted geothermal reservoir in porous sands, similar to other fields in the region such as Heber and East Mesa. Sand porosity may remain higher in the eastern portion of the low resistivity zone. This is based on its location hydrologically downstream of the probable area of thermal upwelling, intense fracture development, and associated pore-filling hydrothermal mineral deposition to the west.

Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

SciTech Connect

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Hydrostrat Model and Alternatives for Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainer Mesa-Shoshone Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit was completed in Fiscal Year 2006. The model extends from eastern Pahute Mesa in the north to Mid Valley in the south and centers on the former nuclear testing areas at Rainier Mesa, Aqueduct Mesa, and Shoshone Mountain. The model area also includes an overlap with the existing Underground Test Area Corrective Action Unit models for Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa. The model area is geologically diverse and includes un-extended yet highly deformed Paleozoic terrain and high volcanic mesas between the Yucca Flat extensional basin on the east and caldera complexes of the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field on the west. The area also includes a hydrologic divide between two groundwater sub-basins of the Death Valley regional flow system. A diverse set of geological and geophysical data collected over the past 50 years was used to develop a structural model and hydrostratigraphic system for the model area. Three deep characterization wells, a magnetotelluric survey, and reprocessed gravity data were acquired specifically for this modeling initiative. These data and associated interpretive products were integrated using EarthVision{reg_sign} software to develop the three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model. Crucial steps in the model building process included establishing a fault model, developing a hydrostratigraphic scheme, compiling a drill-hole database, and constructing detailed geologic and hydrostratigraphic cross sections and subsurface maps. The more than 100 stratigraphic units in the model area were grouped into 43 hydrostratigraphic units based on each unit's propensity toward aquifer or aquitard characteristics. The authors organized the volcanic units in the model area into 35 hydrostratigraphic units that include 16 aquifers, 12 confining units, 2 composite units (a mixture of aquifer and confining units), and 5 intrusive confining units. The underlying pre-Tertiary rocks are divided into six hydrostratigraphic units, including three aquifers and three confining units. Other units include an alluvial aquifer and a Mesozoic-age granitic confining unit. The model depicts the thickness, extent, and geometric relationships of these hydrostratigraphic units ('layers' in the model). The model also incorporates 56 Tertiary normal faults and 4 Mesozoic thrust faults. The complexity of the model area and the non-uniqueness of some of the interpretations incorporated into the base model made it necessary to formulate alternative interpretations for some of the major features in the model. Four of these alternatives were developed so they can be modeled in the same fashion as the base model. This work was done for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Underground Test Area Subproject of the Environmental Restoration Project.

NSTec Geotechnical Sciences Group

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Preliminary Analysis of Dose Rates Associated with ITER CVCS Equipment/Area Location  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary analysis of the ITER Chemical and Volume Control System (CVCS) Area was performed to assess dose rates outside the walls and ceiling of the facility after 1.5 years of operation at shutdown, 2 days, and 10 days after shutdown. For this purpose a simplified Monte Carlo computer model was developed using the MCNP (MCNP5 Ver. 1.51) code. Two components are included: the smaller filter tank and the larger ion exchanger. These pieces of equipment are associated with the Integrated Blanket ELM Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System, which will have the largest dose rates associated with activated corrosion products during operation in comparison with other systems. The ion exchanger contained two source regions, a 1.2-m-thick resin bed above a 0.55 m-thick skirt, and a 0.8-m-thick water region. The filter constituted an additional source. Thus the model consisted of three sources (filter, resin, water), homogeneously distributed within the appropriate source regions. However, much of the results (that address individual isotopes) are presented with the two sources in the ion exchanger combined. In these cases the sources are referred to as the 'ion exchanger source' and the 'filter source.' Dimensions for the facility and components, as well as source isotopes and strengths, and material densities, were supplied by US ITER. Because of its simplification, the model does not contain pipes. Consequently, radiation streaming through pipe penetrations, radiation emanating from the pipes, and shielding from the pipes were not considered in this analysis. Dose rates on the outside of two walls and the ceiling were calculated. The two walls are labeled as the 'long' wall (aligned with the X-axis) and the 'short' wall (aligned with the Y-axis). These walls and ceiling were nominally set to 30-cm-thick concrete. In the original analysis, standard concrete (2.3 g/cc density) was used. In addition to the shielding walls/ceiling, a floor and an additional wall opposite the long wall were added for photon scattering contributions. These were both 10-cm-thick, standard concrete structures. Other components (tanks, pipes, etc.), that were not included in the model, would potentially add additional scattering and shielding. Possibly these additional effects will be addressed in a later, more detailed analysis. The room was 29.6 m in length (X-axis), but was limited to 15 m in the model. The inside width (Y axis) and height (Z axis) were 4 m and 3.4 m, respectively. The origin for the model was located inside the room at the corner opposite the long wall and adjacent to the short wall at the floor level. The room was filled with air at standard temperature and pressure. The stainless steel (SS304) wall thicknesses for the ion exchanger and filter were 2.2 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. The axial center of the filter was located 140 cm from the short wall and 100 cm from the long wall (outer surface). The axial center of the ion exchanger was located 440 cm from the short wall and 250 cm from the long wall (inner surface). The resin was assumed to be a homogeneous mixture of equal atom density fractions of hydrogen and carbon* at a specified density of 1.136 g/cc. The filter material was assumed to be homogeneous carbon at a specified density of 1.8 g/cc. If the filter media were stainless steel and the accumulated activity were the same, the dose rate outside the filter would be lower, provided the density of the stainless steel sintered filter material is significantly higher than 1.8g/cc. The densities of the water and air were assumed to be 1.0 g/cc and 1.096E-3 g/cc, respectively. The model included 10 small volumes placed outside the model adjacent to the wall at locations where the dose rates were expected to be highest and which showed to a degree the fall-off of the dose rate with distance along a particular wall or ceiling. These 'tally cells' are shown in Fig. 2 and are described in Table 1. Each cell had dimensions of 50 cm x 50 cm x 1 cm and was oriented so that the 1-cm-thick dimension was perpendicular to the wall again

Blakeman, Edward D [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708  

SciTech Connect

In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of blind geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the Best Geophysics Paper at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the fault zones is constrained by geological, drilling, and geothermal production data. The objective is to determine interpretation techniques for evaluating structural controls of fluid circulation in hydrothermal systems. The conclusions are: directions of MT polarization and anisotropy and MEQ S-splitting correlate. Polarization and anisotropy are caused by fluid filled fractures at the base of the clay cap. Microearthquakes occur mainly on the boundary of low resistivity within the fracture zone and high resistivity in the host rock. Resistivity is lowest within the core of the fracture zone and increases towards the margins of the fracture zone. The heat source and the clay cap for the hydrothermal have very low resistivity of less than 5?m. Fracture porosity imaged by resistivity indicates that it varies between 45-5% with most between 10-20%, comparable to values from core samples in volcanic areas in Kenya and Iceland. For resistivity values above 60?m, the porosity reduces drastically and therefore this might be used as the upper limit for modeling fracture porosity from resistivity. When resistivity is lower than 5?m, the modeled fracture porosity increases drastically indicating that this is the low resistivity limit. This is because at very low resistivity in the heat source and the clay cap, the resistivity is dominated by ionic conduction rather than fracture porosity. Microearthquakes occur mainly above the heat source which is defined by low resistivity at a depth of 3-4.5 km at the Krafla hydrothermal system and 4-7 km in the Longonot hydrothermal system. Conversions of S to P waves occur for microearthquakes located above the heat source within the hydrothermal system. Shallow microearthquakes occur mainly in areas that show both MT and S-wave anisotropy. S-wave splitting and MT anisotropy occurs at the base of the clay cap and therefore reflects the variations in fracture porosity on top of the hydrothermal system. In the Krafla hydrothermal system in Iceland, both MT polarization and MEQ splitting directions align with

Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of blind geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the Best Geophysics Paper at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the fault zones is constrained by geological, drilling, and geothermal production data. The objective is to determine interpretation techniques for evaluating structural controls of fluid circulation in hydrothermal systems. The conclusions are: directions of MT polarization and anisotropy and MEQ S-splitting correlate. Polarization and anisotropy are caused by fluid filled fractures at the base of the clay cap. Microearthquakes occur mainly on the boundary of low resistivity within the fracture zone and high resistivity in the host rock. Resistivity is lowest within the core of the fracture zone and increases towards the margins of the fracture zone. The heat source and the clay cap for the hydrothermal have very low resistivity of less than 5?m. Fracture porosity imaged by resistivity indicates that it varies between 45-5% with most between 10-20%, comparable to values from core samples in volcanic areas in Kenya and Iceland. For resistivity values above 60?m, the porosity reduces drastically and therefore this might be used as the upper limit for modeling fracture porosity from resistivity. When resistivity is lower than 5?m, the modeled fracture porosity increases drastically indicating that this is the low resistivity limit. This is because at very low resistivity in the heat source and the clay cap, the resistivity is dominated by ionic conduction rather than fracture porosity. Microearthquakes occur mainly above the heat source which is defined by low resistivity at a depth of 3-4.5 km at the Krafla hydrothermal system and 4-7 km in the Longonot hydrothermal system. Conversions of S to P waves occur for microearthquakes located above the heat source within the hydrothermal system. Shallow microearthquakes occur mainly in areas that show both MT and S-wave anisotropy. S-wave splitting and MT anisotropy occurs at the base of the clay cap and therefore reflects the variations in fracture porosity on top of the hydrothermal system. In the Krafla hydrothermal system in Iceland, both MT polarization and MEQ splitting directions align with

Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

ON THE PHYSICS OF GALVANIC SOURCE ELECTROMAGNETIC GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR TERRESTRIAL AND MARINE EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

A numerical study was conducted to investigate the governing physics of galvanic source electromagnetic (EM) methods for terrestrial and marine exploration scenarios. The terrestrial exploration scenario involves the grounded electric dipole source EM (GESTEM) method and the examination of how the GESTEM method can resolve a thin resistive layer representing underground gas and/or hydrocarbon storage. Numerical modeling studies demonstrate that the loop transient EM (TEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) methods are insensitive to a thin horizontal resistor at depth because they utilize horizontal currents. In contrast to these standard EM methods, the GESTEM method generates both vertical and horizontal transient currents. The vertical transient current interacts with a thin horizontal resistor and causes charge buildup on its surface. These charges produce a measurable perturbation in the surface electric field at early time. The degree of perturbation depends on source waveform. When the GESTEM method is energized with step-off waveform, the perturbation due to a thin horizontal resistor is small. This is because the step-off waveform mainly consists of low frequency signals. An alternative is taking the time-derivative of the step-off responses to approximate the impulse response which includes higher frequency signals. In order to improve degree of perturbation especially due to a localized small 3-D resistor, the diffusion angle of the vertical transient current, 45 should be considered to make vertical currents coupled to a resistive target efficiently. The major drawback of the GESTEM method lies in the fact that GESTEM sounding can not be interpreted using 1-D inversion schemes if there is near-surface inhomogeneity. The marine exploration scenario investigates the physics of marine frequency-domain controlled source EM (FDCSEM) and time-domain controlled source EM (TDCSEM) methods to explore resistive hydrocarbon reservoirs in marine environments. Unlike the marine MT (MMT) method, these two methods are very sensitive to a thin hydrocarbon reservoir at depth because their sources generate vertical as well as horizontal currents. As for the FDCSEM method, the normalized EM peak response occurs where the airwave starts to dominate the seafloor EM response in the background model. This point is a function of source frequency, seawater depth and seafloor resistivity. The peak magnitude of the normalized EM response depends on whether the high concentration of vertical currents can reach and interact with the reservoir effectively. Noise levels of the EM receivers are important factors for successful FDCSEM and TDCSEM survey design. The major benefit of using magnetic field responses over electric ones is that the noise level of magnetic receiver theoretically allows for greater surface coverage compared to that of the electric receiver. Like the GESTEM method, the TDCSEM method also requires the use of a proper transient EM pulse such that the relatively high frequencies are produced. The impulse response of the TDCSEM method is characterized by two-path diffusion of the EM signal. The initial response is caused by faster signal diffusion through the less conductive seafloor, while the later arrivals result from slower diffusion through the more conductive seawater. Therefore, at larger separations, the effects of the seafloor and seawater are separable. This can be useful in reducing the airwave problem associated with the FDCSEM method in shallow marine environments.

David Alumbaugh and Evan Um

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of electrical geophysical research at UURI has been to provide reliable exploration and reservoir assessment tools for the shallowest to the deepest levels of interest in geothermal fields. Three diverse methods are being considered currently: magnetotellurics (MT, and CSAMT), self-potential, and borehole resistivity. Primary shortcomings in the methods addressed have included a lack of proper interpretation tools to treat the effects of the inhomogeneous structures often encountered in geothermal systems, a lack of field data of sufficient accuracy and quantity to provide well-focused models of subsurface resistivity structure, and a poor understanding of the relation of resistivity to geothermal systems and physicochemical conditions in the earth generally. In MT, for example, interpretation research has focused successfully on the applicability of 2-D models in 3-D areas which show a preferred structural grain. Leading computer algorithms for 2-D and 3-D simulation have resulted and are combined with modern methods of regularized inversion. However, 3-D data coverage and interpretation is seen as a high priority. High data quality in our own research surveys has been assured by implementing a fully remote reference with digital FM telemetry and real-time processing with data coherence sorting. A detailed MT profile across Long Valley has mapped a caldera-wide altered tuff unit serving as the primary hydrothermal aquifer, and identified a low-resistivity body in the middle crust under the west moat which corresponds closely with teleseismic delay and low density models. In the CSAMT method, our extensive tensor survey over the Sulphur Springs geothermal system provides valuable structural information on this important thermal regime and allows a fundamental analysis of the CSAMT method in heterogeneous areas. The self-potential (SP) method is promoted as an early-stage, cost-effective, exploration technique for covered hydrothermal resources, of low to high temperature, which has little or no adverse environmental impact and yields specific targets for temperature gradient and fluid chemistry testing. Substantial progress has been made in characterizing SP responses for several known, covered geothermal systems in the Basin and Range and southern Rio Grande Rift, and at identifying likely, causative source areas of thermal fluids. (Quantifying buried SP sources requires detailed knowledge of the resistivity structure, obtainable through DC or CSAMT surveys with 2-D or 3-D modeling.) Borehole resistivity (BHR) methods may help define hot and permeable zones in geothermal systems, trace the flow of cooler injected fluids and determine the degree of-water saturation in vapor dominated systems. At UURI, we develop methods to perform field surveys and to model and interpret various borehole-to-borehole, borehole-to-surface and surface-to-borehole arrays. The status of our BHR research may be summarized as follows: (1) forward modeling algorithms have been developed and published to evaluate numerous resistivity methods and to examine the effects of well-casing and noise; (2) two inverse two-dimensional algorithms have been devised and successfully applied to simulated field data; (3) a patented, multi-array resistivity system has been designed and is under construction; and (4) we are seeking appropriate wells in geothermal and other areas in which to test the methods.

Wannamaker, Philip E.; Wright, Phillip M.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z