Sample records for magnetotellurics z-axis tipper

  1. Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, NewYanceyYokayoYorktownYukon,Colorado:Z-Axis

  2. Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource History View

  3. Evaluation of the Drum Tipper Mechanism for the WRAP Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEIST, K.J.

    1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The drum tipper assembly has had numerous problems and has recently failed. ARES Corporation was asked to evaluate the existing system and provide recommendations for a replacement system.

  4. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  5. MAGNETOTELLURIC STUDIES AT CERRO PRIETO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, T. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    magneto- tellurics at Cerro Prieto, in Proceedings, FirstSecond Symposium on the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, BajaMAGNETOTELLURIC STUDIES AT CERRO PRIETO T. Do Gamble, W. M.

  6. Continuous profiling of magnetotelluric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdin, C.T.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method of mapping ground electrical conductivity is traditionally based on measurement of the surface impedance at widely spaced stations to infer models of the subsurface through a suitable pseudo 1-D inverse or with linearized least-squares inversion for 2- or 3-D geoelectric media. It is well known that small near-surface inhomogeneities can produce spatial discontinuities in the measured electric fields over a wide frequency range and may consequently bias the impedance on a very local scale. Inadequate station spacing effectively aliases the electric field measurements and results in distortions that cannot be removed in subsequent processing or modelling. In order to fully exploit the benefits of magnetotellurics in complex geological environments, closely spaced measurements must be used routinely. This thesis entertains an analysis of MT data taken along continuous profiles and is a first step that will allow more encompassing 2-D sampling techniques to become viable in the years to come. The developments presented here are to a large extent motivated by the physical insight gained from low-contrast solutions to the forward MT problem. These solutions describe the relationship between a perturbation in the electrical conductivity of the subsurface and the ensuing perturbation of the MT response as the output of a linear system. Albeit strictly accurate in a limited subset of practical exploration problems, the linearized solutions allow one to pursue a model independent study of the response characteristics of MT data. In fact, these solutions yield simple expressions for 1-,2-, and 3-D resistivity models which are here examined in progressive sequence.

  7. 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: 3-D...

  8. MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO...

  9. Three-Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Three-Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC,...

  10. Further Analysis of 3D Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Further Analysis of 3D Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the Coso...

  11. argentina audio magnetotelluric: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    argentina audio magnetotelluric First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Inversion of...

  12. Magnetotelluric survey of San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furgerson, R.B. (Phoenix Geoscience Inc., Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, consisting almost entirely of Tertiary volcanic rocks, are bounded on the southwest by the mature oil and gas province of the San Juan basin and on the east by the San Luis basin, continuation of the sediments from the San Juan basin eastward beneath the volcanics was suspected based on the reported presence of seeps and the evaluation of regional gravity and magnetic data. The probability greatly increased when Milestone drilled Tertiary and Cretaceous sediments beneath 3,000 ft of volcanics, 37 mi northeast of the nearest Cretaceous outcrop. The MT (magnetotellurium) program described in this presentation is part of a nonexclusive survey that included magnetotelluric soundings, time-domain electromagnetic soundings, gravity stations, and geochemical sampling. MT data were acquired at 20 sites along an east-west profile centered on the Milestone 1 AMF well, five sites along a north-south cross profile, and three more sites around the wells northeast of the Milestone well. Site spacing was of the order of 1 to 3 mi except for the cross line. The program was designed to map the thickness of the surface volcanics and the thickness and resistivity of the underlying sediments. The MT data acquired near the Milestone well indicated that the Cretaceous sedimentary rocks are characterized by an average resistivity of the order of 4-12 ohm-meters. The MT data acquired in the San Luis basin east of Del Norte also shows 4-12 ohm-meter rocks in the subsurface, correlated in this case with Tertiary volcanics, volcaniclastics, and continental sediments. The MT data show that the low-resistivity 4-12 ohm-meter section extends continuously beneath the more resistive surface volcanics from the San Luis Valley to at least 16 mi west-northwest of Del Norte.

  13. Magnetotelluric models of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roosevelt Hot Springs (RHS) thermal area, which includes a hotwater-dominated fracture zone prospect, near the eastern margin of the Basin-Range tectonic province, conceivably possesses a whole family of resistivity structures that includes the following: deep hot brine reservoirs, deep-seated partially molten heat sources in the crust or upper mantle that drive the convective system, near-surface hydrothermal alteration zones, wet sedimentary fill in valleys, and a regional, apparently one-dimensional resistivity profile of the crust and upper mantle. This complex resistivity makeup, particular to RHS but probably similar to that at other geothermal areas in the Great Basin, must be treated as being fully three-dimensional (3-D). In an attempt to understand these structures, broadband (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ Hz) tensor magnetotelluric (MT) data were obtained including apparent resistivities (rho/sub a/), impedance phases (phi) and vertical magnetic field transfer functions for 93 sites in the vicinity of this resource area.

  14. Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya V. Sakkas volcanic chain on the eastern flank of the Kenya Rift in East Africa. Transient electromagnetic (TEM flank of the Kenya Rift deduced from wide-angle P-wave data. In: Fuchs, K., Altherr, R., Muller, B

  15. The structure of a Mesozoic basin beneath the Lake Tana area, Ethiopia, revealed by magnetotelluric imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The structure of a Mesozoic basin beneath the Lake Tana area, Ethiopia, revealed by magnetotelluric of Mines, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia c Geological Survey of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Received 18 April 2006 Abstract The northwestern Plateau of Ethiopia is almost entirely covered with extensive Tertiary

  16. Audio-magnetotelluric data collected in the area of Beatty, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 1997, electrical geophysical data was collected north of Beatty, Nevada. Audio-magnetotellurics (AMT) was the geophysical method used to collect 16 stations along two profiles. The purpose of this data collection was to determine the depth to the alluvial basement, based upon the needs of the geologists requesting the data.

  17. MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

  18. 3-D Magnetotelluric Investigations for geothermal exploration in Martinique (Lesser Antilles). Characteristic Deep Resistivity Structures, and Shallow Resistivity Distribution Matching Heliborne TEM Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coppo, Nicolas; Girard, Jean-François; Wawrzyniak, Pierre; Hautot, Sophie; Tarits, Pascal; Jacob, Thomas; Martelet, Guillaume; Mathieu, Francis; Gadalia, Alain; Bouchot, Vincent; Traineau, Hervé

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of a global French program oriented towards the development of renewable energies, Martinique Island (Lesser Antilles, France) has been extensively investigated (from 2012 to 2013) through an integrated multi-methods approach, with the aim to define precisely the potential geothermal ressources, previously highlighted (Sanjuan et al., 2003). Amongst the common investigation methods deployed, we carried out three magnetotelluric (MT) surveys located above three of the most promising geothermal fields of Martinique, namely the Anses d'Arlet, the Montagne Pel{\\'e}e and the Pitons du Carbet prospects. A total of about 100 MT stations were acquired showing single or multi-dimensional behaviors and static shift effects. After processing data with remote reference, 3-D MT inversions of the four complex elements of MT impedance tensor without pre-static-shift correction, have been performed for each sector, providing three 3-D resistivity models down to about 12 to 30 km depth. The sea coast effe...

  19. Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to:Macquarie Energy LLC

  20. Continuous Profiling of Magnetotelluric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdin, C.T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    those employed in seismic data interpretation under the nameseismic nature, these techniques power implicit in the at least two decades of continued field and interpretation

  1. Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:MadisonYork:Drill CoreTechniques

  2. Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    structure in the reservoir region. Some of the data were reinterpreted using K508 computer models, and interpretations from the various surveys were compared for consistency of...

  3. Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    structure in the reservoir region. Some of the data were reinterpreted using computer models, and interpretations from the various surveys were compared for consistency of...

  4. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Basis The goal of this project was to better define the fault system running through the thermally active part of Dixie Valley and infer the sources for the heat...

  5. Magnetotelluric Transect of Long Valley Caldera: Resistivity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MT line. Our MT data set reveals numerous resistivity structures which illuminate the evolution and present state of the Long Valley system. Many of these have been quantified...

  6. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA1 DOEAnalysis to

  7. Category:Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual ModelLists for Companies"

  8. Magnetotellurics (Muse, 1973) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison Gas & JumpStructuralMuse,

  9. Magnetotellurics (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:MadisonYork:Drill

  10. Category:Audio-Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashton Greens Jump

  11. Category:Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo Back to PVMagnetotellurics as

  12. Audio-Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria Power Corporation Ltd APCL

  13. Electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetotelluric methods | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open JumpEcologyElInformationof

  14. A magnetotelluric investigation of crustal structure in southeastern Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parizek, Daniel Joseph

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The consistent deep electrical strike may also suggest that the NN-trend of surface structures in the region was controlled by pre-existing, deep seated, NW-trending structures. Correlation between heat flow and depth to the crustal conductive zone... cross-section wi th the apparent resistivity model Conductive temperature profiles for major heat flow provinces in the United States (from Shankland and Ander, in press) 51 52 56 Page Figure 15. Heat flow sites in southeastern Arizona...

  15. Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Hermance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Additional References Retrieved from...

  16. 3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    C. Arango, A. Marcuello, J. Ledo and P. Queralt Published Journal Journal of Applied Geophysics, 2009 DOI 10.1016j.jappgeo.2008.05.006 Citation C. Arango,A. Marcuello,J. Ledo,P....

  17. Role of magnetotellurics in exploration of San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orange, A.; Schofield, J. (Emerald Exploration Consultants, Austin, TX (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, consisting almost entirely of Tertiary volcanic rocks, are bounded on the southwest by the mature oil and gas province of the San Juan basin and on the east by the San Luis basin. Continuation of the sediments from the San Juan basin eastward beneath the volcanics was suspected based on the reported presence of seeps and the evaluation of regional gravity and magnetic data. The objective of applying MT to the exploration of the San Juan sag area was to determine, through the measurement of subsurface resistivity, whether the hydrocarbon-rich sedimentary rocks of the San Juan basin indeed extended eastward beneath the San Juan volcanics and, if so, to what extent. The MT program the authors describe was a reconnaissance profile, one of the initial investigations of the area. MT data were acquired at 12 sites extending from Pagosa Springs east across Wolf Creek Pass to Del Norte on the western margin of the San Luis basin. Data were acquired for calibration at well sites near Pagosa Springs and northeast of Del Norte. Site spacing was 4-8 mi. The 12-site program was designed to test the geologic concept and evaluate for a minimum expenditure the feasibility of applying MT to the problem.

  18. Magnetotellurics At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MT data. References S. H. Ward, W. T. Parry, W. P. Nash, W. R. Sill, K. L. Cook, R. B. Smith, D. S. Chapman, F. H. Brown, J. A. Whelan, J. R. Bowman (1978) A Summary of the...

  19. Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and fitted to geologic models. Authors Stanley, W.D.; Boehl, J.E.; Bostick, F.X.; Smith and H.W. Published Journal J. Geophys. Res., 6101977 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  20. A Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cover formations and of the intensity of the artificial disturbances from local power stations and distribution lines. Nevertheless it has been possible to obtain good...

  1. Magnetotellurics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to use the funds available to work at the Fort Bidwell Indian reservation where characterization work could be done at relatively low cost. We decided to perform a time lapse SP...

  2. A Target-Oriented Magnetotelluric Inversion Approach For Characterizin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to establish an in situ laboratory to investigate the potential for geothermal energy production. Classical 2-D smooth inversion of the MT data, recorded along two profiles,...

  3. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric characterization of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    array profiling has been acquired over the east flank of the Coso geothermal system, CA, USA. Due to production related electromagnetic (EM) noise the permanent observatory at...

  4. Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structural Controls and Hydrothermal Alteration Abstract A new generation MT array measurement system was applied in a contiguous bipole deployment at the Dixie Valley thermal...

  5. Further Analysis of 3D Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the Coso

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, New Jersey:Transit JumpNewGeothermal

  6. Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell Testing and EvaluationRiver

  7. Audio-Magnetotellurics At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    about the same extent as that indicated on the 7.5 Hz AMT map (Fig. 6b). The resistivity data suggest a reservoir of limited horizontal extent. References W. F. Isherwood, D. R....

  8. 3D MAGNETOTELLURIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's APTA BasicEnergy Information

  9. 3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly In The

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. A Broadband Tensorial Magnetotelluric Study In The Travale Geothermal Field

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe CommissionEnergyEnergySeismic Response ofBrief| Open

  11. A Magnetotelluric Survey Of The Nissyros Geothermal Field (Greece) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. A Systematic Approach to the Interpretation of Magnetotelluric Data in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. A Target-Oriented Magnetotelluric Inversion Approach For Characterizing The

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. Magnetotelluric Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. Magnetotelluric Techniques At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Magnetotelluric Transect of Long Valley Caldera: Resistivity Cross Section,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison Gas & JumpStructural

  19. Magnetotellurics At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Magnetotellurics At Brady Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) | Open Energy

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  1. Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information

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  3. Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) | Open Energy

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  5. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Laney, 2005) | Open

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  6. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker, Et Al., 2006)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Magnetotellurics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) | Open

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  8. Magnetotellurics At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005)

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  9. Magnetotellurics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Laney,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. Magnetotellurics At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison GasEnergy| Open Energy2005)

  11. Magnetotellurics At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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  12. Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison GasEnergy|

  13. Magnetotellurics At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) | Open Energy

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  14. Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |

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  15. Magnetotellurics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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  16. Magnetotellurics At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) | Open

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadisonOpen Energy

  17. Magnetotellurics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadisonOpen Energynot indicated

  18. Magnetotellurics At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2010) | Open

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadisonOpen Energynot indicatedEnergy

  19. Magnetotellurics At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open Energy

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  20. Magnetotellurics At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004)

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadisonOpen EnergynotInformation|

  1. Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir Jump to: navigation,Delta Jumpmapping in and

  2. Audio-Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformationGuide |Aubrey, Texas:1978)

  3. Magnetotellurics At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:MadisonYork:DrillEnergy

  4. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:MadisonYork:DrillEnergyEnergy|

  5. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker, Et Al., 2007)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:MadisonYork:DrillEnergyEnergy||

  6. Magnetotellurics At Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,

  7. Magnetotellurics At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details

  8. Magnetotellurics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Laney, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity

  9. Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Hermance, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity1988) | Open

  10. Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Nordquist, 1987) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity1988) |

  11. Magnetotellurics At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity1988) |New

  12. Magnetotellurics At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity1988)

  13. Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity1988)Energy

  14. Magnetotellurics At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration

  15. Magnetotellurics At Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) ExplorationStillwater Area

  16. Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Wilt & Haar,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) ExplorationStillwater Area1986) |

  17. Magnetotellurics At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Wilt

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) ExplorationStillwater Area1986)

  18. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric characterization of the Coso geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. An Audio-Magnetotelluric Investigation In Terceira Island (Azores) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmite County,Amrit BioElevatedEnergy

  20. Application Of 3D Inversion To Magnetotelluric Data In The Ogiri...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    difference method. A Bayesian criterion ABIC is applied to searching for the optimum trade-off among the minimization of the data misfit, model roughness and static shifts. The...

  1. A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    recording and processing levels for a practical solution of the overall problem of the Earth electromagnetism, in geophysics. Up to now, the random character of the natural...

  2. 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 2-D...

  3. DETECTION OF GEOTHERMAL INTERFERENCE IN THE TUNNEL EXCAVATION USING MAGNETOTELLURICS TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    temperature of the hot springs is as high as 900 C at some places. Major civil construction sites such as dams, tunnels etc. need to be carefully planned to avoid the hot spring locations. For example, high temperature-engineers involved in tunnel construction in Himalayas is to know the possible interference of hot water regimes

  4. 2D Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Authors F. A. M. Santos, A. R. A. Afonso and A. Dupis Published Journal Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, 20070101 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

  5. audio-magnetotelluric station location: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Chicago ATLAS HEP, Enrico Fermi Institute 5640 S. Ellis Ave Chicago, IL 60637 October 15, 2007 Abstract A remote monitoring station located at the University of Chicago is...

  6. Area selection for diamonds using magnetotellurics: Examples from southern Africa Alan G. Jones a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    of the Witwatersrand, Jan Smuts Avenue, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa k ABB AB, HVDC, Ludvika, SE-77180, Sweden a b

  7. A Closely-Spaced Magnetotelluric Study Of The Ahuachapan-Chipilapa...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that the Chipilapa and La Labor hot springs are supplied by two separate sources of hot fluids, one coming from the east and the other from the south or southwest. The...

  8. A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00 U.S. NationalMammals JumpMt-5-Ex | Open

  9. 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets-

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource HistorykVOpenOpenDesignatedResistivity

  10. 2D Joint Inversion Of Dc And Scalar Audio-Magnetotelluric Data In The

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformationColorado School20090: SWRCB

  11. 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformationColorado3 PhasesIndonesia |

  12. A Closely-Spaced Magnetotelluric Study Of The Ahuachapan-Chipilapa

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe CommissionEnergyEnergySeismic ResponseEnergyGeothermal

  13. Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison Gas &OpenInformation

  14. Magnetotellurics At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison GasEnergy| OpenInformation

  15. Magnetotellurics At Rio Grande Rift Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison GasEnergy|Energy

  16. Magnetotellurics At U.S. West Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadisonOpen EnergynotInformation

  17. Station location map and audio-magnetotelluric data log for Rye Patch known

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt. Francis(RedirectedStarr|| Open

  18. Audio-Magnetotellurics At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood & Mabey,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformationGuide |Aubrey, Texas:1978) | Open

  19. Audio-Magnetotellurics At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformationGuide |Aubrey, Texas:1978) |

  20. Audio-Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformationGuide |Aubrey,

  1. Magnetotellurics At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Garg, Et Al., 2007) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:MadisonYork:DrillEnergyEnergy

  2. The Long Valley/Mono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotelluric

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformation 2EnergyCityGreen Data Book Jump

  3. Three-Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC, Methodology

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoulOaks,Mile Canyonand

  4. Application Of 3D Inversion To Magnetotelluric Data In The Ogiri Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County, Michigan:Applewood, Colorado: EnergyDispersion

  5. Audio-Magnetotellurics At Chena Geothermal Area (Holdmann, Et Al., 2006) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to: navigation,Kansas: Energy ResourcesAuburndale,Open

  6. Audio-Magnetotellurics At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to: navigation,Kansas: Energy

  7. The electrical resistivity structure of the crust beneath the northern Main Ethiopian Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ´aniques', Place Nicolas Copernic, F-29280 Plouzane, France Abstract: 18 audio-frequency magnetotelluric (MT) sites

  8. Magnetotelluric studies of the crust and upper mantle in a zone of active continental breakup, Afar, Ethiopia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Nicholas Edward

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Afar region of Ethiopia is slowly being torn apart by the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Main Ethiopian rifts which all meet at this remote, barren corner of Africa. Prior to rifting, volcanism probably started here some ...

  9. Visual Servoing from Spheres using a Spherical Projection Model Romeo Tatsambon Fomena and Francois Chaumette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to stability problems if the displacement that the robot has to realize is very large [3]. Therefore has been designed for a good system behaviour in the z- axis [4]. Similarly, for satisfactory motion of the system in the cartesian space, the z-axis translational and rotational motions can be decoupled from

  10. Geophysical Prospecting, 2013, 61 (Suppl. 1), 505532 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2478.2012.01117.x Review paper: Instrumentation for marine magnetotelluric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    dipoles can be towed continuously through the seawater or on the sea-bed, achieving output currents and transmitters needs to be navigated using either long baseline or short baseline acoustic ranging, while sea exploits the natural variations in the Earth's magnetic field that induce electric currents and fields C

  11. MERIT Beam Collimator Design Nicholas Olesen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    mm, longitudinal movement (z axis) of +55mm; manually adjustable Uses CERN standard parts wherever to be exchangeable (e.g. for different sized aperture) Material is tungsten Need drawings of CERN standard parts

  12. Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Using Magnetotelluric Surveys to Map Permeability Ussher, 2007 Karaha - Telaga Bodas, Indonesia MT surveys can be used to map: * Smectite and interlayered illite-smectite that...

  13. Finding Hidden Geothermal Resources In The Basin And Range Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnetotellurics At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Modeling-Computer...

  14. The Long Valley/Mono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ValleyMono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotelluric and Magnetic Variation Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  15. Integrated geophysical-petrological modeling of lithosphereasthenosphere1 boundary in Central Tibet using electromagnetic and seismic data2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    1 Integrated geophysical-petrological modeling of lithosphere­asthenosphere1 boundary in Central magnetotelluric and seismic data in petrologically24 consistent manner25 · Lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary a petrologically-driven approach to jointly model magnetotelluric (MT) and29 seismic surface wave dispersion (SW

  16. Electronic Applications of High Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroger, H.; Miracky, R. F.

    in conjunction with SQUID magnetometry to obtain reliable estimates of the tipper, features such as fault lines and geothermal reservoirs can in fact be iden tified [13). When viewed from this perspective, yes, SQUID magnetometers can indeed make a... of induction coils. It is clear then that SQUID magnetometry is not a "far out" application d,f HTS materials, but is a near term extension of today's technol ogy. The second consideration which might create opportunit~ for HTS SQUID magnetometers relates...

  17. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  18. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  19. Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3d Magnetotelluric Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below...

  20. A NEW PETROLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENT-DAY PLUMBING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A NEW PETROLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENT-DAY PLUMBING SYSTEM OF MT. VESUVIUS, on geophysical information, in particular, magnetotelluric (MT) data, and on petrological and geochemical

  1. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 39, Nr 6, 787790 (2004) Abstract available online at http://meteoritics.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claeys, Philippe

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exploratory program by PEMEX with intermittent core recovery and, more recently, by the National University, magnetotelluric and offshore seismic surveys, pre-existing boreholes of PEMEX and UNAM programs, site conditions

  2. CSR by modal analysis Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellison, James

    singularities, and the resulting numerical problems can be controlled only with some difficulty. By contrast in bunch compressors with parallel conducting plates to represent the vacuum chamber. In this contribution. For a bunch compressor, the Z-axis would be the beam line direction. We denote with ¯E = ¯mc2 the energy

  3. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  4. Radiation induced by charged particles in optical fibers Xavier Artru and Cedric Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . If the fiber radius is large enough and the particle passes trough it, as in Fig. 1, both PIGL and oustide) = = 1/137. 2.1 Expansion of the field in proper modes The fiber is along the ^z axis. The cylindrical inside a cylindrical box. The quantized magnetic field is expanded like in (1). am and a m obey

  5. Geometric simplification of a wooden building connector in dynamic finite element model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    as fonction of elastic modulus along x-axis, Ex , moment of inertia of the cross-section about z-axis, IG of the Eq. 1 leads to the following results in calculating the elastic modulus, Ex as function of frequency eigenvalues determined on the frequency response (cf. Fig. 3), we calculated the values of the elastic modulus

  6. Shock-Induced Structural Phase Transition, Plasticity, and Brittle Cracks in Aluminum Nitride Ceramic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    into an elastic wave and a slower SPT wave that transforms the wurtzite structure into the rocksalt phase into the wurtzite phase. Nanovoids coalesce into mode I cracks while dislocations give rise to kink bands and mode. Before impact, the crystal- line structure of the target material is wurtzite. The z axis, parallel

  7. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 065706 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/6/065706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrica,Traian

    experimental data on graphite (equilibrium interlayer spacing, Z-axis compressibility, and the interlayer shear-mode frequency), tight-binding is extended to model the interlayer interactions of graphitic structures. (Some to be accounted for. CNTs are conformal mappings of a graphite layer onto the surface of a cylinder with nanometre

  8. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C7, suppZ6ment au n07, Tome 40, JuiZlet 1979, page C7-43 ELECTRONSWARM HAVING A N ANISOTROPIC VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONFUNCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    direction( z axis ), In recent years there has been a renewed we find the integrodifferential equation % the condition of one dimensional spatial Article published online by EDP Sciences and available at http. Figure 1 and 2 show each term of the energy distribution 4 *functions fR ( E ) = 7 g E( v

  9. Kinematic Synthesis with Configuration Spaces \\Lambda Devika Subramanian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Devika

    of a windshield wiper whose input power is provided by a motor rapidly rotating around the z axis and whose output about the x axis. The spur gear drives a crank rocker of length 6. The wiper output is tapped from

  10. DATA REDUCTION OF HYPERSPECTRAL RADIO-ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES FOR GALAXY CLUSTER SEGMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coordinates as x and y axis and the radial velocity as z axis, i.e., wavelength bands. This general few lines (spectral rays e.g. CO or HI emissions) which are shifted ac- cording to the radial velocity of the observed gas (Doppler effect). The standard method for the study of data cubes is the creation of moment

  11. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V. C. (Port Jefferson, NY); Wang, Chengpu (Upton, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  12. AutoCAD Tutorial # 1: Nidhi Vaid Creating a Footprint Map of a Community Using an Aerial Photograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Standard toolbar Draw toolbar Modify toolbar Command Line #12;AutoCAD Tutorial # 1: Nidhi Vaid Creating. All the objects in the drawing space are considered entities such as lines, arcs, circles, text-axis up the screen and positive Z-axis coming out of the screen towards the user). For example, lines

  13. Microsoft Word - ls311.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the electron-beam direction on the z-axis. The radiated photon energy e n for the nth harmonic is given by 2 2 2 9.498 ( ) ( ) , ( )1 ) ( n E GeV e keV n mm K + + (2)...

  14. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  15. Fluid Dynamics 3 2011/12 Questions 1,2,3 to be handed in on 11th November

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggers, Jens

    to the horizontal. Sufficiently far from the point of impingement the jet flow becomes smooth, uniform and parallel pressure at a point where S = A2. The volume flow rate is Q. Show that if a tube is connected with the pipe a vortex with centre along the ^z-axis, so the flow field is of the form u = f(r)^ in cylindrical polars

  16. Electronic structure of dimetal bonded systems: ditungsten, dimolybdenum and diruthenium systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villagran Martinez, Dino

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    with a 0.05 contour surface. The z axis is taken to be perpendicular to the plane defined by the tungsten atoms and ? -CO ligands.......24 5 Orbital correlation diagram for 1 illustrating the changes in energy of the four highest occupied (dashed... Page 1 Crystallographic Data for Tungsten Formamidinate Compounds................. 9 2 Bond Parameters (? or deg) for 1................................................................. 11 3 Bond Parameters (? or deg) for 2...

  17. Computational evaluation of a novel approach to process planning for circuit card assembly on dual head placement machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Nilanjan Dutta

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    nozzle that uses vacuum to pick a component. Spindles can be rotated around the z-axis simultaneously, by a common drive motor to achieve proper component orientations. Each head can pick components from a set of two racks, each having 32 feeder.... Two nozzle change racks are also associated with each head. These consist of nozzle pads, which hold different nozzle types. Operation managers pre-assign nozzle types to heads. Nozzles are picked up from the pads by spindles using vacuum...

  18. The one and a half monopoles solution of the SU(2) Yang–Mills–Higgs field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teh, Rosy, E-mail: rosyteh@usm.my; Ng, Ban-Loong; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently we have reported on the existence of finite energy SU(2) Yang–Mills–Higgs particle of one-half topological charge. In this paper, we show that this one-half monopole can co-exist with a ’t Hooft–Polyakov monopole. The magnetic charge of the one-half monopole is of opposite sign to the magnetic charge of the ’t Hooft–Polyakov monopole. However the net magnetic charge of the configuration is zero due to the presence of a semi-infinite Dirac string along the positive z-axis that carries the other half of the magnetic monopole charge. The solution possesses gauge potentials that are singular along the z-axis, elsewhere they are regular. The total energy is found to increase with the strength of the Higgs field self-coupling constant ?. However the dipole separation and the magnetic dipole moment decrease with ?. This solution is non-BPS even in the BPS limit when the Higgs self-coupling constant vanishes. -- Highlights: •This one-half monopole can co-exist with a ’t Hooft–Polyakov monopole. •The magnetic charge of the one-half monopole and one monopole is of opposite sign. •This solution is non-BPS. •The net magnetic charge of the configuration is zero. •This solution upon Cho decomposition is only singular along the negative z-axis.

  19. Vacuum electron acceleration by using two variable frequency laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is proposed for producing a relativistic electron bunch in vacuum via direct acceleration by using two frequency-chirped laser pulses. We consider the linearly polarized frequency-chiped Hermit-Gaussian 0, 0 mode lasers with linear chirp in which the local frequency varies linearly in time and space. Electron motion is investigated through a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional particle trajectory code in which the relativistic Newton's equations of motion with corresponding Lorentz force are solved. Two oblique laser pulses with proper chirp parameters and propagation angles are used for the electron acceleration along the z-axis. In this way, an electron initially at rest located at the origin could achieve high energy, ?=319 with the scattering angle of 1.02{sup ?} with respect to the z-axis. Moreover, the acceleration of an electron in different initial positions on each coordinate axis is investigated. It was found that this mechanism has the capability of producing high energy electron microbunches with low scattering angles. The energy gain of an electron initially located at some regions on each axis could be greatly enhanced compared to the single pulse acceleration. Furthermore, the scattering angle will be lowered compared to the acceleration by using laser pulses propagating along the z-axis.

  20. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  1. Geophys. J. Int. (2011) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05105.x GJIGeomagnetism,rockmagnetismandpalaeomagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    ,rockmagnetismandpalaeomagnetism A marine electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrate at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon K. A. Weitemeyer,1 S; in original form 2010 April 8 S U M M A R Y Gas hydrates are a potential energy resource and hazard of controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) methods to map gas hydrate and free gas

  2. RESEARCH ARTICLES CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 93, NO. 3, 10 AUGUST 2007 323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    , sulphur and borax deposits. The temperature of thermal water is as high as the boiling point of water (84 of geothermal manifestation. Analysis of temperature logs indicated a high tempe- rature (~260°C) associated: Geothermal resource, magnetotelluric study, power generation, resistivity. THE Hot Spring Committee

  3. Internal structure of the western flank of the Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands, from land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Palma, Canary Islands, from land magnetotelluric imaging X. Garcia1,2 and A. G. Jones1 Received 9 March on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands) provides an ideal setting to address fundamental questions about (2010), Internal structure of the western flank of the Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands

  4. CX-011399: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High-Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 12/19/2013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. METHODOLOGICAL RE-EVALUATION OF THE ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SILICATE MELTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Revised ms METHODOLOGICAL RE-EVALUATION OF THE ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SILICATE MELTS A in laboratory on silicate melts are used to interpret magnetotelluric anomalies. On the basis of two- and four to small chemical and physical changes, it represents a subtle probe for studying silicate melts properties

  6. doi: 10.1098/rsta.1997.0008 , 233-2533551997Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    of four major components: wide-angle seismic profiles using ocean bottom seismometers; seismic reflection profiles; controlled source electromagnetic sounding; and magneto-telluric sounding. Interpretation seismic P-wave velocity and electrical resistivity, and is associated with a seismic reflector

  7. Electrical conductivity of continental lithospheric mantle from integrated geophysical and petrological modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    and petrological modeling: Application to the Kaapvaal Craton and Rehoboth Terrane, southern Africa J. Fullea,1 M LitMod, which allows for petrological and geophysical modeling of the lithosphere and sublithospheric and petrological observables: namely, elevation, surface heat flow, and magnetotelluric and xenolith data. We find

  8. Reinterpretation of the RRISP77 Iceland Shear Wave Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    this hypothesis and suggest that the crust is thicker (20­30 km), and cooler. A reexamination of the RRISP­77 data. This model is not attributable to any single author. Instead, over a period of 10­15 years, seismological (Saemundsson 1979), geothermal (Palmason 1971, 1973, 1986; Palmason and Saemundsson, 1974), and magnetotelluric

  9. Reinterpretation of the RRISP-77 Iceland Shear Wave Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    this hypothesis and suggest that the crust is thicker (20-30 km), and cooler. A reexamination of the RRISP-77 data. This model is not attributable to any single author. Instead, over a period of 10-15 years, seismological (Saemundsson 1979), geothermal (Palmason 1971, 1973, 1986; Palmason and Saemundsson, 1974), and magnetotelluric

  10. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  11. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  12. SU-E-J-248: Comparative Study of Two Image Registration for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, K; Wang, J; Liu, D; Li, R; Cao, Y; Chi, Z [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, CN, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is one of the major treatment of esophageal cancer. Gray value registration and bone registration are two kinds of image registration, the purpose of this work is to compare which one is more suitable for esophageal cancer patients. Methods: Twenty three esophageal patients were treated by Elekta Synergy, CBCT images were acquired and automatically registered to planning kilovoltage CT scans according to gray value or bone registration. The setup errors were measured in the X, Y and Z axis, respectively. Two kinds of setup errors were analysed by matching T test statistical method. Results: Four hundred and five groups of CBCT images were available and the systematic and random setup errors (cm) in X, Y, Z directions were 0.35, 0.63, 0.29 and 0.31, 0.53, 0.21 with gray value registration, while 0.37, 0.64, 0.26 and 0.32, 0.55, 0.20 with bone registration, respectively. Compared with bone registration and gray value registration, the setup errors in X and Z axis have significant differences. In Y axis, both measurement comparison results of T value is 0.256 (P value > 0.05); In X axis, the T value is 5.287(P value < 0.05); In Z axis, the T value is ?5.138 (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: Gray value registration is recommended in image-guided radiotherapy for esophageal cancer and the other thoracic tumors. Manual registration could be applied when it is necessary. Bone registration is more suitable for the head tumor and pelvic tumor department where composed of redundant interconnected and immobile bone tissue.

  13. Fixture for supporting and aligning a sample to be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, L.A.; Heck, J.L. Jr.

    1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A fixture is provided for supporting and aligning small samples of material on a goniometer for x-ray diffraction analysis. A sample-containing capillary is accurately positioned for rotation in the x-ray beam by selectively adjusting the fixture to position the capillary relative to the x and y axes thereof to prevent wobble and position the sample along the z axis or the axis of rotation. By employing the subject fixture relatively small samples of materials can be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus previously limited to the analysis of much larger samples.

  14. Guided Wave Propagation in Tubular Section with Multi-Layered Viscoelastic Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuo, Chi-Wei 1982-

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    cross-section of the pipe. The layer between radii r1 and r2 is elastic. The outer layer between radii r2 and r3 is the viscoelastic coating material. The axial direction of the cylinder is along the z-axis. The circumferential direction is defined... by the ?-axis. Fig. 2.1 Pipe model Fig. 2.2 Pipe cross-section 2.1. Longitudinal Wave along Axial Direction The Lame-Navier equation of motion for isotropic materials is 2 2 2( ) ( ) ( / )? ? ? ?? + + ? ?? = ? ? tu u u (2.1) r3 r2 r1...

  15. The effect of elastic strain on M-center distribution in LiF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolny, Richard Frank

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of lithium fluoride, illustrating the Seitz and Knox models of the M-center 3 2. A two dimensional lattice of lithium fluoride, illustrating the F and P -centers. 2 4 3. Prism sub]ected to torque about z-axis 4. Cross-section of a rectangular crystal... was to determine the influence of elastic strain on the production of M-centers in crystals of lithium fluoride. g secondary objective was to observe whether the amount of time that a crystal was strained had any effect on the M-center distribution. Data...

  16. Three-dimensional response of an automobile to a generalized impulse / by John Frederick Bet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, John Frederick

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (+ or -). 3. All A-3 locations are instantaneous , orce magnitudes aligned with the local vehicle y-axis, in pounds (+ or -). 4. All A=4 locations are instantaneous force magnitudes aligned with the local vehicle z-axis, in pounds (+ or -). '5. All A=5...) = DUN(3) SUBB(4, JJ) = DUM(4) SUBB(5, JJ) = DUM(5) SUBB(6, JJ) = DUN(6) SUBB(7, JJ) = DUN(7) GO TO 2 Therefore, the data card only uses seven of the n1ne fields provided, and the variables are loaded in the order of time, x, y, and z forces...

  17. Equivalence and Hermiticity of Dirac Hamiltonians in the Kerr gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Gorbatenko; V. P. Neznamov

    2014-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper, for the Kerr field, we prove that Chandrasekhar's Dirac Hamiltonian and the self-adjoint Hamiltonian H_{\\eta} with a flat scalar product of the wave functions are physically equivalent. Operators of transformation of Chandrasekhar's Hamiltonian and wave functions to the \\eta-representation with a flat scalar product are defined explicitly. If the domain of the wave functions of Dirac's equation in the Kerr field is bounded by two-dimensional surfaces of revolution around the z axis, Chandrasekhar's Hamiltonian and the self-adjoint Hamiltonian in the \\eta-representation are Hermitian with equality of the scalar products,(\\psi, H \\varphi)=(H \\psi, \\varphi).

  18. Automated Builder and Database of Protein/Membrane Complexes for Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Sunhwan; Kim, Taehoon; Im, Wonpil

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    it if necessary, and generate a structure topology file. Users can upload their own pre-oriented protein structure, or specify PDB entry ID and a database, either of PDB database [14] or OPM database [25]. Protein structures from OPM database are pre... to the Z-axis. In the case that the protein structure is not easily aligned with the available options, one should align it in a local machine and then upload it. One can skip the alignment step for the protein structures from OPM database [25] or pre...

  19. Exploration of the El Hoyo-Monte Galan Geothermal Concession. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1996 Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation (TGC) was granted a geothermal concession of 114 square kilometers from the Instituto Nicaragueense de Energie (INE) for the purpose of developing between 50 and 150 MWe of geothermal electrical generating capacity. The Concession Agreement required TGC to perform geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies as part of the development program. TGC commenced the geotechnical studies in January 1996 with a comprehensive review of all existing data and surveys. Based on this review, TGC formulated an exploration plan and executed that plan commencing in April, 1996. The ground magnetic (GM), self potential (SP), magnetotelluric/controlled source audio magnetotelluric (MT/CSAMT) and one-meter temperature surveys, data integration, and synthesis of a hydrogeologic model were performed. The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of all data gathered from the geophysical exploration program and to provide an integrated interpretation of that data.

  20. Marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Responses of a Thin Hydrocarbon Reservoir beneath Anisotropic Overburden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youn, Sangseok

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    friends for their patience and persistent love. v NOMENCLATURE MCSEM Marine Controlled-source Electromagnetic HED Horizontal electric dipole MT Magnetotellurics TX Transmitter RX Receiver EX Total electric field response EX-EX Total.... ............................................................ 22 Figure 8. The isotropic EX-EX responses for an isotropic halfspace results, computed to validate the anisotropy modification of the SEATEM code. ........................ 24 Figure 9. EX-EX responses for different values of the z...

  1. Heavy Oil Program. Quarterly progress report No. 1, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayland, J. R.; Bartel, L. C.; Johnson, D. R.; Fox, R. L.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and development efforts in support of the DOE Heavy Oil RD and D Program in reservoir access were initiated. Preliminary activities in the survey of sand control, drilling, and fracturing techniques in heavy oil formations are described. The continued development of a high temperature packer for use in steam injection applications is presented. A new application of controlled source audio magnetotelluric survey to developing thermal fronts from in situ combustion and steam drive is described.

  2. Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

  3. Instabilities and generation of a quasistationary magnetic field by the interaction of relativistically intense electromagnetic wave with a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillani, S. S. A.; Shah, H. A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Tsintsadze, N. L. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Institute of Physics, Tbilisi 380077 (Georgia); Razzaq, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the interaction of the superstrong laser radiation with an isotropic plasma leads to the generation of low frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves and in particular a quasistationary magnetic field. When the relativistic circularly polarized transverse EM wave propagates along z-axis, it creates a ponderomotive force, which affects the motion of particles along the direction of its propagation. On the other hand, motion of the particles across the direction of propagation is defined by the ponderomotive potential. The dispersion relation for the transverse EM wave using a special distribution function, which has an anisotropic form, is derived. The dispersion relation is subsequently investigated for a number of special cases. In general, it is shown that the growth rate of the EM wave strongly depends upon its intensity.

  4. Electrochemical Performance and Stability of the Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. I. Cross Validation of Polarization Measurements by Impedance Spectroscopy and Current-Potential Sweep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Xiao Dong; Pederson, Larry R.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to address three issues in solid oxide fuel cells: (1) cross-validation of the polarization of a single cell measured using both dc and ac approaches, (2) the precise determination of the total areal specific resistance (ASR), and (3) understanding cathode polarization with LSCF cathodes. The ASR of a solid oxide fuel cell is a dynamic property, meaning that it changes with current density. The ASR measured using ac impedance spectroscopy (low frequency interception with real Z´ axis of ac impedance spectrum) matches with that measured from a dc IV sweep (the tangent of dc i-V curve). Due to the dynamic nature of ASR, we found that an ac impedance spectrum measured under open circuit voltage or on a half cell may not represent cathode performance under real operating conditions, particularly at high current density. In this work, the electrode polarization was governed by the cathode activation polarization; the anode contribution was negligible.

  5. Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G. [and others

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

  6. Validation of a Monte Carlo model used for simulating tube current modulation in computed tomography over a wide range of phantom conditions/challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostani, Maryam, E-mail: mbostani@mednet.ucla.edu; McMillan, Kyle; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F. [Departments of Biomedical Physics and Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); DeMarco, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods have been widely used in patient dosimetry in computed tomography (CT), including estimating patient organ doses. However, most simulation methods have undergone a limited set of validations, often using homogeneous phantoms with simple geometries. As clinical scanning has become more complex and the use of tube current modulation (TCM) has become pervasive in the clinic, MC simulations should include these techniques in their methodologies and therefore should also be validated using a variety of phantoms with different shapes and material compositions to result in a variety of differently modulated tube current profiles. The purpose of this work is to perform the measurements and simulations to validate a Monte Carlo model under a variety of test conditions where fixed tube current (FTC) and TCM were used. Methods: A previously developed MC model for estimating dose from CT scans that models TCM, built using the platform of MCNPX, was used for CT dose quantification. In order to validate the suitability of this model to accurately simulate patient dose from FTC and TCM CT scan, measurements and simulations were compared over a wide range of conditions. Phantoms used for testing range from simple geometries with homogeneous composition (16 and 32 cm computed tomography dose index phantoms) to more complex phantoms including a rectangular homogeneous water equivalent phantom, an elliptical shaped phantom with three sections (where each section was a homogeneous, but different material), and a heterogeneous, complex geometry anthropomorphic phantom. Each phantom requires varying levels of x-, y- and z-modulation. Each phantom was scanned on a multidetector row CT (Sensation 64) scanner under the conditions of both FTC and TCM. Dose measurements were made at various surface and depth positions within each phantom. Simulations using each phantom were performed for FTC, detailed x–y–z TCM, and z-axis-only TCM to obtain dose estimates. This allowed direct comparisons between measured and simulated dose values under each condition of phantom, location, and scan to be made. Results: For FTC scans, the percent root mean square (RMS) difference between measurements and simulations was within 5% across all phantoms. For TCM scans, the percent RMS of the difference between measured and simulated values when using detailed TCM and z-axis-only TCM simulations was 4.5% and 13.2%, respectively. For the anthropomorphic phantom, the difference between TCM measurements and detailed TCM and z-axis-only TCM simulations was 1.2% and 8.9%, respectively. For FTC measurements and simulations, the percent RMS of the difference was 5.0%. Conclusions: This work demonstrated that the Monte Carlo model developed provided good agreement between measured and simulated values under both simple and complex geometries including an anthropomorphic phantom. This work also showed the increased dose differences for z-axis-only TCM simulations, where considerable modulation in the x–y plane was present due to the shape of the rectangular water phantom. Results from this investigation highlight details that need to be included in Monte Carlo simulations of TCM CT scans in order to yield accurate, clinically viable assessments of patient dosimetry.

  7. A new dynamical indicator for chaos detection in galactic Hamiltonian systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2012-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new dynamical parameter, the f-indicator, is introduced and used in order to distinguish between regular and chaotic motion in galactic Hamiltonian systems. Two kinds of galactic potentials are used: (i) a global potential, which describes the whole galaxy and (ii) a local potential, which is made up of perturbed harmonic oscillators and describes motion near an equilibrium point. The new indicator is based on the energies of the separable system along the x, y and z axis. Comparison between the outcomes obtained using the new dynamical parameter and other methods, such as the maximum Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent (L.C.E), or the S(c) dynamical spectrum, shows that the new dynamical indicator gives fast and reliable results concerning the regular or chaotic character of the orbits. The new indicator was tested in several Hamiltonian systems of two (2D) degrees and three (3D) degrees of freedom.

  8. All-dielectric periodic terajet waveguide using an array of coupled cuboids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minin, I V; Pacheco-Peña, V; Beruete, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the recently proposed technique to produce photonic jets (terajets at THz frequencies) using 3D dielectric cuboids is applied in the design of mesoscale cuboid-chain waveguide. The chains are basically designed with several dielectric cubes with dimensions {\\lambda}0 along the x, y and z axes placed periodically along the axial z-axis and separated by an air-gap. Based on this, a systematic study of the focusing properties and wave guiding of this chain is performed when the air-gap between the dielectric cubes is changed from 0.25{\\lambda}0 to 2.5{\\lambda}0 with the best performance achieved with the latter design. The numerical results of focusing and transport properties are carried out using Finite Integration Technique. The results here presented may be scaled to any frequency ranges such as millimeter, sub-millimeter or optical frequencies.

  9. Laser-induced damage investigation at 1064 nmin KTiOPO4 crystals and its analogy with RbTiOPO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildenbrand, A.; Wagner, F. R.; Akhouayri, H.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Commandre, M.; Theodore, F.; Albrecht, H.

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk laser-induced damage at 1064 nm has been investigated in KTiOPO4 (KTP) and RbTiOPO4 (RTP) crystals with a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Both crystals belong to the same family. Throughout this study, their comparison shows a very similar laser-damage behavior. The evolution of the damage resistance under a high number of shots per site (10,000 shots) reveals a fatigue effect of KTP and RTP crystals. In addition, S-on-1 damage probability curves have been measured in both crystals for all combinations of polarization and propagation direction aligned with the principal axes of the crystals. The results show an influence of the polarization on the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), with a significantly higher threshold along the z axis, whereas no effect of the propagation direction has been observed. This LIDT anisotropy is discussed with regard to the crystallographic structure.

  10. Value of Information spreadsheet

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    This spreadsheet represents the information posteriors derived from synthetic data of magnetotellurics (MT). These were used to calculate value of information of MT for geothermal exploration. Information posteriors describe how well MT was able to locate the "throat" of clay caps, which are indicative of hidden geothermal resources. This data is full explained in the peer-reviewed publication: Trainor-Guitton, W., Hoversten, G. M., Ramirez, A., Roberts, J., Júlíusson, E., Key, K., Mellors, R. (Sept-Oct. 2014) The value of spatial information for determining well placement: a geothermal example, Geophysics.

  11. Value of Information spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This spreadsheet represents the information posteriors derived from synthetic data of magnetotellurics (MT). These were used to calculate value of information of MT for geothermal exploration. Information posteriors describe how well MT was able to locate the "throat" of clay caps, which are indicative of hidden geothermal resources. This data is full explained in the peer-reviewed publication: Trainor-Guitton, W., Hoversten, G. M., Ramirez, A., Roberts, J., Júlíusson, E., Key, K., Mellors, R. (Sept-Oct. 2014) The value of spatial information for determining well placement: a geothermal example, Geophysics.

  12. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ?10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime loss correction while keeping the study duration reasonable.

  13. SU-E-I-21: Deformation Mapping and Shape Prediction with 3D Tumor Volume Morphing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, S; Wu, H; Fang, S [Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Lu, M [PerkinElmer Medical Imaging, Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ?10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime loss correction while keeping the study duration reasonable.

  14. Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the controlled source audio frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (1) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (2) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the conate water of the production field; (3) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (4) mathematically comparing the maps from step (1) and step (3) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

  15. Cerro Prieto geothermal field: exploration during exploitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. The description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field are presented. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development.

  16. Results of investigation at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.B. (HydroGeophysics, Tucson, AZ (United States))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ahuachapan Geothermal Field (AGF) is a 95 megawatt geothemal-sourced power-plant operated by the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) of El Salvador. During the past decade, as part of an effort to increase in situ thermal reserves in order to realize the full generation capacity of the AGF, extensive surface geophysical coverage has been obtained over the AGF and the prospective Chipilapa area to the east. The geophysical surveys were performed to determine physical property characteristics of the known reservoir and then to search for similar characteristics in the Chipilapa area. A secondary objective was to evaluate the surface recharge area in the highlands to the south of the AGF. The principal surface electrical geophysical methods used during this period were DC resistivity and magnetotellurics. Three available data sets have been reinterpreted using drillhole control to help form geophysical models of the area. The geophysical models are compared with the geologic interpretations.

  17. Parameterization of geophysical inversion model using particle clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Dikun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new method of constructing physical models in a geophysical inverse problem, when there are only a few possible physical property values in the model and they are reasonably known but the geometry of the target is sought. The model consists of a fixed background and many small "particles" as building blocks that float around in the background to resemble the target by clustering. This approach contrasts the conventional geometric inversions requiring the target to be regularly shaped bodies, since here the geometry of the target can be arbitrary and does not need to be known beforehand. Because of the lack of resolution in the data, the particles may not necessarily cluster when recovering compact targets. A model norm, called distribution norm, is introduced to quantify the spread of particles and incorporated into the objective function to encourage further clustering of the particles. As proof of concept, 1D magnetotelluric inversion is used as example. My experiments reveal that the ...

  18. Geological interpretation of Mount Ciremai geothermal system from remote sensing and magneto-teluric analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumintadireja, Prihadi; Irawan, Dasapta E; Irawan, Diky; Fadillah, Ahmad

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exploration of geothermal system at Mount Ciremai has been started since the early 1980s and has just been studied carefully since the early 2000s. Previous studies have detected the potential of geothermal system and also the groundwater mechanism feeding the system. This paper will discuss the geothermal exploration based on regional scale surface temperature analysis with Landsat image to have a more detail interpretation of the geological setting and magneto-telluric or MT survey at prospect zones, which identified by the previous method, to have a more exact and in depth local scale structural interpretation. Both methods are directed to pin point appropriate locations for geothermal pilot hole drilling and testing. We used four scenes of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper or ETM+ data to estimate the surface manifestation of a geothermal system. Temporal analysis of Land Surface Temperature or LST was applied and coupled with field temperature measurement at seven locations. By combining the TTM with ...

  19. Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II contains appendices for the following: (1) remote sensing and surface mapping techniques; (2) subsurface mapping methods for site characterization; (3) gravity technique; (4) audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique; (5) seismic refraction technique; (6) direct-current electrical resistivity method; (7) magnetic technique; (8) seismic reflection technique; (9) seismic crosshole method; (10) mechanical downhole seismic velocity survey method; (11) borehole geophysical logging techniques; (12) drilling and coring methods for precharacterization studies; (13) subsurface drilling methods for site characterization; (14) geomechanical/thermomechanical techniques for precharacterization studies; (15)geomechanical/thermal techniques for site characterization studies; (16) exploratory geochemical techniques for precharacterization studies; (17) geochemical techniques for site characterization; (18) hydrologic techniques for precharacterization studies; (19) hydrologic techniques for site characterization; and (20) seismological techniques.

  20. Recently discovered overthrusting northeast of Llano uplift along extension of San Marcos platform: new exploration frontier in central Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMurdie, D.S.; Bryan, J.G.; Gibson, M.; King, T.; Sill, W.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TJB Resources recently completed gravity, magnetotelluric, and seismic geophysical surveys in San Saba and Mills Counties north of the Llano uplift, west of the Ouachita Disturbed belt. Significant results show overthrusting has occurred 60-70 mi west of the Ouachita Disturbed belt. Earliest thrusting could have occurred in the Silurian-Devonian from south or southeast. Faulting reoccurs during Pennsylvanian Ouachita thrusting and again in the Late Cretaceous. The primitive Llano uplift buttressed the allochthonous rocks moving north and west. Magnetotelluric and gravity data indicate the Llano uplift is a separate and distinct isolated remnant or terrain, with numerous igneous intrusions reaching to great depths. Associated with this thrusting is a major tectonic northwest-southeast lineament located parallel to the termination of the Cretaceous rocks, outcropping on the western edge of Mills and Lampasas Counties. This lineament is documented by east-west seismic lines displaying a 0.3-sec displacement and farther southwest a 1.1-sec displacement. Paleozoic fossils were found near the surface trace of the northwest-southwest lineament as observed on the east-west seismic line. This area was previously mapped as Cretaceous. Surface inspection found Paleozoic rocks containing crinoids, spirifers, and rugose corals, with beds dipping to 45/sup 0/, contrasted with the N2/sup 0/ regional dip surrounding the lineament area. Well-log correlations from Marble Falls to Ellenberger range from 350 to 600 ft from east to west near the Llano uplift. The 60 to 70-mi frontal edge of the thrusting provides potential hydrocarbon traps along a north to northeast trend from central Texas to Oklahoma.

  1. Density of defects and the scaling law of the entanglement entropy in quantum phase transition of one dimensional spin systems induced by a quench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banasri Basu; Pratul Bandyopadhyay; Priyadarshi Majumdar

    2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied quantum phase transition induced by a quench in different one dimensional spin systems. Our analysis is based on the dynamical mechanism which envisages nonadiabaticity in the vicinity of the critical point. This causes spin fluctuation which leads to the random fluctuation of the Berry phase factor acquired by a spin state when the ground state of the system evolves in a closed path. The two-point correlation of this phase factor is associated with the probability of the formation of defects. In this framework, we have estimated the density of defects produced in several one dimensional spin chains. At the critical region, the entanglement entropy of a block of $L$ spins with the rest of the system is also estimated which is found to increase logarithmically with $L$. The dependence on the quench time puts a constraint on the block size $L$. It is also pointed out that the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model in point-splitting regularized form appears as a combination of the XXX model and Ising model with magnetic field in the negative z-axis. This unveils the underlying conformal symmetry at criticality which is lost in the sharp point limit. Our analysis shows that the density of defects as well as the scaling behavior of the entanglement entropy follows a universal behavior in all these systems.

  2. MAP, MAC, and Vortex-rings Configurations in the Weinberg-Salam Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosy Teh; Ban-Loong Ng; Khai-Ming Wong

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the presence of new axially symmetric monopoles, antimonopoles and vortex-rings solutions of the SU(2)$\\times$U(1) Weinberg-Salam model of electromagnetic and weak interactions. When the $\\phi$-winding number $n=1$, and 2, the configurations are monopole-antimonopole pair (MAP) and monopole-antimonopole chain (MAC) with poles of alternating sign magnetic charge arranged along the $z$-axis. Vortex-rings start to appear from the MAP and MAC configurations when the winding number $n=3$. The MAP configurations possess zero net magnetic charge whereas the MAC configurations possess net magnetic charge of $4\\pi n/e$. In the MAP configurations, the monopole-antimonopole pair is bounded by the ${\\cal Z}^0$ field flux string and there is an electromagnetic current loop encircling it. The monopole and antimonopole possess magnetic charges $\\pm\\frac{4\\pi n}{e}\\sin^2\\theta_W$ respectively. In the MAC configurations there is no string connecting the monopole and the adjacent antimonopole and they possess magnetic charges $\\pm\\frac{4\\pi n}{e}$ respectively. The MAC configurations possess infinite total energy and zero magnetic dipole moment whereas the MAP configurations which are actually sphalerons possess finite total energy and magnetic dipole moment. The configurations were investigated for varying values of Higgs self-coupling constant $0\\leq \\lambda\\leq 40$ at Weinberg angle $\\theta_W=\\frac{\\pi}{4}$.

  3. Density of defects and the scaling law of the entanglement entropy in quantum phase transition of one-dimensional spin systems induced by a quench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Banasri; Bandyopadhyay, Pratul; Majumdar, Priyadarshi [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata 700 108 (India); Jyotinagar Bidyasree Niketan H.S. School, 41 Jyotinagar, Kolkata 700 108 (India)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied quantum phase transition induced by a quench in different one-dimensional spin systems. Our analysis is based on the dynamical mechanism which envisages nonadiabaticity in the vicinity of the critical point. This causes spin fluctuation which leads to the random fluctuation of the Berry phase factor acquired by a spin state when the ground state of the system evolves in a closed path. The two-point correlation of this phase factor is associated with the probability of the formation of defects. In this framework, we have estimated the density of defects produced in several one-dimensional spin chains. At the critical region, the entanglement entropy of a block of L spins with the rest of the system is also estimated which is found to increase logarithmically with L. The dependence on the quench time puts a constraint on the block size L. It is also pointed out that the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model in point-splitting regularized form appears as a combination of the XXX model and Ising model with magnetic field in the negative z axis. This unveils the underlying conformal symmetry at criticality which is lost in the sharp point limit. Our analysis shows that the density of defects as well as the scaling behavior of the entanglement entropy follows a universal behavior in all these systems.

  4. Cosmic strings in $f\\left(R,L_m\\right)$ gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiberiu Harko; Matthew J. Lake

    2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Kasner type static, cylindrically symmetric interior string solutions in the $f\\left(R,L_m\\right)$ theory of modified gravity. The physical properties of the string are described by an anisotropic energy-momentum tensor satisfying the condition $T_t^t=T_z^z$; that is, the energy density of the string along the $z$-axis is equal to minus the string tension. As a first step in our study we obtain the gravitational field equations in the $f\\left(R,L_m\\right)$ theory for a general static, cylindrically symmetric metric, and then for a Kasner type metric, in which the metric tensor components have a power law dependence on the radial coordinate $r$. String solutions in two particular modified gravity models are investigated in detail. The first is the so-called "exponential" modified gravity, in which the gravitational action is proportional to the exponential of the sum of the Ricci scalar and matter Lagrangian, and the second is the "self-consistent model", obtained by explicitly determining the gravitational action from the field equations under the assumption of a power law dependent matter Lagrangian. In each case, the thermodynamic parameters of the string, as well as the precise form of the matter Lagrangian, are explicitly obtained.

  5. Phase transition between quantum and classical regimes for the escape rate of dimeric molecular nanomagnets in a staggered magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon Akaraka Owerre; M. B Paranjape

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase transition of the escape rate of exchange-coupled dimer of single-molecule magnets which are coupled either ferromagnetic ally or antiferromagnetically in a staggered magnetic field and an easy $z$-axis anisotropy. The Hamiltonian for this system has been used to study molecular dimer nanomagnets [Mn$_4$]$_2$. We generalize the method of mapping a single-molecule magnetic spin problem onto a quantum-mechanical particle to dimeric molecular nanomagnets. The problem is mapped to a single particle quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian in terms of the relative coordinate and a coordinate dependent reduced mass. It is shown that the presence of the external staggered magnetic field creates a phase boundary separating the first- from the second-order transition. With the set of parameters used by R. Tiron, $\\textit{et al}$, \\prl {\\bf 91}, 227203 (2003), and S. Hill, $\\textit{et al}$ science {\\bf 302}, 1015 (2003) to fit experimental data for [Mn$_{4}$]$_2$ dimer we find that the critical temperature at the phase boundary is $T^{(c)}_0 =0.29K$. Therefore, thermally activated transitions should occur for temperatures greater than $T^{(c)}_0$.

  6. Numerical and experimental study of the thermal stress of silicon induced by a millisecond laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xi; Qin Yuan; Wang Bin; Zhang Liang; Shen Zhonghua; Lu Jian; Ni Xiaowu

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A spatial axisymmetric finite element model of single-crystal silicon irradiated by a 1064 nm millisecond laser is used to investigate the thermal stress damage induced by a millisecond laser. The transient temperature field and the thermal stress field for 2 ms laser irradiation with a laser fluence of 254 J/cm{sup 2} are obtained. The numerical simulation results indicate that the hoop stresses along the r axis on the front surface are compressive stress within the laser spot and convert to tensile stress outside the laser spot, while the radial stresses along the r axis on the front surface and on the z axis are compressive stress. The temperature of the irradiated center is the highest temperature obtained, yet the stress is not always highest during laser irradiation. At the end of the laser irradiation, the maximal hoop stress is located at r=0.5 mm and the maximal radial stress is located at r=0.76 mm. The temperature measurement experiments are performed by IR pyrometer. The numerical result of the temperature field is consistent with the experimental result. The damage morphologies of silicon under the action of a 254 J/cm{sup 2} laser are inspected by optical microscope. The cracks are observed initiating at r=0.5 mm and extending along the radial direction.

  7. PHOTOS Interface in C++; Technical and Physics Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Davidson; T. Przedzinski; Z. Was

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The first version of PHOTOS Monte Carlo for bremsstrahlung in the decay of particles and resonances with an interface to the HepMC event record written in C++ is now available. The main purpose of the present paper is to document technical aspects of the PHOTOS Monte Carlo installation and its use. A multitude of test results and examples are distributed together with the program code. The PHOTOS C++ physics precision is now as good as that of its FORTRAN predecessor. Howeverbetter steering options are available. An algorithm of the event record interface is prepared for the installation of process dependent variants of the photon emission kernel. Weights, featuring complete first order matrix elements, can be installed for general use. In the FORTRAN version of PHOTOS they were available only for decays of particles at rest and with spin set along the z axis. Physics assumptions used in the program and properties of the solution it offers are reviewed. In particular, it is mentioned that the second order matrix elements were used in design and validation of the program iteration procedure. Also it is explained that the phase space parameterization used in the program is exact.

  8. Use of High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Percutaneous Tumor Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denys, Alban, E-mail: alban.denys@chuv.ch; Lachenal, Yann; Duran, Rafael [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology (Switzerland); Bize, Pierre [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland)

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeTo report feasibility and potential benefits of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in tumor ablations techniques in liver, kidney, and lung lesions.MethodsThis prospective study included 51 patients (14 women, mean age 66 years) bearing 66 tumors (56 hepatic, 5 pulmonary, 5 renal tumors) with a median size of 16 ± 8.7 mm, referred for tumor ablation in an intention-to-treat fashion before preoperative anesthesiology visit. Cancellation and complications of HFJV were prospectively recorded. Anesthesia and procedure duration, as well as mean CO{sub 2} capnea, were recorded. When computed tomography guidance was used, 3D spacial coordinates of an anatomical target <2 mm in diameter on 8 slabs of 4 slices of 3.75-mm slice thickness were registered.ResultsHFJV was used in 41 of 51 patients. Of the ten patients who were not candidate for HFJV, two patients had contraindication to HFJV (severe COPD), three had lesions invisible under HFJV requiring deep inspiration apnea for tumor targeting, and five patients could not have HFJV because of unavailability of a trained anesthetic team. No specific complication or hypercapnia related to HFJV were observed despite a mean anesthetic duration of 2 h and ventilation performed in procubitus (n = 4) or lateral decubitus (n = 6). Measured internal target movement was 0.3 mm in x- and y-axis and below the slice thickness of 3.75 mm in the z-axis in 11 patients.ConclusionsHFJV is feasible in 80 % of patients allowing for near immobility of internal organs during liver, kidney, and lung tumor ablation.

  9. Nonuniform character of the population of spin projections K for a fissile nucleus at the scission point and anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the induced fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Bunakov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kadmensky, S. S. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the emergence of anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the spontaneous and induced fission of oriented actinide nuclei is possible only if nonuniformities in the population of the projectionsM (K) of the fissile-nucleus spin onto the z axis of the laboratory frame (fissile-nucleus symmetry axis) appear simultaneously in the vicinity of the scission point but not in the vicinity of the outer saddle point of the deformation potential. The possibilities for creating the orientation of fissile nuclei for spontaneous and induced fission and the effect of these orientations on the anisotropies under analysis are considered. The role of Coriolis interaction as a unique source of the mixing of different-K fissile-nucleus states at all stages of the fission process is studied with allowance for the dynamical enhancement of this interaction for excited thermalized states of the nucleus involved that is characterized by a high energy density. It is shown that the absence of thermalization of excited states of the fissile nucleus that appear because of the effect of nonadiabaticity of its collective deformation motion in the vicinity of the scission point is a condition of conservation of the influence that transition fission states formed at the inner and outer fission barriers exerts on the distribution of the spin projections K for lowenergy spontaneous nuclear fission. It is confirmed that anisotropies observed in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the fission of nuclei that is induced by fast light particles (multiply charged ions) are due to the appearance of strongly excited equilibrium(nonequilibrium) states of the fissile nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point that have a Gibbs (non-Gibbs) distribution of projections K.

  10. Quantum Field Effects in Stationary Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri Yerchuck; Vyacheslav Stelmakh; Yauhen Yerchak; Alla Dovlatova

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proved on the example of electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of anthracites, that by strong electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions the formation of the coherent system of the resonance phonons takes place. The acoustic quantum Rabi oscillations were observed for the first time in ESR-spectroscopy. Its Rabi frequency value on the first damping stage was found to be equal 920.6 kHz, being to be independent on the microwave power level in the range 20 - 6 dB [0 dB corresponds to 100 mW]. By the subsequent increase of the microwave power the stepwise transition to the phenomenon of nonlinear quantum Rabi oscillations, characterised by splitting of the oscillation group of lines into two subgroups with doubling of the total lines' number takes place. Linewidth of an individual oscillation line becomes approximately the twofold narrower, being to be equal the only to $0.004 \\pm 0.001$ G. Along with the absorption process of EM-field energy the emission process was observed. It was found, that the emission process is the realization of the acoustic spin resonance, the source of acoustic wave power in which is the system of resonance phonons, accumulated in the samples by the registration with AFC. It has been found, that the lifetime of coherent state of a collective subsystem of resonance phonons in anthracites is very long and even by room temperature it is evaluated by the value exceeding 4.6 minutes. The model of new kinds of instantons was proposed. They are considered to be similar in the mathematical structure to Su-Schrieffer-Heeger solitons with "propagation" direction along time $t$-axis instead of space $z$-axis. The proof, that the superconductivity state in the anthracite samples studied is produced at the room temperature in ESR conditions in the accordance with the theory of the quantised acoustic field, has experimentally been obtained.

  11. Interpretation of 3D void measurements with Tripoli4.6/JEFF3.1.1 Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, P.; Colomba, A. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC/LEPh, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work details the first analysis of the 3D void phase conducted during the EPICURE/UM17x17/7% mixed UOX/MOX configuration. This configuration is composed of a homogeneous central 17x17 MOX-7% assembly, surrounded by portions of 17x17 1102 assemblies with guide-tubes. The void bubble is modelled by a small waterproof 5x5 fuel pin parallelepiped box of 11 cm height, placed in the centre of the MOX assembly. This bubble, initially placed at the core mid-plane, is then moved in different axial positions to study the evolution in the core of the axial perturbation. Then, to simulate the growing of this bubble in order to understand the effects of increased void fraction along the fuel pin, 3 and 5 bubbles have been stacked axially, from the core mid-plane. The C/E comparison obtained with the Monte Carlo code Tripoli4 for both radial and axial fission rate distributions, and in particular the reproduction of the very important flux gradients at the void/water interfaces, changing as the bubble is displaced along the z-axis are very satisfactory. It demonstrates both the capability of the code and its library to reproduce this kind of situation, as the very good quality of the experimental results, confirming the UM-17x17 as an excellent experimental benchmark for 3D code validation. This work has been performed within the frame of the V and V program for the future APOLL03 deterministic code of CEA starting in 2012, and its V and V benchmarking database. (authors)

  12. Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of hypotheses for the cause of the 1886 Charleston earthquake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.M.; Long, L.T. (Law Environmental, Inc., Kennesaw, GA (USA); Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a geophysical/geological investigation of the earth's crust at seismogenic depths in the Charleston, South Carolina area. This investigation was made for the purpose of narrowing the range of theories that have been used to explain the historic 1886 Charleston earthquake. Since a number of these theories are based on only a portion of the available data, we have established a comprehensive data set in order to allow these hypotheses to be subjected to the entire data set. Specifically, we combined existing and new gravity, magnetic and topographic data in grids of 128 km, 256 km and 1028 km on a side centered on Charleston. Seismic, geologic and drilling data were collected and summarized. A magnetotelluric survey consisting of 12 soundings interpreted to depths of over 40 kilometers defined the bottom of the rigid crust with assistance from seismic reflection and other data. A geologic model of the crust in the area of Charleston was constructed and it defined the locations of Triassic/Jurassic basins Paleozoic plutons in greater detail than has previously been achieved. 102 refs., 75 figs.

  14. Geothermal-resource assessment of the Steamboat-Routt Hot Springs area, Colorado. Resources Series 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the Steamboat Springs region in northwest Colorado was initiated and carried out in 1980 and 1981. The goal of this program was to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of the thermal waters (temperatures in excess of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C)) in this area at Steamboat Springs and 8 miles (12.8 km) north at Routt Hot Springs. Thermal waters from Heart Spring, the only developed thermal water source in the study area, are used in the municipal swimming pool in Steamboat Springs. The assessment program was a fully integrated program consisting of: dipole-dipole, Audio-magnetotelluric, telluric, self potential and gravity geophysical surveys, soil mercury and soil helium geochemical surveys; shallow temperature measurements; and prepartion of geological maps. The investigation showed that all the thermal springs appear to be fault controlled. Based on the chemical composition of the thermal waters it appears that Heart Spring in Steamboat Springs is hydrologically related to the Routt Hot Springs. This relationship was further confirmed when it was reported that thermal waters were encountered during the construction of the new high school in Strawberry Park on the north side of Steamboat Springs. In addition, residents stated that Strawberry Park appears to be warmer than the surrounding country side. Geological mapping has determined that a major fault extends from the Routt Hot Springs area into Strawberry Park.

  15. Fuel Pond Sludge - Lessons Learned from Initial De-sludging of Sellafield's Pile Fuel Storage Pond - 12066

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Derek; Adamson, Kate [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) at Sellafield was built and commissioned between the late 1940's and early 1950's as a storage and cooling facility for irradiated fuel and isotopes from the two Windscale Pile reactors. The pond was linked via submerged water ducts to each reactor, where fuel and isotopes were discharged into skips for transfer along the duct to the pond. In the pond the fuel was cooled then de-canned underwater prior to export for reprocessing. The plant operated successfully until it was taken out of operation in 1962 when the First Magnox Fuel Storage Pond took over fuel storage and de-canning operations on the site. The pond was then used for storage of miscellaneous Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and fuel from the UK's Nuclear Programme for which no defined disposal route was available. By the mid 1970's the import of waste ceased and the plant, with its inventory, was placed into a passive care and maintenance regime. By the mid 1990s, driven by the age of the facility and concern over the potential challenge to dispose of the various wastes and fuels being stored, the plant operator initiated a programme of work to remediate the facility. This programme is split into a number of key phases targeted at sustained reduction in the hazard associated with the pond, these include: - Pond Preparation: Before any remediation work could start the condition of the pond had to be transformed from a passive store to a plant capable of complex retrieval operations. This work included plant and equipment upgrades, removal of redundant structures and the provision of a effluent treatment plant for removing particulate and dissolved activity from the pond water. - Canned Fuel Retrieval: Removal of canned fuel, including oxide and carbide fuels, is the highest priority within the programme. Handling and export equipment required to remove the canned fuel from the pond has been provided and treatment routes developed utilising existing site facilities to allow the fuel to be reprocessed or conditioned for long term storage. - Sludge Retrieval: In excess of 300 m{sup 3} of sludge has accumulated in the pond over many years and is made up of debris arising from fuel and metallic corrosion, wind blown debris and bio-organic materials. The Sludge Retrieval Project has provided the equipment necessary to retrieve the sludge, including skip washer and tipper machines for clearing sludge from the pond skips, equipment for clearing sludge from the pond floor and bays, along with an 'in pond' corral for interim storage of retrieved sludge. Two further projects are providing new plant processing routes, which will initially store and eventually passivate the sludge. - Metal Fuel Retrieval: Metal Fuel from early Windscale Pile operations and various other sources is stored within the pond; the fuel varies considerably in both form and condition. A retrieval project is planned which will provide fuel handling, conditioning, sentencing and export equipment required to remove the metal fuel from the pond for export to on site facilities for interim storage and disposal. - Solid Waste Retrieval: A final retrieval project will provide methods for handling, retrieval, packaging and export of the remaining solid Intermediate Level Waste within the pond. This includes residual metal fuel pieces, fuel cladding (Magnox, aluminium and zircaloy), isotope cartridges, reactor furniture, and miscellaneous activated and contaminated items. Each of the waste streams requires conditioning to allow it to be and disposed of via one of the site treatment plants. - Pond Dewatering and Dismantling: Delivery of the above projects will allow operations to progressively remove the radiological inventory, thereby reducing the hazard/risk posed by the plant. This will then allow subsequent dewatering of the pond and dismantling of the structure. (authors)

  16. A new correction method serving to eliminate the parabola effect of flatbed scanners used in radiochromic film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppinga, D., E-mail: daniela.poppinga@uni-oldenburg.de; Schoenfeld, A. A.; Poppe, B. [Medical Radiation Physics, Carl v. Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26127, Germany and Department for Radiation Oncology, Pius Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)] [Medical Radiation Physics, Carl v. Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26127, Germany and Department for Radiation Oncology, Pius Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany); Doerner, K. J. [Radiotherapy Department, General Hospital, Celle 29223 (Germany)] [Radiotherapy Department, General Hospital, Celle 29223 (Germany); Blanck, O. [CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Güstrow 18273, Germany and Department for Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck 23562 (Germany)] [CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Güstrow 18273, Germany and Department for Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck 23562 (Germany); Harder, D. [Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg-August-University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany)] [Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg-August-University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is the correction of the lateral scanner artifact, i.e., the effect that, on a large homogeneously exposed EBT3 film, a flatbed scanner measures different optical densities at different positions along thex axis, the axis parallel to the elongated light source. At constant dose, the measured optical densitiy profiles along this axis have a parabolic shape with significant dose dependent curvature. Therefore, the effect is shortly called the parabola effect. The objective of the algorithm developed in this study is to correct for the parabola effect. Any optical density measured at given position x is transformed into the equivalent optical density c at the apex of the parabola and then converted into the corresponding dose via the calibration of c versus dose. Methods: For the present study EBT3 films and an Epson 10000XL scanner including transparency unit were used for the analysis of the parabola effect. The films were irradiated with 6 MV photons from an Elekta Synergy accelerator in a RW3 slab phantom. In order to quantify the effect, ten film pieces with doses graded from 0 to 20.9 Gy were sequentially scanned at eight positions along thex axis and at six positions along the z axis (the movement direction of the light source) both for the portrait and landscape film orientations. In order to test the effectiveness of the new correction algorithm, the dose profiles of an open square field and an IMRT plan were measured by EBT3 films and compared with ionization chamber and ionization chamber array measurement. Results: The parabola effect has been numerically studied over the whole measuring field of the Epson 10000XL scanner for doses up to 20.9 Gy and for both film orientations. The presented algorithm transforms any optical density at positionx into the equivalent optical density that would be measured at the same dose at the apex of the parabola. This correction method has been validated up to doses of 5.2 Gy all over the scanner bed with 2D dose distributions of an open square photon field and an IMRT distribution. Conclusions: The algorithm presented in this study quantifies and corrects the parabola effect of EBT3 films scanned in commonly used commercial flatbed scanners at doses up to 5.2 Gy. It is easy to implement, and no additional work steps are necessary in daily routine film dosimetry.

  17. Utilizing a simple CT dosimetry phantom for the comprehension of the operational characteristics of CT AEC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A. [Medical Physics Department, Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens “Agios Savvas,” 171 Alexandras Avenue, 115 22 Athens (Greece)] [Medical Physics Department, Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens “Agios Savvas,” 171 Alexandras Avenue, 115 22 Athens (Greece); Varsamidis, Athanasios; Thalassinou, Stella; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P. [Second Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Athens, University General Hospital, “Attikon,” Rimini 1, 124 62 Athens (Greece)] [Second Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Athens, University General Hospital, “Attikon,” Rimini 1, 124 62 Athens (Greece)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the nested polymethylacrylate (PMMA) phantom (which is available in many CT facilities for CTDI measurements), as a tool for the presentation and comparison of the ways that two different CT automatic exposure control (AEC) systems respond to a phantom when various scan parameters and AEC protocols are modified.Methods: By offsetting the two phantom's components (the head phantom and the body ring) half-way along their longitudinal axis, a phantom with three sections of different x-ray attenuation was created. Scan projection radiographs (SPRs) and helical scans of the three-section phantom were performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 and a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanners, with different scan parameter selections [scan direction, pitch factor, slice thickness, and reconstruction interval (ST/RI), AEC protocol, and tube potential used for the SPRs]. The dose length product (DLP) values of each scan were recorded and the tube current (mA) values of the reconstructed CT images were plotted against the respective Z-axis positions on the phantom. Furthermore, measurements of the noise levels at the center of each phantom section were performed to assess the impact of mA modulation on image quality.Results: The mA modulation patterns of the two CT scanners were very dissimilar. The mA variations were more pronounced for Aquilion 64, where changes in any of the aforementioned scan parameters affected both the mA modulations curves and DLP values. However, the noise levels were affected only by changes in pitch, ST/RI, and AEC protocol selections. For Brilliance 64, changes in pitch affected the mA modulation curves but not the DLP values, whereas only AEC protocol and SPR tube potential selection variations affected both the mA modulation curves and DLP values. The noise levels increased for smaller ST/RI, larger weight category AEC protocol, and larger SPR tube potential selection.Conclusions: The nested PMMA dosimetry phantom can be effectively utilized for the comprehension of CT AEC systems performance and the way that different scan conditions affect the mA modulation patterns, DLP values, and image noise. However, in depth analysis of the reasons why these two systems exhibited such different behaviors in response to the same phantom requires further investigation which is beyond the scope of this study.

  18. Fast magnetic response in gigahertz-band for columnar-structured Fe nanoparticle assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, T., E-mail: tomoyuki@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Tate, R. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kura, H. [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Oikawa, T.; Hata, K. [Samsung R and D Institute Japan Co., Ltd., 2-7 Sugasawa-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0027 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High density Fe-based ferromagnetic nanoparticle (NP) assembly is expected to have unique magnetic properties, such as superferromagnetism and super-spin-glass, different from magnetically isolated NP systems due to strong dipole interactions among the NPs. A high dipole interaction field, H{sub dip}, of ?3.5 kOe can result in a high effective internal field to the magnetic moment of the NP, expecting for ultra-fast magnetic response, that is, a high magnetic resonance frequency, f{sub r}, of ?10 GHz. However, for a simply molded Fe NP assembly, a low f{sub r} was observed due to inhomogeneous distribution of the internal field, implying the necessity of a unidirectional state of H{sub dip} for higher f{sub r}. In this study, we fabricated a columnar Fe NP assembly for realizing the unidirectional state of H{sub dip} by applying our uniquely developed external field-induced agglomeration method for monodispersed Fe NPs (13 nm in average size) as a function of the field (0–30 kOe) and volume fraction of the Fe NPs (0.5%–51%) in a polymer matrix with dimensions of 4 mm × 4 mm × 0.7 mm{sup t}. A columnar-structured Fe NP assembly was successfully achieved along an in-plane direction (defined as the x-axis) under optimized conditions. From static magnetization curves, induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy was observed according to the shape of the columnar structure of the Fe NP assembly, where easy and hard axes of magnetization were realized along the parallel (x-axis) and normal directions (in-plane y-axis and z-axis in the thickness direction) to the external field during the process, respectively. Interestingly, this fabricated columnar-structured Fe NP assembly exhibited very high f{sub r} in the range from 3 to 11 GHz judging from the complex susceptibility spectra obtained. The f{sub r} values were well-scaled by a modified Snoek's-limit-law using demagnetization factors quantitatively estimated from the static magnetization curves. Thus, shape-induced anisotropy originating from the unidirectional state of H{sub dip} in the columnar structure of the Fe NP assembly plays an important role for high frequency magnetic response in the GHz-band.

  19. Engineering scale demonstration of a prospective Cast Stone process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Fowley, M.; Hansen, E.; Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Williams, M.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an engineering-scale demonstration with non-radioactive simulants that was performed at SRNL using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. Over three days, the SCPF was used to fill a 1600 gallon container, staged outside the facility, with simulated Cast Stone grout. The container, staged outside the building approximately 60 ft from the SCPF, was instrumented with x-, y-, and z-axis thermocouples to monitor curing temperature. The container was also fitted with two formed core sampling vials. For the operation, the targeted grout production rate was 1.5 gpm. This required a salt solution flow rate of approximately 1 gpm and a premix feed rate of approximately 580 lb/h. During the final day of operation, the dry feed rate was increased to evaluate the ability of the system to handle increased throughput. Although non-steady state operational periods created free surface liquids, no bleed water was observed either before or after operations. The final surface slope at a fill height of 39.5 inches was 1-1.5 inches across the 8.5 foot diameter container, highest at the final fill point and lowest diametrically opposed to the fill point. During processing, grout was collected in cylindrical containers from both the mixer discharge and the discharge into the container. These samples were stored in a humid environment either in a closed box proximal to the container or inside the laboratory. Additional samples collected at these sampling points were analyzed for rheological properties and density. Both the rheological properties (plastic viscosity and yield strength) and density were consistent with previous and later SCPF runs.

  20. Stable pseudoanalytical computation of electromagnetic fields from arbitrarily-oriented dipoles in cylindrically stratified media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Moon; F. L. Teixeira; B. Donderici

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Computation of electromagnetic fields due to point sources (Hertzian dipoles) in cylindrically stratified media is a classical problem for which analytical expressions of the associated tensor Green's function have been long known. However, under finite-precision arithmetic, direct numerical computations based on the application of such analytical (canonical) expressions invariably lead to underflow and overflow problems related to the poor scaling of the eigenfunctions (cylindrical Bessel and Hankel functions) for extreme arguments and/or high-order, as well as convergence problems related to the numerical integration over the spectral wavenumber and to the truncation of the infinite series over the azimuth mode number. These problems are exacerbated when a disparate range of values is to be considered for the layers' thicknesses and material properties (resistivities, permittivities, and permeabilities), the transverse and longitudinal distances between source and observation points, as well as the source frequency. To overcome these challenges in a systematic fashion, we introduce herein different sets of range-conditioned, modified cylindrical functions (in lieu of standard cylindrical eigenfunctions), each associated with non-overlapped subdomains of (numerical) evaluation to allow for stable computations under any range of physical parameters. In addition adaptively-chosen integration contours are employed in the complex spectral wavenumber plane to ensure convergent numerical integration in all cases. We illustrate the application of the algorithm to problems of geophysical interest involving layer resistivities ranging from 1000 $\\Omega \\cdot$m to 10$^{-8} \\Omega \\cdot$m, frequencies of operation ranging from 10 MHz down to the low magnetotelluric range of 0.01 Hz, and for various combinations of layer thicknesses.

  1. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  2. The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

  3. A new 3D parallel high resolution electromagnetic nonlinear inversion based on new global magnetic integral and local differential decomposition (GILD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, G.; Li, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new 3D electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm is presented based on global integral and local differential equations decomposition (GILD). The GILD parallel nonlinear inversion algorithm consists of five parts: (1) the domain is decomposed into subdomain SI and subdomain SII; (2) a new global magnetic integral equation in SI and the local magnetic differential equations IN SII will be used together to obtain the magnetic field in the modeling step; (3) the new global magnetic integral Jacobian equation in SI and the local magnetic differential Jacobian equations in SII will be used together to update the electric conductivity and permittivity from the magnetic field data in the inversion step; (4) the subdomain SII can naturally and uniformly be decomposed into 2{sup n} smaller sub-cubic-domains; the sparse matrix in each sub-cubic-domain can be eliminated separately, in parallel; (5) a new parallel multiple hierarchy substructure algorithm will be used to solve the smaller full matrices in SI, in parallel. The applications of the new 3D parallel GILD EM modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm and software are: (1) to create high resolution controlled-source electric conductivity and permittivity imaging for interpreting electromagnetic field data acquired from cross hole, surface to borehole, surface to surface, single hole, and multiple holes; (2) to create the magnetotelluric high resolution imaging from the surface impedance and field data. The new GILD parallel nonlinear inversion will be a 3D/2.5D powerful imaging tool for the oil geophysical exploration and environmental remediation and monitoring.

  4. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  5. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  6. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  7. Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this sedimentary section is sand-rich, suggesting good potential for a sediment-hosted geothermal reservoir in porous sands, similar to other fields in the region such as Heber and East Mesa. Sand porosity may remain higher in the eastern portion of the low resistivity zone. This is based on its location hydrologically downstream of the probable area of thermal upwelling, intense fracture development, and associated pore-filling hydrothermal mineral deposition to the west.

  8. Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of “blind” geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the “Best Geophysics Paper” at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the fault zones is constrained by geological, drilling, and geothermal production data. The objective is to determine interpretation techniques for evaluating structural controls of fluid circulation in hydrothermal systems. The conclusions are: • directions of MT polarization and anisotropy and MEQ S-splitting correlate. Polarization and anisotropy are caused by fluid filled fractures at the base of the clay cap. •Microearthquakes occur mainly on the boundary of low resistivity within the fracture zone and high resistivity in the host rock. Resistivity is lowest within the core of the fracture zone and increases towards the margins of the fracture zone. The heat source and the clay cap for the hydrothermal have very low resistivity of less than 5?m. •Fracture porosity imaged by resistivity indicates that it varies between 45-5% with most between 10-20%, comparable to values from core samples in volcanic areas in Kenya and Iceland. For resistivity values above 60?m, the porosity reduces drastically and therefore this might be used as the upper limit for modeling fracture porosity from resistivity. When resistivity is lower than 5?m, the modeled fracture porosity increases drastically indicating that this is the low resistivity limit. This is because at very low resistivity in the heat source and the clay cap, the resistivity is dominated by ionic conduction rather than fracture porosity. •Microearthquakes occur mainly above the heat source which is defined by low resistivity at a depth of 3-4.5 km at the Krafla hydrothermal system and 4-7 km in the Longonot hydrothermal system. •Conversions of S to P waves occur for microearthquakes located above the heat source within the hydrothermal system. Shallow microearthquakes occur mainly in areas that show both MT and S-wave anisotropy. •S-wave splitting and MT anisotropy occurs at the base of the clay cap and therefore reflects the variations in fracture porosity on top of the hydrothermal system. •In the Krafla hydrothermal system in Iceland, both MT polarization and MEQ splitting directions align with

  9. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodology calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal system in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. The overall project area is 2500km2 with the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) being about 170km2. The project was subdivided into five tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data; (2) design and populate a GIS database; (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area at 0.5km intervals to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km; (4) collect new geophysical and geochemical data, and (5) repeat Task 3 for the enhanced (baseline + new ) data. Favorability maps were based on the integrated assessment of the three critical EGS exploration parameters of interest: rock type, temperature and stress. A complimentary trust map was generated to compliment the favorability maps to graphically illustrate the cumulative confidence in the data used in the favorability mapping. The Final Scientific Report (FSR) is submitted in two parts with Part I describing the results of project Tasks 1 through 3 and Part II covering the results of project Tasks 4 through 5 plus answering nine questions posed in the proposal for the overall project. FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  10. A Preliminary Analysis of Dose Rates Associated with ITER CVCS Equipment/Area Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blakeman, Edward D [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary analysis of the ITER Chemical and Volume Control System (CVCS) Area was performed to assess dose rates outside the walls and ceiling of the facility after 1.5 years of operation at shutdown, 2 days, and 10 days after shutdown. For this purpose a simplified Monte Carlo computer model was developed using the MCNP (MCNP5 Ver. 1.51) code. Two components are included: the smaller filter tank and the larger ion exchanger. These pieces of equipment are associated with the Integrated Blanket ELM Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System, which will have the largest dose rates associated with activated corrosion products during operation in comparison with other systems. The ion exchanger contained two source regions, a 1.2-m-thick resin bed above a 0.55 m-thick skirt, and a 0.8-m-thick water region. The filter constituted an additional source. Thus the model consisted of three sources (filter, resin, water), homogeneously distributed within the appropriate source regions. However, much of the results (that address individual isotopes) are presented with the two sources in the ion exchanger combined. In these cases the sources are referred to as the 'ion exchanger source' and the 'filter source.' Dimensions for the facility and components, as well as source isotopes and strengths, and material densities, were supplied by US ITER. Because of its simplification, the model does not contain pipes. Consequently, radiation streaming through pipe penetrations, radiation emanating from the pipes, and shielding from the pipes were not considered in this analysis. Dose rates on the outside of two walls and the ceiling were calculated. The two walls are labeled as the 'long' wall (aligned with the X-axis) and the 'short' wall (aligned with the Y-axis). These walls and ceiling were nominally set to 30-cm-thick concrete. In the original analysis, standard concrete (2.3 g/cc density) was used. In addition to the shielding walls/ceiling, a floor and an additional wall opposite the long wall were added for photon scattering contributions. These were both 10-cm-thick, standard concrete structures. Other components (tanks, pipes, etc.), that were not included in the model, would potentially add additional scattering and shielding. Possibly these additional effects will be addressed in a later, more detailed analysis. The room was 29.6 m in length (X-axis), but was limited to 15 m in the model. The inside width (Y axis) and height (Z axis) were 4 m and 3.4 m, respectively. The origin for the model was located inside the room at the corner opposite the long wall and adjacent to the short wall at the floor level. The room was filled with air at standard temperature and pressure. The stainless steel (SS304) wall thicknesses for the ion exchanger and filter were 2.2 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. The axial center of the filter was located 140 cm from the short wall and 100 cm from the long wall (outer surface). The axial center of the ion exchanger was located 440 cm from the short wall and 250 cm from the long wall (inner surface). The resin was assumed to be a homogeneous mixture of equal atom density fractions of hydrogen and carbon* at a specified density of 1.136 g/cc. The filter material was assumed to be homogeneous carbon at a specified density of 1.8 g/cc. If the filter media were stainless steel and the accumulated activity were the same, the dose rate outside the filter would be lower, provided the density of the stainless steel sintered filter material is significantly higher than 1.8g/cc. The densities of the water and air were assumed to be 1.0 g/cc and 1.096E-3 g/cc, respectively. The model included 10 small volumes placed outside the model adjacent to the wall at locations where the dose rates were expected to be highest and which showed to a degree the fall-off of the dose rate with distance along a particular wall or ceiling. These 'tally cells' are shown in Fig. 2 and are described in Table 1. Each cell had dimensions of 50 cm x 50 cm x 1 cm and was oriented so that the 1-cm-thick dimension was perpendicular to the wall again