Sample records for magnetic resonance imaging

  1. Chapter 20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and software training from Siemens Medical Solutions; research funding through the Siemens-MIT Alliance and Technology (HST). 2 Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany. #12;Chapter 20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Siemens Medical Solutions, Siemens-MIT Alliance, HST Martinos Catalyst Fund. Project Staff: Audrey P. Fan

  2. Single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDougall, Mary Preston

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The dramatic improvement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan time over the past fifteen years through gradient-based methods that sample k-space more efficiently and quickly cannot be sustained, as thresholds regarding hardware and safety...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold Flooding During Continuous Fuel Cell Operation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of self-assembled biomaterial scaffolds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bull, Steve R; Meade, Thomas J; Stupp, Samuel I

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and/or mixtures comprising peptide amphiphile compounds comprising one or more contrast agents, as can be used in a range of magnetic resonance imaging applications.

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging using parallel transmission at 7T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagoski, Borjan Aleksandar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), also known as phase-encoded (PE) chemical shift imaging (CSI), suffers from both low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the brain metabolites, as well as inflexible ...

  6. Microfluidically Cryo-Cooled Planar Coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Chiwan

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically required for higher resolution and faster speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Planar microcoils as receiver probes in MRI systems offer the potential to be configured into array elements for fast...

  7. RF Pulse Design for Parallel Excitation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yinan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel excitation is an emerging technique to improve or accelerate multi-dimensional spatially selective excitations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using multi-channel transmit arrays. The technique has potential in many applications...

  8. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-parameter computational model is proposed for the study of the regional motion of the left ventricle (LV) wall using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) data. In this model, the LV wall motion is mathematically ...

  9. Improvements in magnetic resonance imaging excitation pulse design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelinski, Adam Charles

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the design of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radio-frequency (RF) excitation pulses, and its primary contributions are made through connections with the novel multiple-system single-output (MSSO) ...

  10. Instrumentation for parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David Gerald

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    of the art of parallel MR imaging. First, a low-cost desktop MR scanner was developed (2.54 cm fields-of view) at low magnetic field strengths (25 T). The performance of the prototype was verified through bench...

  11. Original Research In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorassini, Monica

    Original Research In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Cervical Spinal Cord at 3 Tesla is feasible at 3 T. Key Words: MRI; 3 Tesla; cervical spinal cord; gradient echo; gray matter; white matter J, and pulsatile flow (9,10). Deficits in motor and sensory function from damage to the spinal cord are mainly due

  12. Original Research Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Trans-Septal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    vasculature. Key Words: interventional; magnetic resonance imaging; trans-septal catheterization; cardiac; MR with a pigtail catheter in the aorta and the use of His bundle/coronary sinus catheters (1), and, more recently from a percutaneous femoral vein ap- proach. MATERIALS AND METHODS Animal Model The Institutional

  13. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kehayias, J.J.; Joel, D.D.; Adams, W.H.; Stein, H.L.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D/sub 2/O in a solution with water.

  14. Portable low-cost magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as intensive care units (ICUs), physician ...

  15. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging: characterization and comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rane, Swati Dnyandeo

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [Sodickson, 1997], GRAPPA [Griswold, 2002] and SPACE RIP [Kyriakos, 2000]; developed in the past decade have been studied, simulated and compared in this research. Because of the dependence of the parallel imaging methods on numerous factors such as receiver...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging 1 A new global optimization algorithm and its application to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging 1 A new global optimization algorithm and its application to a Magnetic-cost, low-field multipolar magnet for Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a high field uniformity, the proposed method em- ploys, as local search engine, a derivative free procedure. Under reasonable

  17. White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic resonance imaging findings and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic to evaluate white matter architecture after preterm birth. The goals were (1) to compare white matter if sex, gestational age, birth- weight, white matter injury score from conventional magnetic resonance

  18. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yanle, E-mail: yhu@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  19. On the dynamics of magnetic fluids in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamics of magnetic fluids, often termed ferrofluids, has been an active area of research since the mid 1960s. However, it is only in the past twenty years that these fluids have begun to be used in magnetic ...

  20. A REAL TIME 3D VISUALIZATION PROTOTYPE FOR INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Heidrun

    A REAL TIME 3D VISUALIZATION PROTOTYPE FOR INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING JENS FISCHER.weiss@pfh.research.philips.com HEIDRUN SCHUMANN University of Rostock, Computer Science Department, D­18051 Rostock,Germany schumann radiologists during invasive and non­invasive magnetic resonance imaging. We use pre­acquired and real time

  1. Application of Parallel Imaging to Murine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chieh-Wei 1980-

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    . This dissertation describes foundational level work to enable parallel imaging of mice on a 4.7 Tesla/40 cm bore research scanner. Reducing the size of the hardware setup associated with typical parallel imaging was an integral part of achieving the work, as animal...

  2. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  3. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraus, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

  4. Accelerating magnetic resonance imaging by unifying sparse models and multiple receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weller, Daniel (Daniel Stuart)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an increasingly versatile diagnostic tool for a variety of medical purposes. During a conventional MRI scan, samples are acquired along a trajectory in the spatial Fourier transform ...

  5. Highly Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Fourth Gradient Channel for Compensation of RF Phase Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosshard, John 1983-

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A fourth gradient channel was implemented to provide slice dependent RF coil phase compensation for arrays in dual-sided or "sandwich" configurations. The use of highly parallel arrays for single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging allows...

  6. An iterative technique for refinement of selective excitations for magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebsack, Eliot Todd

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective RF pulses are needed or many application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The desired excitation profile is omen used as the spectrum of the applied RF pulse; the modulation waveform of the RF pulse which approximately excites...

  7. T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging used to detect coagulative necrosis in tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Hyfte, John Bruce

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to prevent unnecessary collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. This research focuses on using T2*-weighted FLASH magnetic resonance imaging to detect irreversible changes in i . n vitro bovine liver tissue and tissuesimulating polyacrylamide gel...

  8. Eight-Channel Head Array and Control System for Parallel Transmit/Receive Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Katherine

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high fields strengths (3 Tesla and above) is driven by the associated improvements in signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution. In practice, however, technical challenges prevent these benefits...

  9. A 16-Channel Receive Array Insert for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast at 7T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    By, Samantha

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among females in the United States. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful tool for detecting and evaluating the disease, with notable advantages over other modalities...

  10. HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollub, Randy L.

    This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge ...

  11. Multimodal neuroimaging with simultaneous electroencephalogram and high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdon, Patrick L. (Patrick Lee), 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) is an important emerging tool in functional neuroimaging with the potential to reveal new mechanisms for brain function ...

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with 2D spectroscopy for the detection of brain metabolites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kok, Trina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) derives its signal from protons in water, additional biochemical compounds are detectable in vivo within the proton spectrum. The detection and mapping of these much weaker signals ...

  13. The development of magnetic resonance imaging for the determination of porosity in reservoir core samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Byron Blake

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR THE DETERMINATION OF POROSITY IN RESERVOIR CORE SAMPLES A Thesis by BYRON BLAKE SHERMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR THE DETERMINATION OF POROSITY IN RESERVOIR CORE SAMPLES A Thesis by BYRON BLAKE SHERMAN Approved...

  14. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandava, Shanthi Sree

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY TO FLUIDS IN POROUS MEDIA A Thesis by SHANTHI SREE MANDAVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY TO FLUIDS IN POROUS MEDIA A Thesis by SHANTHI SREE MANDAVA Approved as to style and content by: A. Ted...

  15. Abstract-In this study, imaging of electrical current density in conducting objects, which contain nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyüboðlu, Murat

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active nuclei is planned using 0.15T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI at each cycle within the object. The applied current pulse creates a measurable magnetic flux density. The component of magnetic flux density parallel to the main magnetic field accumulates an additional phase

  16. Identification of breast calcification using magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatemi-Ardekani, Ali; Boylan, Colm; Noseworthy, Michael D. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Centre, Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Diagnostic Imaging, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Imaging Research Centre, Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Diagnostic Imaging, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5 (Canada) and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MRI phase and magnitude images provide information about local magnetic field variation ({Delta}B{sub 0}), which can consequently be used to understand tissue properties. Often, phase information is discarded. However, corrected phase images are able to produce contrast as a result of magnetic susceptibility differences and local field inhomogeneities due to the presence of diamagnetic and paramagnetic substances. Three-dimensional (3D) susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) can be used to probe changes in MRI phase evolution and, subsequently, result in an alternate form of contrast between tissues. For example, SWI has been useful in the assessment of negative phase induced {Delta}B{sub 0} modulation due to the presence of paramagnetic substances such as iron. Very little, however, has been done to assess positive phase induced contrast changes resulting from the presence of diamagnetic substances such as precipitated calcium. As ductal carcinoma in situ, which is the precursor of invasive ductal cancer, is often associated with breast microcalcification, the authors proposed using SWI as a possible visualization technique. In this study, breast phantoms containing calcifications (0.4-1.5 mm) were imaged using mammography, computed tomography (CT), and SWI. Corrected phase and magnitude images acquired using SWI allowed identification and correlation of all calcifications seen on CT. As the approach is a 3D technique, it could potentially allow for more accurate localization and biopsy and maybe even reduce the use of gadolinium contrast. Furthermore, the approach may be beneficial to women with dense breast tissue where the ability to detect microcalcification with mammography is reduced.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  18. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Mosher, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  19. Simultaneous Electroencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of General Anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdon, Patrick Lee

    It has been long appreciated that anesthetic drugs induce stereotyped changes in electroencephalogram (EEG), but the relationships between the EEG and underlying brain function remain poorly understood. Functional imaging ...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials entails numerous problems from short longitudinal relaxation (T2) times to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    . Solid-State STRAFI NMR Probe for Material Imaging of Quadrupolar Nuclei, J. Magn. Reson. httpMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials entails numerous problems from short for broadband tuning, sample translation along z-axis, and electrodes for in situ battery studies. An Alderman

  1. Evaluation of Hydatid Disease of the Heart with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotoulas, Grigoris K.; Magoufis, George L.; Gouliamos, Athanasios D.; Athanassopoulou, Alexandra K.; Roussakis, Arcadios C.; Koulocheri, Dimitra P.; Kalovidouris, Angelos; Vlahos, Labros [Department of Radiology, CT-MRI Unit, Areteion Hospital, University of Athens, 76 Vas. Sophias Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece)

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two patients with cardiac involvement of hydatid disease are presented: one with hydatid cyst of the interventricular septum and pulmonary arteries and the other with multiple pulmonary cysts associated with intracardiac and pericardial cysts. The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide a global view of cardiac anatomy in any plane with high contrast between flowing blood and soft tissue ensures it an important role in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of hydatid disease of the heart.

  2. Directed evolution of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for noninvasive imaging of dopamine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    The development of molecular probes that allow in vivo imaging of neural signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution remains challenging. Here we applied directed evolution techniques to create magnetic ...

  3. GPU-accelerated denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howison, Mark; Wes Bethel, E.

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The raw computational power of GPU accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. In practice, applying these filtering operations requires setting multiple parameters. This study was designed to provide better guidance to practitioners for choosing the most appropriate parameters by answering two questions: what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? And what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? To answer the first question, we use two different metrics, mean squared error (MSE) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM), to compare denoising quality against a reference image. Surprisingly, the best improvement in structural similarity with the bilateral filter is achieved with a small stencil size that lies within the range of real-time execution on an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU. Moreover, inappropriate choices for parameters, especially scaling parameters, can yield very poor denoising performance. To answer the second question, we perform an autotuning study to empirically determine optimal memory tiling on the GPU. The variation in these results suggests that such tuning is an essential step in achieving real-time performance. These results have important implications for the real-time application of denoising to MR images in clinical settings that require fast turn-around times.

  4. Construction of a two-parameter empirical model of left ventricle wall motion using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jack J; Alenezy, Mohammed D.; Smirnova, Irina V.; Bilgen, Mehmet

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    visualized using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) covering the contraction and relaxation phases. Based on the characteristics of the overall dynamics of the LV wall, its motion was represented by a combination of two components - radial...

  5. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 {micro}T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz{sup -1/2} referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm{sup 3} resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm{sup 3} images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm{sup 3} in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T{sub 1}) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T{sub 1} of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissue differ significantly at 132 {micro}T. A single-sided MRI system designed for prostate imaging could achieve 3 x 3 x 5 mm{sup 3} resolution in 8 minutes. Existing SQUID-based magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems could be used as microtesla MRI detectors. A commercial 275-channel MEG system could acquire 6-minute brain images with (4 mm){sup 3} resolution and SNR 16.

  6. A 64-channel personal computer based image reconstruction system and applications in single echo acquisition magnetic resonance elastography and ultra-fast magnetic resonance imaging.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yallapragada, Naresh

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , this value is 2? x 42.5759 MHz/Tesla. This translates to a Larmor frequency of 200.238 MHz for the 4.7T magnet situated in the Magnetic Resonance Systems Lab (MRSL). In the presence of the static ????the proton population aligns itself according...

  7. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  8. Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of green-state ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N.; Ford, J.M.; Raptis, A.C.; Ellingson, W.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rizo, P. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France). Lab. d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Informatique); Tracey, D.M.; Pujari, V.K. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective is the development of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques and technology applicable to the nondestructive characterization of green-state ceramics. To this end, a three-dimensional (3-D) NMR imaging technique has been developed, based on a back-projection acquisition protocol in combination with image reconstruction techniques that are based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. The method incorporates the experimental flexibility to overcome many of the difficulties associated with imaging of solid and semisolid broad-line materials, and also provides contiguously sampled data in three dimensions. This technique has been evaluated as a nondestructive characterizauon method for determining the spatial distribution of organic additves in green-state injection-molded cylindrical Si{sub 3}N{sup 4} tensile specimens. The technique has been evaluated on the basis of providing moderate image resolution over large sample volumes, high resolution over smaller specimen volumes, and sensitivity to variations in the concentration of organics. Resolution of 200{mu}m has been obtained with excellent sensitivity to concentration. A detailed account of the 3-D imaging results obtained from the study, a discussion of the difficulties and limitations of the imaging technique, and suggestions for technique and system improvements are included.

  9. K-space reconstruction of magnetic resonance inverse imaging (K-InI) of human visuomotor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MRI InI Visual MRI Neuroimaging K-InI Inverse solution MEG EEG Electroencephalography channels of a radio-frequency coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) can achieve ultra. Mathematically, the InI reconstruction is a generalization of parallel MRI (pMRI), which includes image space

  10. Preliminary tests using magnetic resonance imaging of two-phase flow patterns and transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Lafi, A.Y. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Saloner, D. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of preliminary tests used to establish the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine and quantitatively characterize two-phase flow patterns and flow transitions. These tests were performed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine MRI Center as a collaborative research effort with Oregon State University (OSU). Special scanning sequences designed by UCSF for flow imaging were implemented in the tests. UCSF operated the MRI facility, and OSU constructed and operated a cocurrent air-water flow loop consisting of a 1-in.-diam test section capable of producing air superficial velocities j[sub g] ranging from 0.3 to 14 m/s, and water superficial velocities j[sub l] ranging from 0.08 to 1.3 m/s.

  11. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, B.deB. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  12. A 200-MHz fully-differential CMOS front-end with an on-chip inductor for magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala, Julio Enqrique, II

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200-MHZ FULLY-DIFFERENTIAL CMOS FRONT-END WITH AN ON-CHIP INDUCTOR FOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING A Thesis by JULIO ENRIQUE AYALA II Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2005 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering A 200-MHZ FULLY-DIFFERENTIAL CMOS FRONT-END WITH AN ON-CHIP INDUCTOR FOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING A Thesis by JULIO ENRIQUE AYALA II Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  13. Pulmonary Hemorrhage: Imaging with a New Magnetic Resonance Blood Pool Agent in Conjunction with Breathheld Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Schmidt, Michaela; Debatin, Joerg F. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe the three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA) imaging appearance of the pulmonary arteries following administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent to human volunteers, and to demonstrate in an animal model (pigs) how this technique can be used to detect pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage. Methods: Two volunteers were examined following the intravenous administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent (NC100150 Injection, Nycomed Amersham Imaging, Wayne, PA, USA). T1-weighted 3D gradient recalled echo (GRE) image sets (TR/TE 5.1/1.4 msec, flip angle 30 deg.) were acquired breathheld over 24 sec. To assess the detectability of pulmonary bleeding with intravascular MR contrast, pulmonary parenchymal injuries were created in two animals under general anesthesia, and fast T1-weighted 3D GRE image sets collected before and after the injury. Results: Administration of the intravascular contrast in the two volunteers resulted in selective enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature permitting complete visualization and excellent delineation of central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Following iatrogenic injury in the two animals, pulmonary hemorrhage was readily detected on the 3D image sets. Conclusion: The data presented illustrate that ultrafast 3D GRE MR imaging in conjunction with an intravenously administered intravascular blood pool agent can be used to perform high-quality pulmonary MRA as well as to detect pulmonary hemorrhage.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fukushima, Eiichi (Los Alamos, NM); Roeder, Stephen B. W. (La Mesa, CA); Assink, Roger A. (Albuquerque, NM); Gibson, Atholl A. V. (Bryan, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  15. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada) [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  16. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Sears, Jr., Jesse A. (Kennewick, WA); Hoyt, David W. (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA)

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  17. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  18. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which could aid in individualizing therapy, particularly for patients at risk for liver injury after RT.

  19. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 20-year Survivors of Mediastinal Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad [Department of Radiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Breunig, Margret; Stoerk, Stefan; Angermann, Christiane [Department of Cardiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Seufert, Ines; Schwab, Franz; Koelbl, Oliver; Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Vordermark, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.vordermark@medizin.uni-halle.d [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The recognition of the true prevalence of cardiac toxicity after mediastinal radiotherapy requires very long follow-up and a precise diagnostic procedure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits excellent quantification of cardiac function and identification of localized myocardial defects and has now been applied to a group of 20-year Hodgkin's disease survivors. Methods and materials: Of 143 patients treated with anterior mediastinal radiotherapy (cobalt-60, median prescribed dose 40 Gy) for Hodgkin's disease between 1978 and 1985, all 53 survivors were invited for cardiac MRI. Of those, 36 patients (68%) presented for MRI, and in 31 patients (58%) MRI could be performed 20-28 years (median, 24) after radiotherapy. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5-T MRI: transversal T1-weighted TSE and T2-weighted half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, a steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine sequence in the short heart axis and in the four-chamber view, SSFP perfusion sequences under rest and adenosine stress, and a SSFP inversion recovery sequence for late enhancement. The MRI findings were correlated with previously reconstructed doses to cardiac structures. Results: Clinical characteristics and reconstructed doses were not significantly different between survivors undergoing and not undergoing MRI. Pathologic findings were reduced left ventricular function (ejection fraction <55%) in 7 (23%) patients, hemodynamically relevant valvular dysfunction in 13 (42%), late myocardial enhancement in 9 (29%), and any perfusion deficit in 21 (68%). An association of regional pathologic changes and reconstructed dose to cardiac structures could not be established. Conclusions: In 20-year survivors of Hodgkin's disease, cardiac MRI detects pathologic findings in approximately 70% of patients. Cardiac MRI has a potential role in cardiac imaging of Hodgkin's disease patients after mediastinal radiotherapy.

  20. Fast and contrast-enhanced phase-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Jong Bum

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    two signals if the resonance frequencies are close. For example, in MR mammography, it is difficult to separate silicone breast implants signals (4.0 ppm) from fat signals (3.5 ppm); (2) the signal dynamic range of images acquired using Dixon...

  1. Automatic Landmarking of Magnetic Resonance brain Images Camille Izard*a,b, Bruno M. Jedynaka,b and Craig E.L. Starkc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedynak, Bruno M.

    Automatic Landmarking of Magnetic Resonance brain Images Camille Izard*a,b, Bruno M. JedynakaDepartment of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD ABSTRACT Landmarking MR images is crucial in registering brain structures from different images. It consists in locating the voxel

  2. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, William G., E-mail: bp1@bu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hindson, David F. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Langmore, Susan E. [Department of Otolaryngology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Otolaryngology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Speech and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zumwalt, Ann C. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions: Muscles of both the suprahyoid and the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle groups are active in swallowing, and both swallowing exercises effectively target muscles elevating the hyolaryngeal complex. mfMRI is useful in testing swallowing muscle function.

  3. Fiber-Optic Stethoscope: A Cardiac Monitoring and Gating System for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the distortion of the ECG due to electromagnetic interference

  4. Optically Enhanced Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suter, Dieter

    , like spatial structures or molecular dynamics. While the direct excitation of nuclear spin transitions.1 Motivation The physical mechanism of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the excitation of transitions light for polarizing the spin system or for observing its dynamics. This possibility arises from

  5. Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 286 (2005) 324328 Light-free magnetic resonance force microscopy for studies of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 286 (2005) 324­328 Light-free magnetic resonance force for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD, USA Available online 4 November 2004 Abstract Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a scanned probe technique capable of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Its

  6. Assessment of Wall Shear Stress Changes in Arteries and Veins of Arteriovenous Polytetrafluoroethylene Grafts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Sanjay, E-mail: Misra.sanjay@mayo.edu; Woodrum, David A. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Homburger, Jay [Medical College of Georgia, Department of Vascular Surgery (United States); Elkouri, Stephane [Centre Hospitalier de I'Universite de Montreal, Department of Vascular Surgery (Canada); Mandrekar, Jayawant N. [Mayo Clinic, Division of Biostatistics (United States); Barocas, Victor [University of Minnesota, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Glockner, James F. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Rajan, Dheeraj K. [Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada); Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata [Mayo Clinic, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to determine simultaneously the temporal changes in luminal vessel area, blood flow, and wall shear stress (WSS) in both the anastomosed artery (AA) and vein (AV) of arteriovenous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. PTFE grafts were placed from the iliac artery to the ipsilateral iliac vein in 12 castrated juvenile male pigs. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiograpgy with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging was performed. Luminal vessel area, blood flow, and WSS in the aorta, AA, AV, and inferior vena cava were determined at 3 days (D3), 7 days (D7), and 14 days (D14) after graft placement. Elastin von Gieson staining of the AV was performed. The average WSS of the AA was highest at D3 and then decreased by D7 and D14. In contrast, the average WSS and intima-to-media ratio of the AV increased from D3 to D7 and peaked by D14. Similarly, the average area of the AA was highest by D7 and began to approximate the control artery by D14. The average area of the AV had decreased to its lowest by D7. High blood flows through the AA causes a decrease in average WSS and increase in the average luminal vessel area, whereas at the AV, the average WSS and intima-to-media ratio both increase while the average luminal vessel area decreases.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  8. arthritis magnetic resonance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the distortion of the ECG due to electromagnetic interference cardiac activity that, unlike the ECG, is immune to electromagnetic...

  9. Prediction of the reversibility of the ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using passive cavitation detection with magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    cavitation detection with magnetic resonance imaging validation Tao Sun1 , Gesthimani Samiotaki1 and Elisa E (diameters: 1-2, 4-5, or 6-8 m). A 10-MHz passive cavitation detector was used to acquire cavitation signals that the stable cavitation dose increased with the number of days required for closing while it reached a plateau

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Osseous Biopsy in Children With Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Jan, E-mail: jfritz9@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Tzaribachev, Nikolay [University Children's Hospital, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology (Germany); Thomas, Christoph [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Wehrmann, Manfred [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Pathology (Germany); Horger, Marius S. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Carrino, John A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Koenig, Claudius W.; Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the safety and diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided core biopsy of osseous lesions in children with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) that were visible on MRI but were occult on radiography and computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of MRI-guided osseous biopsy performed in seven children (four girls and three boys; mean age 13 years (range 11 to 14) with CRMO was performed. Indication for using MRI guidance was visibility of lesions by MRI only. MRI-guided procedures were performed with 0.2-Tesla (Magnetom Concerto; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; n = 5) or 1.5-T (Magnetom Espree; Siemens; n = 2) open MRI systems. Core needle biopsy was obtained using an MRI-compatible 4-mm drill system. Conscious sedation or general anesthesia was used. Parameters evaluated were lesion visibility, technical success, procedure time, complications and microbiology, cytology, and histopathology findings. Results: Seven of seven (100%) targeted lesions were successfully visualized and sampled. All obtained specimens were sufficient for histopathological analysis. Length of time of the procedures was 77 min (range 64 to 107). No complications occurred. Histopathology showed no evidence of malignancy, which was confirmed at mean follow-up of 50 months (range 28 to 78). Chronic nonspecific inflammation characteristic for CRMO was present in four of seven (58%) patients, and edema with no inflammatory cells was found in three of seven (42%) patients. There was no evidence of infection in any patient. Conclusion: MRI-guided osseous biopsy is a safe and accurate technique for the diagnosis of pediatric CRMO lesions that are visible on MRI only.

  11. Application of topological sensitivity toward tissue elasticity imaging using magnetic resonance data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzina, Bojan

    ) and brain degeneration imaging (Green et al., 2008) with promising results. Specifically, the MRE estimates

  12. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  13. HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollub, Randy L.

    Provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. Provides in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for ...

  14. HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollub, Randy L.

    Provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. Provides in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for ...

  15. Developing novel polymer architectures for applications In magnetic resonance imaging and self-assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCombs, Jessica R. (Jessica Rose)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macromolecular scaffolds for drug delivery, self-assembly, and imaging applications have attracted significant attention over the last several decades. As polymerization techniques become more sophisticated, it becomes ...

  16. On the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy B.E., Electrical and Electronic EngineeringOn the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment

  17. Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucourt, Maximilian de, E-mail: mdb@charite.de; Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Collettini, Federico [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Guettler, Felix [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Teichgraeber, U. K. [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

  18. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using deuterum as a contrast agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kehayias, Joseph J. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Joel, Darrel D. (Setauket, NY); Adams, William H. (Eastport, NY); Stein, Harry L. (Glen Head, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D.sub.2 O in a solution with water.

  19. Transmit field pattern control for high field magnetic resonance imaging with integrated RF current sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurpad, Krishna Nagaraj

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in units of radians/tesla and B is the magnetic flux density of the applied field, expressed in units of tesla. The hydrogen nucleus, which consists of a single proton, is the most abundantly present in tissue and is most widely used for MRI...

  20. Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuch, Wolfgang

    Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch Freie Universit¨at Berlin, Institut f¨ur Experimentalphysik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Imaging of magnetic domains has- ern techniques is used nowadays routinely for magnetic imaging of magnetic ma- terials

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal magnetic resonance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between men and women at rest and during lower Summary: resonance-compatible exercise bicycle, magnetic resonance imaging techniques, and custom data processing... at all. We have...

  2. A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

  3. An analysis of the PERL Magnetic Resonance Imaging theory and implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kremkus, Mark Christian

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of PERL MRI in its most basic form is single shot imaging without the need to rapidly switch gradients to encode spatial information into the signal. PERL MRI incorporates the application of the PERL field into the standard spin echo...

  4. A Prospective Study of the Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Determining Candidacy for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorn, Paige L.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Haq, Farah; Goldberg, Mira [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Abe, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hasan, Yasmin [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chmura, Steven J., E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Retrospective data have demonstrated that breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may change a patient's eligibility for partial breast irradiation (PBI) by identifying multicentric, multifocal, or contralateral disease. The objective of the current study was to prospectively determine the frequency with which MRI identifies occult disease and to establish clinical factors associated with a higher likelihood of MRI prompting changes in PBI eligibility. Methods and Materials: At The University of Chicago, women with breast cancer uniformly undergo MRI in addition to mammography and ultrasonography. From June 2009 through May 2011, all patients were screened prospectively in a multidisciplinary conference for PBI eligibility based on standard imaging, and the impact of MRI on PBI eligibility according to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0413 entry criteria was recorded. Univariable analysis was performed using clinical characteristics in both the prospective cohort and in a separate cohort of retrospectively identified patients. Pooled analysis was used to derive a scoring index predictive of the risk that MRI would identify additional disease. Results: A total of 521 patients were screened for PBI eligibility, and 124 (23.8%) patients were deemed eligible for PBI based on standard imaging. MRI findings changed PBI eligibility in 12.9% of patients. In the pooled univariable analysis, tumor size ?2 cm on mammography or ultrasonography (P=.02), age <50 years (P=.01), invasive lobular histology (P=.01), and HER-2/neu amplification (P=.01) were associated with a higher likelihood of MRI changing PBI eligibility. A predictive score was generated by summing the number of significant risk factors. Patients with a score of 0, 1, 2, and 3 had changes to eligibility based on MRI findings in 2.8%, 13.2%, 38.1%, and 100%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: MRI identified additional disease in a significant number of patients eligible for PBI, based on standard imaging. Clinical characteristics may be useful in directing implementation of MRI in the staging of PBI candidates.

  5. Intensity inhomogeneity correction for magnetic resonance imaging of human brain at 7T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Ito, Kenji; Sasaki, Makoto [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan)] [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Kudo, Kohsuke, E-mail: kkudo@huhp.hokudai.ac.jp; Goodwin, Jonathan; Harada, Taisuke [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648 (Japan)] [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and efficacy for intensity inhomogeneity correction of various sequences of the human brain in 7T MRI using the extended version of the unified segmentation algorithm. Materials: Ten healthy volunteers were scanned with four different sequences (2D spin echo [SE], 3D fast SE, 2D fast spoiled gradient echo, and 3D time-of-flight) by using a 7T MRI system. Intensity inhomogeneity correction was performed using the “New Segment” module in SPM8 with four different values (120, 90, 60, and 30 mm) of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in Gaussian smoothness. The uniformity in signals in the entire white matter was evaluated using the coefficient of variation (CV); mean signal intensities between the subcortical and deep white matter were compared, and contrast between subcortical white matter and gray matter was measured. The length of the lenticulostriate (LSA) was measured on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images in the original and corrected images. Results: In all sequences, the CV decreased as the FWHM value decreased. The differences of mean signal intensities between subcortical and deep white matter also decreased with smaller FWHM values. The contrast between white and gray matter was maintained at all FWHM values. LSA length was significantly greater in corrected MIP than in the original MIP images. Conclusions: Intensity inhomogeneity in 7T MRI can be successfully corrected using SPM8 for various scan sequences.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance readable sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Yibo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring of physiological biomarkers is fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. We describe here the development of molecular sensors which can be read by magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry. MR is an ...

  7. Classification of brain compartments and head injury lesions by neural networks applied to magnetic resonance images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kischell, Eric Robert

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the limitation that they carry no infor- mation regarding the relative position of pixels with respect to each other [14] . The gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) method is a "direct approach" to texture analysis using low-level features of the image... by matrices [20]. The transformation matrices are based on the training samples and then applied to the testing samples. Given an original feature vector, x, and an f x f transformation matrix, A, the transformed vector, y, is given by [20]: ~A. E, (13...

  8. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  9. artery magnetic resonance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Whole Brain Isotropic Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a transgenic mouse...

  10. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jasper A. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial component of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  11. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1 H, 13 C NMR and...

  12. Magnetite-Loaded Polymeric Micelles as Ultrasensitive Magnetic-Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    Magnetite-Loaded Polymeric Micelles as Ultrasensitive Magnetic-Resonance Probes** By Hua Ai* Polymeric micelles offer a powerful multifunctional plat- form for drug delivery and diagnostic imaging- tions, polymeric micelles have also received increasing atten- tion in diagnostic imaging applications

  13. Real-Time Color-Flow Magnetic ResonanceImaging of Congenital Heart Disease E. De La Pena-Almaguer, K. S. Nayak, M. Terashima, P.C. Yang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Real-Time Color-Flow Magnetic ResonanceImaging of Congenital Heart Disease E. De La Pena used for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD), although it has limitations. Conventional MRI flow pulse sequence.A low flip- angle water selective spectral-spatial excitation is followed

  14. Unentangling nuclear magnetic resonance Matthias Bechmann 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Unentangling nuclear magnetic resonance computing Matthias Bechmann 1 , John A. Clark 2 , Angelika of York, UK, YO10 5DD Abstract. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is typically thought of as a possible could be used to perform non-quantum computation: from addressable 3D memory, to a programmable 3D

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery . Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for...

  16. Neuroimaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T: Comparison of Oxygenation-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Gary H.

    and becomes a larger fraction of the total noise at 3.0 T. Activation of the primary motor and visual cortex a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla (T) seems to represent a good compromise. Functional MRI (f

  17. Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testylier, Guy [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France)]. E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net; Lahrech, Hana [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Montigon, Olivier [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Foquin, Annie [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Delacour, Claire [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Bernabe, Denis [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Segebarth, Christoph [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Dorandeu, Frederic [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Carpentier, Pierre [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France)

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 {mu}g/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N{sub 2}O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures.

  18. Use of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve sheath to detect raised intracranial pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geeraerts, Thomas; Newcombe, Virginia F J; Coles, Jonathan P; Abate, Maria Giulia; Perkes, Iain E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Outtrim, Jo G; Chatfield, Dot A; Menon, David K

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    is accurate at measuring ONSD [27,28] and has been proposed to detect raised ICP in idiopathic hydrocephalus and to diagnose shunt malfunction [12,14,29,30]. On T2-weighted sequences, water (and CSF) exhibits a high signal (white). Fat and grey matter appear... as light grey, and white matter as dark grey. The perioptic CSF is surrounded by orbital fat. Contrast between CSF and orbital fat can be improved with fat suppression, increasing the image resolution for the ONSD measurement [12,13]. We have con- firmed...

  19. Use of Non-Invasive Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Estimation of Atrial Septal Defect Size and Morphology: A Comparison with Transesophageal Echo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piaw, Chin Sze; Kiam, Ong Tiong [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia); Rapaee, Annuar [University of Malaysia Sarawak (Malaysia)], E-mail: rannuar@fmhs.unimas.myp; Khoon, Liew Chee; Bang, Liew Houng; Ling, Chan Wei [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia); Samion, Hasri [National Heart Institute, Pediatric of Cardiology (Malaysia); Hian, Sim Kui [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a trusted method of sizing atrial septal defect (ASD) prior to percutaneous closure but is invasive, uncomfortable, and may carry a small risk of morbidity and mortality. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be useful non-invasive alternative in such patients who refuse or are unable to tolerate TEE and may provide additional information on the shape of the A0SD. Purpose: To validate the accuracy of ASD sizing by MRI compared with TEE.Method: Twelve patients (mean age 30 years; range 11-60 years) scheduled for ASD closure underwent TEE, cine balanced fast field echo MRI (bFFE-MRI) in four-chamber and sagittal views and phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) with reconstruction using the two orthogonal planes of T2-weighted images as planning. The average of the three longest measurements for all imaging modalities was calculated for each patient. Results: Mean maximum ASD length on TEE was 18.8 {+-} 4.6 mm, mean length by bFFE-MRI was 20.0 {+-} 5.0 mm, and mean length by PC-MRI was 18.3 {+-} 3.6 mm. The TEE measurement was significantly correlated with the bFFE-MRI and PC-MRI measurements (Pearson r = 0.69, p = 0.02 and r = 0.59, p = 0.04, respectively). The mean difference between TEE and bFFE-MRI measurements was -1.2mm (95% CI: -3.7, 1.3) and between TEE and PC-MRI was 0.5 mm (95% CI: -1.9, 2.9). Bland-Altman analysis also determined general agreement between both MRI methods and TEE. The ASDs were egg-shaped in two cases, circular in 1 patient and oval in the remaining patients. Conclusion: ASD sizing by MRI using bFFE and phase-contrast protocols correlated well with TEE estimations. PC-MRI provided additional information on ASD shapes and proximity to adjacent structures.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 May 29, 2012 Nuclear magnetic signal of plutonium 239's unique nuclear magnetic resonance signature has been detected by scientists on the subject, "Observation of 239 Pu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance," was published in the May 18 issue of Science

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    velocity · Relates Elastic modulus to speed of sound Assumes Concrete heterogeneous Can be affected by steel Modulus related to speed of sound Strength of concrete related to modulus Location of flaws structure · In both cases procedure is destructive Systems to monitor concrete modulus · Ultra-sonic pulse

  2. Magnetic elliptical polarization of Schumann resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sentman, D.D.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of orthogonal, horizontal components of the magnetic field in the ELF range obtained during September 1985 show that the Schumann resonance eigenfrequencies determined separately for the north-south and east-west magnetic components differ by as much as 0.5 Hz, suggesting that the underlying magnetic signal is not linearly polarized at such times. The high degree of magnetic ellipticity found suggests that the side multiplets of the Schumann resonances corresponding to azimuthally inhomogeneous normal modes are strongly excited in the highly asymmetric earth-ionosphere cavity. The dominant sense of polarization over the measurement passband is found to be right-handed during local daylight hours, and to be left-handed during local nighttime hours. 16 references.

  3. Performing temperature feedback controlled tissue photo-coagulation using magnetic resonance thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampath, Smita

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled photo-coagulation using magnetic resonance imaging as the non-invasive means of temperature feedback. The desired coagulation depth was controlled at a constant temperature of 40 degrees for different amounts of time and the actual coagulation...

  4. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA); Minard, Kevin R. (Kennewick, WA); Majors, Paul D. (Kennewick, WA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  5. The magnetic resonance force microscope: A new microscopic probe of magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Midzor, M.; Roukes, M.L. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Wigen, P.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Childress, J.R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1997-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) marries the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), to produce a three-dimensional imaging instrument with high, potentially atomic-scale, resolution. The principle of the MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in numerous experiments. By virtue of its unique capabilities the MRFM shows promise to make important contributions in fields ranging from three-dimensional materials characterization to bio-molecular structure determination. Here the authors focus on its application to the characterization and study of layered magnetic materials; the ability to illuminate the properties of buried interfaces in such materials is a particularly important goal. While sensitivity and spatial resolution are currently still far from their theoretical limits, they are nonetheless comparable to or superior to that achievable in conventional MRI. Further improvement of the MRFM will involve operation at lower temperature, application of larger field gradients, introduction of advanced mechanical resonators and improved reduction of the spurious coupling when the magnet is on the resonator.

  6. Resonant detection of axion mediated forces with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asimina Arvanitaki; Andrew A. Geraci

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10^9 and 10^12 GeV or axion masses between 10^-6 and 10^-3 eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  7. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Workshop Report | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministrator ReferencesalkaliAdvanced Magnetic Resonance

  8. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Portable and integrated Lead: P. Poulichet.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudoin, Geneviève

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Portable and integrated Lead: P. Poulichet. Permanent members: L. Rousseau, A. Fakri. Associated researchers: C. Delabie, A. Exertier. Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance : our work in the field of nuclear magneto resonance is focused on the design and the realization

  10. Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Spin Echoes MIT Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Sara

    Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Spin Echoes MIT Department of Physics (Dated: February 5, 2014) In this experiment, the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is used to determine the magnetic moments-factor in atomic spectroscopy and is given by g = (µ/µN )/I, (2) and µN is the nuclear magneton, e /2mp

  11. Magnetic levitation of metamaterial bodies enhanced with magnetostatic surface resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Bingham, Chris; Padilla, Willie; Smith, David R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that macroscopic objects built from negative-permeability metamaterials may experience resonantly enhanced magnetic force in low-frequency magnetic fields. Resonant enhancement of the time-averaged force originates from magnetostatic surface resonances (MSR) which are analogous to the electrostatic resonances of negative-permittivity particles, well known as surface plasmon resonances in optics. We generalize the classical problem of MSR of a homogeneous object to include anisotropic metamaterials, and consider the most extreme case of anisotropy where the permeability is negative in one direction but positive in the others. It is shown that deeply subwavelength objects made of such indefinite (hyperbolic) media exhibit a pronounced magnetic dipole resonance that couples strongly to uniform or weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field and provides strong enhancement of the magnetic force, enabling applications such as enhanced magnetic levitation.

  12. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  13. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Schoeder, Heiko [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stambuk, Hilda E. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wang Ya [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Patel, Senehal G. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shah, Jatin P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shukla-Dave, Amita, E-mail: davea@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  14. Controlling interactions between highly-magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlana Kotochigova

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic $^7$S$_3$ chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on Dysprosium and Erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative magnetic resonance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field provides a tool for tuning the dielectric resonance... resonator a magnetic field tunable dielectric resonances at frequencies much higher than usual ferromagnetic... , on...

  16. Purcell factor of Mie resonators featuring electric and magnetic modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a modal approach to compute the Purcell factor in Mie resonators exhibiting both electric and magnetic resonances. The analytic expressions of the normal modes are used to calculate the effective volumes. We show that important features of the effective volume can be predicted thanks to the translation-addition coefficients of a displaced dipole. Using our formalism, it is easy to see that, in general, the Purcell factor of Mie resonators is not dominated by a single mode, but rather by a large superposition. Finally we consider a silicon resonator homogeneously doped with electric dipolar emitters, and we show that the average electric Purcell factor dominates over the magnetic one.

  17. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging of Magnetic

  18. Target-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hepler Blackwell, Megan Leticia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) can be used to delineate prominent architectonic features in the human brain, but increased contrast is required to visualize more subtle distinctions. The goal ...

  19. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron...

  20. acoustic nuclear magnetic resonance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic nuclear magnetic resonance First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1...

  1. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  2. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  3. Magnetic resonance studies of cement based materials in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boguszynska, Joanna [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, Poznan (Poland); Brown, Marc C.A. [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); McDonald, Peter J. [School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk; Mitchell, Jonathan [School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Mulheron, Mike [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Tritt-Goc, Jadwiga [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, Poznan (Poland); Verganelakis, Dimitris A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-sided magnets give hope that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) might in future be used for in situ characterisation of hydration and water transport in the surface layers of concrete slabs. Towards that end, a portable NMR-MOUSE (MObile Universal Surface Explorer) has been used to follow the hydration of gypsum based plaster, a Portland cement paste and concrete mortar. The results compare favourably to those obtained using a standard laboratory bench-top spectrometer. Further, stray field imaging (STRAFI) based methods have been used with embedded NMR detector coils to study water transport across a mortar/topping interface. The measured signal amplitudes are found to correlate with varying sample conditions.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of methane adsorbed on porous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Feng

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by FENG I I Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1992 Major Subject: Physics NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by FENG LI Approved as to style and content by: . P. Kirk (Chair of Committee) i G. Agnolet (Member) J. H. Ross, r (Member) M...

  5. Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most laboratory environments. The NMR facilities maintain superconducting magnets which have for asphyxiation. Once energized the field of the superconducting magnet of the spectrometer is always present

  6. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  7. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  8. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  9. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  11. Optical pumping magnetic resonance in high magnetic fields: Characterization of nuclear relaxation during pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustine, Mathew P.

    Optical pumping magnetic resonance in high magnetic fields: Characterization of nuclear relaxation during pumping Matthew P. Augustine and Kurt W. Zilm Department of Chemistry, Yale University, New Haven exchange with optically pumped Rb vapor is investigated in high magnetic field. Operation in a high field

  12. Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchheim,, A. P.; Dal Molin, D.C.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Provis, J.L.; Fischer, P.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study details the differences in real-time hydration between pure tricalcium aluminate (cubic C{sub 3}A or 3CaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Na-doped tricalcium aluminate (orthorhombic C{sub 3}A or Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 8}Al{sub 6}O{sub 18}), in aqueous solutions containing sulfate ions. Pure phases were synthesized in the laboratory to develop an independent benchmark for the reactions, meaning that their reactions during hydration in a simulated early age cement pore solution (saturated with respect to gypsum and lime) were able to be isolated. Because the rate of this reaction is extremely rapid, most microscopy methods are not adequate to study the early phases of the reactions in the early stages. Here, a high-resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging technique operating in the X-ray water window, combined with solution analysis by {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to capture information regarding the mechanism of C{sub 3}A hydration during the early stages. There are differences in the hydration mechanism between the two types of C{sub 3}A, which are also dependent on the concentration of sulfate ions in the solution. The reactions with cubic C{sub 3}A (pure) seem to be more influenced by higher concentrations of sulfate ions, forming smaller ettringite needles at a slower pace than the orthorhombic C{sub 3}A (Na-doped) sample. The rate of release of aluminate species into the solution phase is also accelerated by Na doping.

  13. On transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, Q. [MOE Key Lab of Materials Modification by Beams and School of Physics and Optoelectrical Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, X., E-mail: xgwang@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection with a focus on the property of their singularities. As the driven frequency tends to zero, the logarithmic singularity of Alfvén resonance shifts to the power-law singularity of forced reconnection, due to merging of the two resonance layers. The transition criterion depends on either kinetic effects or dissipations that resolve the singularity. As an example, a small but finite resistivity ? is introduced to investigate the transition process. The transition threshold is then obtained as the driven frequency reaches a level of ?O((?/k){sup 1/3})

  14. Co-Funding for the Conference on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan McLaughlin, Ph.D., Director, Division of Applied Science & Technology, NIBIB, NIH

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The XXIst International Conference on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems (ICMRBS 2005), '60th anniversary of the discovery of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance,' was held between 16 and 21 January 2005 in Hyderabad, India. The meeting focused on a broad range of magnetic resonance methods as applied to studies of biological processes related to human health. The biennial ICMRBS has become the major venue for discussion of advances in nuclear and electron magnetic resonance (NMR & EMR/EPR) studies of the structure, dynamics, and chemical properties of important classes of biomolecules. Magnetic resonance has become an established tool in structural biology, and its special importance derives from its ability to provide atomic level information. It is becoming increasingly evident that the dynamic features of biomolecules, their intermolecular interactions, and accessible conformations in solution are data of key importance in understanding molecular recognition and function. NMR, which is already contributing to approximately 25% of the new structures being deposited with the Protein Data Bank, is destined to be a major player in the post genomic structure age with its emphasis on structure and function. In-vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results shed light on human metabolic processes and on the cellular ramifications of cancer, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other pathologies. New methodologies in metabonomics may lead to development of new drugs and medical diagnosis. The ICMRBS is the one conference that brings together experts from high-resolution NMR, solid state NMR, EPR, in-vivo MRS and MRI, and developers of instrumentation, techniques, software, and databases. Symposia at this ICMRBS are designed to continue the fruitful cross-fertilization of ideas that has been so successful in driving the spectacular advances in this field. ICMRBS 2005 maintained the traditional format of poster sessions, and plenary lectures that highlight major advances in each of the major areas, and three parallel symposia that focused on particular biological systems, interfacial applications of magnetic resonance, and rapidly advancing technology. Funds provided partial travel support for 33 younger scientists from the U.S. (graduate students, postdoctoral research associates, and beginning faculty), selected from those who submitted accepted posters; 12 of these were invited to contribute oral presentations. Those receiving travel support were selected by a committee composed of the U.S. members of the International Advisory Committee for the meeting. Particular emphasis was placed on facilitating participation of minority and women scientists.

  15. Next Generation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemm, Piper Julia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. A. ; MacRenaris, K. W. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Ho,R. ; Eckermann, A. L. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Meade,E. A. ; MacRenaris, K. W. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Ho,

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the only logging technique available to estimate pore-size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    1 ABSTRACT Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the only logging technique available to estimate, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) logging has been used to assess a handful of key petrophysical parameters

  17. Application of magnetic resonance microscopy to tissue engineering: A polylactide model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of magnetic resonance microscopy to tissue engineering: A polylactide model K. J. L seeding; magnetic resonance mi- croscopy; polylactide; tissue engineering INTRODUCTION Absorbable polymers Engineering Research Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 2 Department of Radiology

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - ablation assisted resonance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhancement (LGE) mag- netic resonance imaging (MRI) immediately post-ablation (IPA... enhancement MRI magnetic resonance imaging NE nonenhancing RF radiofrequency RFA...

  19. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on ?-conjugated semiconductor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ying

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) techniques were used to investigate the dynamics of excitons and charge carriers in ?-conjugated organic semiconductors. Degradation behavior of the negative spin-1/2 electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance (ELDMR) was observed in Alq3 devices. The increase in the resonance amplitude implies an increasing bipolaron formation during degradation, which might be the result of growth of charge traps in the device. The same behavior of the negative spin-1/2 ELDMR was observed in 2wt% Rubrene doped Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminium (Alq3) devices. However, with increasing injection current, a positive spin-1/2 ELDMR, together with positive spin 1 triplet powder patterns at {delta}m{sub S}={+-}1 and {delta}m{sub S}={+-}2, emerges. Due to the similarities in the frequency dependences of single and double modulated ELDMR and the photoluminescence-detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR) results in poly[2-methoxy-5-(2 -ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenyl ene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films, the mechanism for this positive spin-1/2 ELDMR was assigned to enhanced triplet-polaron quenching under resonance conditions. The ELDMR in rubrene doped Alq3 devices provides a path to investigate charge distribution in the device under operational conditions. Combining the results of several devices with different carrier blocking properties and the results from transient EL, it was concluded trions not only exist near buffer layer but also exist in the electron transport layer. This TPQ model can also be used to explain the positive spin-1/2 PLDMR in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films at low temperature and in MEH-PPV films at various temperatures up to room temperature. Through quantitative analysis, TE-polaron quenching (TPQ) model is shown having the ability to explain most behaviors of the positive spin-1/2 resonance. Photocurrent detected magnetic resonance (PCDMR) studies on MEH-PPV devices revealed a novel transient resonance signal. The signal may originate from the higher concentration of deep traps near cathode. A quantitative analysis based on this assumption was carried out and found to be consistent with the experimental results.

  20. Precise wavefunction engineering with magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Bennie; P. B. Wigley; S. S. Szigeti; M. Jasperse; J. J. Hope; L. D. Turner; R. P. Anderson

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling quantum fluids at their fundamental length scale will yield superlative quantum simulators, precision sensors, and spintronic devices. This scale is typically below the optical diffraction limit, precluding precise wavefunction engineering using optical potentials alone. We present a protocol to rapidly control the phase and density of a quantum fluid down to the healing length scale using strong time-dependent coupling between internal states of the fluid in a magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate this protocol by simulating the creation of a single stationary soliton and double soliton states in a Bose-Einstein condensate with control over the individual soliton positions and trajectories, using experimentally feasible parameters. Such states are yet to be realized experimentally, and are a path towards engineering soliton gases and exotic topological excitations.

  1. Sub-surface characterization and three dimensional profiling of semiconductors by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammel, P.C.; Moore, G.; Roukes, M.; Zhenyong Zhang

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project successfully developed a magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) instrument to mechanically detect magnetic resonance signals. This technique provides an intrinsically subsurface, chemical-species-specific probe of structure, constituent density and other properties of materials. As in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an applied magnetic field gradient selects a well defined volume of the sample for study. However mechanical detection allows much greater sensitivity, and this in turn allows the reduction of the size of the minimum resolvable volume. This requires building an instrument designed to achieve nanometer-scale resolution at buried semiconductor interfaces. High-resolution, three-dimensional depth profiling of semiconductors is critical in the development and fabrication of semiconductor devices. Currently, there is no capability for direct, high-resolution observation and characterization of dopant density, and other critical features of semiconductors. The successful development of MRFM in conjunction with modifications to improve resolution will enable for the first time detailed structural and electronic studies in doped semiconductors and multilayered nanoelectronic devices, greatly accelerating the current pace of research and development.

  2. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murase, Kenya, E-mail: murase@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Faculty of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  3. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering from structurally and magnetically rough interfaces in multilayered systems. I. Specular reflectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haskel, Daniel

    X-ray resonant magnetic scattering from structurally and magnetically rough interfaces formulation of x-ray resonant magnetic scattering from rough surfaces and interfaces is given for specular/Fe multilayer. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.68.224409 PACS number s : 75.70.Cn, 61.10.Kw I. INTRODUCTION X-ray

  4. Chemometric Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALAM,TODD M.; ALAM,M. KATHLEEN

    2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has increased dramatically in recent years. A variety of different chemometric techniques have been applied to a wide range of problems in food, agricultural, medical, process and industrial systems. This article gives a brief review of chemometric analysis of NMR spectral data, including a summary of the types of mixtures and experiments analyzed with chemometric techniques. Common experimental problems encountered during the chemometric analysis of NMR data are also discussed.

  5. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Peter; Heyn, Martin F.; Kernbichler, Winfried [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Ivanov, Ivan B. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); St. Petersburg State University, Institute of Physics, Ulyanovskaya 1, Petrodvoretz 198504 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina, Leningrad Oblast (Russian Federation); Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology,” Ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results.

  6. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winefordner, James D. (Gainesville, FL); Matveev, Oleg I. (Gainesville, FL); Smith, Benjamin W. (Gainesville, FL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  7. Continuum resonance induced electromagnetic torque by a rotating plasma response to static resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yueqiang; Connor, J. W.; Cowley, S. C.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical study is carried out, based on a simple toroidal tokamak equilibrium, to demonstrate the radial re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque density, as a result of a rotating resistive plasma (linear) response to a static resonant magnetic perturbation field. The computed electromagnetic torque peaks at several radial locations even in the presence of a single rational surface, due to resonances between the rotating response, in the plasma frame, and both Alfven and sound continuum waves. These peaks tend to merge together to form a rather global torque distribution, when the plasma resistivity is large. The continuum resonance induced net electromagnetic torque remains finite even in the limit of an ideal plasma.

  8. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging of

  9. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging ofLensless

  10. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging

  11. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless ImagingLensless

  12. Magnetic Resonant Coupling As a Potential Means for Wireless Power Transfer to Multiple Small Receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannon, Benjamin Louis

    Wireless power transfer via magnetic resonant coupling is experimentally demonstrated in a system with a large source coil and either one or two small receivers. Resonance between source and load coils is achieved with ...

  13. Experimental Test of Complementarity by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiwen Zhu; Ximing Fang; Xinhua Peng; Mang Feng; Kelin Gao; Fei Du

    2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested complementarity for the ensemble-averaged spin states of nuclei $^{13}$C in the molecule of $^{13}$CHCl$_{3}$ by the use of the spin states of another nuclei $^{1}$H as the path marker. It turns out that the wave-particle duality holds when one merely measures the probability density of quantum states, and that the wave- and particle-like behavior is simultaneously observed with the help of measuring populations and coherence in a single nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) experiment. Effects of path-marking schemes and causes of the appearance and disappearance of the wave behavior are analysed.

  14. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of glycolysis in protozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoades, Teresa Ann

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the ratio of 1:2:8:3. 17 ~ ~ CHg-COSH CHg-COSH CHg-CO)H ~ CH2-COSH ~ CHg-COSH HACH)-CO(H FIGURE 7. Simulated coupling patterns for the C-2 of succinate. (a) [1, 2- C]; (b) [U- C]; (c) [1, 2, 3- C]; (d) 1:1:1 addition of (a), (b), and (c); (e) 1... May 1986 Major Subject: Chemistry CARBON-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDIES OF GLYCOLYSIS IN PROTOZOA A Thesis by TERESA ANN RHOADES Approved as to style and content by: A. I. Scott (Chair of Committee) Marvin W. Rowe (h1ember) Neil E...

  15. Near-electrode imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - ankle magnetic resonance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ankle magnetic resonance Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Evaluation of Methods That Locate the...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - arch magnetic resonance Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The resonator having central frequency f0 5 GHz... are the development of magnetically tunable YIG band-pass ... Source: Srinivasan, Gopalan - Department of Physics, Oakland...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - alzheimer-type magnetic resonance Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The resonator having central frequency f0 5 GHz... are the development of magnetically tunable YIG band-pass ... Source: Srinivasan, Gopalan - Department of Physics, Oakland...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-dcys-ser-lys-cys magnetic resonance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The resonator having central frequency f0 5 GHz... are the development of magnetically tunable YIG band-pass ... Source: Srinivasan, Gopalan - Department of Physics, Oakland...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - authentic magnetic resonance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The resonator having central frequency f0 5 GHz... are the development of magnetically tunable YIG band-pass ... Source: Srinivasan, Gopalan - Department of Physics, Oakland...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - activatable magnetic resonance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The resonator having central frequency f0 5 GHz... are the development of magnetically tunable YIG band-pass ... Source: Srinivasan, Gopalan - Department of Physics, Oakland...

  2. Array combination for parallel imaging in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Dan Kenrick

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................103 Figure 51. Diagram of geometry used...........................................................................104 Figure 52. 64 element 8x8 grid array SNR map using 64 receivers. ............................105 Figure 53. 64 element 8x8 grid...-factor maps for point combined array......................................................117 Figure 63. SENSE reconstructions using point combined array...................................118 Figure 64. Grid array geometry used for simulation...

  3. Molecular dynamics in liquid cyclopropane. Raman and magnetic nuclear resonance studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    723 Molecular dynamics in liquid cyclopropane. II. 2014 Raman and magnetic nuclear resonance as a function of temperature (155, 300 K) and pressure (up to 3 kilobars). 13C and 2H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments are performed in the same temperature range. The isotropic and anisotropic Raman profiles

  4. Gravitational resonance spectroscopy with an oscillating magnetic field gradient in the GRANIT flow through arrangement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pignol; S. Baessler; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; K. Protasov; D. Rebreyend; A. Yu. Voronin

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational resonance spectroscopy consists in measuring the energy spectrum of bouncing ultracold neutrons above a mirror by inducing resonant transitions between different discrete quantum levels. We discuss how to induce the resonances with a flow through arrangement in the GRANIT spectrometer, excited by an oscillating magnetic field gradient. The spectroscopy could be realized in two distinct modes (so called DC and AC) using the same device to produce the magnetic excitation. We present calculations demonstrating the feasibility of the newly proposed AC mode.

  5. 3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

  6. Active resonant subwavelength grating for scannerless range imaging sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Nellums, Robert O.; Boye, Robert R.; Peters, David William

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this late-start LDRD, we will present a design for a wavelength-agile, high-speed modulator that enables a long-term vision for the THz Scannerless Range Imaging (SRI) sensor. It takes the place of the currently-utilized SRI micro-channel plate which is limited to photocathode sensitive wavelengths (primarily in the visible and near-IR regimes). Two of Sandia's successful technologies--subwavelength diffractive optics and THz sources and detectors--are poised to extend the capabilities of the SRI sensor. The goal is to drastically broaden the SRI's sensing waveband--all the way to the THz regime--so the sensor can see through image-obscuring, scattering environments like smoke and dust. Surface properties, such as reflectivity, emissivity, and scattering roughness, vary greatly with the illuminating wavelength. Thus, objects that are difficult to image at the SRI sensor's present near-IR wavelengths may be imaged more easily at the considerably longer THz wavelengths (0.1 to 1mm). The proposed component is an active Resonant Subwavelength Grating (RSG). Sandia invested considerable effort on a passive RSG two years ago, which resulted in a highly-efficient (reflectivity greater than gold), wavelength-specific reflector. For this late-start LDRD proposal, we will transform the passive RSG design into an active laser-line reflector.

  7. On the validation of magnetic resonance velocimetry in single-phase turbulent pipe flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jullien, P.; Lemonnier, H. [CEA Grenoble, DTN LITA SE2T, F-38054 Grenoble 9, (France)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear magnetic resonance imaging technique is used to measure velocity distributions in turbulent pipe flows up to Re = 24580. While turbulent intensity is usually determined from signal attenuation, we deduce turbulent intensity from velocity distribution with no need to suppose a Gaussian distribution for velocity fluctuations. Skewness and flatness measurements are also presented in this paper. Comparison with DNS show good agreement and we show that NMR data is sufficiently accurate to provide turbulent viscosity profile. The low field system used in this study allow the suppression of susceptibility artifacts and thus open its use for studying two-phase flows. We postulate that the method used here could be applied to two-phase flows and would thus provide valuable information on turbulent viscosity models. (authors)

  8. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small IV, W; Gjersing, E; Herberg, J L; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

  9. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via...

  10. Optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamidi, S. M. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, G. C., Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals have been investigated. We use transfer matrix method to solve our magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals consist of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers. The results of the change in the optical and magneto-optical properties of structure as a result of the alteration in the structural properties such as thickness, plasma frequency and collision frequency, plasma filling factor, number of resonators and dielectric constant of dielectric layers and external magnetic field have been reported. The main feature of this structure is a good magneto-optical rotation that takes place at the defect modes and the edge of photonic band gap of our proposed optical magnetized plasma waveguide. Our outcomes demonstrate the potential applications of the device for tunable and adjustable filters or reflectors and active magneto-optic in microwave devices under structural parameter and external magnetic field.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance based Characterization of the Protein Binding Pocket using Hyperpolarized Ligand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Hlaing

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarization (DNP) combined with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has emerged as a new tool for studying interactions between different molecules. In this study, the DNP-NMR technique was employed for characterization of the protein binding pocket through...

  12. Bounds on the entanglability of thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Terri M. (Terri Mak), 1981-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theorists have recently shown that the states used in current nuclear magnetic resonance (NMIR) quantum computing experiments are not entangled. Yet it is widely believed that entanglement is a necessary resource in the ...

  13. Developing improved nuclear magnetic resonance marginal oscillator spectrometers for advanced teaching laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willingham, Frank Phillip

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPING IMPROVED NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MARGINAL OSCILLATOR SPECTROMETERS FOR ADVANCED TEACHING LABORATORIES A Thesis by FRANK PHILLIP WILLINGHAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE D e cemb er 1988 Major Subject: Physics DEVELOPING IMPROVED NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MARGINAL OSCILLATOR SPECTROMETERS FOR ADVANCED TEACHING LABORATORIES A Thesis by FRANK PHILLIP...

  14. Optically detected magnetic resonance studies on {pi}-conjugate polymers and novel carbon allotropes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partee, J.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: introduction to photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR); introduction to {pi}-conjugated systems; PLDMR measurements on poly(p-phenylene)-type ladder polymers; PLMDR measurements on poly(p-phenylene ethylene); and PLDMR measurements on C{sub 70}, polythiophene, poly(p-phenylene vinylene) and Dan-40. Appendices to this report describe: Operation of ODMR (optically detected magnetic resonance) spectrometer; ODMR system parameters; and Special purpose circuitry.

  15. Surfactant based imbibition and induced solution gas drive process: investigation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, James Calvin

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drive mechanism. This imbibition and induced solution gas drive study employed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to monitor and characterize the progress of oil recovery inside the rock sample core. A specially designed core...SURFACTANT BASED IMBIBITION AND INDUCED SOLUTION GAS DRIVE PROCESS: INVESTIGATION BY NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE A Thesis by JAMES CALVIN COX Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  16. The study of skin permeation mechanism and terpene-skin lipid interaction via nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, P. F. C.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Huang, Meng; Ho, P. C. L.; Chan, S. Y.

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    , lipid extraction, etc. In our case, the interaction between a terpene and a lipid was examinedwith nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which aims to provide some insight to enhancement in skin permeation. Palmitic acid (Fig 1), a 16-carbon fatty acid... and oxides were able to producea greater ??. National University of Singapore, 2006 PS77 -The Study of Skin Permeation Mechanism and Terpene-Lipid Interaction via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Perry Fung Chye Lim a, Xiang Yang Liu b, Meng Huang a, Paul Chi...

  17. Neutron resonance spin echo, bootstrap method for increasing the effective magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1195 Neutron resonance spin echo, bootstrap method for increasing the effective magnetic field R donné en spectrométrie d'echos de spins de neutrons. Les limites théoriques et techniques à l field intensity in Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) spectrometry. The limits, theoretical as well

  18. A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

    2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the core and borehole scales. Vp, density, porosity, and permeability logs are integrated with crosswell reflection data to produce impedance, permeability, and porosity images. These images capture three flow units that are characterized at the pore and borehole scales. The upper flow units are thin, continuous beds, and the deeper flow unit is thicker and heterogeneous. NMR well log calibration data and thin section analysis demonstrate that interwell region permeability is controlled mainly by micropores and macropores, which represent the flow unit matrices of the confined aquifer. Reflection image-derived impedance provides lateral detail and the depth of the deeper confining unit. The permeable regions identified in both parts of this phase of the study are consistent with the hydrological results of high water production being monitored between two wells in the South Florida aquifer. Finally, we describe the two major methodologies developed to support the aquifer characterization efforts--(1) a method to estimate frequency-dependent scattering attenuation based on the volume fraction and typical size of vugs or karsts, and (2) a method to more accurately interpret NMR well logs by taking into account the diffusion of magnetization between large and small pores. For the first method, we take the exact vug structure from x-ray CT scans of two carbonate cores and use 3-D finite difference modeling to determine the P-wave scattering attenuation in these cores at ultrasonic frequencies. In spite of the sharp contrast in medium properties between cavity and rock and the violation of the small perturbation assumption, the computed scattering attenuation is roughly comparable to that predicted by various random medium scattering theories. For the second method, we investigate how the diffusion of magnetization between macropores and micropores influences NMR log interpretation through 2D simulation of magnetization diffusion in realistic macropore geometries derived from digital images of thin sections. In most cases, our simulations show that the resulting simulate

  19. Ferrite-ferroelectric layered structures for electrically and magnetically tunable microwave resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demokritov, S.O.

    Ferrite-ferroelectric layered structures for electrically and magnetically tunable microwave It is demonstrated experimentally that a layered structure consisting of ferrite and ferroelectric thin films can constant , and a bias magnetic field to the ferrite layer. The resonator having central frequency f0 5 GHz

  20. Chemical analysis by ultrahigh-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance in the Earth's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Chemical analysis by ultrahigh-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance in the Earth spectroscopy2 in the Earth's magnetic field. We show that in the Earth's field the transverse relaxation time T electronics Data acquisition d.c. transmission coil Earth's field N S B0 B0 = 1 T Figure 1 Setup of mobile

  1. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)] [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Garbini, Joseph L. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 ?m diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  2. Resonant normal form and asymptotic normal form behavior in magnetic bottle Hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Efthymiopoulos; M. Harsoula; G. Contopoulos

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider normal forms in `magnetic bottle' type Hamiltonians of the form $H=\\frac{1}{2}(\\rho^2_\\rho+\\omega^2_1\\rho^2) +\\frac{1}{2}p^2_z+hot$ (second frequency $\\omega_2$ equal to zero in the lowest order). Our main results are: i) a novel method to construct the normal form in cases of resonance, and ii) a study of the asymptotic behavior of both the non-resonant and the resonant series. We find that, if we truncate the normal form series at order $r$, the series remainder in both constructions decreases with increasing $r$ down to a minimum, and then it increases with $r$. The computed minimum remainder turns to be exponentially small in $\\frac{1}{\\Delta E}$, where $\\Delta E$ is the mirror oscillation energy, while the optimal order scales as an inverse power of $\\Delta E$. We estimate numerically the exponents associated with the optimal order and the remainder's exponential asymptotic behavior. In the resonant case, our novel method allows to compute a `quasi-integral' (i.e. truncated formal integral) valid both for each particular resonance as well as away from all resonances. We applied these results to a specific magnetic bottle Hamiltonian. The non resonant normal form yields theorerical invariant curves on a surface of section which fit well the empirical curves away from resonances. On the other hand the resonant normal form fits very well both the invariant curves inside the islands of a particular resonance as well as the non-resonant invariant curves. Finally, we discuss how normal forms allow to compute a critical threshold for the onset of global chaos in the magnetic bottle.

  3. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States); He, Bin, E-mail: binhe@umn.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ?1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  4. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Kraus, Jr., Robert Henry

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Method comprising obtaining an NMR measurement from a sample wherein an ultra-low field NMR system probes the sample and produces the NMR measurement and wherein a sampling temperature, prepolarizing field, and measurement field are known; detecting the NMR measurement by means of inductive coils; analyzing the NMR measurement to obtain at least one measurement feature wherein the measurement feature comprises T1, T2, T1.rho., or the frequency dependence thereof; and, searching for the at least one measurement feature within a database comprising NMR reference data for at least one material to determine if the sample comprises a material of interest.

  5. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

  6. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in...

  7. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  8. Particle transport as a result of resonant magnetic perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordijck, Saskia

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field of plasma physics with a particular focus on particlewe will focus on localized measurements at the plasma edgefocuses on the Magnetic confinement technique utilizing a Tokamak [91]. The goal of a burning plasma,

  9. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Oxygen Image Hypoxic Fraction Plus Radiation Dose Strongly Correlates With Tumor Cure in FSa Fibrosarcomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elas, Martyna [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Center for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging In Vivo Physiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Bell, Rebecca; Hleihel, Danielle; Barth, Eugene D.; McFaul, Colin [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Center for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging In Vivo Physiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Haney, Chad R. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Center for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging In Vivo Physiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Bielanska, Joanna; Pustelny, Katarzyna [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Center for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging In Vivo Physiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Ahn, Kang-Hyun [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Center for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging In Vivo Physiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)] (and others)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia has long been known to produce resistance to radiation. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oxygen imaging was investigated for its power to predict the success of tumor control according to tumor oxygenation level and radiation dose. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 EPR oxygen images were obtained from the legs of C3H mice bearing 0.5-cm{sup 3} FSa fibrosarcomas under both normal (air breathing) and clamped tumor conditions. Under the same conditions as those during which the images were obtained, the tumors were irradiated to a variety of doses near the FSa dose at which 50% of tumors were cured. Tumor tissue was distinguished from normal tissue using co-registration of the EPR oxygen images with spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging of the tumor and/or stereotactic localization. The tumor voxel statistics in the EPR oxygen image included the mean and median partial pressure of oxygen and the fraction of tumor voxels below the specified partial pressure of oxygen values of 3, 6, and 10 mm Hg. Bivariate logistic regression analysis using the radiation dose and each of the EPR oxygen image statistics to determine which best separated treatment failure from success. Results: The measurements of the dose at which 50% of tumors were cured were similar to those found in published data for this syngeneic tumor. Bivariate analysis of 34 tumors demonstrated that tumor cure correlated with dose (p = 0.004) and with a <10 mm Hg hypoxic fraction (p = 0.023). Conclusion: Our results have shown that, together, radiation dose and EPR image hypoxic fraction separate the population of FSa fibrosarcomas that are cured from those that fail, thus predicting curability.

  10. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh, E-mail: rramesh@iisermohali.ac.in [Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali, Sector 81, Manauli, P.O. Box-140306, Mohali, Punjab (India)] [Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali, Sector 81, Manauli, P.O. Box-140306, Mohali, Punjab (India)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R{sup 2}) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R{sup 2} experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  11. Effect of Gold Marker Seeds on Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Murshed, E-mail: Murshed.Hossain@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schirmer, Timo [Global MR Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Munich (Germany); Richardson, Theresa; Chen, Lili; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Ma Changming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance stereoscopic imaging (MRSI) of the prostate is an emerging technique that may enhance targeting and assessment in radiotherapy. Current practices in radiotherapy invariably involve image guidance. Gold seed fiducial markers are often used to perform daily prostate localization. If MRSI is to be used in targeting prostate cancer and therapy assessment, the impact of gold seeds on MRSI must be investigated. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of gold seeds on the quality of MRSI data acquired in phantom experiments. Methods and Materials: A cylindrical plastic phantom with a spherical cavity 10 centimeters in diameter wss filled with water solution containing choline, creatine, and citrate. A gold seed fiducial marker was put near the center of the phantom mounted on a plastic stem. Spectra were acquired at 1.5 Tesla by use of a clinical MRSI sequence. The ratios of choline + creatine to citrate (CC/Ci) were compared in the presence and absence of gold seeds. Spectra in the vicinity of the gold seed were analyzed. Results: The maximum coefficient of variation of CC/Ci induced by the gold seed was found to be 10% in phantom experiments at 1.5 T. Conclusion: MRSI can be used in prostate radiotherapy in the presence of gold seed markers. Gold seeds cause small effects (in the order of the standard deviation) on the ratio of the metabolite's CC/Ci in the phantom study done on a 1.5-T scanner. It is expected that gold seed markers will have similar negligible effect on spectra from prostate patients. The maximum of 10% of variation in CC/Ci found in the phantom study also sets a limit on the threshold accuracy of CC/Ci values for deciding whether the tissue characterized by a local spectrum is considered malignant and whether it is a candidate for local boost in radiotherapy dose.

  12. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13 CO to Lipid 31 P ABSTRACT: Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane

  13. The Effect of Magnesium Coordination on the and "N Magnetic Resonance Spectra of Chlorophyll a.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    7058 The Effect of Magnesium Coordination on the and "N Magnetic Resonance Spectra of Chlorophyll a magnesium-free derivative pheophytin a have been assigned. Emphasis is placed on the quaternary carbon atoms was developed to permit these assign- ments. On complexation with magnesium, large downfield chemical

  14. Study of Brazilian Gasoline Quality Using Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H NMR) Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Study of Brazilian Gasoline Quality Using Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H NMR) Spectroscopy The identification of gasoline adulteration by organic solvents is not an easy task, because compounds that constitute the solvents are already in gasoline composition. In this work, the use of hydrogen nuclear

  15. Electrical, optical and magnetic resonance studies of novel. pi. -conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Qing-Xiao.

    1992-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Conductivity, optical properties including visible and infrared absorption and photoluminescence, and magnetic resonance properties including electron spin resonance and optically detected magnetic resonance have been studied in polydiethynylsilanes (PDES) and poly(2,5-dibutoxyparaphenyleneacetylene) (PDBOPA), which have been recently synthesized. PDES and PDBOPA blend and PDBOPA-based electroluminescent preliminary diodes which were fabricated by the author were also explored. The undoped one-dimensional gap of PDES polymers, which have average molecular weight from {approximately}2{times}10{sup 5} to 1{times}10{sup 6}, is 2.0 eV in both films and solutions; photoluminescence is barely observed. I{sub 2} doping induces a single absorption band at {approximately}1.05 eV in solutions and lightly doped films, but another at {approximately}0.55 eV in heavily doped films. Both are correlated with strong IR-active vibrations associated with known lines in Raman scattering.

  16. Electrical, optical and magnetic resonance studies of novel {pi}-conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Qing-Xiao

    1992-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Conductivity, optical properties including visible and infrared absorption and photoluminescence, and magnetic resonance properties including electron spin resonance and optically detected magnetic resonance have been studied in polydiethynylsilanes (PDES) and poly(2,5-dibutoxyparaphenyleneacetylene) (PDBOPA), which have been recently synthesized. PDES and PDBOPA blend and PDBOPA-based electroluminescent preliminary diodes which were fabricated by the author were also explored. The undoped one-dimensional gap of PDES polymers, which have average molecular weight from {approximately}2{times}10{sup 5} to 1{times}10{sup 6}, is 2.0 eV in both films and solutions; photoluminescence is barely observed. I{sub 2} doping induces a single absorption band at {approximately}1.05 eV in solutions and lightly doped films, but another at {approximately}0.55 eV in heavily doped films. Both are correlated with strong IR-active vibrations associated with known lines in Raman scattering.

  17. Effect of Electric and Magnetic Fields on Spin Dynamics in the Resonant Electric Dipole Moment Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander J. Silenko

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A buildup of the vertical polarization in the resonant electric dipole moment (EDM) experiment [Y. F. Orlov, W. M. Morse, and Y. K. Semertzidis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 214802 (2006)] is affected by a horizontal electric field in the particle rest frame oscillating at a resonant frequency. This field is defined by the Lorentz transformation of an oscillating longitudinal electric field and a uniform vertical magnetic one. The effect of a longitudinal electric field is significant, while the contribution from a magnetic field caused by forced coherent longitudinal oscillations of particles is dominant. The effect of electric field on the spin dynamics was not taken into account in previous calculations. This effect is considerable and leads to decreasing the EDM effect for the deuteron and increasing it for the proton. The formula for resonance strengths in the EDM experiment has been derived. The spin dynamics has been calculated.

  18. Frequency stabilization of spin-torque-driven oscillations by coupling with a magnetic nonlinear resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudo, Kiwamu, E-mail: kiwamu.kudo@toshiba.co.jp; Suto, Hirofumi; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie [Corporate Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki 212–8582 (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental function of any oscillator is to produce a waveform with a stable frequency. Here, we show a method of frequency stabilization for spin-torque nano-oscillators (STNOs) that relies on coupling with an adjacent nanomagnet through the magnetic dipole–dipole interaction. It is numerically demonstrated that highly stable oscillations occur as a result of mutual feedback between an STNO and a nanomagnet. The nanomagnet acts as a nonlinear resonator for the STNO. This method is based on the nonlinear behavior of the resonator and can be considered as a magnetic analogue of an optimization scheme in nanoelectromechanical systems. The oscillation frequency is most stabilized when the nanomagnet is driven at a special feedback point at which the feedback noise between the STNO and resonator is completely eliminated.

  19. All-optical high-resolution magnetic resonance using a nitrogen-vacancy spin in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen-Yu Wang; Jian-Ming Cai; Alex Retzker; Martin B. Plenio

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an all-optical scheme to prolong the quantum coherence of a negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. Optical control of the NV spin suppresses energy fluctuations of the $^{3}\\text{A}_{2}$ ground states and forms an energy gap protected subspace. By optical control, the spectral linewidth of magnetic resonance is much narrower and the measurement of the frequencies of magnetic field sources has higher resolution. The optical control also improves the sensitivity of the magnetic field detection and can provide measurement of the directions of signal sources.

  20. Bioengineering 278: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Laboratory Winter 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    the provided piece of pyrolytic carbon (diamagnetic) on the surface of the pink oil phantom so that the carbon and the collection of the center of K-space (the gradient echo). In spin echo mode, the CV tau sets the offset by applying a shim offset in the X direction. The shim offset should perturb the phase of the gradient echoes

  1. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Microtesla Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantization (30). In a Josephson junction, Cooper pairs ofconsists of two Josephson junctions connected in parallel onis the array of 20 Josephson junctions in series with the

  2. Postinfectious Encephalitis A Coregistered SPECT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itti, Laurent

    -mail: eitti@humc.edu From the Departments of Radiology,* Pediatric Neurology, and Pathology, Harbor

  3. Compressed Sensing accelerated radial acquisitions for dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwaan, I.N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??We present a flexible method dubbed Accelerated Radial Compressed Sensing (ARCS) which uses Compressed Sensing to reconstruct 2D and 3D radial data. Our tests on… (more)

  4. Wavelet smoothing of functional magnetic resonance images: A ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-30-72T23:59:59.000Z

    and these choices, among other things, concern us in this paper. ... shows the active pixels in white (with a pixel value of 1) and the inactive pixels in black (with a value of 0). ... We dealt with the boundaries in the final (time) dimension.

  5. ischemic (at-risk) Current Research in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    killer in the United States, and is responsible for half million deaths and medical costs on the order of $165 billion per year. There are many different types of heart disease (ischemic, valvular, con Department of Electrical Engineering, Viterbi School of EngineeringMing Hsieh Department of Electrical

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . SChromatography

  7. Application of Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging for the Development and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mailRadioimmunotherapy of Cancers.Appendix

  8. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail5,722,326 Site Map PrintableMagnetism

  9. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect Imaging of

  10. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect Imaging

  11. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect ImagingDirect

  12. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  13. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  14. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spicer, L. D.; Bennet, D. W.; Davis, J. F.

    1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/NH with SO/sub 2/. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SI)/sub 2/O and a new solid compound (NH/sub 4/) ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/). Both (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO and (NH/sub 4/) ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO/sub 2/ pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/NH, whereby any SO/sub 2/ present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO/sub 2/ in the original gas sample. The solid product (NH/sub 4/)(((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, or /sup 29/Si may be used as a reference.

  15. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, Leonard D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Bennett, Dennis W. (Clemson, SC); Davis, Jon F. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either .sup.1 H, .sup.13 C, .sup.15 N, or .sup.29 Si may be used as a reference.

  16. Laboratory studies of the dynamic of resonance cones formation in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarov, V. V.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Kostrov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is devoted to experimental studies of formation of resonance cones in magnetized plasmas by pulsed RF source in the lower-hybrid (whistler) and the upper-hybrid frequency ranges. It is shown that in both frequency ranges, resonance cones exhibit similar dynamics after switching-on the RF source: at first, wide maxima of radiation are formed in non-resonance directions, which then become narrower, with their direction approaching the resonance one. While the resonance cones are being formed, one observes a fine structure in the form of secondary radiation maxima. It is shown that the characteristic formation time of stationary resonance cones is determined by the minimal value of the group velocity of the quasi-electrostatic waves excited by the antenna. In the low-temperature plasma, this value is limited in the lower-hybrid frequency range by the spatial spectrum of the emitting antenna and in the upper-hybrid range, by the effects of spatial plasma dispersion.

  17. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  18. Spin counting in electrically detected magnetic resonance via low-field defect state mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Corey J.; Lenahan, Patrick M. [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The work herein describes a method that allows one to measure paramagnetic defect densities in semiconductor and insulator based devices with electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). The method is based upon the mixing of defect states which results from the dipolar coupling of paramagnetic sites at low magnetic fields. We demonstrate the measurement method with spin dependent tunneling in thin film dielectrics; however, the method should be equally applicable to paramagnetic defect density measurements in semiconductors via the more commonly utilized EDMR technique called spin dependent recombination.

  19. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamentalmicroscopies Research of magnetism in low dimensions has notnanoscience [3]. Solid state magnetism is also a showcase in

  20. Fundamental investigations of supported monometallic and bimetallic catalysts by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xi.

    1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen, has been applied to investigate silica-supported Group VIII monometallic and Group VIII-Group IB bimetallic catalysts and alumina- and silica-supported platinum-rhenium bimetallic catalysts. Two adsorbed states of hydrogen, i.e., irreversible and reversible hydrogen, on the surfaces of monometallic Ru, Pt, and Cu particles and bimetallic Ru-Group Ib, Pt-Group Ib, and Pt-Re particles were observed directly via proton NMR. The same amounts of the irreversible hydrogen adsorbed on pure Ru catalysts were measured by both proton NMR and the volumetric technique. The electronic environments on surfaces of monometallic catalysts are sensitive to changes in metal dispersion, state of adsorbed hydrogen, and residual chlorine. Surface compositions for the Ru--Cu and Pt--Cu bimetallic catalysts were determined by NMR of adsorbed hydrogen. 297 refs., 96 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Ferguson, R. M. [LodeSpin Labs, P.O. Box 95632, Seattle, Washington 98145 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25?kHz and 20?mT/?{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (?). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2?kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52?mT/?{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (?H{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  2. Circularly polarized microwaves for magnetic resonance study in the GHz range: application to nitrogen-vacancy in diamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrozek, Mariusz; Rudnicki, Daniel S; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to create time-dependent magnetic fields of controlled polarization is essential for many experiments with magnetic resonance. We describe a microstrip circuit that allows us to generate strong magnetic field at microwave frequencies with arbitrary adjusted polarization. The circuit performance is demonstrated by applying it to an optically detected magnetic resonance and Rabi nutation experiments in nitrogen-vacancy color centers in diamond. Thanks to high efficiency of the proposed microstrip circuit and degree of circular polarization of 85% it is possible to address the specific spin states of a diamond sample using a low power microwave generator.

  3. Distinguishing carbonate reservoir pore facies with nuclear magnetic resonance as an aid to identify candidates for acid stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genty, Coralie

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    patterns. This study integrates data from thin sections and core analyses with measurements of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) T2 relaxation times. It exposes a novel approach to the use of NMR by applying geological and statistical analysis to define...

  4. JOURNAL OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE 87,620-627 ( 1990) Practical Aspectsof Proton-Carbon-Carbon-Proton Three-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clore, G. Marius

    JOURNAL OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE 87,620-627 ( 1990) Practical Aspectsof Proton-Carbon-Carbon and demonstrate improvements that greatly reduce their intensity. 0022-2364190 $3.00 Copyright 0 1990 by Academic

  5. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance methodology and applications to structure determination of peptides, proteins and amyloid fibrils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methodological developments and applications of multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance to biomolecular structure determination are presented. Studies are performed in uniformly 3C, 15N isotope ...

  6. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 6 APRIL 2009 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1232 Control of a magnetic Feshbach resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    with ultracold gases. Magnetic Feshbach resonances1,2 are widely harnessed for this purpose, but future an optical Feshbach resonance. Using light to change the s-wave scattering length a in ultracold gases offers, Germany. *e-mail: stephan.duerr@mpq.mpg.de. Energy Internuclear distance Laser |g |a |e Figure 1 | Level

  7. Observations of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamaru, S., E-mail: shingo.tamaru@aist.go.jp; Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Konoto, M.; Nozaki, T.; Fukushima, A.; Imamura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Arai, H.; Tsunegi, S.; Yuasa, S. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance were performed on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and in-plane magnetized reference layer (abbreviated as PMF-STO in the following) for the purpose of obtaining magnetic properties in the PMF-STO structure. The measured spectra clearly showed a large main peak and multiple smaller peaks on the high frequency side. A Lorentzian fit on the main peak yielded Gilbert damping factor of 0.0041. The observed peaks moved in proportion to the out-of-plane bias field. From the slope of the main peak frequency as a function of the bias field, Lande g factor was estimated to be about 2.13. The mode intervals showed a clear dependence on the diameter of the PMF-STOs, i.e., intervals are larger for a smaller diameter. These results suggest that the observed peaks should correspond to eigenmodes of lateral spin wave resonance in the perpendicularly magnetized free layer.

  8. x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity of stratified magnetic structures: eigen-wave formalism and application to a Fe thin film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity of stratified magnetic structures: eigen-wave formalism regime up to soft and hard x-rays. The originality of the present formalism lies in the use of eigen-waves throughout the treatment. An application to a Fe thin film illustrates the methodology. I. INTRODUCTION X-ray

  9. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 ?m SQUID loops.

  10. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy Frank Ludwig a , Hilke. Krishnan b,n a Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig

  11. Residual Dipolar Couplings in Zero-to-Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchard, John W; King, Jonathan P; Ledbetter, Micah P; Levine, Emma H; Bajaj, Vikram S; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zero-to-ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF-NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the interaction averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial orientational ordering, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero-to-ultra-low-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-$^{13}$C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This represents the first investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin $J$-coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole c...

  12. Homometallic and Heterometallic Antiferromagnetic Rings: Magnetic Properties Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casadei, Cecilia

    2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present thesis is to investigate the local magnetic properties of homometallic Cr{sub 8} antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring and the changes occurring by replacing one Cr{sup 3+} ion with diamagnetic Cd{sup 2+} (Cr{sub 7}Cd) and with Ni{sup 2+} (Cr{sub 7}Ni). In the heterometallic ring a redistribution of the local magnetic moment is expected in the low temperature ground state. We have investigated those changes by both {sup 53}Cr-NMR and {sup 19}F-NMR. We have determined the order of magnitude of the transferred hyperfine coupling constant {sup 19}F - M{sup +} where M{sup +} = Cr{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+} in the different rings. This latter result gives useful information about the overlapping of the electronic wavefunctions involved in the coordinative bond.

  13. Generation and control of resonance states in crossed magnetic and electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Krajewska; Jerzy Z. Kaminski

    2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional electron system interacting with an impurity and placed in crossed magnetic and electric fields is under investigation. Since it is assumed that an impurity center interacts as an attractive $\\delta$-like potential a renormalization procedure for the retarded Green's function has to be carried out. For the vanishing electric field we obtain a close analytical expression for the Green's function and we find one bound state localized between Landau levels. It is also shown by numerical investigations that switching on the electric field new long-living resonance states localized in the vicinity of Landau levels can be generated.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an encoding module for the recently developed NMR remote detection experiment. The feasibility of using hyperpolarized xenon-129 gas as a sensor is discussed. This work also reports the use of an optical atomic magnetometer to detect the nuclear magnetization of Xe-129 gas, which has potential applicability as a detection module for NMR remote detection experiments.

  15. THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

  16. Development of an electro-optic resonator probe for Terahertz imaging R. Mueckstein, Huiyun Liu, and O. Mitrofanov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Development of an electro-optic resonator probe for Terahertz imaging R. Mueckstein, Huiyun Liu, Abstract: We introduce the concept of an electro-optic resonator to improve resolution and enhance. The optimum design in terms of 3dB-bandwidth, reflectivity, and electro-optic enhancement is deduced

  17. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for an Extended Strand Conformation of the Membrane-Bound HIV-1 Fusion Peptide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for an Extended Strand Conformation of the Membrane-Bound HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Jun Yang, Charles M. Gabrys, and David P. Weliky* Department of ChemistryVed May 4, 2001 ABSTRACT: Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied

  18. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL] [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL] [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  19. Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Byron J.; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Kostryukov, Artem Yu.; Miroshnikov, Igor V. [St. Petersburg State Technical University, St. Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Seo, Dongcheol [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Omori, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 {mu}m, 256x360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF{sub 2} optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cmx9 cmx5 {mu}m tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is achieved with 40x24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} for 16x12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U.

  20. Site-Selective Determination of Magnetic Helices in BaTiCoFe{sub 10}O{sub 19} by Resonant Magnetic Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okube, Maki; Kaneko, Yuhei; Ohsawa, Seiji; Sasaki, Satoshi [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Toyoda, Takeshi [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa, Kuratsuki 2-1, Kanazawa 920-8203 (Japan); Mori, Takeharu [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation intensity measurements were made for single crystals of ferrimagnetic BaTiCoFe{sub 10}O{sub 19} at the BL-6C(3A) beamline of the Photon Factory. The resonant x-ray magnetic scattering (RXMS) method at the Fe K edge makes it possible to determine the magnetic crystal structure, having the magnetic helices for Fe ions in tetrahedral 4f{sub 1}, bipyramidal 2b, and octahedral 2a, 4f{sub 2} and 12k sites. Based on the information on x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and a resonant magnetic scattering factor f''{sub m} ( = 0.23) estimated from BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} at E = 7128.2 eV, the magnetic structures have been determined from an asymmetrical ratio {Delta}R (Y{sup +}-Y{sup -})/(Y{sup +}+Y{sup -}), where Y{sup +} and Y{sup -} are scattering intensities for left- and right-circular polarizations, respectively. Spin orientations were estimated in the least-squares procedure to minimize a residual factor of {Sigma}({Delta}R{sub obs}-{Delta}R{sub calc}){sup 2}. The canting angles estimated in this study are 180 deg., 19 deg., 118 deg., 180 deg. and 65 deg. for the magnetic moments of Fe ions in 4f{sub 1}, 2b, 2a, 4f{sub 2} and 12k sites, respectively.

  1. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamone, Salvatore, E-mail: s.mamone@soton.ac.uk; Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H., E-mail: mhl@soton.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  2. Three path interference using nuclear magnetic resonance: a test of the consistency of Born's rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel K. Park; Osama Moussa; Raymond Laflamme

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Born rule is at the foundation of quantum mechanics and transforms our classical way of understanding probabilities by predicting that interference occurs between pairs of independent paths of a single object. One consequence of the Born rule is that three way (or three paths) quantum interference does not exist. In order to test the consistency of the Born rule, we examine detection probabilities in three path intereference using an ensemble of spin-1/2 quantum registers in liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (LSNMR). As a measure of the consistency, we evaluate the ratio of three way interference to two way interference. Our experiment bounded the ratio to the order of $10^{-3} \\pm 10^{-3}$, and hence it is consistent with Born's rule.

  3. Coherent dynamical recoupling of diffusion-driven decoherence in magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalo A. Alvarez; Noam Shemesh; Lucio Frydman

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    During recent years, dynamical decoupling (DD) has gained relevance as a tool for manipulating quantum systems and extracting information from them. This is particularly relevant for spins involved in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), where DD sequences can be used to prolong quantum coherences, or for selectively couple/decouple the effects imposed by random environmental fluctuations. In this Letter, we show that one can exploit these concepts in order to selectively recouple diffusion processes in restricted spaces. The ensuing method provides a novel tool to measure restriction lengths in confined systems such as capillaries, pores or cells. The principles of this method for selectively recoupling diffusion-driven decoherence, its standing within the context of diffusion NMR, and corroborating experiments, are presented.

  4. In Vivo Imaging with a Cell-Permeable Porphyrin-Based MRI Contrast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Taekwan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

  5. In vivo imaging with a cell-permeable porphyrin-based MRI contrast agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Taekwan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative imaging modality Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: traditional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US... detection and characterization of breast cancer pathology...

  7. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  8. Numerical procedure for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical procedure is developed for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors, and is applied to three sets of higher resolution data provided to us by J. C. Seamus Davis and E. W. Hudson. Each image...

  9. Resonant

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding accessProposal Title:TechnicalSmall) Resonant

  10. Methods for functional brain imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witzel, Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the potential for non-invasive mapping of structure and function (fMRI) in the human brain. In this thesis, we propose a series of methodological developments towards ...

  11. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muncaci, S.; Ardelean, I. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Boboia, S. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  12. The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope P. Chris Hammel and Denis V. Pelekhov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammel, P. Chris

    , Zhang, Moore and Roukes, 1995; Bruland et al., 1998) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) experiments

  13. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shikama, T., E-mail: shikama@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaoka, H. [Faculty of Engineering, Undergraduate School of Engineering Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30?eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  14. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Zueqian

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  15. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of hydrogen in battery and chemically prepared material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, R.J.; Jessel, A.M.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance studies have been undertaken on positive plate material from lead-acid batteries and on samples of both pure ..cap alpha..-PbO/sub 2/ and pure ..beta..-PbO/sub 2/ prepared by nonelectrochemical methods. Battery positive plate samples contain protons in two different surface and near surface configurations. One of these proton species is associated with mobile, isolated, adsorbed hydroxyl groups, and/or water molecules that can be removed by outgassing. The other proton species is not removed by outgassing; it probably corresponds to water molecules and/of closely spaced hydroxyl groups trapped on internal crystal surfaces. The proton species present in fresh (uncycled) positive plate material are not significantly different in either configuration or abundance from those in extensively cycled samples. Thus, it is unlikely that decline in battery capacity with cycling service is associated with a change in the hydrogen content of PbO/sub 2/.

  16. Lithium-7 nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of lithium insertion in hard carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Y.; Wang, Y.; Greenbaum, S.G. [City Univ. of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Eshkenazi, V.; Peled, E. [Tel Aviv Univ., IL (United States). School of Chemistry

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium battery anodes based on disordered, hard carbon were prepared by low-temperature (1,000 C) pyrolysis of cotton cloth. Samples were lithiated in an electrochemical cell. The Li insertion (potential vs. capacity) curve exhibits two different regions: a sloping one, from 1.1 to 0.1 V (vs Li/Li{sup +}) denoted as the high-voltage region (HVR), and a plateau between 0.1 and zero V, denoted as the low-voltage plateau (LVP). Lithium-7 high-resolution (magic angle spinning) nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in fully lithiated samples reveal three main features: a broad line at ca. 50 ppm, a relatively sharp line at 17 ppm, with a shoulder at about zero ppm (all shifts relative to aqueous LiCl). The 50 ppm component is attributed to Li intercalated between turbostratically disordered graphene planes and is associated with the LVP part of the potential curve. The 17 ppm signal arises from a Li site which resides in amorphous hydrogen-containing regions of the carbon and is correlated with the HVR part of the curve. The zero ppm component is attributed to the irreversible portion of the Li (up to {approximately} 20% of the total) which constitutes the solid electrolyte interphase on the surface of the carbon grains formed by electrochemical reduction of the electrolyte. These spectral assignments were verified by running other samples which were electrochemically delithiated to varying degrees.

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Huang, Cheng; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The vanadium (IV) electrolyte solutions with various vanadium concentrations are studied by variable temperature 1H and 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The structure and kinetics of vanadium (IV) species in the electrolyte solutions are explored with respect to vanadium concentration and temperature. It was found that the vanadium (IV) species exist as hydrated vanadyl ion, i.e. [VO(H2O)5]2+ forming an octahedral coordination with vanadyl oxygen in the axial position and the remaining positions occupied by water molecules. This hydrated vanadyl ion structure is stable in vanadium concentrations up to 3M and in the temperature range of 240 to 340 K. The sulfate anions in the electrolyte solutions are found to be weekly bound to this hydrated vanadyl ion and occupies its second coordination sphere. The possible effects of these sulfate anions in proton and water exchange between vanadyl ion and solvent molecules are discussed based on 1H and 17O NMR results.

  18. Plasma studies of the permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Peking University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Xu, Y.; Zhao, J.; Lu, P. N.; Chen, J.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, T.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At Peking University (PKU) we have developed several 2.45 GHz Permanent Magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources for PKUNIFTY, SFRFQ, Coupled RFQ and SFRFQ, and Dielectric-Wall Accelerator (DWA) projects (respectively, 50 mA of D{sup +}, 10 mA of O{sup +}, 10 mA of He{sup +}, and 50 mA of H{sup +}). In order to improve performance of these ion sources, it is necessary to better understand the principal factors that influence the plasma density and the atomic ion fraction. Theoretical analysis about microwave transmission and cut-off inside the discharge chamber were carried out to study the influence of the discharge chamber diameters. As a consequence, experimental studies on plasma density and ion fraction with different discharge chamber sizes have been carried out. Due to the difficulties in measuring plasma density inside the discharge chamber, the output beam current was measured to reflect the plasma density. Experimental results show that the plasma density increases to the maximum and then decreases significantly as the diameter changed from 64 mm to 30 mm, and the atomic ion fraction has the same tendency. The maximum beam intensity was obtained with the diameter of 35 mm, but the maximum atomic ion fraction with a diameter of 40 mm. The experimental results are basically accordant with the theoretical calculation. Details are presented in this paper.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced magnetic resonance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Namikawa, 1985; Gibbs, 1988) channels. These include studies... weak, synchrotron radiation brightness, together with resonant ... Source: Haskel, Daniel - Advanced Photon...

  20. Efficient MR image reconstruction for compressed MR imaging Junzhou Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    to be very powerful for the MR image reconstruction. First, we decompose the original problem into L1 and TV.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging has been widely used in medical. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used in practical MR image

  1. Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for com- pressed MR image reconstruction. 1 [1][2] show that it is possi- ble to accurately reconstruct the Magnetic Resonance (MR) images from for real MR images. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used

  2. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferracin, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the design of a N b S n superconducting magnet system for aNbjSn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron5 C H 1 1 2 3 1 . Nb Sn superconducting magnets for electron

  3. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P. J. (Hayward, CA); Hartemann, Frederic V. (San Ramon, CA); McNabb, Dennis P. (Alameda, CA); Pruet, Jason A. (Brentwood, CA)

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Angiography of the Peripheral Vessels in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: When Is an Additional Conventional Angiography Required?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janka, R., E-mail: rolf.janka@idr.imed.uni-erlangen.de; Wenkel, E. [Friedrich-Alexander-University, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Fellner, C. [Institute of Radiology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Lang, W. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery (Germany); Bautz, W.; Uder, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-University, Institute of Radiology (Germany)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to find out how often the clinician asks for a conventional angiography (CA) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) after a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has been performed and how often the CA reveals additional information for therapy planning. Quality criteria for the MRA were defined and tested to see whether they can predict the need for an additional CA. In this prospective study, 81 patients suffering from PAOD (Fontaine classification IIa, n = 13; IIb, n = 33; III, n = 10; IV, n = 25) were examined with a 1.5-T MR-scanner with dedicated coils using a step-by-step technique. The vascular surgeon decided whether he could plan the therapy on the basis of the MRA or if he needed an additional CA. The MRA was assessed in terms of the image quality of the MRA and regarding therapeutic management of the patient in a two-grade scale: sufficient and insufficient. In 27/81 (33%) patients, the clinician asked for a CA, which revealed new information in only 11 patients. The relative number of MRAs with insufficient image quality was significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the group with additional information on CA (8/11) compared to the group without additional information (0/16). The assessment of an MRA based on image quality and regarding therapeutic management of the patient might reduce the number of CAs for therapy planning in patients with PAOD.

  5. Impact of screening of resonant magnetic perturbations in three dimensional edge plasma transport simulations for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frerichs, H.; Reiter, D.; Schmitz, O. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research-Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Juelich (Germany); Cahyna, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Evans, T. E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Feng, Y. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany); Nardon, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, IRFM, CEA Cadarache, St-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the plasma edge can be analyzed in detail by three dimensional computer simulations, which take the underlying magnetic field structure as input. Previously, the 'vacuum approximation' has been used to calculate the magnetic field structure although plasma response effects may result in a screening (or even an amplification) of the external perturbations. Simulation results for an ITER similar shape plasma at the DIII-D tokamak are presented for the full vacuum perturbation field and an ad hoc screening case in comparison to the unperturbed configuration. It is shown that the RMP induced helical patterns in the plasma edge and on the divertor target shrink once screening is taken into account. However, a flat temperature profile is still found in the 'open field line domain' inside the separatrix, while the 'density pump out effect' found in the vacuum RMP case is considerably weakened.

  6. Rotor Design for High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 deg C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  7. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruk, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, S?oneczna 54, PL-10710 Olsztyn (Poland); Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A. [Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Rachocki, A. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Pozna? (Poland); Korpa?a, A. [Department of Biophysics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, ?azarza 16, 31-530 Kraków, Poland and Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Singh, R. K. [Ionic Liquid and Solid State Ionics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220–258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF{sub 4}, 243–318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF{sub 6}, 258–323 K). The dispersion of {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate R{sub 1}(?) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by {sup 19}F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF{sub 6} in the corresponding frequency range. From the {sup 1}H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF{sub 4}, and BMIM-PF{sub 6} are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R{sub 1} on square root of frequency. From the {sup 19}F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF{sub 6}. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  8. Capture and evolution of dust in planetary mean-motion resonances: a fast, semi-analytic method for generating resonantly trapped disk images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon, Andrew; Wyatt, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust grains migrating under Poynting-Robertson drag may be trapped in mean-motion resonances with planets. Such resonantly trapped grains are observed in the solar system. In extrasolar systems, the exozodiacal light produced by dust grains is expected to be a major obstacle to future missions attempting to directly image terrestrial planets. The patterns made by resonantly trapped dust, however, can be used to infer the presence of planets, and the properties of those planets, if the capture and evolution of the grains can be modelled. This has been done with N-body methods, but such methods are computationally expensive, limiting their usefulness when considering large, slowly evolving grains, and for extrasolar systems with unknown planets and parent bodies, where the possible parameter space for investigation is large. In this work, we present a semi-analytic method for calculating the capture and evolution of dust grains in resonance, which can be orders of magnitude faster than N-body methods. We calibr...

  9. Knowledge discovery using data mined from Nuclear Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Knowledge discovery using data mined from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectral images William J cyberinfrastructure · Method ­ Solid State ab initio calculations ­ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) ­ Support Vector refined (and/or relaxed) structure, perform Self-Consistent Field calculation for electronic structure

  10. Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd Multilayers using Resonant X-ray Holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tianhan; Zhu, Diling; Benny Wu,; Graves, Catherine; Schaffert, Stefan; Rander, Torbjorn; Muller, leonard; Vodungbo, Boris; Baumier, Cedric; Bernstein, David P.; Brauer, Bjorn; Cros, Vincent; Jong, Sanne de; Delaunay, Renaud; Fognini, Andreas; Kukreja, Roopali; Lee, Sooheyong; Lopez-Flores, Victor; Mohanty, Jyoti; Pfau, Bastian; Popescu, 5 Horia

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first single-shot images of ferromagnetic, nanoscale spin order taken with femtosecond x-ray pulses. X-ray-induced electron and spin dynamics can be outrun with pulses shorter than 80 fs in the investigated fluence regime, and no permanent aftereffects in the samples are observed below a fluence of 25 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Employing resonant spatially-muliplexed x-ray holography results in a low imaging threshold of 5 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our results open new ways to combine ultrafast laser spectroscopy with sequential snapshot imaging on a single sample, generating a movie of excited state dynamics.

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - angio-magnetic resonance finding Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resonator is placed in contact with soil medium and the real and imaginary parts of soil Source: Sarabandi, Kamal - Radiation Laboratory & Department of Electrical Engineering and...

  12. Magnetic fields at resonant conditions for the hydrogen ion affect neurite outgrowth in PC-12 cells: A test of the ion parametric resonance model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trillo, M.A.; Ubeda, A. [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain). Dept. Investigacion] [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain). Dept. Investigacion; Blanchard, J.P. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States). Research and Development Dept.] [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States). Research and Development Dept.; House, D.E.; Blackman, C.F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PC-12 cells primed with nerve growth factor (NGF) were exposed to sinusoidal extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs) selected to test the predictions of the ion parametric resonance (IPR) model under resonance conditions for a single ion (hydrogen). The authors examined the field effects on the neurite outgrowth (NO) induced by NGF using three different combinations of flux densities of the parallel components of the AC MF (B{sub ac}) and the static MF (B{sub dc}). The first test examined the NO response in cells exposed to 45 Hz at a B{sub dc} of 2.96 {micro}T with resonant conditions for H{sup +} according to the model. The B{sub ac} values ranged from 0.29 to 4.11 {micro}T root-mean-square (rms). In the second test, the MF effects at off-resonance conditions (i.e., no biologically significant ion at resonance) were examined using the frequency of 45 Hz with a B{sub dc} of 1.97 {micro}T and covering a B{sub ac} range between 0.79 and 2.05 {micro}T rms. In the third test, the Ac frequency was changed to 30 Hz with the subsequent change in B{sub dc} to 1.97 {micro}T to tune for H{sup +} as in the first test. The B{sub ac} values ranged from 0.79 to 2.05 {micro}T rms. After a 23 h incubation and exposure to the MF in the presence of NGF (5 ng/ml), the NO was analyzed using a stereoscopic microscope. The results showed that the NGF stimulation of neurite outgrowth (NSNO) was affected by MF combinations over most of the B{sub ac} exposure range generally consistent with the predictions of the IPR model. However, for a distinct range of B{sub ac} where the IPR model predicted maximal ionic influence, the observed pattern of NSNO contrasted sharply with those predictions. The symmetry of this response suggests that values of B{sub ac} within this distinct range may trigger alternate or additional cellular mechanisms that lead to an apparent lack of response to the MF stimulus.

  13. Magnetofossil spike during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum: Ferromagnetic resonance, rock magnetic, and electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetofossil spike during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum: Ferromagnetic resonance, rock,2 Timothy D. Raub,3,4 Dirk Schumann,5 Hojatollah Vali,5 Alexei V. Smirnov,3,6 and Joseph L. Kirschvink1 controversial hypothesis that a cometary impact triggered the PETM. Here we present ferromagnetic resonance (FMR

  14. Interface defects in SiC power MOSFETs - An electrically detected magnetic resonance study based on spin dependent recombination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruber, Gernot [KAI GmbH, Europastrasse 8, 9500 Villach, Austria and Graz University of Technology - Institute of Solid State Physics, Petersgasse 16, 8020 Graz (Austria); Hadley, Peter [Graz University of Technology - Institute of Solid State Physics, Petersgasse 16, 8020 Graz (Austria); Koch, Markus [Graz University of Technology - Institute of Experimental Physics, Petersgasse 16, 8020 Graz (Austria); Peters, Dethard [Infineon Technologies, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Aichinger, Thomas [Infineon Technologies, Siemensstrasse 2, 9500 Villach (Australia)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurements on a silicon carbide (SiC) MOSFET having the structure of a double-diffused silicon MOSFET (DMOS). The resonance pattern of a SiC DMOS was measured by monitoring the change of the recombination current between the source/body and the drain. The amplitude of the response has a maximum when the device is biased in depletion due to the equal concentrations of electrons and holes at the interface resulting in the most efficient recombination. The measured anisotropic g-tensor has axial symmetry with g{sub ?} = 2.0051(4) (B ? c-axis), and g{sub ?} = 2.0029(4) (B? c-axis) and the pattern shows several hyperfine (HF) peaks. We tentatively identify the observed defect as a silicon vacancy located directly at the interface.

  15. Unoccupied electronic states of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals: Evidence of image potential resonance and pseudogap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniraj, M [UGC-DAE Confortium for Scientific Research; Rai, Abhishek [UGC-DAE Confortium for Scientific Research; Barman, S R [UGC-DAE Confortium for Scientific Research; Krajci, M [Slovak Academy of Sciences; Schlagel, Deborah L [Ames Laboratory; Lograsso, Thomas A [Ames Laboratory; Horn, K [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the unoccupied region of the electronic structure of the fivefold symmetric surface of an icosahedral (i) Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal. A feature that exhibits parabolic dispersion with an effective mass of (1.15±0.1)me and tracks the change in the work function is assigned to an image potential resonance because our density functional calculation shows an absence of band gap in the respective energy region. We show that Sn grows pseudomorphically on i?Al?Pd?Mn as predicted by density functional theory calculations, and the energy of the image potential resonance tracks the change in the work function with Sn coverage. The image potential resonance appears much weaker in the spectrum from the related crystalline Al-Pd-Mn surface, demonstrating that its strength is related to the compatibility of the quasiperiodic wave functions in i?Al?Pd?Mn with the free-electron-like image potential states. Our investigation of the energy region immediately above EF provides unambiguous evidence for the presence of a pseudogap, in agreement with our density functional theory calculations.

  16. Image Fusion for MR Bias Stochastic Systems Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    We can target T1 and T2 through appropriate selection of TE and TR. #12;Image Reconstruction The MRImage Fusion for MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Joint work with W. Wells, J. Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A. Willsky, B. Mulkern #12;Magnetic Resonance The magnetic resonance (MR

  17. X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

  18. X-ray imaging of vortex cores in confined magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Kasai, S.; Yamada, K.; Ono, T.; Thiaville, A.

    2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Cores of magnetic vortices in micron-sized NiFe disk structures, with thicknesses between 150 and 50 nm, were imaged and analysed by high resolution magnetic soft X-ray microscopy. A decrease of the vortex core radius was observed, from #24; ~38 to 18 nm with decreasing disk thickness. By comparing with full 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the well-known barrel structure, we obtained excellent agreement taking into account instrumental broadening and a small perpendicular anisotropy. The proven magnetic spatial resolution of better than 25 nm was sufficient to identify a negative dip close to the vortex core, originating from stray fields of the core. Magnetic vortex structures can serve as test objects for evaluating sensitivity and spatial resolution of advanced magnetic microscopy techniques.

  19. Design of a scanning Josephson junction microscope for submicron-resolution magnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plourde, B.L.; Van Harlingen, D.J. [Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a magnetic field scanning instrument designed to extend the spatial resolution of scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy into the submicron regime. This instrument, the scanning Josephson junction microscope, scans a single Josephson junction across the surface of a sample, detecting the local magnetic field by the modulation of the junction critical current. By using a submicron junction and a scanning tunneling microscope feedback system to maintain close proximity to the surface, magnetic field sensitivity of 10 {mu}G with a spatial resolution of 0.3 {mu}m should be attainable, opening up new opportunities for imaging vortex configurations and core structure in superconductors and magnetic domains in magnetic materials. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Magnetic-dipolar-mode Fano resonances for microwave spectroscopy of high absorption matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, G; Shavit, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of interaction between high absorption matter and microwave radiated energy is a subject of great importance. Especially, this concerns microwave spectroscopic characterization of biological liquids. Use of effective testing methods to obtain information about physical properties of different liquids on the molecular level is one of the most important problems in biophysics. However, the standard methods based on the microwave resonant techniques are not sufficiently suitable for biological liquids because the resonance peak in a resonator with high-loss liquids is so broad that the material parameters cannot be measured correctly. Although molecular vibrations of biomolecules may have microwave frequencies, it is not thought that such resonant coupling is significant due to their low energy compared with thermal energy and the strongly dampening aqueous environment. This paper presents an innovative microwave sensing technique for different types of lossy materials, including biological liquids. The te...

  1. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Bobra, Monica G; Sun, Xudong D; Norton, Aimee A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of polytropic gas with specific heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimen...

  2. Evaluation of the toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Maassberg, Henning [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant magnetic perturbations (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) is an important momentum source affecting the toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. The well-known force-flux relation directly links this torque to the non-ambipolar neoclassical particle fluxes arising due to the violation of the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field. Here, a quasilinear approach for the numerical computation of these fluxes is described, which reduces the dimension of a standard neoclassical transport problem by one without model simplifications of the linearized drift kinetic equation. The only limiting condition is that the non-axisymmetric perturbation field is small enough such that the effect of the perturbation field on particle motion within the flux surface is negligible. Therefore, in addition to most of the transport regimes described by the banana (bounce averaged) kinetic equation also such regimes as, e.g., ripple-plateau and resonant diffusion regimes are naturally included in this approach. Based on this approach, a quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 [W. Kernbichler et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 3, S1061 (2008).] has been developed and benchmarked against a few analytical and numerical models. Results from NEO-2 stay in good agreement with results from these models in their pertinent range of validity.

  3. Fructose-induced aberration of metabolism in familial gout identified by sup 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seegmiller, J.E. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (England) Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)); Dixon, R.M.; Kemp, G.J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Radda, G.K. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (England)); Angus, P.W. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (England) Austin Hospital, Heidelburg, Victoria (Australia)); McAlindon, T.E.; Dieppe, P. (Univ. of Bristol (England))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hyperuricemia responsible for the development of gouty arthritis results from a wide range of environmental factors and underlying genetically determined aberrations of metabolism. {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of children with hereditary fructose intolerance revealed a readily detectable rise in phosphomonoesters with a marked fall in inorganic phosphate in their liver in vivo and a rise in serum urate in response to very low doses of oral fructose. Parents and some family members heterozygous for this enzyme deficiency showed a similar pattern when given a substantially larger dose of fructose. Three of the nine heterozygotes thus identified also had clinical gout, suggesting the possibility of this defect being a fairly common cause of gout. In the present study this same noninvasive technology was used to identify the same spectral pattern in 2 of the 11 families studied with hereditary gout. In one family, the index patient's three brothers and his mother all showed the fructose-induced abnormality of metabolism, in agreement with the maternal inheritance of metabolism, in agreement with the maternal inheritance of the gout in this family group. The test dose of fructose used produced a significantly larger increment in the concentration of serum urate in the patients showing the changes in {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectra than in the other patients with familial gout or in nonaffected members, thus suggesting a simpler method for initial screening for the defect.

  4. 128 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 25, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 Unwrapping of MR Phase Images Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koetter, Ralf

    128 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 25, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 Unwrapping of MR Phase of blood flow [1], [2]. Extracting the phase image from its measured complex MR image is nontrivial because, phase unwrapping. I. INTRODUCTION A. Background Magnetic resonance (MR) phase images often contain

  5. 106 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 Feature Based Nonrigid Brain MR Image Registration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Albert C. S.

    106 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 Feature Based Nonrigid Brain MR Image Registration With Symmetric Alpha Stable Filters Shu Liao* and Albert C. S. Chung Abstract--A new feature based nonrigid image registration method for magnetic resonance (MR) brain images

  6. Two-channel R-matrix analysis of magnetic-field-induced Feshbach resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nygaard, Nicolai; Schneider, Barry I.; Julienne, Paul S. [Danish National Research Foundation Center for Quantum Optics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia 22230 (United States) and Electron and Optical Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Feshbach resonance arises in cold atom scattering due to the complex interplay between several coupled channels. However, the essential physics of the resonance may be encapsulated in a simplified model consisting of just two coupled channels. In this paper we describe in detail how such an effective Feshbach model can be constructed from knowledge of a few key parameters, characterizing the atomic Born-Oppenheimer potentials and the low energy scattering near the resonance. These parameters may be obtained either from experiment or full coupled-channel calculations. Using R-matrix theory we analyze the bound state spectrum and the scattering properties of the two-channel model, and find it to be in good agreement with exact calculations.

  7. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garitezi, T. M., E-mail: thalesmg@ifi.unicamp.br; Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” UNICAMP, Campinas, SP 13083-859 (Brazil); Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, FSU, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4005 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report high field {sup 75}As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T{sub 0}?128??K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency ?{sub Q}?2.57(1)??MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe–As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T{sub 0} in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T{sub 0} suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  8. Magnetic and microwave properties of U-type hexaferrite films with high remanence and low ferromagnetic resonance linewidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Zhijuan; Bennett, Steven; Hu, Bolin; Chen, Yajie, E-mail: y.chen@neu.edu; Harris, Vincent G. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA and The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    U-type barium hexaferrite films (Ba{sub 4}Ni{sub 1.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 36}O{sub 60}) were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure and magnetic properties of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were performed at X-band. The results indicate an anisotropy field of ?8 kOe, and the saturation magnetization (4?M{sub s}) of ?3.6 kG. An optimal post-deposition annealing of films results in a strong (0 0?n) crystallographic texture and a high hysteresis loop squareness (M{sub r}/M{sub s}?=?92%) leading to self biased properties. Furthermore, the highly self-biased ferrite films exhibited an FMR linewidth of ?200?Oe. The U-type hexaferrite films having low microwave loss, low magnetic anisotropy field, and high squareness are a suitable alternative to Sc or In doped BaM ferrites that have been the choice material for self-biased microwave devices at X-band frequencies.

  9. A practical acceleration algorithm for real-time imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumbul, Uygar

    A practical acceleration algorithm for real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presented. Neither separate training scans nor embedded training samples are used. The Kalman filter based algorithm provides a fast and ...

  10. Development of a microwave ion and plasma source immersed in a multicusp electron-cyclotron-resonant magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahimene, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental development and test of an electrodeless microwave (2.45 GHz)-generated plasma and ion source in a discharge pressure range of 6 x 10 /sup -4/-5 x 10/sup -1/ Torr and relatively low power (80-350 W CW) are presented. Also presented is a semi-empirical model applicable to low-pressure microwave discharges with no static magnetic field. Initial experiments studied the properties of variable diffusion length (0.43-1.22 cm) disk-shaped discharges generated and maintained in a cylindrical microwave resonant-cavity applicator for argon and oxygen gases without a static magnetic field. These discharges were characterized by measuring plasma densities and electron temperatures using a Langmuir double probe for different experimental conditions. The measured plasma densities and electron temperatures ranged for 8 x 10/sup 10/ to 5 x 10 /sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ and 2 x 10/sup 4/ to 8 x 10/sup 4/ /sup 0/K, respectively. The ion temperature was less than 500 /sup 0/K. Ion beams were extracted from these discharges using single and double grids. Argon ion-beam currents densities were measured to be 3.0 mA/cm/sup 2/ for the single grid and 5.8 mA/cm/sup 2/ for the double grids with a maximum extraction voltage of 1.7 kV. This applicator was then retrofitted with magnets to study the effect of a multicusp static magnetic field. Using this concept, a new cylindrical microwave applicator was designed and tested.

  11. Two-dimensional resonant magnetic excitation in BaFe1.84Co0.16As2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL; Parshall, Daniel [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL; Lokshin, Konstantin A [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Goremychkin, E. A. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Osborn, R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; Jin, Rongying [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of superconducting BaFe1.84Co0.16As2 clearly reveal a magnetic excitation located at wavevectors (1/2 1/2 L) in tetragonal notation. The scattering is much broader in L than are spin waves observed in the parent compound BaFe2As2 indicating that the excitations in the superconducting material are more two-dimensional in nature. The excitation appears gapless for T > TC and becomes gapped on cooling below TC. The observed gap energy is approximately 9.6 meV corresponding to 5 kBTC which is remarkably similar to the canonical value for the resonance energy in the cuprates.

  12. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  13. Magnetic resonance investigation of Zn{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O properties influenced by annealing atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raita, O.; Popa, A.; Toloman, D.; Stan, M.; Giurgiu, L. M. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies Donath 65-103, 400293, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies Donath 65-103, 400293, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnO is an attractive system for a wide variety of practical applications, being a chemically stable oxide semiconductor. It has been shown that Fe doping produces ferromagnetic semiconductor at room temperature. This material, therefore, has the potential for use in spintronic devices such as spin transistors, spin light emitting diodes, very high density nonvolatile semiconductor memory and optical emitters. It is believed that oxygen vacancies and substitutional incorporation are important to produce ferromagnetism in semiconductor oxide doped with transition metal ions. The present paper reports detailed electron paramagnetic resonance investigations (EPR) of the samples in order to investigate how annealing atmosphere (Air and Argon) influenced the magnetic behavior of the samples. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of Fe{sup 3+} ions in Zn{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O powders with x = 1%, 3% is reported. These samples are interesting to investigate as Fe doping produce ferromagnetism in ZnO, making a promising ferromagnetic semiconductor at room temperature.

  14. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide to Lipid Distances Reveal the Intimate Contact of Strand Peptide with Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide to Lipid Distances Reveal 23, 2007 ABSTRACT: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection begins with fusion between viral and host cell membranes and is catalyzed by the HIV gp41 fusion protein. The 20 N-terminal apolar residues

  15. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for Parallel and Antiparallel Strand Arrangements in the Membrane-Associated HIV-1 Fusion Peptide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for Parallel and Antiparallel Strand Arrangements in the Membrane-Associated HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Jun Yang and David P. Weliky* Department of Chemistry, Michigan 7, 2003 ABSTRACT: The HIV-1 fusion peptide serves as a useful model system for understanding viral

  16. Multi-rank nuclear magnetic resonance studies of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei in solids by three-dimensional dynamic-angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frydman, Lucio

    Multi-rank nuclear magnetic resonance studies of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei in solids by three-integer quadrupolar nuclei in solids. The method is based on the multi-rank expansion of the high-field NMR, as well as by second- and fourth-rank anisotropies depending on the principal values and relative

  17. Effective Cerebral Connectivity during Silent Speech Reading Revealed by Functional Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effective Cerebral Connectivity during Silent Speech Reading Revealed by Functional Magnetic Y-H, Lin F-H, Chou Y-J, Tsai KW-K, Kuo W-J, et al. (2013) Effective Cerebral Connectivity during that no competing interests exist. * E-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw . These authors contributed equally to this work

  18. A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of Fe-Al and Al20V2Eu intermetallics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Ji

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Al-rich Fe-Al systems (FeAl2, Fe2 Al5 and Fe4Al13) and Al20V2Eu have complicated structures with quasicrystal-like features making these materials potentially of interest for magnetic behavior. However, there is not much work on these materials...

  19. Image Charge Differential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Image Charge Differential Amplifier FT 0 Crude Oil Time (s) 543210 Frequency (kHz) m/z m q B f Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) uses the frequency of cyclotron motion of the ions in a static magnetic field to determine the mass-to-charge ratio, which is then used

  20. Proton magnetic resonance studies of the chemical shifts occurring in propionic acid-dioxane solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldham, William J. Bryan

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Nxperimentaliy Gutowsky 1'ound S to be a linear function of Pl, Howevers Bhar end Lindstrom(I~ found deviations from the linear de- pendence g1ven in Gutowsky's report, These deviat1ons occur in the range of 5Q of acid by volume. The shift does not decrease... lines are displayed as the f10IlL is swept through 'the resonant value Since it was desire4 to find if the cheaical shift is tesperature de pendent~ 1t vas decided to neasure the shift at two tenperatures, One of those vas to be roc' tenperatuze...

  1. ANALYSIS OF FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING DATA USING SIGNAL PROCESSING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    parents. Without their encourangement and endless toil, the opportunities for this journey would be lost for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy December 2002 #12;- ii - To my parents and Abigail. #12;- iii

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolar, Divya Sanam

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen consumption is an essential process of the functioning brain. The rate at which the brain consumes oxygen is known as the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO?). CMRO? is intimately related to brain health and ...

  3. Applications of Magnetic Resonance to Current Detection and Microscale Flow Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern-Manners, Nicholas Wm

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Reversible Hydrogen Storage. Chemistry of Materials 18,F. Nanoporous Polymers for Hydrogen Storage. Small 5, 10 (136] as well as hydrogen storage [36][35]. The development

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and analysis for determination of porous media properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uh, Jinsoo

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    heterogeneous porous media. The permeability distributions are determined by solving the inverse problem formulated in terms of flow models and the velocity data. We present new experimental designs associated with flow conditions to enhance the accuracy...

  5. Rf coil design for multi-frequency magnetic resonance imaging & spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabirzadeh, Arash

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    was then verified by using it with general-purpose proton coils available. Phantoms were built to mimic the phosphorus content normally found in biologic tissues in order to verify applicability of this coil for in vivo studies. The contribution of this work lies...

  6. Cardiac dysfunction in the diabetic rat: quantitative evaluation using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Bilgen, Mehmet; Al-Hafez, Baraa; Alenezy, Mohammed D.; Smirnova, Irina V.

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In particular, type 1 diabetes compromises the cardiac function of individuals at a relatively early age due to the protracted course of abnormal ...

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Microstructural Remodeling Using Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fluid (Fomblin Y-LVAC 6-06, Solvay Solexis, West Deptford,fluid (Fomblin Y-LVAC 6-06, Solvay Solexis, West Deptford,fluid (Fomblin Y-LVAC 6-06, Solvay Solexis, West Deptford,

  8. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Cortical Functional Connectivity in the Developing Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    in the Developing Brain Weili Lin, Ph.D.^1 , Quan Zhu, M.S.^ 2 , Wei Gao, M.S.^ 3 , Yasheng Chen, D.Sc.^ 1 , Cheng was utilized to depict brain regions exhibiting temporal synchronization, also known as resting brain pixel-by-pixel throughout the entire brain, identifying regions with high temporal correlation. Results

  9. Near-infrared frequency-domain optical spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging: a combined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for measurements in all neonates. Positron emission tomogra- phy PET studies in humans have shown regional changes of glucose utilization, oxygen consumption, and blood flow with brain maturation.2­7 However, because

  10. Analysis, design, and application of circularly polarized RF receiver antennas for magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usey, Michael Christopher

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , an example coil will be designed for significantly improved SNR over the spine, with a minimum of added cost and complexity. The receiver antenna will be evaluated in both lab and clinical environments, with the results presented in this thesis. Further MRI...

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 30, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2011 1771 Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ljubljana, University of

    conditions for successful electroporation, applications based on electropo- ration would greatly benefit of the cell with a sufficiently large electric field therefore presents one of the most important conditions for successful electroporation [7], [8]. Applications such as electrochemotherapy (ECT) [9], [10

  12. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics of Josephson junctions, Appl. Phys. Lett.Josephson junctions ..and current-limiting Josephson junction array. Figure 4.6(B)

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Decreased Choroidal and Retinal Blood Flow in the DBA/2J Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    proteins: tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), which causes iris stromal atrophy,6 and glycoprotein

  14. Development of vocal tract length during early childhood: A magnetic resonance imaging studya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yandell, Brian S.

    of Wisconsin-Madison, 1975 Willow Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 Lindell R. Gentry Department of Radiology pediatric cases ages birth to 6 years and 9 months and 12 adults. Results indicate a ongoing growth of all

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Princeton, UofV, and UNH | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

  16. Variability in functional magnetic resonance imaging : influence of the baseline vascular state and physiological fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behzadi, Yashar

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    function and the interconnectivity of neurons as a basis forthen refers to the interconnectivity of these specializedas attention pathways. The interconnectivity of the visual

  17. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.61) to convert equivalent resistance to field noise andnoise. The equivalent pickup coil resistance of the spinThis power is equivalent to a series resistance R loss = P

  18. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling techniques.J = NI/A C . 5.1.2. Cooling techniques The first polarizingI call this technique internal cooling as opposed to

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Princeton, UofV, and UNH | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticut RegionsScience (SC) Life at the Frontiers

  20. Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network Recommendations for Prospective Multi-Center Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1002/jmri.23572. Function Biomedical Informatics Researchstudy performed by Biomedical Informatics Research Network.of information in distributed biomedical collaboratories.

  1. Pellet fuelling of plasmas with ELM mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations in MAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valovic, M; Garzotti, L; Gurl, C; Kirk, A; Naylor, G; Patel, A; Scannell, R; Thornton, A J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow fuelling pellets are injected from the high field side into plasmas in which ELMs have been mitigated using external magnetic perturbation coils. The data are compared with ideal assumptions in the ITER fuelling model, namely that mitigated ELMs are not affected by fuelling pellets. Firstly it is shown that during the pellet evaporation an ELM is triggered, during which the amount particle loss could be larger (factor ~1.5) than the particle loss during an ELM which was not induced by pellet. Secondly, a favourable example is shown in which post-pellet particle losses due to mitigated ELMs are similar to the non-pellet case, however unfavourable counter-examples also exist.

  2. Noise-Produced Patterns in Images Constructed from Magnetic Flux Leakage Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Levesley, Jeremy; Elkington, Peter; Bacciarelli, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic flux leakage measurements help identify the position, size and shape of corrosion-related defects in steel casings used to protect boreholes drilled into oil and gas reservoirs. Images constructed from magnetic flux leakage data contain patterns related to noise inherent in the method. We investigate the patterns and their scaling properties for the case of delta-correlated input noise, and consider the implications for the method's ability to resolve defects. The analytical evaluation of the noise-produced patterns is made possible by model reduction facilitated by large-scale approximation. With appropriate modification, the approach can be employed to analyze noise-produced patterns in other situations where the data of interest are not measured directly, but are related to the measured data by a complex linear transform involving integrations with respect to spatial coordinates.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of dynamics in poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium polyether-ester-sulfonate ionomers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roach, David J. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Dou, Shichen [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Colby, Ralph H. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the dynamics of poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium sulfonate ionomer samples that have low glass transition temperatures. 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the bulk polymer and lithium ions, respectively, were measured and analyzed in samples with a range of ion contents. The temperature dependence of T1 values along with the presence of minima in T1 as a function of temperature enabled correlation times and activation energies to be obtained for both the segmental motion of the polymer backbone and the hopping motion of lithium cations. Similar activation energies for motion of both the polymer and lithium ions in the samples with lower ion content indicate that the polymer segmental motion and lithium ion hopping motion are correlated in these samples, even though their respective correlation times differ significantly. A divergent trend is observed for correlation times and activation energies of the highest ion content sample with 100% lithium sulfonation due to the presence of ionic aggregation. Details of the polymer and cation dynamics on the nanosecond timescale are discussed and complement the findings of X-ray scattering and Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments.

  4. Dynamics of water-alcohol mixtures: Insights from nuclear magnetic resonance, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and triplet solvation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, D.; Schuster, B.; Rosenstihl, M.; Schneider, S.; Blochowicz, T.; Stühn, B.; Vogel, M. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Talluto, V.; Walther, T. [Institut für Angewandte Physik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 7, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Institut für Angewandte Physik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 7, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), and triplet solvation dynamics (TSD) to investigate molecular dynamics in glass-forming mixtures of water and propylene glycol in very broad time and temperature ranges. All methods yield consistent results for the ? process of the studied mixtures, which hardly depends on the composition and shows Vogel-Fulcher temperature dependence as well as Cole-Davidson spectral shape. The good agreement between BDS and TDS data reveals that preferential solvation of dye molecules in microheterogeneous mixtures does not play an important role. Below the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, NMR and BDS studies reveal that the ? process of the mixtures shows correlation times, which depend on the water concentration, but exhibit a common temperature dependence, obeying an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of E{sub a} = 0.54? eV, as previously reported for mixtures of water with various molecular species. Detailed comparison of NMR and BDS correlation functions for the ? process unravels that the former decay faster and more stretched than the latter. Moreover, the present NMR data imply that propylene glycol participates in the ? process and, hence, it is not a pure water process, and that the mechanism for molecular dynamics underlying the ? process differs in mixtures of water with small and large molecules.

  5. The Structure of Hydrated Electron. Part 1. Magnetic Resonance of Internally Trapping Water Anions: A Density Functional Theory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Shkrob

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to rationalize magnetic parameters of hydrated electron trapped in alkaline glasses as observed using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies. To this end, model water cluster anions (n=4-8 and n=20,24) that localize the electron internally are examined. It is shown that EPR parameters of such water anions (such as hyperfine coupling tensors of H/D nuclei in the water molecules) are defined mainly by the cavity size and the coordination number of the electron; the water molecules in the second solvation shell play a relatively minor role. An idealized model of hydrated electron (that is usually attributed to L. Kevan) in which six hydroxyl groups arranged in an octahedral pattern point towards the common center is shown to provide the closest match to the experimental parameters, such as isotropic and anisotropic hyperfine coupling constants for the protons (estimated from ESEEM), the second moment of the EPR spectra, and the radius of gyration. The salient feature of these DFT models is the significant transfer (10-20%) of spin density into the frontal O 2p orbitals of water molecules. Spin bond polarization involving these oxygen orbitals accounts for small, negative hyperfine coupling constants for protons in hydroxyl groups that form the electron-trapping cavity. In Part 2, these results are generalized for more realistic geometries of core anions obtained using a dynamic one-electron mixed qunatum/classical molecular dynamics model.

  6. Calcium silicate hydrates investigated by solid-state high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meducin, Fabienne [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)]. E-mail: meducin@cnrs-orleans.fr; Bresson, Bruno [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, ESPCI (France); Lequeux, Nicolas [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des polymeres et des milieux disperses, ESPCI (France); Noirfontaine, Marie-Noelle de [Laboratoire CECM-CNRS, 15, rue Georges Urbain, 94407 Vitry sur Seine (France); Zanni, Helene [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work focuses on phases formed during cement hydration under high pressure and temperature: portlandite Ca(OH){sub 2} (CH); hillebrandite Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({beta}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H); jaffeite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 6} (tricalcium silicate hydrate); {alpha}-C{sub 2}SH Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({alpha}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); xonotlite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 6}O{sub 17})(OH){sub 2} and kilchoanite Ca{sub 6}(SiO{sub 4})(Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}). Portlandite and hillebrandite were synthesized and characterised by high resolution solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In addition, information from the literature concerning the last five phases was gathered. In certain cases, a schematic 3D-structure could be determined. These data allow identification of the other phases present in a mixture. Their morphology was also observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  7. Development of a System for Rapid Detection of Contaminants in Water Supplies Using Magnetic Resonance and Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowery, Thomas J; Neely, Lori; Chepin, James; Wellman, Parris; Toso, Ken; Murray, Paul; Audeh, Mark; Demas, Vasiliki; Palazzolo, Robert; Min, Michael; Phung, Nu; Blanco, Matt; Raphel, Jordan; O'Neil, Troy

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To keep the water supply safe and to ensure a swift and accurate response to a water supply contamination event, rapid and robust methods for microbial testing are necessary. Current technologies are complex, lengthy and costly and there is a need for rapid, reliable, and precise approaches that can readily address this fundamental security and safety issue. T2 Biosystems is focused on providing solutions to this problem by making breakthroughs in nanotechnology and biosensor techniques that address the current technical restrictions facing rapid, molecular analysis in complex samples. In order to apply the T2 Biosystems nucleic acid detection procedure to the analysis of nucleic acid targets in unprocessed water samples, Bacillus thuringeinsis was selected as a model organism and local river water was selected as the sample matrix. The initial assay reagent formulation was conceived with a manual magnetic resonance reader, was optimized using a high throughput system, and transferred back to the MR reader for potential field use. The final assay employing the designed and manufactured instruments was capable of detecting 10 CFU/mL of B. thuringiensis directly within the environmental water sample within 90 minutes. Further, discrimination of two closely related species of Bacilli was accomplished using the methods of this project; greater than 3-fold discrimination between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis at a concentrations spanning 10 CFU/mL to 10{sup 5} CFU/mL was observed.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Dynamics in Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Based Lithium Polyether-ester-sulfonate Ionomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, David J.; Dou, Shichen; Colby, Ralph H.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2012-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the dynamics of poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium sulfonate ionomer samples that have low glass transition temperatures. 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the bulk polymer and lithium ions, respectively, were analyzed in samples with a range of ion contents. The temperature dependence of T1 values along with the presence of minima in T1 enabled correlation times and activation energies to be obtained for both the segmental motion of the polymer backbone and the hopping motion of lithium cations. Similar activation energies of both the polymer and lithium ions in the lower ion content samples indicate that the polymer segmental motion and lithium ion hopping motion are correlated even though their respective correlation times differ significantly. A divergent trend is observed for correlation times and activation energies of the highest ion content sample due to the presence of ionic aggregation. Details about the polymer and cation dynamics on the nanosecond timescale are discussed and complement the findings of X-ray scattering and Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments.

  9. Electron nuclear double resonance study of photostimulated luminescence active centers in CsBr:Eu{sup 2+} medical imaging plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrielinck, H.; Loncke, F.; Matthys, P.; Callens, F. [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Tahon, J.-P.; Leblans, P. [Agfa HealthCare NV, Septestraat 27, B-2640 Mortsel (Belgium)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CsBr:Eu{sup 2+} needle image plates exhibit an electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spectrum at room temperature (RT), whose intensity is correlated with the photostimulated luminescence sensitivity of the plate. This EPR spectrum shows a strong temperature dependence: At RT it is owing to a single Eu{sup 2+} (S =7/2) center with axial symmetry, whereas at T<35 K the spectra can only be explained when two distinct centers are assumed to be present, a minority axial center and a majority center with nearly extremely rhombic symmetry. In this paper these low-temperature centers are studied with electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy, which reveals the presence of {sup 1}H nuclei close to the central Eu{sup 2+} ions in the centers. Analysis of the angular dependence of the ENDOR spectra allows to propose models for these centers, providing an explanation for the observed difference in intensity between the spectral components and for their temperature dependence.

  10. Diffusion-assisted selective dynamical recoupling: A new approach to measure background gradients in magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Shemesh, Noam; Frydman, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.frydman@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)] [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical decoupling, a generalization of the original NMR spin-echo sequence, is becoming increasingly relevant as a tool for reducing decoherence in quantum systems. Such sequences apply non-equidistant refocusing pulses for optimizing the coupling between systems, and environmental fluctuations characterized by a given noise spectrum. One such sequence, dubbed Selective Dynamical Recoupling (SDR) [P. E. S. Smith, G. Bensky, G. A. Álvarez, G. Kurizki, and L. Frydman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109, 5958 (2012)], allows one to coherently reintroduce diffusion decoherence effects driven by fluctuations arising from restricted molecular diffusion [G. A. Álvarez, N. Shemesh, and L. Frydman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 080404 (2013)]. The fully-refocused, constant-time, and constant-number-of-pulses nature of SDR also allows one to filter out “intrinsic” T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} weightings, as well as pulse errors acting as additional sources of decoherence. This article explores such features when the fluctuations are now driven by unrestricted molecular diffusion. In particular, we show that diffusion-driven SDR can be exploited to investigate the decoherence arising from the frequency fluctuations imposed by internal gradients. As a result, SDR presents a unique way of probing and characterizing these internal magnetic fields, given an a priori known free diffusion coefficient. This has important implications in studies of structured systems, including porous media and live tissues, where the internal gradients may serve as fingerprints for the system's composition or structure. The principles of this method, along with full analytical solutions for the unrestricted diffusion-driven modulation of the SDR signal, are presented. The potential of this approach is demonstrated with the generation of a novel source of MRI contrast, based on the background gradients active in an ex vivo mouse brain. Additional features and limitations of this new method are discussed.

  11. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of magnetic reconnection and chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K; Raymond, John C; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfv\\'{e}n speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of greatly redshifted ($\\sim$125 km s$^{-1}$ along line of sight) Fe {\\sc{xxi}} 1354.08\\AA{} emission line with a $\\sim$100 km s$^{-1}$ nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe {\\sc{xxi}} feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-Ray source observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) also...

  12. Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Additional Steady-State Acquisition of the Infragenicular Arteries in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Yousef W., E-mail: yujwni01@heh.regionh.d [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Eiberg, Jonas P. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke B. [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Just, Sven [University Hospital at Gentofte, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S. [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if addition of infragenicular steady-state (SS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to first-pass imaging improves diagnostic performance compared with first-pass imaging alone in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) undergoing whole-body (WB) MRA. Twenty consecutive patients with PAD referred to digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) underwent WB-MRA. Using a bolus-chase technique, first-pass WB-MRA was performed from the supra-aortic vessels to the ankles. The blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium was used at a dose of 0.03 mmol/kg body weight. Ten minutes after injection of the contrast agent, high-resolution (0.7-mm isotropic voxels) SS-MRA of the infragenicular arteries was performed. Using DSA as the 'gold standard,' sensitivities and specificities for detecting significant arterial stenoses ({>=}50% luminal narrowing) with first-pass WB-MRA, SS-MRA, and combined first-pass and SS-MRA were calculated. Kappa statistics were used to determine intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA. Overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with first-pass WB-MRA was 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.78) and 0.97 (0.94 to 0.99), respectively. In first-pass WB-MRA, the lowest sensitivity was in the infragenicular region, with a value of 0.42 (0.23 to 0.63). Combined analysis of first-pass WB-MRA and SS-MRA increased sensitivity to 0.81 (0.60 to 0.93) in the infragenicular region, with specificity of 0.94 (0.88 to 0.97). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with isolated infragenicular SS-MRA was 0.47 (0.27 to 0.69) and 0.86 (0.78 to 0.91), respectively. Intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA in the infragenicular region was moderate for first-pass WB-MRA ({kappa} = 0.49), fair for SS-MRA ({kappa} = 0.31), and good for combined first-pass/SS-MRA ({kappa} = 0.71). Addition of infragenicular SS-MRA to first-pass WB MRA improves diagnostic performance.

  13. Understanding the Fe I Line Measurements Returned by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Daniel P; Farris, Laurel; Tritschler, Alexandra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observes the Sun at the Fe I 6173 {\\AA} line and returns full-disk maps of line-of-sight (LOS) observables including the magnetic flux density, velocities, Fe I line width, line depth, and continuum intensity. These data are estimated through an algorithm (the MDI-like algorithm, hereafter), which combines observables obtained at six wavelength positions within the Fe I 6173 {\\AA} line. To properly interpret such data it is important to understand any effects of the instrument and the pipeline that generates these data products. We tested the accuracy of the line width, line depth, and continuum intensity returned by the MDI-like algorithm using various one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere models. It was found that HMI estimates of these quantities are highly dependent on the shape of the line, therefore on the LOS angle and the magnetic flux density associated with the model, and less to line shifts with respect to the central ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Lymphography Findings in Patients With Biochemical Recurrence After Prostatectomy and the Relation With the Stephenson Nomogram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M., E-mail: H.Meijer@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Span, Paul N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Witjes, J. Alfred [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate the occurrence of positive lymph nodes on magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) in patients with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after prostatectomy and to investigate the relation between score on the Stephenson nomogram and lymph node involvement on MRL. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five candidates for salvage radiation therapy were referred for an MRL to determine their lymph node status. Clinical and histopathologic features were recorded. For 49 patients, data were complete to calculate the Stephenson nomogram score. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine how well this nomogram related to the MRL result. Analysis was done for the whole group and separately for patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL to determine the situation in candidates for early salvage radiation therapy, and for patients without pathologic lymph nodes at initial lymph node dissection. Results: MRL detected positive lymph nodes in 47 patients. ROC analysis for the Stephenson nomogram yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.93). Of 29 patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL, 18 had a positive MRL. Of 37 patients without lymph node involvement at initial lymph node dissection, 25 had a positive MRL. ROC analysis for the Stephenson nomogram showed AUCs of 0.84 and 0.74, respectively, for these latter groups. Conclusion: MRL detected positive lymph nodes in 72% of candidates for salvage radiation therapy, in 62% of candidates for early salvage radiation therapy, and in 68% of initially node-negative patients. The Stephenson nomogram showed a good correlation with the MRL result and may thus be useful for identifying patients with a PSA recurrence who are at high risk for lymph node involvement.

  15. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering investigations of hexagonal multiferroics RMnO3 (R = Dy, Ho, Er)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandi, Shibabrata

    2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity and magnetism were unified into a common subject by James Clerk Maxwell in the nineteenth century yielding the electromagnetic theory. Four equations govern the dynamics of electric charges and magnetic fields, commonly known as Maxwell's equations. Maxwell's equations demonstrate that an accelerated charged particle can produce magnetic fields and a time varying magnetic field can induce a voltage - thereby linking the two phenomena. However, in solids, electric and magnetic ordering are most often considered separately and usually with good reason: the electric charges of electrons and ions are responsible for the charge effects, whereas the electron spin governs magnetic properties.

  16. Integrating an automatic classification method into the medical image retrieval process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz, Miguel E.

    the performance of the University at Buffalo Medical Text and Images Retrieval System (UBMedTIRS). This paper classification process was performed using the Image Retrieval for Medical Application (IRMA) codes3 employed to acquire the image such as x-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance measurement, nuclear medicine

  17. Dynamic Surface Reconstruction from 4D-MR Images Matthias Fenchel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumhold, Stefan

    Dynamic Surface Reconstruction from 4D-MR Images Matthias Fenchel1 , Stefan Gumhold2 , Hans approach is applied to 4D-MR images of a human heart in motion. 1 Introduction Image segmentation-Peter Seidel3 1 Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Magnetic Resonance, Karl-Schall-Str. 4, 91052 Erlangen 2 TU

  18. An Integrated Method of Adaptive Enhancement for Unsupervised Segmentation of MRI Brain Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pizurica, Aleksandra

    An Integrated Method of Adaptive Enhancement for Unsupervised Segmentation of MRI Brain Images of the adaptive enhancement for an unsupervised global-to-local segmentation of brain tissues in three-dimensional (3-D) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) images. Three brain tissues are of interest: CSF (Cerebro

  19. 740 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 12, NO. 1, MARCH 2002 High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wider, Gerhard

    740 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 12, NO. 1, MARCH 2002 High research depend on high- field superconducting magnets with outstanding homogeneity and excellent long term, superconducting magnets, TROSY. I. INTRODUCTION IN THE half century since its discovery, nuclear magnetic

  20. Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography at 3 Tesla Using a Hybrid Protocol in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Yousef W., E-mail: yujwni01@heh.regionh.d [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Eiberg, Jonas P., E-mail: Eiberg@dadlnet.d [Rigshospitalet, Department of Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke B., E-mail: viloe@heh.regionh.d [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V., E-mail: tvs@dadlnet.d [Rigshospitalet, Department of Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Just, Sven, E-mail: svju@geh.regionh.d [University Hospital at Gentofte, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S., E-mail: hentho01@heh.regionh.d [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of 3T whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) using a hybrid protocol in comparison with a standard protocol in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). In 26 consecutive patients with PAD two different protocols were used for WB-MRA: a standard sequential protocol (n = 13) and a hybrid protocol (n = 13). WB-MRA was performed using a gradient echo sequence, body coil for signal reception, and gadoterate meglumine as contrast agent (0.3 mmol/kg body weight). Two blinded observers evaluated all WB-MRA examinations with regard to presence of stenoses, as well as diagnostic quality and degree of venous contamination in each of the four stations used in WB-MRA. Digital subtraction angiography served as the method of reference. Sensitivity for detecting significant arterial disease (luminal narrowing {>=} 50%) using standard-protocol WB-MRA for the two observers was 0.63 (95%CI: 0.51-0.73) and 0.66 (0.58-0.78). Specificities were 0.94 (0.91-0.97) and 0.96 (0.92-0.98), respectively. In the hybrid protocol WB-MRA sensitivities were 0.75 (0.64-0.84) and 0.70 (0.58-0.8), respectively. Specificities were 0.93 (0.88-0.96) and 0.95 (0.91-0.97). Interobserver agreement was good using both the standard and the hybrid protocol, with {kappa} = 0.62 (0.44-0.67) and {kappa} = 0.70 (0.59-0.79), respectively. WB-MRA quality scores were significantly higher in the lower leg using the hybrid protocol compared to standard protocol (p = 0.003 and p = 0.03, observers 1 and 2). Distal venous contamination scores were significantly lower with the hybrid protocol (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, observers 1 and 2). In conclusion, hybrid-protocol WB-MRA shows a better diagnostic performance than standard protocol WB-MRA at 3 T in patients with PAD.

  1. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Min

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to other OLEDs' attributes such as mechanical flexibility and potential low cost), the OLED technology is promising to successfully compete with current technologies, such as LCDs and inorganic LEDs.

  2. Design of a compact, permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for proton and H{sub 2}{sup +} beam production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia Xianlu; Zhang Tianjue; Wang Chuan; Zheng Xia; Yin Zhiguo; Zhong Junqing; Wu Longcheng; Qin Jiuchang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(3), Beijing 102413 (China); Luo Shan [The 6th Department, Communication Command Academy, Wuhan 430010 (China)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for proton beam production of over 60 mA [B.-Q. Cui, Y.-W. Bao, L.-Q. Li, W.-S. Jiang, and R.-W. Wang, Proceedings of the High Current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source for Proton Accelerator, APAC-2001, 2001 (unpublished)]. For various proton beam applications, another 2.45 GHz microwave ion source with a compact structure is designed and will be built at CIAE as well for high current proton beam production. It is also considered to be used for the test of H{sub 2}{sup +} beam, which could be injected into the central region model cyclotron at CIAE, and accelerated to 5 MeV before extraction by stripping. The required ECR magnetic field is supplied by all the permanent magnets rather than electrical solenoids and six poles. The magnetic field distribution provided by this permanent magnets configuration is a large and uniformly volume of ECR zone, with central magnetic field of a magnitude of {approx}875 Gs[T. Taylor and J. S. C. Wills, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 309, 37 (1991)]. The field adjustment at the extraction end can be implemented by moving the position of the magnet blocks. The results of plasma, coupling with 2.45 GHz microwave in the ECR zone inside the ion source are simulated by particle-in-cell code to optimize the density by adjusting the magnetic field distribution. The design configuration of the ion source will be summarized in the paper.

  3. Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Xiaojun

    Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images Xiaojun Qi Computer Science present prediction-based image compression techniques take advantage of either intra- or inter function. The prediction-based compression technique has been applied on some magnetic resonance (MR) brain

  4. Parity violation in nuclear magnetic resonance frequencies of chiral tetrahedral tungsten complexes NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahrwold, Sophie, E-mail: nahrwold@fias.uni-frankfurt.de; Berger, Robert, E-mail: r.berger@fias.uni-frankfurt.de [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany) [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Clemens-Schöpf-Institute, Technical University Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 22, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Schwerdtfeger, Peter, E-mail: p.a.schwerdtfeger@massey.ac.nz [Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Albany, Private Bag 102904, North Shore City, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand) [Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Albany, Private Bag 102904, North Shore City, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand); Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Str., D-35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Density functional theory within the two-component quasi-relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) is used to predict parity violation shifts in {sup 183}W nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors of chiral, tetrahedrally bonded tungsten complexes of the form NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I), as well as for the heavier systems NWHAtF and NWH(117)F for comparison. The calculations reveal that sub-mHz accuracy is required to detect such tiny effects in this class of compounds, and that parity violation effects are very sensitive to the choice of ligands.

  5. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wenxian, E-mail: wl240@uowmail.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Solar Energy Technologies, School of Computing, Engineering, and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW 2751 (Australia); Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tian, Dongliang [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ?4?nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  6. Performance Analysis between Two Sparsity Constrained MRI Methods: Highly Constrained Backprojection(HYPR) and Compressed Sensing(CS) for Dynamic Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzouni, Nibal

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important challenges in dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to achieve high spatial and temporal resolution when it is limited by system performance. It is desirable to acquire data fast enough to capture the dynamics...

  7. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  8. 13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006. The size of each also use transparent paper or film, overlay the paper on each image, and mark the locations carefully

  9. Adjustable permanent magnet assembly for NMR and MRI

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Bouchard, Louis S; Blumich, Bernhard

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    System and methods for designing and using single-sided magnet assemblies for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are disclosed. The single-sided magnet assemblies can include an array of permanent magnets disposed at selected positions. At least one of the permanent magnets can be configured to rotate about an axis of rotation in the range of at least +/-10 degrees and can include a magnetization having a vector component perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The single-sided magnet assemblies can further include a magnet frame that is configured to hold the permanent magnets in place while allowing the at least one of the permanent magnets to rotate about the axis of rotation.

  10. Plant root system analysis from MRI images Hannes Schulz1, Johannes A. Postma2, Dagmar van Dusschoten2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    voxel to the base of the plant root, weighing the Euclidean distance measure by a multi-scale vesselness test this method using both virtually generated MRI images of Maize and real MRI images of Barley roots (Ferreira et al., 2010; Nakanishi et al., 2003; Pierret et al., 2003) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  11. Global analysis of Fo rster resonance energy transfer in live cells measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy exploiting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Global analysis of Fo¨ rster resonance energy transfer in live cells measured by fluorescence of Fo¨ rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells using the rise time of acceptor fluorescence those molecules that are involved in the energy-transfer process are monitored. This contrasts

  12. Investigations of the R5(SixGe1-x)4 Intermetallic Compounds by X-Ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lizhi Tan

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The XRMS experiment on the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} system has shown that, below the Neel temperature, T{sub N} = 127 K, the magnetic unit cells is the same as the chemical unit cell. From azimuth scans and the Q dependence of the magnetic scattering, all three Gd sites in the structure were determined to be in the same magnetic space group Pnma. The magnetic moments are aligned along the c-axis and the c-components of the magnetic moments at the three different sites are equal. The ferromagnetic slabs are stacked antiferromagnetically along the b-direction. They found an unusual order parameter curve in Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}. A spin-reorientation transition is a possibility in Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}, which is similar to the Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} case. Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} possesses the same Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type crystallographic structure and the same magnetic space group as Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} does. The difference in magnetic structure is that Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} has a canted one but Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} has nearly a collinear one in the low temperature antiferromagnetic phase. The competition between the magneto-crystalline anisotropy and the nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange interactions may allow a 3-dimensional canted antiferromagnetic structure in Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}. The spin-reorientation transition in both Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} and Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} may arise from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy from the spin-orbit coupling of the conduction electrons and the dipolar interactions anisotropy.

  13. Ultrasensitive Magnetometry and Imaging with NV Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Changdong

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    -size wire structure to sit directly on the surface of millimeter-scale diamond plate. In contrast to conventional magnetic resonance imaging pulsed ESR was used to measure the Rabi oscillations. From the beating of Rabi oscillations from a "double NV...

  14. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  15. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Ann. N. (13170-B Central SE #188, Albuquerque, NM 87123); Anderson, Richard E. (2800 Tennessee NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (2116 White Cloud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

  16. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, A.N.; Anderson, R.E.; Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits are disclosed. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits. 17 figs.

  17. Design and characterization of 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with magnetron magnetic field configuration for high flux of hyperthermal neutral beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seong Bong [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Chul; Yoo, Suk Jae [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source with a magnetron magnetic field configuration was developed to meet the demand of a hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) flux on a substrate of more than 1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for industrial applications. The parameters of the operating pressure, ion density, electron temperature, and distance between the neutralization plate and the substrate for the HNB source are specified in a theoretical analysis. The electron temperature and the ion density are measured to characterize the ECR HNB source using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The parameters of the ECR HNB source are in good agreement with the theoretically specified parameters.

  18. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  19. Spectro-polarimetric Imaging Reveals Helical Magnetic Fields in Solar Prominence Feet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Ramos, A Asensio; Beck, C; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz; Diaz, A J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar prominences are clouds of cool plasma levitating above the solar surface and insulated from the million-degree corona by magnetic fields. They form in regions of complex magnetic topology, characterized by non-potential fields, which can evolve abruptly, disintegrating the prominence and ejecting magnetized material into the heliosphere. However, their physics is not yet fully understood because mapping such complex magnetic configurations and their evolution is extremely challenging, and must often be guessed by proxy from photometric observations.Using state-of-the-art spectro-polarimetric data, we reconstruct the structure of the magnetic field in a prominence. We find that prominence feet harbor helical magnetic fields connecting the prominence to the solar surface below.

  20. Artificial neural network prediction of ischemic tissue fate in acute stroke imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Artificial neural network prediction of ischemic tissue fate in acute stroke imaging Shiliang Huang Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging of acute stroke provides predictive value that can be used to guide stroke therapy. A flexible artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm was developed and applied to predict

  1. Spectroscopic imaging from spatially-encoded single-scan multidimensional MRI data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frydman, Lucio

    Spectroscopic imaging from spatially-encoded single-scan multidimensional MRI data Assaf Tal, Lucio multidimensional magnetic resonance images within a single scan, based on a spatial encoding of the spin in its magnitude the spatial distribution of spins throughout the sample. It is hereby shown that whereas

  2. 3D Harmonic Mapping and Tetrahedral Meshing of Brain Imaging Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    3D Harmonic Mapping and Tetrahedral Meshing of Brain Imaging Data Yalin Wang1 , Xianfeng Gu2 , Paul algorithm finds a harmonic map from a 3-manifold to a 3D solid sphere and the second is a novel sphere of magnetic resonance images (MRI). A heat flow method is used to solve the volumetric harmonic mapping

  3. Imaging and Spectroscopic Diagnostics on the Formation of Two Magnetic Flux Ropes Revealed by SDO/AIA and IRIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, X; Fang, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of corona mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) high temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the \\textit{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} Si IV, C II, and Mg II lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare p...

  4. Role of dopant incorporation on the magnetic properties of Ce1-xNixO2 nanoparticles: An electron paramagnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, S. K.; Andronenko, S. I.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Thurber, Aaron P.; Reddy, K. M.; Punnoose, Alex

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel doping has been found to produce weak room-temperature ferromagnetism in CeO2 [1]. The saturation magnetization of the chemically synthesized Ce1-xNixO2 samples showed a maximum for x = 0.04, above which the magnetization decreased gradually. For Ce1-xNixO2 samples with x ? 0.04, an activation process involving slow annealing of the sample to 500 oC increased the saturation magnetization by more than two orders of magnitude [1]. However, no such activation effect was observed in samples with x < 0.04. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), a sensitive technique to investigate the ionic states and local environments and interactions, has been used here in this work to investigate (i) why the ferromagnetic behavior gradually weakened and disappeared for x > 0.04 and (ii)_what causes the saturation magnetization to dramatically increase in the activated Ce1-xNixO2 samples with x ? 0.04 and why this process is absent in samples with x < 0.04. Our X-band (~9.4 GHz) EPR experiments and detailed simulation analysis on several as-prepared Ce1-xNixO2 samples with 0.01 ? x ? 0.10 at 5 K and 300 K indicate the presence of two magnetically inequivalent Ni2+ ions with the ionic spin of 1, one Ce3+ ion with spin ½, and three O2-. Spectra of samples with x < 0.04 are dominated by a single Ni2+ EPR line ascribed to dopant ions in substitutional sites whereas in samples with x ? 0.04, an additional signal attributed to Ni2+ ions in interstitial sites is also present. In the activated sample, the EPR line due to the interstitial Ni2+ is completely absent and only the lines due to substituional Ni2+ ions are present suggesting that the enhanced ferromagnetism results from conversion of interstitial Ni2+ ions to substitutional sites.

  5. Images of Vega Dust Ring at 350 and 450 microns: New Clues to the Trapping of Multiple-Sized Dust Particles in Planetary Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Marsh; C. D. Dowell; T. Velusamy; K. Grogan; C. A. Beichman

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the SHARC II camera at Caltech Submillimeter Observatory to make 350 and 450 micron images of the Vega dust disk at spatial resolutions (FWHM) of 9.7" and 11.1", respectively. The images show a ring-like morphology (radius \\~ 100 AU) with inhomogeneous structure that is qualitatively different from that previously reported at 850 microns and longer wavelengths. We attribute the 350/450 micron emission to a grain population whose characteristic size (~ 1 mm) is intermediate between that of the cm-sized grains responsible for emission longward of 850 microns and the much smaller grains (< 18 microns) in the extensive halo, visible at 70 microns, discussed by Su et al. (2005). We have combined our submillimeter images with Spitzer data at 70 microns to produce 2-d maps of line-of-sight optical depth (relative column density). These "tau maps" suggest that the mm-sized grains are located preferentially in three symmetrically-located concentrations. If so, then this structure could be understood in terms of the Wyatt (2003) model in which planetesimals are trapped in the mean motion resonances of a Neptune-mass planet at 65 AU, provided allowance is made for the spatial distribution of dust grains to differ from that of the parent planetesimals. The peaks of the tau maps are, in fact, located near the expected positions corresponding to the 4:3 resonance. If this identification is confirmed by future observations, it would resolve an ambiguity with regard to the location of the planet.

  6. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance: Its role as a microscopic probe of the electronic and magnetic properties of High-{Tc} superconductors and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Byoung Jin

    1995-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR experiments are reported for Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+d}, YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. NMR studies typify three different aspects of microscopic properties of HTSC. In non-superconducting antiferromagnetic (AF) prototype Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, we used NMR to investigate Cu{sup 2+} correlated spin dynamics and AF phase transition in CuO2 layers. In the superconductors, we used NMR both to investigate the electronic properties of the Fermi-liquid in normal and superconducting states and to investigate flux lattice and flux-line dynamics in the superconducting state in presence of magnetic field. A summary of each study is given: {sup 35}Cl NMR was measured in Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} single crystals with T{sub N}=257K. {sub 35}Cl NMR relaxation rates showed crossover of Cu{sup 2+} spin dynamics from Heisenberg to XY-like correlation at 290 K well above T{sub N}. A field-dependent T{sub N} for H{perpendicular}c was observed and explained by a field-induced Ising-like anisotropy in ab plane. {sup 199}Hg NMR was measured in HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+d}. Properties of the Fermi-liquid are characterized by a single-spin fluid picture and opening of a spin pseudo-gap at q=0 above {Tc}. Below {Tc}, spin component of Knight shift decreases rapidly in agreement with prediction for d-wave pairing scheme. {sup 11}B and {sup 89}Y NMR/magnetization were measured in YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. Temperature dependence of {sup 11}B Knight shift and of the NSLR gave a normal state which agrees with the Korringa relation, indicating that the AF fluctuations on the Ni sublattice are negligible. Opening of the superconducting gap obeys BCS. A NMR approach to investigate vortex thermal motion in HTSC is presented, based on contribution of thermal flux-lines motion to both T{sub 2}{sup {minus}1} and T{sub 1}{sup {minus}1}. Effects are demonstrated in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+d}.

  8. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard. [SO/sub 2/ in gases by fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, L.D.; Bennett, D.W.; Davis, J.F.

    1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SI)/sub 2/NH with SO/sub 2/. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/O and a new solid compound (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/). Both (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO and (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO/sub 2/ pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/NH, whereby any SO/sub 2/ present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO/sub 2/ in the original gas sample. The solid product (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, or /sup 29/Si may be used as a reference.

  9. Design of multi-channel radio-frequency front-end for 200mhz parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaoqun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    increases to 64 or even 128, the traditional method of stacking the same number of radio-frequency (RF) receivers with very low level of integration becomes expensive and cumbersome. However, the cost, size, power consumption of the Parallel MRI receivers...

  10. nAture methods | VOL.9 NO.6 | JUNE2012 | 597 Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fmri) based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - or single-unit activity6. However, electromagnetic interference compensation is technically challenging

  11. Computer Aided Segmentation and Early Therapeutic Response Classification (CADrx) for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Brain Tumors with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huo, Jing

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    all 1.5T GE and all 1.5T Siemens scanners: (A) Brain WM ROIfield strength for all Siemens scanners: (A) Brain WM ROIincluded two 3T scan- ners (Siemens TrioTim at two sites)

  12. FRPRCS-8 University of Patras, Patras, Greece, July 16-18, 2007 MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF CONCRETE WITH FRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    on the amount of water present but also on its mobility. Water in porous media is generally characterised. Nevertheless, the water in some porous matrices does have sufficiently long relaxation times for MRI to be able (MRI) to measure water content in a range of porous media including rocks [6,7,8,9], soils [10

  13. Assessment of Alzheimer's disease risk with structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging : an arterial spin labeling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bangen, Katherine J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    175-182. Wierenga, C.E. , Stricker, N.R. , McCauley, A. ,ofAging, 30, 1276-1287. Stricker, N.H. , Schweinsburg,W. Bondi, Ph.D. , Nikki H. Stricker, Ph.D. , Amy J. Jak,

  14. Robust inference of baseline optical properties of the human head with 3D segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Alex

    and voltage-sensitive dyes [4]. By relying on photon transport through tis- sue, DOT also accesses spatial, measuring both total hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation. Optical con- trast can also arise from cellMRI). In addition to sensitivity to ab- sorbing chromophores, DOT can be sensitive to cellular scattering changes

  15. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doughty, Frank C. (Plano, TX); Spencer, John E. (Plano, TX)

    2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  16. Rapid prediction of various physical properties for middle distillate fuel utilizing directly coupled liquid chromatography//sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caswell, K.A.; Glass, T.E.; Swann, M.; Dorn, H.C.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group property approach has been developed to predict 17 physical properties of middle distillate (e.g., jet and diesel) fuels from experimentally derived liquid chromatography//sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance (LC//sup 1/H NMR) data. In the LC//sup 1/H NMR technique, the fuel is separated according to chemical class and the average molecular structure for each chemical class is then calculated. These average molecular structures form a basis set to predict the physical properties of the fuel. The physical properties that can be obtained in this manner are cetane number, cetane index, density, specific gravity, pour point, flash point, viscosity, filterability, heat of combustion, cloud point, volume percent aromatics, residual carbon content, and the initial, 10%, 50%, 90%, and end boiling points. Fourteen of the correlation coefficients for the predictions are better than 0.90 with 11 of the predictions falling either within or approximately equal to the ASTM method reproducibility for the measurement of the fuel property. The present method also provides chemical insight concerning the influence of chemical structural changes on the physical properties of the fuel as well as requiring much less analysis time and sample volume than corresponding ASTM methods.

  17. A triple-resonant RF coil setup for 1H, 23Na and 39K MR imaging of the rat brain at 9.4T M. A. Augath1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A triple-resonant RF coil setup for 1H, 23Na and 39K MR imaging of the rat brain at 9.4T M. A. Augath1,2 , P. Heiler1 , S. Kirsch1 , and L. R. Schad1 1 Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Faculty concentrations of 23 Na and 39 K offers a very promising approach in clinical diagnostics. For MR imaging of both

  18. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Polymer Backbone Dynamics in Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Based Lithium and Sodium Polyether-ester-sulfonate Ionomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, David J. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dou, Shichen [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Colby, Ralph H. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer backbone dynamics of single ion conducting poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based ionomer samples with low glass transition temperatures (Tg) have been investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Experiments detecting 13C with 1H decoupling under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions identified the different components of the polymer backbone (PEO spacer and isophthalate groups) and their relative mobilities for a suite of lithium- and sodium-containing ionomer samples with varying cation contents. Variable temperature (203-373 K) 1H-13C cross-polarization MAS (CP-MAS) experiments also provided qualitative assessment of the differences in the motions of the polymer backbone components as a function of cation content and identity. Each of the main backbone components exhibit distinct motions, following the trends expected for motional characteristics based on earlier Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering and 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements. Previous 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation measurements focused on both the polymer backbone and cation motion on the nanosecond timescale. The studies presented here assess the slower timescale motion of the polymer backbone allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the polymer dynamics. The temperature dependences of 13C linewidths were used to both qualitatively and quantitatively examine the effects of cation content and identity on PEO spacer mobility. Variable contact time 1H-13C CP-MAS experiments were used to further assess the motions of the polymer backbone on the microsecond timescale. The motion of the PEO spacer, reported via the rate of magnetization transfer from 1H to 13C nuclei, becomes similar for T ? 1.1 Tg in all ionic samples, indicating that at similar elevated reduced temperatures the motions of the polymer backbones on the microsecond timescale become insensitive to ion interactions. These results present an improved picture, beyond those of previous findings, for the dependence of backbone dynamics on cation density (and here, cation identity as well) in these amorphous PEO-based ionomer systems.

  19. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  20. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures by X-ray Spectro-Holography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless ImagingLensless4 J.

  1. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-Ray Imaging

  2. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-Ray ImagingX-Ray

  3. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-Ray Imaging of

  4. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-Ray Imaging

  5. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore than 20X-RayX-Ray Imaging

  6. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-Ray Imaging of the

  7. Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around {sup 192}Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 55, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate {sup 192}Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate ({approx}0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a {sup 192}Ir wire source.

  8. Decay of an ultracold fermionic lithium gas near a Feshbach resonance The interactions between atoms can be strongly modified by tuning magnetic fields to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decay of an ultracold fermionic lithium gas near a Feshbach resonance The interactions between the interaction strength is crucial in the search for a superfluid phase transition. Otherwise, the phase lithium gas near a Feshbach resonance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 203201 (2002). 2. K.M. O'Hara, S.L. Hemmer, S

  9. Strong reduction of V{sup 4+} amount in vanadium oxide/hexadecylamine nanotubes by doping with Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions: Electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleta, M. E.; Troiani, H. E.; Ribeiro Guevara, S.; Ruano, G.; Sanchez, R. D. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, CNEA, (8400) S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Malta, M. [Depto. de Cs. Exatas e da Terra, Univ. do Estado da Bahia, Cabula Salvador CP 2555 (Brazil); Torresi, R. M. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo CP 26077, 05513-970 (Brazil)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a complete characterization and magnetic study of vanadium oxide/hexadecylamine nanotubes (VO{sub x}/Hexa NT's) doped with Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions. The morphology of the NT's has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, while the metallic elements have been quantified by the instrumental neutron activation analysis technique. The static and dynamic magnetic properties were studied by collecting data of magnetization as a function of magnetic field and temperature and by electron paramagnetic resonance. At difference of the majority reports in the literature, we do not observe magnetic dimers in vanadium oxide nanotubes. Also, we observed that the incorporation of metallic ions (Co{sup 2+}, S = 3/2 and Ni{sup 2+}, S = 1) decreases notably the amount of V{sup 4+} ions in the system, from 14-16% (nondoped case) to 2%-4%, with respect to the total vanadium atoms (fact corroborated by XPS experiments) anyway preserving the tubular nanostructure. The method to decrease the amount of V{sup 4+} in the nanotubes improves considerably their potential technological applications as Li-ion batteries cathodes.

  10. Imaging vasodynamics in the awake mouse brain with two-photon Andy Y. Shih1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    magnetic resonance imaging PoRTS = polished and reinforced thinned skull RBC = red blood cell TPLSM = two-to-moment energy demands of neuronal computation in the mammalian brain are high, yet the brain has limited reserves of energy [1, 2]. A solution to this dilemma calls for a vascular system that functions

  11. 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF PLANT ROOTS FROM MRI IMAGES Hannes Schulz1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    distance measure by a multi-scale vesselness measure. As a result, paths running within good root candidates are preferred over paths in bare soil. We test this method using both virtually generated MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (Brown et al., 1990; Jahnke et al., 2009; Southon and Jones, 1992

  12. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In About |Imaging Imaging Print

  13. Electrically driven spin resonance in silicon carbide color centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Klimov; A. L. Falk; B. B. Buckley; D. D. Awschalom

    2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the spin of optically addressable point defects can be coherently driven with AC electric fields. Based on magnetic-dipole forbidden spin transitions, this scheme enables spatially confined spin control, the imaging of high-frequency electric fields, and the characterization of defect spin multiplicity. While we control defects in SiC, these methods apply to spin systems in many semiconductors, including the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. Electrically driven spin resonance offers a viable route towards scalable quantum control of electron spins in a dense array.

  14. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasicsScience atIanIgorIlyaBuildingImaging Print

  15. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasicsScience atIanIgorIlyaBuildingImaging

  16. " Rotating, In Plane Magnetization and Magneto-Optic Imaging of Cracks in Thick-Section Steel Under Stainless-Steel Cladding".

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Fitzpatrick & Richard Skaugset

    2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The nondestructive inspection (NDI) of thick-section steel nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV'S) is rendered difficult by rough stainless steel cladding. Because the cladding condition is poorly known in most RPV's, an NDI technique that is unaffected by cladding roughness would be a major advance. Magneto-optic imaging is one such technique. The purpose of this project was to develop a novel method to induce rotating, in-plane magnetization, and to combine this capability with magneto-optic imaging to produce a self-contained inspection system. Imaging of cracks under thick cladding (0.250 inches) was demonstrated using a system capable, in principle, of performing robotic inspections, both inside & outside a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) RPV. This report, together publications listed, constitutes a comprehensive account of this work.

  17. Dynamic control of spin states in interacting magnetic elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the control of the magnetic states of interacting magnetic elements comprising providing a magnetic structure with a plurality of interacting magnetic elements. The magnetic structure comprises a plurality of magnetic states based on the state of each interacting magnetic element. The desired magnetic state of the magnetic structure is determined. The active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the desired magnetic state is determined. Each magnetic element of the magnetic structure is then subjected to an alternating magnetic field or electrical current having a frequency and amplitude below the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of said desired magnetic state and above the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the current state of the magnetic structure until the magnetic state of the magnetic structure is at the desired magnetic state.

  18. Appl. Magn. Reson. (2007) 32, 93112 DOI 10.1007/s00723-007-0002-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied Magnetic Resonance Noninvasive Measurements of Gas Exchange in a Three- Dimensional Fluidized Bed 12 July 2006 © Springer-Verlag 2007 Abstract. We present a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a noninvasive tool for studying the dy- namics of the solid particles

  19. Permanent magnet with MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Akiyasu, E-mail: yamamoto@appchem.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Ishihara, Atsushi; Tomita, Masaru [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38 Hikari, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconductors with persistent zero-resistance currents serve as permanent magnets for high-field applications requiring a strong and stable magnetic field, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The recent global helium shortage has quickened research into high-temperature superconductors (HTSs)—materials that can be used without conventional liquid-helium cooling to 4.2?K. Herein, we demonstrate that 40-K-class metallic HTS magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) makes an excellent permanent bulk magnet, maintaining 3?T at 20?K for 1 week with an extremely high stability (<0.1 ppm/h). The magnetic field trapped in this magnet is uniformly distributed, as for single-crystalline neodymium-iron-boron. Magnetic hysteresis loop of the MgB{sub 2} permanent bulk magnet was determined. Because MgB{sub 2} is a simple-binary-line compound that does not contain rare-earth metals, polycrystalline bulk material can be industrially fabricated at low cost and with high yield to serve as strong magnets that are compatible with conventional compact cryocoolers, making MgB{sub 2} bulks promising for the next generation of Tesla-class permanent-magnet applications.

  20. Resonance expansions of propagators in the presence of potential ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We consider energy levels at which there exists a potential barrier separating the ...... dynamics and nuclear magnetic resonance signals, J. Chem. Phys.

  1. Multiple resonant railgun power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. A plurality of serially connected paired parallel rails are powered by similar power supplies. Each supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles. The multiple serial operation permits relatively small energy components to deliver overall relatively large amounts of energy to the projectiles being propelled.

  2. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

    1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

  3. Automatic generation of boundary conditions using Demons non-rigid image registration for use in 3D modality-independent elastography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miga, Michael I.

    was successfully performed in silico using magnetic resonance and X-ray computed tomography image data with known to lung cancer in cancer-induced mortality among women. For 2009, the American Cancer Society projected by X-ray mammography. Palpation is limited by its subjective nature and a short range of detection

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Reflectance Imaging: A Label-Free/Real-Time Mapping of Microscale Mixture Concentration Fields (Water+Ethanol)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    Mixture Concentration Fields (Water+Ethanol) Iltai Kim and Kenneth D. Kihm Department of Mechanical (water+ethanol) concentration fields with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reflectance technique based the refractive index and mixture concentration fields. The presented results show that ethanol penetrates

  5. Magnetic Stereoscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The space mission STEREO will provide images from two viewpoints. An important aim of the STEREO mission is to get a 3D view of the solar corona. We develop a program for the stereoscopic reconstruction of 3D coronal loops from images taken with the two STEREO spacecraft. A pure geometric triangulation of coronal features leads to ambiguities because the dilute plasma emissions complicates the association of features in image 1 with features in image 2. As a consequence of these problems the stereoscopic reconstruction is not unique and multiple solutions occur. We demonstrate how these ambiguities can be resolved with the help of different coronal magnetic field models (potential, linear and non-linear force-free fields). The idea is that, due to the high conductivity in the coronal plasma, the emitting plasma outlines the magnetic field lines. Consequently the 3D coronal magnetic field provides a proxy for the stereoscopy which allows to eliminate inconsistent configurations. The combination of stereoscopy and magnetic modelling is more powerful than one of these tools alone. We test our method with the help of a model active region and plan to apply it to the solar case as soon as STEREO data become available.

  6. Linear dichroism and resonant photoemission in Gd 011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S.R.; Cummins, T.R.; Gammon, W.J.; van der Laan, G.; Goodman, K.W.; Tobin, J.G.

    1998-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic Linear Dichroism in Angular Distributions (MLDAD) from Photoelectron Emission was used to probe the nature of Resonant Photoemission. Gd 5p and Gd 4f emission were investigated. Using novel theoretical simulations, we were able to show that temporal matching is a requirement for ``True`` Resonant Photoemission, where the Resonant Photoemission retains the characteristics of Photoelectron Emission.

  7. Stability of the electron cyclotron resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Asch; Olivier Bourget; Cédric Meresse

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the magnetic AC Stark effect for the quantum dynamics of a single particle in the plane under the influence of an oscillating homogeneous electric and a constant perpendicular magnetic field. We prove that the electron cyclotron resonance is insensitive to impurity potentials.

  8. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  9. Instrument for in-situ orientation of superconducting thin-film resonators used for electron-spin resonance experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mowry, Andrew; Kuabsek, James; Friedman, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When used in Electron-Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements, superconducting thin-film resonators must be precisely oriented relative to the external magnetic field in order to prevent the trapping of magnetic flux and the associated degradation of resonator performance. We present a compact design solution for this problem that allows in-situ control of the orientation of the resonator at cryogenic temperatures. Tests of the apparatus show that when proper alignment is achieved, there is almost no hysteresis in the field dependence of the resonant frequency.

  10. Resonance conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Rebusco

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-linear parametric resonances occur frequently in nature. Here we summarize how they can be studied by means of perturbative methods. We show in particular how resonances can affect the motion of a test particle orbiting in the vicinity of a compact object. These mathematical toy-models find application in explaining the structure of the observed kHz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations: we discuss which aspects of the reality naturally enter in the theory, and which one still remain a puzzle.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Caltun, O. F. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol I. Nr. 11, Iasi, 700506 (Romania); Hempelmann, R. [Physical Chemistry Department, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

  12. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  13. Preoperative 3-Tesla Multiparametric Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Odds of Upgrading and Upstaging at Radical Prostatectomy in Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegde, John V. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Mulkern, Robert V. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fennessy, Fiona M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tempany, Clare M.C., E-mail: ctempany@bwh.harvard.edu [Division of MRI, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate whether 3-T esla (3T) multiparametric endorectal MRI (erMRI) can add information to established predictors regarding occult extraprostatic or high-grade prostate cancer (PC) in men with clinically localized PC. Methods and Materials: At a single academic medical center, this retrospective study's cohort included 118 men with clinically localized PC who underwent 3T multiparametric erMRI followed by radical prostatectomy, from 2008 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analyses in all men and in 100 with favorable-risk PC addressed whether erMRI evidence of T3 disease was associated with prostatectomy T3 or Gleason score (GS) 8-10 (in patients with biopsy GS {<=}7) PC, adjusting for age, prostate-specific antigen level, clinical T category, biopsy GS, and percent positive biopsies. Results: The accuracy of erMRI prediction of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion was 75% and 95%, respectively. For all men, erMRI evidence of a T3 lesion versus T2 was associated with an increased odds of having pT3 disease (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-16.98, P=.015) and pGS 8-10 (AOR 5.56, 95% CI 1.10-28.18, P=.038). In the favorable-risk population, these results were AOR 4.14 (95% CI 1.03-16.56), P=.045 and AOR 7.71 (95% CI 1.36-43.62), P=.021, respectively. Conclusions: Three-Tesla multiparametric erMRI in men with favorable-risk PC provides information beyond that contained in known preoperative predictors about the presence of occult extraprostatic and/or high-grade PC. If validated in additional studies, this information can be used to counsel men planning to undergo radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy about the possible need for adjuvant radiation therapy or the utility of adding hormone therapy, respectively.

  14. Measuring and shimming the magnetic field of a 4 Tesla MRI magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyriazis, Georgios

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory (BMRL) of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) has ordered from the Texas Accelerator Center (TAC) a superconducting, self-shielded, solenoidal magnet with a maximum field of 4 Tesla...

  15. An investigation of array elements for enhanced single echo acquisition imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominick, Colleen Elizabeth

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    at the resonance or Larmor frequency described by: oB?? = (2.1) where ? is the resonance frequency in MHz, ? is the gyromagnetic ratio, 42.56 MHz/Tesla for hydrogen, and Bo is the external magnetic field in Tesla. A radio frequency (RF) pulse... has been reported by Adriany et al for transmit and receive imaging at 7 Tesla in both a linear and a loop style configuration (19). Adriany et al use an additional tune capacitor to allow for more flexibility in the length of the coil, however...

  16. Direct torsional actuation of microcantilevers using magnetic excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Nalam, Prathima C.; Tam, Qizhan; Carpick, Robert W., E-mail: carpick@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Exarhos, Annemarie L.; Kikkawa, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Torsional mode dynamic force microscopy can be used for a wide range of studies including mapping lateral contact stiffness, torsional frequency or amplitude modulation imaging, and dynamic friction measurements of various materials. Piezo-actuation of the cantilever is commonly used, but it introduces spurious resonances, limiting the frequency range that can be sampled, and rendering the technique particularly difficult to apply in liquid medium where the cantilever oscillations are significantly damped. Here, we demonstrate a method that enables direct torsional actuation of cantilevers with high uniformity over wide frequency ranges by attaching a micrometer-scale magnetic bead on the back side of the cantilever. We show that when beads are magnetized along the width of the cantilever, efficient torsional actuation of the cantilevers can be achieved using a magnetic field produced from a solenoid placed underneath the sample. We demonstrate the capability of this technique by imaging atomic steps on graphite surfaces in tapping mode near the first torsional resonance of the cantilever in dodecane. The technique is also applied to map the variations in the lateral contact stiffness on the surface of graphite and polydiacetylene monolayers.

  17. Three-dimensional medical image analysis using local dynamic algorithm selection on a multiple-instruction, multiple-data architecture. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stytz, M.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation outlines development of a medical imaging machine which renders 3D images from voxel data within a MIMD multiprocessor architecture at interactive rates. Interactive performance is achieved using local dynamic selection of the optimum adaptive recursive hidden-surface removal algorithm. A survey of the medical imaging, graphics, and medical imaging modality literature is provided. A description of Computerized Technology, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography, and Ultrasound imaging modalities is presented Previous work in 3D volume rendering graphics techniques and data models is introduced. Eleven medical imaging machines are examined with emphasis on characterization of the major innovation(s) and performance of each machine. A five stage image processing pipeline is described.

  18. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N. [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)] [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of {+-}0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  19. Nonlinear coupling of nano mechanical resonators to Josephson quantum circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a technique to couple the position operator of a nano mechanical resonator to a SQUID device by modulating its magnetic flux bias. By tuning the magnetic field properly, either linear or quadratic couplings can be realized, with a discretely adjustable coupling strength. This provides a way to realize coherent nonlinear effects in a nano mechanical resonator by coupling it to a Josephson quantum circuit. As an example, we show how squeezing of the nano mechanical resonator state can be realized with this technique. We also propose a simple method to measure the uncertainty in the position of the nano mechanical resonator without quantum state tomography.

  20. Image 2006 DESY A Beamline Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    precise #12;Image © 2006 DESY A Zero Schematic BPM BPM BPM BPM BPM Yellow Magnet Kicker Corrector Magnet Spectrometer Magnet 1 2 3 4 5 BPM: Beam Position Monitor Yellow Magnet: Not part of experiment, suppose · BPM resolution · Time step · Yellow Magnet field strength · Kicker field strength · Corrector Magnet

  1. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  2. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W. (Princeton, NJ); Chiu, Shiu-Chu (San Diego, CA); Parks, Paul (San Diego, CA); Rawls, John M. (Del Mar, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  3. NMR imaging techniques and applications in the flow behavior of fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halimi, Hassan I

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proton magnetic resonance technique can be used to determine the oil saturation in the pores of a rock. The NMR system can produce images of the molecules under investigation because the signals recorded are obtained directly from fluids contained... in liquids as well. This should enable us to obtain additional information about the fluids in the rock '4. Spin-spin relaxation has a characteristic time T~. T~ is the time constant for the decay of the precessing R-Zo component of the magnetization...

  4. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ACCURACY OF MAGENTIC RESONANCE PHASE VELOCITY MAPPING IN TURBULENT FLOW THROUGH ORIFICES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pidaparthi, Sahitya

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping (MRPVM) is an established clinical technique to measure blood flow. The acquired information can be used to diagnose a… (more)

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced cardiac imaging Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering, Magnetic Resonance Engineering Laboratory Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Engineering 11 Fluids & Combustion Seminar Novel Experimental and Modeling Approaches to...

  6. Cyclotron resonance in plasma flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V. [LPC2E/CNRS-University of Orleans, Orleans (France)] [LPC2E/CNRS-University of Orleans, Orleans (France)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to the mechanism of particle acceleration via resonant interaction with the electromagnetic circular wave propagating along the inhomogeneous background magnetic field in the presence of a plasma flow. We consider the system where the plasma flow velocity is large enough to change the direction of wave propagation in the rest frame. This system mimics a magnetic field configuration typical for inner structure of a quasi-parallel shock wave. We consider conditions of gyroresonant interaction when the force corresponding to an inhomogeneity of the background magnetic field is compensated by the Lorentz force of the wave-magnetic field. The wave-amplitude is assumed to be about 10% of the background magnetic field. We show that particles can gain energy if kv{sub sw}>?>kv{sub sw}??{sub c} where k is the wave number, v{sub sw} is a plasma flow velocity, and ? and ?{sub c} are the wave frequency and the particle gyrofrequency, respectively. This mechanism of acceleration resembles the gyrosurfing mechanism, but the effect of the electrostatic field is replaced by the effect of the magnetic field inhomogeneity.

  7. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  8. Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen J. DeVience; Linh M. Pham; Igor Lovchinsky; Alexander O. Sushkov; Nir Bar-Gill; Chinmay Belthangady; Francesco Casola; Madeleine Corbett; Huiliang Zhang; Mikhail Lukin; Hongkun Park; Amir Yacoby; Ronald L. Walsworth

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well-established techniques that provide valuable information in a diverse set of disciplines but are currently limited to macroscopic sample volumes. Here we demonstrate nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging under ambient conditions of samples containing multiple nuclear species, using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond as sensors. With single, shallow NV centres in a diamond chip and samples placed on the diamond surface, we perform NMR spectroscopy and one-dimensional MRI on few-nanometre-sized samples containing $^1$H and $^{19}$F nuclei. Alternatively, we employ a high-density NV layer near the surface of a diamond chip to demonstrate wide-field optical NMR spectroscopy of nanoscale samples containing $^1$H, $^{19}$F, and $^{31}$P nuclei, as well as multi-species two-dimensional optical MRI with sub-micron resolution. For all diamond samples exposed to air, we identify a ubiquitous $^1$H NMR signal, consistent with a $\\sim 1$ nm layer of adsorbed hydrocarbons or water on the diamond surface and below any sample placed on the diamond. This work lays the foundation for nanoscale NMR and MRI applications such as studies of single proteins and functional biological imaging with subcellular resolution, as well as characterization of thin films with sub-nanometre resolution.

  9. Radio-frequency quadrupole resonator for linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moretti, A.

    1982-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An RFQ resonator for a linear accelerator having a reduced level of interfering modes and producing a quadrupole mode for focusing, bunching and accelerating beams of heavy charged particles, with the construction being characterized by four elongated resonating rods within a cylinder with the rods being alternately shorted and open electrically to the shell at common ends of the rods to provide an LC parallel resonant circuit when activated by a magnetic field transverse to the longitudinal axis.

  10. Electric-dipole-induced spin resonance in disordered semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    ARTICLES Electric-dipole-induced spin resonance in disordered semiconductors MATHIAS DUCKHEIM One of the hallmarks of spintronics is the control of magnetic moments by electric fields enabled in such structures is electric-dipole-induced spin resonance (EDSR), where the radio-frequency fields driving

  11. Catheter based magnetic resonance compatible perfusion probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toretta, Cara Lynne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurosurgeons are using a thermal based technique to quantify brain perfusion. The thermal diffusion probe (TDP) technology measures perfusion in a relatively small volume of brain tissue. The neurosurgeon chooses the ...

  12. Tissue oxymetry using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lisa Chiawen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A noninvasive method for in vivo measurement of tissue oxygen concentration has been developed. Several techniques currently used suffer limitations that prevent their practical clinical use. Our method is to use the ...

  13. SELECTIVITY IN MULTIPLE QUANTUM NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Warren Sloan.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    27-0ct-19&2 13 :11:14 :l VAX-II FOF.TP.A~ €a? l~' .FOjt.12o-:. -'''''--': 27-0ct-~9:,0 VAX- II rOfiTRA~ IV-? LUS Vl.3-193~ :.J (:;PI·'.f'O';'.12 VAX-I! FO? ~~At, IV-PL1S V1.3-22

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonances in weak fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Richard Warren

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' The snalInr 30. voltages necessary in this case would allow the use of parallel banks of batteries, which should increase the stability of the cux xwnt. Lf batteries are used as a ycwsr source, no. 6 wire should be a convenient siss for prodcci...&g fields uy to 106 gauss in a sole noid of the dinensions used here. Pour banks of batterissx each bank containing five batteries in serissx should pxxxvide ~te stabili RIGDIILATTOM FXELUi 'Ae two wain difficulties with the pxesent nodulation scheme...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Pulse Sequences for Fluorine-19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terry, Robin

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    successful cell tracking and quantification of cells. The primary objective of this work was to enable the study of ^(19)F MRI on the Siemens MAGNETOM Verio scanner located at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies (TIPS) facility at Texas A...

  16. SELECTIVITY IN MULTIPLE QUANTUM NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Warren Sloan.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. Wemmer, J. Tang and S. Sinton, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc.G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, D. Weitekamp, and D. Wemmer,Perkin II 1541 (1975). S. Sinton and A. Pines, Chem. Phys.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet), National Bioenergy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientists to run their own liquid sample analysis * Solid-state analysis of biomass feedstocks, biomass- related materials, and polymers * Analysis of compounds with...

  18. Edward Purcell and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6.DavidE-print NetworkUSE ANDEXPERIMENTAL

  19. Plutonium less mysterious with nuclear magnetic resonance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design Passive SolarCenterYou are here:and Protein/RNAPitsPlutonium

  20. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, Anand

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall goal of this project is to understand the mechanism of magnetite particle synthesis in the presence of the biomineralization proteins, mms6 and C25. Previous work has hypothesized that the mms6 protein helps to template magnetite and cobalt ferrite particle synthesis and that the C25 protein templates cobalt ferrite formation. However, the effect of parameters such as the protein concentration on the particle formation is still unknown. It is expected that the protein concentration significantly affects the nucleation and growth of magnetite. Since the protein provides iron-binding sites, it is expected that magnetite crystals would nucleate at those sites. In addition, in the previous work, the reaction medium after completion of the reaction was in the solution phase, and magnetic particles had a tendency to fall to the bottom of the medium and aggregate. The research presented in this thesis involves solid Pluronic gel phase reactions, which can be studied readily using small-angle x-ray scattering, which is not possible for the solution phase experiments. In addition, the concentration effect of both of the proteins on magnetite crystal formation was studied.

  1. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N I

  2. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImaging of

  3. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImaging

  4. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImagingLensless

  5. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - advance molecular imaging Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resonance and Spectroscopy Imaging ... Source: Jacob, Mathews - Departments of Biomedical Engineering & Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester...

  7. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  8. A Small Scale Magnetic Particle Relaxometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Ghamrawy, Ahmed

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a newly found imaging modality. It utilizes superparamagnetic materials as tracers in the blood stream to obtain very high resolutions. MPI promises to have high sensitivity, high spatial resolution...

  9. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  10. The 700-1500 cm{sup ?1} region of the S{sub 1} (A{sup ~1}B{sub 2}) state of toluene studied with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy, and time-resolved slow-electron velocity-map imaging (tr-SEVI) spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Green, Alistair M.; Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Reid, Katharine L.; Davies, Julia A.; Parkes, Victoria H. K.; Wright, Timothy G., E-mail: Tim.Wright@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report (nanosecond) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), (nanosecond) zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) and (picosecond) time-resolved slow-electron velocity map imaging (tr-SEVI) spectra of fully hydrogenated toluene (Tol-h{sub 8}) and the deuterated-methyl group isotopologue (?{sub 3}-Tol-d{sub 3}). Vibrational assignments are made making use of the activity observed in the ZEKE and tr-SEVI spectra, together with the results from quantum chemical and previous experimental results. Here, we examine the 700–1500 cm{sup ?1} region of the REMPI spectrum, extending our previous work on the region ?700 cm{sup ?1}. We provide assignments for the majority of the S{sub 1} and cation bands observed, and in particular we gain insight regarding a number of regions where vibrations are coupled via Fermi resonance. We also gain insight into intramolecular vibrational redistribution in this molecule.

  11. Shape of the coherent-population-trapping resonances and high-rank polarization moments S. Gateva,* L. Petrov, E. Alipieva, and G. Todorov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    magnetic resonances. The comparison of the theoretical and experimental shapes of the CPT resonances operation, a good knowledge of the internal and external factors influencing the resonance shape is re- quired 4 . The CPT resonance shape has been studied experimen- tally and theoretically in many works see

  12. Magnetic chicane for terahertz management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, Stephen (Yorktown, VA); Biallas, George Herman (Yorktown, VA); Douglas, David (Yorktown, VA); Jordan, Kevin Carl (Newport News, VA); Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA); Willams, Gwyn P. (Yorktown, VA)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of a magnetic electron beam orbit chicane between the wiggler and the downstream initial bending dipole in an energy recovering Linac alleviates the effects of radiation propagated from the downstream bending dipole that tend to distort the proximate downstream mirror of the optical cavity resonator.

  13. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Normal-Appearing White Matter as Biomarker for Radiation-Induced Late Delayed Cognitive Decline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Christopher H., E-mail: chchap@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nagesh, Vijaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sundgren, Pia C. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Buchtel, Henry [Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chenevert, Thomas L. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Junck, Larry [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were acquired before RT, at 3 and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. The diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. A quality-of-life survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered before and after RT at the magnetic resonance imaging follow-up visits. Results: In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Up-Tack }) increased after RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < .05). The radiation dose correlated with an increase in cingulum {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a greater increase in {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05). The post-RT changes in verbal recall scores correlated linearly with the late changes in cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} (30 weeks, p < .02). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} changes predicted for post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 and 6 weeks, p < .05). The neurocognitive test scores correlated significantly with the quality-of-life survey results. Conclusions: The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging might be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline.

  14. The Benefits of Planar Magnetics in OF Power Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is increased, are related to the magnetic components: transformers and inductors. Unless the copper and coreThe Benefits of Planar Magnetics in OF Power Conversion Planar Magnetics (PM): The Technology that Meets the Challenges of HF Switch and Resonant Mode Power Conversion Professor Sam Ben-Yaakov Department

  15. Resonance Paramagnetic Relaxation and Alignment of Ultrasmall Grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazarian A

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a short summary of a mechanism of the enhanced paramagnetic relaxation that acts on rapidly rotating interstellar grains. We show that the Barnett magnetization that arises from grain rotation ensures that paramagnetic absorption happens at its maximum efficiency, i.e. the conditions for paramagnetic resonance are automatically fulfilled. The differences between the predictions of classical Davis-Greenstein relaxation and the process which we refer to as ``resonance relaxation'' are most pronounced for grains rotating faster than 10 GHz. Microwave polarization is likely to be an impediment for cosmic microwave background studies, but can provide a good tool for studying galactic magnetic field.

  16. Gravitational waves interacting with a spinning charged particle in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations which determine the response of a spinning charged particle moving in a uniform magnetic field to an incident gravitational wave are derived in the linearized approximation to general relativity. We verify that 1) the components of the 4-momentum, 4-velocity and the components of the spinning tensor, both electric and magnetic moments, exhibit resonances and 2) the co-existence of the uniform magnetic field and the GW are responsible for the resonances appearing in our equations. In the absence of the GW, the magnetic field and the components of the spin tensor decouple and the magnetic resonances disappear.

  17. Helioseismology The Resonant Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helioseismology The Resonant Sun Professor Bill Chaplin, School of Physics & Astronomy University Eddington #12;The Unseen Interior ''At first sight it would seem that the deep interior of the sun and stars;Overview What are resonant oscillations of the Sun? How do we observe the oscillations? What can we learn

  18. Resonant Kicker System Development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beukers, Tony; Krzaszczak, John; Larrus, Marc; Lira, Antonio de; /SLAC

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and installation of the Linear Coherent Light Source [1] at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has included the development of a kicker system for selective beam bunch dumping. The kicker is based on an LC resonant topology formed by the 50 uF energy storage capacitor and the 64 uH air core magnet load which has a sinusoidal pulse period of 400us. The maximum magnet current is 500 A. The circuit is weakly damped, allowing most of the magnet energy to be recovered in the energy storage capacitor. The kicker runs at a repetition rate of 120Hz. A PLC-based control system provides remote control and monitoring of the kicker via EPICS protocol. Fast timing and interlock signals are converted by discrete peak-detect and sample-hold circuits into DC signals that can be processed by the PLC. The design and experimental characterization of the system are presented.

  19. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  20. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Jih-Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Young, Sr., Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Daoshen (Knoxville, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ott, Jr., George W. (Knoxville, TN); White, Clifford P. (Knoxville, TN); McKeever, John W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  1. Narrowband resonant transmitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Simpson, John T.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  2. Observation of Efimov Resonances in a Mixture with Extreme Mass Imbalance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Pires; J. Ulmanis; S. Häfner; M. Repp; A. Arias; E. D. Kuhnle; M. Weidemüller

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe two consecutive heteronuclear Efimov resonances in an ultracold Li-Cs mixture by measuring three-body loss coefficients as a function of magnetic field near a Feshbach resonance. The first resonance is detected at a scattering length of $a_-^{(1)}=-320(10)~a_0$ corresponding to $\\sim 7 $ ($\\sim 3$) times the Li-Cs (Cs-Cs) van der Waals range. The second resonance appears at $5.8(1.0) a_-^{(1)}$ close to the unitarity-limited regime at the sample temperature of 450 nK. Indication of a third resonance is found in the atom loss spectra. The scaling of the resonance positions is close to the universal scaling value of 4.9 predicted for zero temperature. Deviations from universality might be caused by finite-range and temperature effects, as well as magnetic field dependent Cs-Cs interactions.

  3. NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 11 N0.1 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 11 · N0.1 · 2004 OPERATED BY: FLORIDA STATE R E V I E W BIOLOGY BIOCHEMISTRY CHEMISTRY CRYOGENICS ENGINEERING MATERIALS GEOCHEMISTRY INSTRUMENTATION KONDO/HEAVY FERMION SYSTEMS MAGNET TECHNOLOGY MAGNETIC RESONANCE TECHNIQUES MAGNETISMAND MAGNETIC

  4. LABCOM resonator Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keres, L.J.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop quartz crystal resonator designs, production processes, and test capabilities for 5-MHz, 6.2-MHz, and 10-MHz resonators for Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator (TMXO) applications. GE Neutron Devices (GEND) established and demonstrated the capability to produce and test quartz crystal resonators for use in the TMXO developed by the US Army ERADCOM (now LABCOM). The goals in this project were based on the ERADCOM statement of work. The scope of work indicated that the resonator production facilities for this project would not be completely independent, but that they would be supported in part by equipment and processes in place at GEND used in US Department of Energy (DOE) work. In addition, provisions for production test equipment or or eventual technology transfer costs to a commercial supplier were clearly excluded from the scope of work. The demonstrated technical capability of the deep-etched blank design is feasible and practical. It can be manufactured in quantity with reasonable yield, and its performance is readily predictable. The ceramic flatpack is a very strong package with excellent hermeticity. The four-point mount supports the crystal to reasonable shock levels and does not perturb the resonator's natural frequency-temperature behavior. The package can be sealed with excellent yields. The high-temperature, high-vacuum processing developed for the TMXO resonator, including bonding the piezoid to its mount with conductive polyimide adhesive, is consistent with precision resonator fabrication. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  5. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

  6. Near Infrared Surface Plasmon Resonance Phase Imaging and Nanoparticle-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Phase Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    utilized a near-infrared 860 nm light emitting diode (LED) light source and a wedge depolarizer to create

  7. An electron spin resonance investigation of irradiated potassium chloride crystals doped with sodium nitroprusside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayers, Richard Ralph

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    's, attention was turned. to a large extent to the topic of organic n-radicals. Electron spin resonance was first observed in free rad1cals in 1907 by Kozyrev and. Salikhov ) in the case of pentaphenyclopentadienyl. In solid penta... radical possesses mainly spin magnetism in accordance with measurements of its static magnetic susceptibility. In l949 a systematic study of electron spin resonance spectra in free radicals was initiated, i. e. molecules in which at least one electron...

  8. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  9. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex K. (Kensington, CA); Jensen, Kenneth J. (Berkeley, CA); Girit, Caglar (Albany, CA); Mickelson, William E. (San Francisco, CA); Grossman, Jeffrey C. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  10. Sensitivity Evaluation of Global Resonant H-Tree Clock Distribution Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    . This approach lowers the power consumption, since the energy resonates between the electric and magnetic fieldsSensitivity Evaluation of Global Resonant H-Tree Clock Distribution Networks Jonathan Rosenfeld and Eby G. Friedman Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Rochester Rochester

  11. Fabrication of 3-D cubic unit cells with measured IR resonances.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, A. Robert; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal; Wendt, Joel Robert; Burckel, David Bruce; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3-D cubic unit cell arrays containing split ring resonators were fabricated and characterized. The unit cells are {approx}3 orders-of-magnitude smaller than microwave SRR-based metamaterials and exhibit both electrically and magnetically excited resonances for normally incident TEM waves in addition to showing improved isotropic response.

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

  13. Micro-machined resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Godshall, Ned A. (Albuquerque, NM); Koehler, Dale R. (Albuquerque, NM); Liang, Alan Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Bradley K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  14. Micro-machined resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Godshall, N.A.; Koehler, D.R.; Liang, A.Y.; Smith, B.K.

    1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  15. Forced oscillations in magnetized accretion disks and QPOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pétri

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new model for these QPOs based on forced oscillations induced in the accretion disk due to the stellar magnetic field. First, it is shown that a magnetized accretion disk evolving in a rotating nonaxisymmetric magnetic field anchored to a neutron star will be subject to three kinds of resonances: a corotation resonance, a Lindblad resonance due to a driving force, and a parametric resonance due to the time varying epicyclic frequencies. In the second part of the paper, we focus on the linear response of a thin accretion disk, developing the density perturbation as the sum of free wave solutions and non-wavelike disturbances. In the last part, we show results of 2D numerical simulations of a simplified version of the accretion disk consisting of a column of plasma threaded by a vertical magnetic field. It is argued that the nearly periodic motion induced in the disk will produce high quality factor QPOs.

  16. Deconvolution of mixed magnetism in multilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, Akshaya Kumar [IITB-Monash Research Academy, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bahadur, Dhirendra, E-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic properties of graphite modified at the edges by KCl and exfoliated graphite in the form of twisted multilayered graphene (<4 layers) are analyzed to understand the evolution of magnetic behavior in the absence of any magnetic impurities. The mixed magnetism in multilayer graphene is deconvoluted using Low field-high field hysteresis loops at different temperatures. In addition to temperature and the applied magnetic field, the density of edge state spins and the interaction between them decides the nature of the magnetic state. By virtue of magnetometry and electron spin resonance studies, we demonstrate that ferromagnetism is intrinsic and is due to the interactions among various paramagnetic centers. The strength of these magnetic correlations can be controlled by modifying the structure.

  17. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  18. Injector with integrated resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The system may include a turbine engine. The turbine engine may include a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle may include an air path. The fuel nozzle may also include a fuel path such that the fuel nozzle is in communication with a combustion zone of the turbine engine. Furthermore, the fuel nozzle may include a resonator. The resonator may be disposed in the fuel nozzle directly adjacent to the combustion zone.

  19. Classical Computing in Nuclear Magnetic MARTA ROSELL O-MERINO, MATTHIAS BECHMANN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Classical Computing in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance MARTA ROSELL ´O-MERINO, MATTHIAS BECHMANN of matter to perform non classical in materio computation, we show how to use NMR to perform classical, in materio computing, universal gates, trajectories 1 INTRODUCTION Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is used

  20. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); TenCate, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Guyer, Robert A. (Amherst, MA); Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A. (Sint-Niklaas, BE)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  1. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S., E-mail: samkoe@dartmouth.ed [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Chen, Alina [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Rizvi, Imran [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); O'Hara, Julia A. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Hoopes, P. Jack [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Department of Surgery, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States); Pereira, Stephen P. [Institute of Hepatology, University College London Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Hasan, Tayyaba [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Surgery, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  2. Techniques calm fear of imaging machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Pelt, D.

    1990-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become a valuable tool in diagnosing diseases, and the imaging devices are now used as often as 2 million times a year in the United States. But as many as 10 percent of patients advised to undergo the procedure cannot because they become overwhelmed with claustrophobialike fear triggered by having to lie motionless in the machine's tunnel-like cylinder for about 45 minutes. To counteract this fear, several hospitals now practice various techniques to help reduce the feelings of confinement. One popular method is to give a patient special eyeglasses that allow him to look beyond his feet and see the tunnel opening. Other glasses use mirrors to direct the patient's vision out the back of the unit to large wilderness photographs or murals that simulate a sense of spaciousness. Even a basic item like a set of headphones that plays music can often distract a patient, and technicians frequently hold a patient's hand or foot during the procedure. Another trick is to invite family members and friends to remain with the patient during the scan to provide company and reassurance.

  3. Electric control of magnetization relaxation in thin film magnetic insulators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.; Sun, Y.; Song, Y-Y.; Wu, M.; Schultheiss, H.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A. (Materials Science Division); (Colorado State Univ.)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of magnetization relaxation in magnetic insulators via interfacial spin scattering is demonstrated. The experiments use nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/Pt layered structures, with the Pt layer biased by an electric voltage. The bias voltage produces a spin current across the Pt thickness. As this current scatters off the YIG surface, it exerts a torque on the YIG surface spins. This torque can reduce or enhance the damping and thereby decrease or increase the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of the YIG film, depending on the field/current configuration.

  4. Microfluidic microwave resonant sensors.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, David James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Matter can be identified by its interaction with electromagnetic fields. This can be described by its dielectric and magnetic properties, which typically vary with respect… (more)

  5. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  6. Assembly and magnetic properties of nickel nanoparticles on silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picraux, Samuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manandhar, Pradeep [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nazaretski, E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The directed assembly of magnetic Ni nanoparticles at the tips of silicon nanowires is reported. Using electrodeposition Ni shells of thickness from 10 to 100 nm were selectively deposited on Au catalytic seeds at the ends of nanowires. Magnetic characterization confirms a low coercivity ({approx}115 Oe) ferromagnetic behavior at 300 K. This approach to multifunctional magnetic-semiconducting nanostructure assembly could be extended to electrodeposition of other materials on the nanowire ends, opening up novel ways of device integration. Such magnetically functionalized nanowires offer a new approach to developing novel highly localized magnetic probes for high resolution magnetic resonance force microscopy.

  7. Argonne scientists discover new magnetic phase in iron-based...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neutron diffraction image giving evidence for the new magnetic phase in iron-based superconductors discovered by Argonne scientists. It shows the scattering results from a sample...

  8. Anisotropic rare-earth spin ensemble strongly coupled to a superconducting resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Probst; H. Rotzinger; S. Wünsch; P. Jung; M. Jerger; M. Siegel; A. V. Ustinov; P. A. Bushev

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacing photonic and solid-state qubits within a hybrid quantum architecture offers a promising route towards large scale distributed quantum computing. Ideal candidates for coherent qubit interconversion are optically active spins magnetically coupled to a superconducting resonator. We report on a cavity QED experiment with magnetically anisotropic Er3+:Y2SiO5 crystals and demonstrate strong coupling of rare-earth spins to a lumped element resonator. In addition, the electron spin resonance and relaxation dynamics of the erbium spins are detected via direct microwave absorption, without aid of a cavity.

  9. Free-Electron Laser-Powered Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, S; Edwards, D T; van Tol, J; Ramian, G; Han, S; Sherwin, M S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy interrogates unpaired electron spins in solids and liquids to reveal local structure and dynamics; for example, EPR has elucidated parts of the structure of protein complexes that have resisted all other techniques in structural biology. EPR can also probe the interplay of light and electricity in organic solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and the origin of decoherence in condensed matter, which is of fundamental importance to the development of quantum information processors. Like nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), EPR spectroscopy becomes more powerful at high magnetic fields and frequencies, and with excitation by coherent pulses rather than continuous waves. However, the difficulty of generating sequences of powerful pulses at frequencies above 100 GHz has, until now, confined high-power pulsed EPR to magnetic fields of 3.5 T and below. Here we demonstrate that ~1 kW pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) can power a pulsed EPR spectrometer at 240 GHz...

  10. Giant resonances in Ti-46,Ti-48

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokimoto, Y.; Lui, Y. -W; Clark, H. L.; John, B.; Chen, X.; Youngblood, David H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 74, 044308 (2006) Giant resonances in 46,48Ti Y. Tokimoto, Y.-W. Lui, H. L. Clark, B. John,* X. Chen, and D. H. Youngblood Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA (Received 30 June 2006... parameter sets using electro- magnetic B(E2) values [14] and collective model transition potentials successfully reproduced the angular distributions of 0556-2813/2006/74(4)/044308(9) 044308-1 ?2006 The American Physical Society TOKIMOTO, LUI, CLARK, JOHN...

  11. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.P.

    1990-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    J. P. Young attended the Fifth International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and presented an invited oral presentation on research he and coworkers had carried out in applying diode lasers to resonance ionization mass spectrometry. A summary of the conference is given along with an assessment of some of the presentations that the author found of interest. Young also visited Professor Marassi at the University of Camerino to present a seminar and discuss mutual interests in a new molten salt research project of the author. Some of the studies at Camerino are described. Ideas concerning the author's research that came from private discussions are also presented here.

  12. Method for resonant measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, George W. (5201 Rio Grande Blvd., N.W., Albuquerque, NM 87107); Migliori, Albert (Rte. 4, Box 258 Tano Rd., Sante Fe, NM 87501); Dixon, Raymond D. (396 Connie Ave., White Rock, NM 87544)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson's ratio (.sigma.) and shear modulus (.mu.) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson's ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson's ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson's ratio.

  13. Evaluation and Immunohistochemical Qualification of Carbogen-Induced ?R{sub 2}* as a Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Improved Tumor Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Lauren C.J., E-mail: lauren.baker@icr.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, The Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Boult, Jessica K.R.; Jamin, Yann; Gilmour, Lesley D.; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Burrell, Jake S. [Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, The Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Ashcroft, Margaret [Division of Medicine, Centre for Cell Signalling and Molecular Genetics, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Howe, Franklyn A. [St. George's, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Griffiths, John R. [Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Raleigh, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kogel, Albert J. van der [University of Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Robinson, Simon P. [Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, The Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate and histologically qualify carbogen-induced ?R{sub 2}* as a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging biomarker of improved tumor oxygenation using a double 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker approach. Methods and Materials: Multigradient echo images were acquired from mice bearing GH3 prolactinomas, preadministered with the hypoxia marker CCI-103F, to quantify tumor R{sub 2}* during air breathing. With the mouse remaining positioned within the magnet bore, the gas supply was switched to carbogen (95% O{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}), during which a second hypoxia marker, pimonidazole, was administered via an intraperitoneal line, and an additional set of identical multigradient echo images acquired to quantify any changes in tumor R{sub 2}*. Hypoxic fraction was quantified histologically using immunofluorescence detection of CCI-103F and pimonidazole adduct formation from the same whole tumor section. Carbogen-induced changes in tumor pO{sub 2} were further validated using the Oxylite fiberoptic probe. Results: Carbogen challenge significantly reduced mean tumor R{sub 2}* from 116 ± 13 s{sup ?1} to 97 ± 9 s{sup ?1} (P<.05). This was associated with a significantly lower pimonidazole adduct area (2.3 ± 1%), compared with CCI-103F (6.3 ± 2%) (P<.05). A significant correlation was observed between ?R{sub 2}* and ?hypoxic fraction (r=0.55, P<.01). Mean tumor pO{sub 2} during carbogen breathing significantly increased from 6.3 ± 2.2 mm Hg to 36.0 ± 7.5 mm Hg (P<.01). Conclusions: The combined use of intrinsic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging with a double hypoxia marker approach corroborates carbogen-induced ?R{sub 2}* as a noninvasive imaging biomarker of increased tumor oxygenation.

  14. Magnetic investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA); Baldwin, M.J. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Mercury, NV (USA)

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Magnetic Barcoded Hydrogel Microparticles for Multiplexed Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bong, Ki Wan

    Magnetic polymer particles have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from targeting and separation to diagnostics and imaging. Current synthesis methods have limited these particles to spherical or deformations ...

  16. p-wave optical Feshbach resonances in {sup 171}Yb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, Krittika; Deutsch, Ivan [Center for Quantum Information and Control, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Reichenbach, Iris [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the use of an optical Feshbach resonance to modify the p-wave interaction between ultracold polarized {sup 171}Yb spin-1/2 fermions. A laser exciting two colliding atoms to the {sup 1}S{sub 0}+{sup 3}P{sub 1} channel can be detuned near a purely-long-range excited molecular bound state. Such an exotic molecule has an inner turning point far from the chemical binding region, and thus, three-body recombination in the Feshbach resonance will be highly suppressed in contrast to that typically seen in a ground-state p-wave magnetic Feshbach resonance. We calculate the excited molecular bound-state spectrum using a multichannel integration of the Schroedinger equation, including an external perturbation by a magnetic field. From the multichannel wave functions, we calculate the Feshbach resonance properties, including the modification of the elastic p-wave scattering volume and inelastic spontaneous scattering rate. The use of magnetic fields and selection rules for polarized light yields a highly controllable system. We apply this control to propose a toy model for three-color superfluidity in an optical lattice for spin-polarized {sup 171}Yb, where the three colors correspond to the three spatial orbitals of the first excited p band. We calculate the conditions under which tunneling and on-site interactions are comparable, at which point quantum critical behavior is possible.

  17. Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchheim,, A. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992. 9. Mehta PK, Monteiro PJM. Concrete - Microstructure,Emwas c , J. L. Provis d and P.J.M. Monteiro e a Department16. Silva DA, Monteiro PJM. Early Formation of Ettringite in

  18. Storage ring lattice calibration using resonant spin depolarization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Corbett, W. J.; Huang, X.; LeBlanc, G. S.; Lundin, M.; Panopoulos, H. P.; Safranek, J. A.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Tian, K.; Rassool, R. P.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents measurements of the GeV-scale electron beam energy for the storage rings at the synchrotron light source facilities Australian Synchrotron (AS) and SPEAR3 at SLAC. Resonant spin depolarization was employed in the beam energy measurement, since it is presently the highest precision technique and an uncertainty of order 10?6 was achieved at SPEAR3 and AS. Using the resonant depolarization technique, the beam energy was measured at various rf frequencies to measure the linear momentum compaction factor. This measured linear momentum compaction factor was used to evaluate models of the beam trajectory through combined-function bending magnets. The main bending magnets of both lattices are rectangular, horizontally defocusing gradient bending magnets. Four modeling approaches are compared for the beam trajectory through the bending magnet: a circular trajectory, linear and nonlinear hyperbolic cosine trajectories, and numerical evaluation of the trajectory through the measured magnetic field map. Within the uncertainty of the measurement the momentum compaction factor is shown to agree with the numerical model of the trajectory within the bending magnet, and disagree with the hyperbolic cosine approximation.

  19. Proton resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Complete Level Scheme for {sup 30}P; A Search for Resonances Suitable for Tests of Detailed-Balance Violation; The Fourier Transform as a Tool for Detecting Chaos; Entrance Channel Correlations in p + {sup 27}Al; The Parity Dependence of Level Densities in {sup 49}V; and A Computer Program for the Calculation of Angular Momentum Coupling.

  20. Resonant scattering of surface plasmon polaritons by dressed quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Danhong; Cardimona, Dave [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Easter, Michelle [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, 1 Castle Point Terrace, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Gumbs, Godfrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Maradudin, A. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Lin, Shawn-Yu [Department of Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Zhang, Xiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, 3112 Etcheverry Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonant scattering of surface plasmon-polariton waves (SPP) by embedded semiconductor quantum dots above the dielectric/metal interface is explored in the strong-coupling regime. In contrast to non-resonant scattering by a localized dielectric surface defect, a strong resonant peak in the spectrum of the scattered field is predicted that is accompanied by two side valleys. The peak height depends nonlinearly on the amplitude of SPP waves, reflecting the feedback dynamics from a photon-dressed electron-hole plasma inside the quantum dots. This unique behavior in the scattered field peak strength is correlated with the occurrence of a resonant dip in the absorption spectrum of SPP waves due to the interband photon-dressing effect. Our result on the scattering of SPP waves may be experimentally observable and applied to spatially selective illumination and imaging of individual molecules.