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Sample records for magnetic domain walls

  1. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications. Magnetic Data Storage "Rats My disk drive has crashed. How will I...

  2. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  3. Nonadiabatic Spin Torque Investigated Using Thermally Activated Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Nonadiabatic Spin Torque Investigated Using Thermally Activated Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics M microscopy, we investigate the thermally activated motion of domain walls (DWs) between two positions properly analyzed, thermally activated processes at tem- peratures even well below the Curie temperature

  4. Pinning induced by inter-domain wall interactions in planar magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, T.J.; Bryan, M.T.; Fry, P.W.; Fundi, P.M.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D.A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-10-30

    We have investigated pinning potentials created by inter-domain wall magnetostatic interactions in planar magnetic nanowires. We show that these potentials can take the form of an energy barrier or an energy well depending on the walls' relative monopole moments, and that the applied magnetic fields required to overcome these potentials are significant. Both transverse and vortex wall pairs are investigated and it is found that transverse walls interact more strongly due to dipolar coupling between their magnetization structures. Simple analytical models which allow the effects of inter-domain wall interactions to be estimated are also presented.

  5. Phase diagram of magnetic domain walls in spin valve nano-stripes N. Rougemaille,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Phase diagram of magnetic domain walls in spin valve nano-stripes N. Rougemaille,1 V. Uhlí,2, 1 O walls in Co/Cu/Py spin valve nano-stripes (Py: Permalloy), in which the Co layer is mostly single domain Magneto- Resistance. These stacking are called spin valve for a metal spacer layer, and pseudo spin valve

  6. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

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  7. Magnetic behavior of 360° domain walls in patterned magnetic thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Mark Daniel

    2012-01-01

    360° transverse domain walls (360DWs), which form readily from transverse 180° domain walls (180DWs) of opposite sense, demonstrate qualitatively distinct behaviors from their constituent 180DWs and are therefore of interest ...

  8. Magnetic domain wall propagation in a submicron spin-valve stripe: influence of the pinned layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/10 Magnetic domain wall propagation in a submicron spin-valve stripe: influence of the pinned ferromagnetic spin-valve stripe is investigated using giant magnetoresistance. A notch in the stripe efficiently generated in the vicinity of the notch by the pinned layer of the spin-valve. PACS: 72.25.Ba; 73.43.Qt; 75

  9. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferromagnetic wires of nanometer sizes are considered to be key components in future spintronic applications for novel classes of magnetic storage devices. One example is the...

  10. Magnetic domain wall manipulation in (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures for spintronic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Figielski, Tadeusz; Olender, Karolina; Wrobel, Jerzy

    2014-02-21

    Ring-shaped nanostructures have been designed and fabricated by electron-beam lithography patterning and chemical etching from thin epitaxial layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. The nanostructures, in a form of planar rings with a slit, were supplied with four electrical terminals and subjected to magneto-transport studies under planar weak magnetic field. Magnetoresistive effects caused by manipulation of magnetic domain walls and magnetization reversal in the nanostructures have been investigated and possible applications of the nanostructures as four-terminal spintronic devices are discussed.

  11. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20?nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  12. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

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  13. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

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  14. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

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  15. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semenoff, G W; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  16. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Semenoff; V. Semenoff; Fei Zhou

    2008-05-31

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  17. Domain wall assisted magnetization switching in (111) oriented L1{sub 0} FePt grown on a soft magnetic metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaushik, Neelam; Sharma, Parmanand; Yubuta, Kunio; Makino, Akihiro; Inoue, Akihisa

    2010-08-16

    We report on growth and magnetic properties of exchange-coupled (111)-L1{sub 0} FePt hard/CoFeTaB soft magnetic metallic glass bilayered structure processed at lower temperature ({approx}400 deg. C). Single phaselike hysteresis loops with tailorable coercivity (<8.2 kOe) in out of plane direction are obtained. The magnetization switching mechanism is identified as domain wall assisted. In views of excellent nanofabrication abilities of metallic glass thin film and the ability to grow preferred oriented L1{sub 0} FePt, the present bilayered structure is very promising for the fabrication of high density bit--patterned magnetic recording media and other spintronic devices.

  18. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in...

  19. Domain wall displacement by remote spin-current injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skirdkov, P. N.

    We demonstrate numerically the ability to displace a magnetic domain wall (DW) by remote spin current injection. We consider a long and narrow magnetic nanostripe with a single DW. The spin-polarized current is injected ...

  20. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

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  1. Effective Supergravity for Supergravity Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cvetic; N. D. Lambert

    2002-05-23

    We discuss the low energy effective action for the Bosonic and Fermionic zero-modes of a smooth BPS Randall-Sundrum domain wall, including the induced supergravity on the wall. The result is a pure supergravity in one lower dimension. In particular, and in contrast to non-gravitational domain walls or domain walls in a compact space, the zero-modes representing transverse fluctuations of domain wall have vanishing action.

  2. Influence of topography and Co domain walls on the magnetization reversal of the FeNi layer in FeNi/Al2O3/Co magnetic tunnel junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuch, Wolfgang

    Influence of topography and Co domain walls on the magnetization reversal of the FeNi layer in Fe situated on and situated be- tween steps is large. To test the influence of the topography microscopic view of the influence of the substrate-induced layer topography on the magnetization reversal

  3. Spatially resolved observation of domain-wall propagation in a submicron ferromagnetic NOT-gate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grütter, Peter

    , one head-to-head or tail-to-tail domain wall propagates in the structure. Magnetic fields above by the polarity of the adjacent wire magnetization directions as either head-to- head or tail-to-tail domain walls-wall propagation. MFM using low magnetic moment tips 30 nm CoPtCr was operated in the constant height mode

  4. Magnetic domain structure and domain-wall energy in UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2} intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyslocki, J.J.; Suski, W.; Wochowski, K.

    1994-03-01

    Magnetic domain structures in the UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2} compounds were studied using the powder pattern method. The domain structure observed is typical for uniaxial materials. The domain-wall energy density {gamma} was determined from the average surface domain width D{sub s} observed on surfaces perpendicular to the easy axis as equal to 16 erg/cm{sup 2} for UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and 10 erg/cm{sup 2} for UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2}. Moreover, the critical diameter for single domain particle D{sub c} was calculated for the studied compounds.

  5. Charm physics with Moebius Domain Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Jüttner; Francesco Sanfilippo; Justus Tobias Tsang; Peter Boyle; Marina Marinkovic; Shoji Hashimoto; Takashi Kaneko; Yong-Gwi Cho

    2015-01-04

    We present results showing that Domain Wall fermions are a suitable discretisation for the simulation of heavy quarks. This is done by a continuum scaling study of charm quarks in a M\\"obius Domain Wall formalism using a quenched set-up. We find that discretisation effects remain well controlled by the choice of Domain Wall parameters preparing the ground work for the ongoing dynamical $2+1f$ charm program of RBC/UKQCD.

  6. Charm physics with Moebius Domain Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jüttner, Andreas; Tsang, Justus Tobias; Boyle, Peter; Marinkovic, Marina; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kaneko, Takashi; Cho, Yong-Gwi

    2015-01-01

    We present results showing that Domain Wall fermions are a suitable discretisation for the simulation of heavy quarks. This is done by a continuum scaling study of charm quarks in a M\\"obius Domain Wall formalism using a quenched set-up. We find that discretisation effects remain well controlled by the choice of Domain Wall parameters preparing the ground work for the ongoing dynamical $2+1f$ charm program of RBC/UKQCD.

  7. Domain wall conduction in multiaxial ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Maksymovych, Petro; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    The conductance of domain wall structures consisting of either stripes or cylindrical domains in multiaxial ferroelectric-semiconductors is analyzed. The effects of the flexoelectric coupling, domain size, wall tilt, and curvature on charge accumulation are analyzed using the Landau-Ginsburg Devonshire theory for polarization vector combined with the Poisson equation for charge distributions. The proximity and size effect of the electron and donor accumulation/depletion by thin stripe domains and cylindrical nanodomains are revealed. In contrast to thick domain stripes and wider cylindrical domains, in which the carrier accumulation (and so the static conductivity) sharply increases at the domain walls only, small nanodomains of radii less than 5-10 correlation lengths appeared conducting across the entire cross-section. Implications of such conductive nanosized channels may be promising for nanoelectronics.

  8. Gravitational Effects in Supersymmetric Domain Wall Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cvetic; S. Griffies

    1992-04-13

    A recent study of supersymmetric domain walls in $N=1$ supergravity theories revealed a new class of domain walls interpolating between supersymmetric vacua with different non-positive cosmological constants. We classify three classes of domain wall configurations and study the geodesic structure of the induced space-time. Motion of massive test particles in such space-times shows that these walls are always repulsive from the anti-deSitter (AdS) side, while on the Minkowski side test particles feel no force. Freely falling particles far away from a wall in an AdS vacuum experience a constant proper acceleration, \\ie\\ they are Rindler particles. A new coordinate system for discussing AdS space-time is presented which eliminates the use of a periodic time-like coordinate.

  9. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  10. Nonlinear magnetoinductive waves and domain walls in composite metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear magnetoinductive waves and domain walls in composite metamaterials Ilya V. Shadrivov a-handed composite metamaterials. We derive the coupled equations for describing the propagation of magnetoinductive waves, and show that in the nonlinear regime the magnetic response of a metamaterial may become bistable

  11. Perforation of domain wall by point mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Gal'tsov; E. Yu. Melkumova; P. A. Spirin

    2013-12-30

    We investigate collision of a point particle and an infinitely thin planar domain wall interacting gravitationally within the linearized gravity in Minkowski space-time of arbitrary dimension. In this setting we are able to describe analytically the perforation of the wall by an impinging particle, showing that it is accompanied by excitation of the spherical shock branon wave propagating outwards with the speed of light. Formally, the shock wave is a free solution of the branon wave equation which has to be added to ensure the validity of the retarded solution at the perforation point. Physically, the domain wall gets excited due to the shake caused by an instantaneous change of sign of the repulsive gravitational force. This effect is shown to hold, in particular, in four space-time dimensions, being applicable to the problem of cosmological domain walls.

  12. Perforation of domain wall by point mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal'tsov, D V; Spirin, P A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate collision of a point particle and an infinitely thin planar domain wall interacting gravitationally within the linearized gravity in Minkowski space-time of arbitrary dimension. In this setting we are able to describe analytically the perforation of the wall by an impinging particle, showing that it is accompanied by excitation of the spherical shock branon wave propagating outwards with the speed of light. Formally, the shock wave is a free solution of the branon wave equation which has to be added to ensure the validity of the retarded solution at the perforation point. Physically, the domain wall gets excited due to the shake caused by an instantaneous change of sign of the repulsive gravitational force. This effect is shown to hold, in particular, in four space-time dimensions, being applicable to the problem of cosmological domain walls.

  13. Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

    2008-11-19

    Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

  14. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merab Gogberashvili; Shynaray Myrzakul; Douglas Singleton

    2009-07-19

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of `stiff' matter, i.e. matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact non-linear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  15. Solitons and Domain Walls in Odd Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; G. W. Gibbons

    2000-07-04

    We discuss the existance of smooth soliton solutions which interpolate between supersymmetric vacua in odd-dimensional theories. In particular we apply this analysis to a wide class of supergravities to argue against the existence of smooth domain walls interpolating between supersymmetric vacua. We find that if the superpotential changes sign then any Goldstino modes will diverge.

  16. One-dimensional domain walls in thin ferromagnetic films with fourfold anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross G. Lund; Cyrill B. Muratov

    2015-09-23

    We study the properties of domain walls and domain patterns in ultrathin epitaxial magnetic films with two orthogonal in-plane easy axes, which we call fourfold materials. In these materials, the magnetization vector is constrained to lie entirely in the film plane and has four preferred directions dictated by the easy axes. We prove the existence of $90^\\circ$ and $180^\\circ$ domain walls in these materials as minimizers of a nonlocal one-dimensional energy functional. Further, we investigate numerically the role of the considered domain wall solutions for pattern formation in a rectangular sample.

  17. End states, ladder compounds, and domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Creutz

    1999-09-01

    A magnetic field applied to a cross linked ladder compound can generate isolated electronic states bound to the ends of the chain. After exploring the interference phenomena responsible, I discuss a connection to the domain wall approach to chiral fermions in lattice gauge theory. The robust nature of the states under small variations of the bond strengths is tied to chiral symmetry and the multiplicative renormalization of fermion masses.

  18. Analysis of ultra-narrow ferromagnetic domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Paul, David

    2012-01-10

    New materials with high magnetic anisotropy will have domains separated by ultra-narrow ferromagnetic walls with widths on the order of a few unit cells, approaching the limit where the elastic continuum approximation often used in micromagnetic simulations is accurate. The limits of this approximation are explored, and the static and dynamic interactions with intrinsic crystalline defects and external driving #12;elds are modeled. The results developed here will be important when considering the stability of ultra-high-density storage media.

  19. Temperature dependence of carrier spin polarization determined from current-induced domain wall motion in a Co/Ni nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, K.; Koyama, T.; Hiramatsu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Chiba, D.; Fukami, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Suzuki, T.; Ohshima, N.; Ishiwata, N.; Nakatani, Y.

    2012-05-14

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowire at various temperatures and with various applied currents. The carrier spin polarization was estimated from the measured domain wall velocity. We found that it decreased more with increasing temperature from 100 K to 530 K than the saturation magnetization did.

  20. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fi...

  1. Light quark masses using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    1998-09-10

    We compute the one-loop self-energy correction to the massive domain wall quark propagator. Combining this calculation with simulations at several gauge couplings, we estimate the strange quark mass in the continuum limit. The perturbative one-loop mass renormalization is comparable to that for Wilson quarks and considerably smaller than that for Kogut-Susskind quarks. Also, scaling violations appear mild in comparison to other errors at present. Given their good chiral behavior and these features, domain wall quarks are attractive for evaluating the light quark masses. Our preliminary quenched result is m_s(2 GeV) = 82(15) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme.

  2. Domain wall mobility in nanowires: transverse versus vortex walls R. Wieser, U. Nowak and K. D. Usadel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usadel, K. D.

    Arrays of magnetic nanowires are possible candidates for patterned magnetic storage media [1, 2]. For these nanowires and also for other future magneto­electronic devices the understanding of domain wall motion and mobility is important for the controlled switching of the nanostructure. In a recent experiment

  3. Melting Instantons, Domain Walls, and Large N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. B. Thacker

    2008-10-22

    Monte Carlo studies of $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models have shown that the structure of topological charge in these models undergoes a sharp transition at $N=N_c\\approx 4$. For $NN_c$ it is dominated by extended, thin, 1-dimensionally coherent membranes of topological charge, which can be interpreted as domain walls between discrete quasi-stable vacua. These vacua differ by a unit of background electric flux. The transition can be identified as the delocalization of topological charge, or "instanton melting," a phenomenon first suggested by Witten to resolve the conflict between instantons and large $N$ behavior. Implications for $QCD$ are discussed.

  4. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadra Jazayeri; Yashar Akrami; Hassan Firouzjahi; Adam R. Solomon; Yi Wang

    2014-11-29

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  5. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Akrami, Yashar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R.; Wang, Yi E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no E-mail: a.r.solomon@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  6. Domain Wall Pinning and Dislocations: Investigating Magnetite Deformed Under Conditions Analogous to Nature Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindquist, A. K.; Feinberg, J. M.; Harrison, R. J.; Loudon, J. C.; Newell, A. J.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we deformed samples cut from a single magnetite octahedron and used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements to experimentally verify earlier computational models of magnetic domain wall pinning by dislocations...

  7. Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies generated by domain wall networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, L

    2015-01-01

    We develop a numerical tool for the fast computation of the temperature and polarization power spectra generated by domain wall networks, by extending the publicly available CMBACT code --- that calculates the CMB signatures generated by active sources --- to also describe domain wall networks. In order to achieve this, we adapt the Unconnected Segment model for cosmic strings to also describe domain wall networks, and use it to model the energy-momentum of domain wall networks throughout their cosmological history. We use this new tool to compute and study the TT, EE, TE and BB power spectra generated by standard domain wall networks, and derive a conservative constraint on the energy scale of the domain wall-forming phase transition of $\\upeta <0.92\\,\\,{\\rm MeV}$ (which is a slight improvement over the original Zel'dovich bound of $1\\,\\,{\\rm MeV}$).

  8. Hamilton-Jacobi method for Domain Walls and Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostas Skenderis; Paul K. Townsend

    2006-12-07

    We use Hamiltonian methods to study curved domain walls and cosmologies. This leads naturally to first order equations for all domain walls and cosmologies foliated by slices of maximal symmetry. For Minkowski and AdS-sliced domain walls (flat and closed FLRW cosmologies) we recover a recent result concerning their (pseudo)supersymmetry. We show how domain-wall stability is consistent with the instability of adS vacua that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also explore the relationship to Hamilton-Jacobi theory and compute the wave-function of a 3-dimensional closed universe evolving towards de Sitter spacetime.

  9. Surface effect on domain wall width in ferroelectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10-26

    Oct 26, 2009 ... the domain wall thickness and gradient coefficients in typical ... phase transitions or u. 0 for the second ... tained from the surface energy in the form12. P3 ? 1 ..... Calculated width solid curves of domain wall at level. 0.76 as a ...

  10. Asymmetric domain walls of small angle in soft ferromagnetic films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas Döring; Radu Ignat

    2014-12-07

    We focus on a special type of domain walls appearing in the Landau-Lifshitz theory for soft ferromagnetic films. These domain walls are divergence-free $S^2$-valued transition layers that connect two directions in $S^2$ (differing by an angle $2\\theta$) and minimize the Dirichlet energy. Our main result is the rigorous derivation of the asymptotic structure and energy of such "asymmetric" domain walls in the limit $\\theta \\to 0$. As an application, we deduce that a supercritical bifurcation causes the transition from symmetric to asymmetric walls in the full micromagnetic model.

  11. Contribution of domain wall networks to the CMB power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazanu, A; Shellard, E P S

    2015-01-01

    We use three domain wall simulations from the radiation era to the late time dark energy domination era based on the PRS algorithm to calculate the energy-momentum tensor components of domain wall networks in an expanding universe. Unequal time correlators in the radiation, matter and cosmological constant epochs are calculated using the scaling regime of each of the simulations. The CMB power spectrum of a network of domain walls is determined. The first ever quantitative constraint for the domain wall surface tension is obtained using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method; an energy scale of domain walls of 0.93 MeV, which is close but below the Zel'dovich bound, is determined.

  12. Collapse of Axionic Domain Wall and Axion Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michiyasu Nagasawa; Masahiro Kawasaki

    1994-05-09

    We examine the collapse of an axion domain wall bounded by an axionic string. It is found that the collapse proceeds quickly and axion domain walls disappear. However axions are emitted in the collapse and its energy density increases during radiation dominated era and contributes significantly to the present mass density of the universe. In particular the axion emitted from the wall can account for the dark matter in the universe for $F_a\\gsim 10^{10}\\GeV$.

  13. Electric and Magnetic Walls on Dielectric Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2010-07-20

    Sufficient conditions of the existence of electric or magnetic walls on dielectric interfaces are given for a multizone uniform dielectric waveguiding system. If one of two adjacent dielectric zones supports a TEM field distribution while the other supports a TM (TE) field distribution, then the common dielectric interface behaves as an electric (magnetic) wall, that is, the electric (magnetic) field line is perpendicular to the interface while the magnetic (electric) field line is parallel to the interface.

  14. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RBC,; Blum, T; Boyle, P A; Christ, N H; Frison, J; Garron, N; Hudspith, R J; Izubuchi, T; Janowski, T; Jung, C; Juettner, A; Kelly, C; Kenway, R D; Lehner, C; Marinkovic, M; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, G; Murphy, D J; Ohta, S; Portelli, A; Sachrajda, C T; Soni, A

    2014-01-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, ...

  15. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RBC; UKQCD collaborations; :; T. Blum; P. A. Boyle; N. H. Christ; J. Frison; N. Garron; R. J. Hudspith; T. Izubuchi; T. Janowski; C. Jung; A. Juettner; C. Kelly; R. D. Kenway; C. Lehner; M. Marinkovic; R. D. Mawhinney; G. McGlynn; D. J. Murphy; S. Ohta; A. Portelli; C. T. Sachrajda; A. Soni

    2014-11-25

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, $B_K$, in the RGI scheme, 0.750(15) and the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

  16. Domain Nucleation and Annihilation in Uniformly Magnetized State under Current Pulses in Narrow Ferromagnetic Wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otani, Yoshichika

    of possible applications in hard disk drives, magnetic random access memory, and other spintronic devices.1 to nucleate a domain wall.10) This idea will be the use of the spintronic magnetization control. Experimental

  17. Gapped Domain Walls, Gapped Boundaries and Topological Degeneracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian Lan; Juven Wang; Xiao-Gang Wen

    2014-11-26

    Gapped domain walls, as topological line defects between 2+1D topologically ordered states, are examined. We provide simple criteria to determine the existence of gapped domain walls, which apply to both Abelian and non-Abelian topological orders. Our criteria also determine which 2+1D topological orders must have gapless edge modes, namely which 1+1D global gravitational anomalies ensure gaplessness. Furthermore, we introduce a new mathematical object, the tunneling matrix $\\mathcal W$, whose entries are the fusion-space dimensions $\\mathcal W_{ia}$, to label different types of gapped domain walls. By studying many examples, we find evidence that the tunneling matrices are powerful quantities to classify different types of gapped domain walls. Since a gapped boundary is a gapped domain wall between a bulk topological order and the vacuum, regarded as the trivial topological order, our theory of gapped domain walls inclusively contains the theory of gapped boundaries. In addition, we derive a topological ground state degeneracy formula, applied to arbitrary orientable spatial 2-manifolds with gapped domain walls, including closed 2-manifolds and open 2-manifolds with gapped boundaries.

  18. Calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    2000-09-18

    We present a first calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions. This paper contains an overview of the domain wall discretization and a pedagogical presentation of the perturbative calculation necessary for computing the mass renormalization. We combine the latter with numerical simulations to estimate the strange quark mass. Our final result in the quenched approximation is 95(26) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme at a scale of 2 GeV. We find that domain wall fermions have a small perturbative mass renormalization, similar to Wilson quarks, and exhibit good scaling behavior.

  19. Depinning transition of a domain wall in ferromagnetic films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xi, Bin; Luo, Meng -Bo; Vinokur, Valerii M.; Hu, Xiao

    2015-09-14

    We report first principle numerical study of domain wall (DW) depinning in two-dimensional magnetic film, which is modeled by 2D random-field Ising system with the dipole-dipole interaction. We observe non-conventional activation-type motion of DW and reveal the fractal structure of DW near the depinning transition. We determine scaling functions describing critical dynamics near the transition and obtain universal exponents establishing connection between thermal softening of pinning potential and critical dynamics. In addition, we observe that tuning the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction switches DW dynamics between two different universality classes, corresponding to two distinct dynamic regimes characterized by non-Arrhenius andmore »conventional Arrhenius-type DW motions.« less

  20. Analytical and micromagnetic study of a Neel domain wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivkin, K.; Romanov, K.; Abanov, Artem; Adamov, Y.; Saslow, W. M.

    2008-01-01

    For ferromagnets with exchange, dipolar interaction, and uniaxial anisotropy, by both analytic methods and micromagnetic simulations we study Neel domain walls in thin ferromagnetic strips of finite width. Comparison of the numerical results...

  1. Control of domain wall pinning by localised focused Ga?{sup +} ion irradiation on Au capped NiFe nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burn, D. M. Atkinson, D.

    2014-10-28

    Understanding domain wall pinning and propagation in nanowires are important for future spintronics and nanoparticle manipulation technologies. Here, the effects of microscopic local modification of the magnetic properties, induced by focused-ion-beam intermixing, in NiFe/Au bilayer nanowires on the pinning behavior of domain walls was investigated. The effects of irradiation dose and the length of the irradiated features were investigated experimentally. The results are considered in the context of detailed quasi-static micromagnetic simulations, where the ion-induced modification was represented as a local reduction of the saturation magnetization. Simulations show that domain wall pinning behavior depends on the magnitude of the magnetization change, the length of the modified region, and the domain wall structure. Comparative analysis indicates that reduced saturation magnetisation is not solely responsible for the experimentally observed pinning behavior.

  2. Spherical Domain Wall Collapse in a Dust Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norihiro Tanahashi; Chul-Moon Yoo

    2015-05-13

    To clarify observational consequence of bubble nucleations in inflationary era, we analyse dynamics of a spherical domain wall in an expanding universe. We consider a spherical shell of the domain wall with tension $\\sigma$ collapsing in a spherically-symmetric dust universe, which is initially separated into the open Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker universe inside the shell and the Einstein-de Sitter universe outside. The domain wall shell collapses due to the tension, and sweeps the dust fluid. The universe after the collapse becomes inhomogeneous and is described by the Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi model. We construct solutions describing this inhomogeneous universe by solving dynamical equations obtained from Israel's junction conditions applied to this system. We find that a black hole forms after the domain wall collapse for any initial condition, and that the black hole mass at the moment of its formation is universally given by $M_{\\rm BH}\\simeq 17 \\sigma/H_{\\rm hc}$, where $H_{\\rm hc}$ is the Hubble parameter at the time when the shell radius becomes equal to the Hubble radius. We also find that the dust fluid is distributed as $\\rho\\propto R^{3/2}$ near the central region after the collapse, where $R$ is the area radius. These features would provide observable signatures of a spherical domain wall generated in the early universe.

  3. Domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems in axion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yoshino, Kazuyoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T. E-mail: tsutomu.tyanagida@ipmu.jp

    2013-11-01

    Axion models have two serious cosmological problems, domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems. In order to solve these problems we investigate the Linde's model in which the field value of the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) scalar is large during inflation. In this model the fluctuations of the PQ field grow after inflation through the parametric resonance and stable axionic strings may be produced, which results in the domain wall problem. We study formation of axionic strings using lattice simulations. It is found that in chaotic inflation the axion model is free from both the domain wall and the isocurvature perturbation problems if the initial misalignment angle ?{sub a} is smaller than O(10{sup ?2}). Furthermore, axions can also account for the dark matter for the breaking scale v ? 10{sup 12?16} GeV and the Hubble parameter during inflation H{sub inf}?<10{sup 11?12} GeV in general inflation models.

  4. A Domain Wall Model for Hysteresis in Piezoelectric Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Domain Wall Model for Hysteresis in Piezoelectric Materials Ralph C. Smith Center for Research to attain the full potential of the materials as sensors and actuators in high performance applications design. i #12; 1 Introduction Piezoelectric materials provide the capability for designing actuators

  5. Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate David A. Scrymgeour and Venkatraman Gopalan Department of Materials Science, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. The contributions to the domain- wall energy from polarization

  6. Speeding up Domain Wall Fermion Algorithms using QCDLAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artan Borici

    2007-03-21

    Simulating lattice QCD with chiral fermions and indeed using Domain Wall Fermions continues to be challenging project however large are concurrent computers. One obvious bottleneck is the slow pace of prototyping using the low level coding which prevails in most, if not all, lattice projects. Recently, we came up with a new proposal, namely QCDLAB, a high level language interface, which we believe will boost our endeavours to rapidly code lattice prototype applications in lattice QCD using MATLAB/OCTAVE language and environment. The first version of the software, QCDLAB 1.0 offers the general framework on how to achieve this goal by simulating set of the lattice Schwinger model {\\tt http://phys.fshn.edu.al/qcdlab.html}. In this talk we introduce QCDLAB 1.1, which extends QCDLAB 1.0 capabilities for real world lattice computations with Wilson and Domain Wall fermions.

  7. Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2014-01-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

  8. Quantum Fusion of Strings (Flux Tubes) and Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-05-20

    We consider formation of composite strings and domain walls as a result of fusion of two elementary objects (elementary strings in the first case and elementary walls in the second) located at a distance from each other. The tension of the composite object T_2 is assumed to be less than twice the tension of the elementary object T_1, so that bound states are possible. If in the initial state the distance d between the fusing strings or walls is much larger than their thickness and satisfies the conditions T_1 d^2 >> 1 (in the string case) and T_1 d^3 >> 1 (in the wall case), the problem can be fully solved quasiclassically. The fusion probability is determined by the first, "under the barrier" stage of the process. We find the bounce configuration and its extremal action S_B. In the wall problem e^{-S_B} gives the fusion probability per unit time per unit area. In the string case, due to a logarithmic infrared divergence, the problem is well formulated only for finite-length strings. The fusion probability per unit time can be found in the limit in which the string length is much larger than the distance between two merging strings.

  9. Energy-momentum balance in particle - domain wall perforating collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Gal'tsov; E. Yu. Melkumova; P. A. Spirin

    2015-02-10

    We investigate the energy-momentum balance in the perforating collision of a point particle with an infinitely thin planar domain wall within the linearized gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Since the metric of the wall increases with distance, the wall and the particle are never free, and their energy-momentum balance involves not only the instantaneous kinetic momenta, but also the non-local contribution of gravitational stresses. However, careful analysis shows that the stresses can be unambiguously divided between the colliding objects leading to definition of the gravitationally dressed momenta. These take into account for gravity in the same way as the potential energy does in the non-relativistic theory, but our treatment is fully relativistic. Another unusual feature of our problem is the non-vanishing flux of the total energy-momentum tensor through the lateral surface of the world tube. In this case the zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor does not imply conservation of the total momentum defined as the integral over the space-like section of the tube. But one can still define the conservation low infinitesimally, passing to time derivatives of the momenta. Using this definition we establish the momentum balance in terms of the dressed particle and wall momenta.

  10. Proton decay matrix elements with domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; C. Dawson; J. Noaki; A. Soni

    2006-09-18

    Hadronic matrix elements of operators relevant to nucleon decay in grand unified theories are calculated numerically using lattice QCD. In this context, the domain-wall fermion formulation, combined with non-perturbative renormalization, is used for the first time. These techniques bring reduction of a large fraction of the systematic error from the finite lattice spacing. Our main effort is devoted to a calculation performed in the quenched approximation, where the direct calculation of the nucleon to pseudoscalar matrix elements, as well as the indirect estimate of them from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements, are performed. First results, using two flavors of dynamical domain-wall quarks for the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are also presented to address the systematic error of quenching, which appears to be small compared to the other errors. Our results suggest that the representative value for the low energy constants from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are given as |alpha| simeq |beta| simeq 0.01 GeV^3. For a more reliable estimate of the physical low energy matrix elements, it is better to use the relevant form factors calculated in the direct method. The direct method tends to give smaller value of the form factors, compared to the indirect one, thus enhancing the proton life-time; indeed for the pi^0 final state the difference between the two methods is quite appreciable.

  11. Scattering from a Domain Wall in a Spontaneously Broken Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; John W. McIntosh, Jr

    1994-12-20

    We study the interaction of particles with a domain wall at a symmetry-breaking phase transition by perturbing about the domain wall solution. We find the particulate excitations appropriate near the domain wall and relate them to the particles present far from the wall in the uniform broken and unbroken phases. For a quartic Higgs potential we find analytic solutions to the equations of motion and derive reflection and transmission coefficients. We discover several bound states for particles near the wall. Finally, we apply our results to the electroweak phase transition in the standard model.

  12. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Bruno S.; Fuelling, Stephan

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  13. Future of Chiral Extrapolations with Domain Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen R. Sharpe

    2007-06-01

    I discuss the constraints on the lattice spacing, a, the quark masses, m, the box size, L, and particularly the residual mass, m_res, such that one can successfully calculate phenomenologically interesting quantities using Domain Wall fermions (DWF). The constraints on a, m, and L are largely common with other improved fermion discretizations, and I emphasize that the improved chiral symmetry of DWF does not remove the need for simulations with a significant range of lattice parameters. Concerning m_res, I compare the analysis of chiral symmetry breaking to that with Wilson fermions, emphasizing that DWF are better than simply Wilson fermions with each chiral symmetry breaking effect reduced by a common factor. I then discuss the impact of non-zero m_res both on generic hadronic quantities, and on matrix elements which involve mixing with lower dimension operators.

  14. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1?mT to 1?mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5?nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300?nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  15. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities II: Fracturing of colliding walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Braden; J. Richard Bond; Laura Mersini-Houghton

    2015-06-09

    We study collisions between nearly planar domain walls including the effects of small initial nonplanar fluctuations. These perturbations represent the small fluctuations that must exist in a quantum treatment of the problem. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that at the linear level a subset of these fluctuations experience parametric amplification as a result of their coupling to the planar symmetric background. Here we study the full three-dimensional nonlinear dynamics using lattice simulations, including both the early time regime when the fluctuations are well described by linear perturbation theory as well as the subsequent stage of fully nonlinear evolution. We find that the nonplanar fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the overall evolution of the system. Specifically, once these fluctuations begin to interact nonlinearly the split into a planar symmetric part of the field and the nonplanar fluctuations loses its utility. At this point the colliding domain walls dissolve, with the endpoint of this being the creation of a population of oscillons in the collision region. The original (nearly) planar symmetry has been completely destroyed at this point and an accurate study of the system requires the full three-dimensional simulation.

  16. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Chanthbouala, Andre; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2013-12-09

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600?m/s) at current densities below 10{sup 7}?A/cm{sup 2}. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (?1?ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  17. Charm physics with physical light and strange quarks using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Boyle; Luigi Del Debbio; Nicolas Garron; Andreas Juttner; Ava Khamseh; Marina Marinkovic; Francesco Sanfilippo; Justus T. Tsang

    2015-02-03

    We present a study of charm physics using RBC/UKQCD 2+1 flavour physical point domain wall fermion ensembles for the light quarks as well as for the valence charm quark. After a brief motivation of domain wall fermions as a suitable heavy quark discretisation we will show first results for masses and matrix elements.

  18. Charm physics with physical light and strange quarks using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Peter A; Garron, Nicolas; Juttner, Andreas; Khamseh, Ava; Marinkovic, Marina; Sanfilippo, Francesco; Tsang, Justus T

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of charm physics using RBC/UKQCD 2+1 flavour physical point domain wall fermion ensembles for the light quarks as well as for the valence charm quark. After a brief motivation of domain wall fermions as a suitable heavy quark discretisation we will show first results for masses and matrix elements.

  19. Domain walls and vortices in linearly coupled systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dror, Nir; Zeng, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    We investigate 1D and 2D radial domain-wall (DW) states in the system of two nonlinear-Schr\\"{o}dinger/Gross-Pitaevskii equations, which are coupled by the linear mixing and by the nonlinear XPM (cross-phase-modulation). The system has straightforward applications to two-component Bose-Einstein condensates, and to the bimodal light propagation in nonlinear optics. In the former case, the two components represent different hyperfine atomic states, while in the latter setting they correspond to orthogonal polarizations of light. Conditions guaranteeing the stability of flat continuous wave (CW) asymmetric bimodal states are established, followed by the study of families of the corresponding DW patterns. Approximate analytical solutions for the DWs are found near the point of the symmetry-breaking bifurcation of the CW states. An exact DW solution is produced for ratio 3:1 of the XPM and SPM coefficients. The DWs between flat asymmetric states, which are mirror images to each other, are completely stable, and al...

  20. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17

    A two-parameter computational model is proposed for the study of the regional motion of the left ventricle (LV) wall using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) data. In this model, the LV wall motion is mathematically decomposed into two...

  1. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  2. Current-driven domain wall motion enhanced by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Wang, Dao-wei; Li, Zhi-xiong; Tang, Wei; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2014-07-14

    The magnetic domain wall (DW) motion driven by a spin-polarized current opens a new concept for memory and logic devices. However, the critical current density required to overcome the intrinsic and/or extrinsic pinning of DW remains too large for practical applications. Here, we show, by using micromagnetic simulations and analytical approaches, that the application of a microwave field offers an effective solution to this problem. When a transverse microwave field is applied, the adiabatic spin-transfer torque (STT) alone can sustain a steady-state DW motion without the sign of Walker breakdown, meaning that the intrinsic pinning disappears. The extrinsic pinning can also be effectively reduced. Moreover, the DW velocity is increased greatly for the microwave-assisted DW motion. This provides a new way to manipulate the DW motion at low current densities.

  3. Magnetic Wall Climbing Robot for Thin Surfaces with Specific Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Magnetic Wall Climbing Robot for Thin Surfaces with Specific Obstacles W. Fischer¹, F. Tâche high magnetic forces The main optimization criterion for this robot was to design it as light@ethz.ch Summary. This paper describes a novel solution to a mobile climbing robot on mag- netic wheels, designed

  4. Domain Wall Model in the Galactic Bose-Einstein Condensate Halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. C. de Souza; M. O. C. Pires

    2013-05-22

    We assume that the galactical dark matter halo, considered composed of an axionlike particles Bose-Einstein condensate \\cite{pir12}, can present topological defects, namely domain walls, arising as the dark soliton solution for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in a self-graviting potential. We investigate the influence that such substructures would have in the gravitational interactions within a galaxy. We find that, for the simple domain wall model proposed, the effects are too small to be identified, either by means of a local measurement of the gradient of the gravitational field or by analysing galaxy rotation curves. In the first case, the gradient of the gravitational field in the vicinity of the domain wall would be $10^{-31}\\; (m/s^2)/m$. In the second case, the ratio of the tangential velocity correction of a star due to the presence of the domain wall to the velocity in the spherical symmetric case would be $10^{-8}$.

  5. Nonlinear Spin-Polarized Transport through a Ferromagnetic Domain Wall Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    of a p-n junction, while two consecutive domain walls correspond to a p-n-p transistor. In a recent paper current is, indeed, possible in the ``p-n-p'' configuration, and can be controlled by a magnetic field

  6. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California, San Diego, have recently used coherent soft x-ray scattering with angular Fourier analysis to discover that the disordered domain patterns do, in fact, exhibit...

  7. Substrate Clamping Effects on Irreversible Domain Wall Dynamics in Lead Zirconate Titanate Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggio, Flavio [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S [ORNL; Kim, H. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Jackson, T. N. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Damjanovic, Dragan [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Trolier-Mckinstry, Susan E [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The role of long-range strain interactions on domain wall dynamics is explored through macroscopic and local measurements of nonlinear behavior in mechanically clamped and released polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) films. Released films show a dramatic change in the global dielectric nonlinearity and its frequency dependence as a function of mechanical clamping. Furthermore, we observe a transition from strong clustering of the nonlinear response for the clamped case to almost uniform nonlinearity for the released film. This behavior is ascribed to increased mobility of domain walls. These results suggest the dominant role of collective strain interactions mediated by the local and global mechanical boundary conditions on the domain wall dynamics. The work presented in this Letter demonstrates that measurements on clamped films may considerably underestimate the piezoelectric coefficients and coupling constants of released structures used in microelectromechanical systems, energy harvesting systems, and microrobots.

  8. Lattice QCD with domain wall quarks and applications to weak matrix elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Blum; A. Soni Brookhaven National Lab

    1997-10-13

    Using domain wall fermions, we estimate $B_K(\\mu\\approx 2 GeV)=0.628(47)$ in quenched QCD which is consistent with previous calculations. At $\\gbeta=6.0$ and 5.85 we find the ratio $f_K/m_\\rho$ in agreement with the experimental value, within errors. These results support expectations that $O(a)$ errors are exponentially suppressed in low energy ($E\\ll a^{-1}$) observables, and indicate that domain wall fermions have good scaling behavior at relatively strong couplings. We also demonstrate that the axial current numerically satisfies the lattice analog of the usual continuum axial Ward identity.

  9. The effect of thermal activation on the coercivity of domain walls L. LopezDiaz a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moro, Esteban

    The effect of thermal activation on the coercivity of domain walls L. Lopez­Diaz a) Departamento de of temperature was taken into account. However, it is well known that thermal activation over finite energy the inclusion and, consequently, the coercivity is low­ ered. In this article, the effect of thermal activation

  10. The effect of thermal activation on the coercivity of domain walls L. Lopez-Diaza)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moro, Esteban

    The effect of thermal activation on the coercivity of domain walls L. Lopez-Diaza) Departamento de of temperature was taken into account. However, it is well known that thermal activation over finite energy the inclusion and, consequently, the coercivity is low- ered. In this article, the effect of thermal activation

  11. Thermoelectric Effect across the Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in VO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Thermoelectric Effect across the Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in VO2 Microbeams J. Cao,,, W. Fan-performance thermoelectric materials are currently one of the focuses in materials research for energy conversion technologies.1-4 A good thermoelectric material should have a relatively high thermopower (Seebeck coefficient

  12. Magnetic Microscopy and Imaging II John Chapman, Chairman Study of in-plane magnetic domains with magnetic transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayreuther, Günther

    with magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy P. Fischer,a) T. Eimu¨ller, and G. Schu¨tz University of Wu be designed by en- gaging, e.g., the different magnetic couplings between each layers. Due to a balanceMagnetic Microscopy and Imaging II John Chapman, Chairman Study of in-plane magnetic domains

  13. Direct observation of domain walls in NiFe films using high-resolution Lorentz microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    . Wong and David E. Laughlin Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University that the thickness dependence has a similar profile to the theoretically predicted trend but the actual wall with the interactive data language IDL image processing software so that the interference between magnetic

  14. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  15. B-physics with dynamical domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth S. Van de Water; Oliver Witzel

    2011-01-24

    We report on our progress in calculating the B-meson decay constants and B^0-bar B^0 mixing parameters using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We present our computational method and show some preliminary results obtained on the coarser (a approx 0.11fm) 24^3 lattices. This work is presented on behalf of the RBC and UKQCD collaborations.

  16. CP violation in the models of fermion localization on a domain wall (brane)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander A. Andrianov; Vladimir A. Andrianov; Oleg O. Novikov

    2013-03-31

    A brief survey of fermion localization mechanism on a domain wall ("thick brane") generated by a topologically nontrivial vacuum configuration of scalar fields is given. The extension of scalar fields interaction with fermions which supplies fermions with an axial mass is proposed. For several flavors and generations of fermions this extension can entail the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix of the Standard Model. As well the model with two scalar doublets which provide a supplementary CP violation mechanism is considered.

  17. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2,BL4-2StefanLightsource StimulatedStochastic

  18. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2,BL4-2StefanLightsource

  19. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! I ,StimulusConnectStochastic

  20. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! I

  1. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! IStochastic

  2. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! IStochasticStochastic

  3. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! IStochasticStochasticStochastic

  4. Nucleon structure from mixed action calculations using 2+1 flavors of asqtad sea and domain wall valence fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratt, Jonathan D.

    We present high statistics results for the structure of the nucleon from a mixed-action calculation using 2+1 flavors of asqtad sea and domain-wall valence fermions. We perform extrapolations of our data based on different ...

  5. One-Flavor Algorithms for Simulation of Lattice QCD with Domain-Wall Fermion: EOFA versus RHMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Chih Chen; Ting-Wai Chiu

    2014-12-02

    We compare the performances of the exact one-flavor algorithm (EOFA) and the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm (RHMC), for dynamical simulations of lattice QCD with domain-wall fermion.

  6. Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in Vanadium Dioxide Nanobeams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal- Insulator Domain Walls localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain the monoclinic phase identification. KEYWORDS: Vanadium dioxide, thermoreflectance microscopy, Peltier effect

  7. The static quark potential in 2+1 flavour Domain Wall QCD from QCDOC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koichi Hashimoto; Taku Izubuchi; Jun Noaki; for the RBC-UKQCD Collaborations

    2005-10-14

    We report our present status of on-going project on the measurement of the static quark potential in 2+1 flavour domain wall QCD with various improved gauge actions and couplings. Lattice spacing determined from Sommer scale on these ensembles are from 1.6 GeV to 2.0 GeV for $16^3 \\times 32$ lattice with fifth dimension size 8. We also examine size of discretization error from scaling of a pair of dimensionless quantities, $(r_0 m_\\pi)^2$ and $r_0 m_\\rho$, and found small scaling violation.

  8. The relation between the waveguide and overlap implementations of Kaplan's domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maarten Golterman; Yigal Shamir

    1995-09-26

    Recently, Narayanan and Neuberger proposed that the fermion determinant for a lattice chiral gauge theory be defined by an overlap formula. The motivation for that formula comes from Kaplan's five dimensional lattice domain wall fermions. In the case that the target continuum theory contains $4n$ chiral families, we show that the effective action defined by overlap formula is identical to the effective action of a modified waveguide model that has extra bosonic ghost fields. This raises serious questions about the viability of the overlap formula for defining chiral gauge theories on the lattice.

  9. Domain wall fermion calculation of nucleon g_A/g_V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Shigemi Ohta; Shoichi Sasaki

    2000-11-01

    We present a preliminary domain-wall fermion lattice-QCD calculation of isovector vector and axial charges, g_V and g_A, of the nucleon. Since the lattice renormalizations, Z_V and Z_A, of the currents are identical with DWF, the lattice ratio (g_A/g_V)^{lattice} directly yields the continuum value. Indeed Z_V determined from the matrix element of the vector current agrees closely with Z_A from a non-perturbative renormalization study of quark bilinears. We also obtain spin related quantities Delta-q/g_V and delta-q/g_V.

  10. Domain Walls and Anchoring Transitions Mimicking Nematic Biaxiality in the Oxadiazole Bent-Core Liquid Crystal C7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-ki; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignme...

  11. Phase-field simulation of electric-field-induced in-plane magnetic domain switching in magnetic/ferroelectric layered heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Phase-field simulation of electric-field-induced in-plane magnetic domain switching in magnetic://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Phase-field simulation of electric-field-induced in-plane magnetic domain switching in magnetic; published online 22 June 2011) The electric-field-induced in-plane magnetic domain switching in magnetic

  12. Nucleon axial charge from quenched lattice QCD with domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Sasaki; Kostas Orginos; Shigemi Ohta; Tom Blum; for the RBCK Collaboration

    2003-07-18

    We present a quenched lattice calculation of the nucleon isovector vector and axial-vector charges gV and gA. The chiral symmetry of domain wall fermions makes the calculation of the nucleon axial charge particularly easy since the Ward-Takahashi identity requires the vector and axial-vector currents to have the same renormalization, up to lattice spacing errors of order O(a^2). The DBW2 gauge action provides enhancement of the good chiral symmetry properties of domain wall fermions at larger lattice spacing than the conventional Wilson gauge action. Taking advantage of these methods and performing a high statistics simulation, we find a significant finite volume effect between the nucleon axial charges calculated on lattices with (1.2 fm)^3 and (2.4 fm)^3 volumes (with lattice spacing, a, of about 0.15 fm). On the large volume we find gA = 1.212 +/- 0.027(statistical error) +/- 0.024(normalization error). The quoted systematic error is the dominant (known) one, corresponding to current renormalization. We discuss other possible remaining sources of error. This theoretical first principles calculation, which does not yet include isospin breaking effects, yields a value of gA only a little bit below the experimental one, 1.2670 +/- 0.0030.

  13. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. II. Islands interacting with resistive walls or resonant magnetic perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    magnetic islands. Such islands degrade plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travelTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. II. Islands interacting with resistive walls-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity Phys. Plasmas 12

  14. Insights into substrate specificity of NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases containing bacterial SH3 domains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu -Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; et al

    2015-09-15

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. In addition, these enzymes all have ?-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting ofmore »two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.Peptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural analysis of three modular NlpC/P60 hydrolases, one lysin, and two recycling enzymes, show that they may have evolved from a common molecular architecture, where the substrate preference is modulated by local changes. These results also suggest that new pathways for recycling PG turnover products, such as tracheal cytotoxin, may have evolved in bacteria in the human gut microbiome that involve NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases.« less

  15. Metallic Magnetic Hetrostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Chi Wah

    .2.2 Domains and magnetization processes 1.2.2.1 Domains and domain walls 1.2.2.2 Magnetization reversal and hysteresis 1.2.2.3 Modelling of magnetization process 1.3 Sputter deposition of thin films in this project 1.3.1 Substrate preparation 1.3.2 ‘UFO...

  16. IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS INTRODUCING A DOUBLE WALL Hg POOL VESSSELAND Be WINDOW.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS INTRODUCING A DOUBLE WALL Hg POOL VESSSELAND Be WINDOW. SC#4 STUDIES FOR 20 cm GAPS SIZE FOR STST IN THE PLACE OF RESISTIVE MAGNETS AND REST OF VOLUME IN Hg POOL SHIELDING IN THE PLACE OF RESISTIVE MAGNETS AND IN THE REST OF VOLUME IN THE Hg POOL VESSEL

  17. Steady-state domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin-transfer torque with assistance of microwave field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Tang, Wei; Wang, D.; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2013-12-23

    We have studied the current-induced displacement of a 180° Bloch wall by means of micromagnetic simulation and analytical approach. It is found that the adiabatic spin-transfer torque can sustain a steady-state domain wall (DW) motion in the direction opposite to that of the electron flow without Walker Breakdown when a transverse microwave field is applied. This kind of motion is very sensitive to the microwave frequency and can be resonantly enhanced by exciting the domain wall thickness oscillation mode. A one-dimensional analytical model was established to account for the microwave-assisted wall motion. These findings may be helpful for reducing the critical spin-polarized current density and designing DW-based spintronic devices.

  18. GPU-Based Conjugate Gradient Solver for Lattice QCD with Domain-Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting-Wai Chiu; Tung-Han Hsieh; Yao-Yuan Mao; Kenji Ogawa

    2011-01-02

    We present the first GPU-based conjugate gradient (CG) solver for lattice QCD with domain-wall fermions (DWF). It is well-known that CG is the most time-consuming part in the Hybrid Monte Carlo simulation of unquenched lattice QCD, which becomes even more computational demanding for lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry. We have designed a CG solver for the general 5-dimensional DWF operator on NVIDIA CUDA architecture with mixed-precision, using the defect correction as well as the reliable updates algorithms. We optimize our computation by even-odd preconditioning in the 4D space-time lattice, plus several innovative techniques for CUDA kernels. For NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285/480, our CG solver attains 180/233 Gflops (sustained).

  19. GPU-Based Conjugate Gradient Solver for Lattice QCD with Domain-Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Ting-Wai; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Ogawa, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    We present the first GPU-based conjugate gradient (CG) solver for lattice QCD with domain-wall fermions (DWF). It is well-known that CG is the most time-consuming part in the Hybrid Monte Carlo simulation of unquenched lattice QCD, which becomes even more computational demanding for lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry. We have designed a CG solver for the general 5-dimensional DWF operator on NVIDIA CUDA architecture with mixed-precision, using the defect correction as well as the reliable updates algorithms. We optimize our computation by even-odd preconditioning in the 4D space-time lattice, plus several innovative techniques for CUDA kernels. For NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285/480, our CG solver attains 180/233 Gflops (sustained).

  20. Nucleon form factors with 2+1 flavor dynamical domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeshi Yamazaki; Yasumichi Aoki; Tom Blum; Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta; Shoichi Sasaki; Robert Tweedie; James Zanotti

    2009-04-14

    We report our numerical lattice QCD calculations of the isovector nucleon form factors for the vector and axialvector currents: the vector, induced tensor, axialvector, and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The calculation is carried out with the gauge configurations generated with N_f=2+1 dynamical domain wall fermions and Iwasaki gauge actions at beta = 2.13, corresponding to a cutoff 1/a = 1.73 GeV, and a spatial volume of (2.7 fm)^3. The up and down quark masses are varied so the pion mass lies between 0.33 and 0.67 GeV while the strange quark mass is about 12% heavier than the physical one. We calculate the form factors in the range of momentum transfers, 0.2 6 is required to ensure that finite volume effects are below 1%.

  1. Magnetic shielding of walls from the unmagnetized ion beam in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2013-01-14

    We demonstrate by numerical simulations and experiments that the unmagnetized ion beam formed in a Hall thruster can be controlled by an applied magnetic field in a manner that reduces by 2-3 orders of magnitude deleterious ion bombardment of the containing walls. The suppression of wall erosion in Hall thrusters to such low levels has remained elusive for decades.

  2. Spin torque and heating effects in current-induced domain wall motion probed by transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Spin torque and heating effects in current-induced domain wall motion probed by transmission are reported. Heating on membranes leads to thermally activated random behavior at low current densities and by backcoating the SiN membranes with Al, heating effects are significantly reduced. A set of indicators

  3. Magnetic shielding of the channel walls in a Hall plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Grys, Kristi de; Mathers, Alex [Aerojet, Redmond, Washington 98052 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    In a qualification life test of a Hall thruster it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after {approx}5600 h. Numerical simulations using a two-dimensional axisymmetric plasma solver with a magnetic field-aligned mesh reveal that when the channel receded from its early-in-life to its steady-state configuration the following changes occurred near the wall: (1) reduction of the electric field parallel to the wall that prohibited ions from acquiring significant impact kinetic energy before entering the sheath, (2) reduction of the potential fall in the sheath that further diminished the total energy ions gained before striking the material, and (3) reduction of the ion number density that decreased the flux of ions to the wall. All these changes, found to have been induced by the magnetic field, constituted collectively an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Thus, we term this process in Hall thrusters 'magnetic shielding'.

  4. Effect of surface roughness on magnetic domain wall thickness, domain size, and coercivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 G. Palasantzas and J. Th. M. De Hosson Department nm thick deposited on plasma etched Si 100 substrates showed that, by increasing surface rough- ness nearly linearly with film thickness. Such an increase of the thickness fluctuations5 was attributed

  5. Domain Walls and Anchoring Transitions Mimicking Nematic Biaxiality in the Oxadiazole Bent-Core Liquid Crystal C7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-ki Kim; Greta Cukrov; Jie Xiang; Sung-Tae Shin; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2015-03-23

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangential-tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. The study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrate yet another mechanism (formation of secondary disclinations) by which a uniaxial nematic can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  6. The finite temperature QCD using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions at Nt = 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M; Christ, N H; Li, M; Mawhinney, R D; Renfrew, D; Hegde, P; Karsch, F; Lin, M; Vranas, P

    2009-11-30

    We study the region of the QCD phase transition using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions (DWF) and a 16{sup 3} x 8 lattice volume with a fifth dimension of L{sub s} = 32. The disconnected light quark chiral susceptibility, quark number susceptibility and the Polyakov loop suggest a chiral and deconfining crossover transition lying between 155 and 185 MeV for our choice of quark mass and lattice spacing. In this region the lattice scale deduced from the Sommer parameter r{sub 0} is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.3 GeV, the pion mass is {approx} 300 MeV and the kaon mass is approximately physical. The peak in the chiral susceptibility implies a pseudo critical temperature T{sub c} = 171(10)(17) MeV where the first error is associated with determining the peak location and the second with our unphysical light quark mass and non-zero lattice spacing. The effects of residual chiral symmetry breaking on the chiral condensate and disconnected chiral susceptibility are studied using several values of the valence L{sub s}.

  7. Finite Temperature QCD Using 2 þ 1 Flavors of Domain Wall Fermions at Nt ¼ 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsch, F.; Lim, M; Cheng, M; Christ, N; Hegde, P.; Li, L.; Mawhinney, R.; Renfrew, D.; Vranas, P.

    2010-03-30

    We study the region of the QCD phase transition using 2 + 1 flavors of domain wall fermions and a 16{sup 3} x 8 lattice volume with a fifth dimension of L{sub s} = 32. The disconnected light quark chiral susceptibility, quark number susceptibility, and the Polyakov loop suggest a chiral and deconfining crossover transition lying between 155 and 185 MeV for our choice of quark mass and lattice spacing. In this region the lattice scale deduced from the Sommer parameter r{sub 0} is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.3 GeV, the pion mass is {approx} 300 MeV, and the kaon mass is approximately physical. The peak in the chiral susceptibility implies a pseudocritical temperature T{sub c} = 171(10)(17) MeV where the first error is associated with determining the peak location and the second with our unphysical light quark mass and nonzero lattice spacing. The effects of residual chiral symmetry breaking on the chiral condensate and disconnected chiral susceptibility are studied using several values of the valence L{sub s}.

  8. A Lattice Study of the Nucleon Excited States with Domain Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Sasaki; Tom Blum; Shigemi Ohta

    2002-01-16

    We present results of our numerical calculation of the mass spectrum for isospin one-half and spin one-half non-strange baryons, i.e. the ground and excited states of the nucleon, in quenched lattice QCD. We use a new lattice discretization scheme for fermions, domain wall fermions, which possess almost exact chiral symmetry at non-zero lattice spacing. We make a systematic investigation of the negative-parity $N^*$ spectrum by using two distinct interpolating operators at $\\beta=6/g^2=6.0$ on a $16^3 \\times 32 \\times 16$ lattice. The mass estimates extracted from the two operators are consistent with each other. The observed large mass splitting between this state, $N^*(1535)$, and the positive-parity ground state, the nucleon N(939), is well reproduced by our calculations. We have also calculated the mass of the first positive-parity excited state and found that it is heavier than the negative-parity excited state for the quark masses studied.

  9. Continuum limit physics from 2+1 flavor domain wall QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Y.; Izubuchi, T.; Arthur, R.; Blum, T.; Boyle, P.A.; Brommel, D.; Christ, N.H.; Dawson, C.; Flynn, J.M.; Jin, X.Y.; Jung, C.; Kelly, C.; Li, M.; Lichtl, A.; Lightman, M.; Lin, M.F.; Mawhinney, R.D.; Maynard,C.M.; Ohta, S.; Pendleton, B.J.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Scholz, E.E.; Soni, A.; Wennekers, J.; Zanotti, J.M.; Zhou, R.

    2011-04-22

    We present physical results obtained from simulations using 2+1 flavors of domain wall quarks and the Iwasaki gauge action at two values of the lattice spacing a, [a{sup -1} = 1.73(3) GeV and a{sup -1} = 2.28(3) GeV]. On the coarser lattice, with 24{sup 3} x 64 x 16 points (where the 16 corresponds to L{sub s}, the extent of the 5th dimension inherent in the domain wall fermion formulation of QCD), the analysis of C. Allton et al. Phys. Rev. D 78 is extended to approximately twice the number of configurations. The ensembles on the finer 32{sup 3} x 64 x 16 lattice are new. We explain in detail how we use lattice data obtained at several values of the lattice spacing and for a range of quark masses in combined continuum-chiral fits in order to obtain results in the continuum limit and at physical quark masses. We implement this procedure for our data at two lattice spacings and with unitary pion masses in the approximate range 290-420 MeV (225-420 MeV for partially quenched pions). We use the masses of the {pi} and K mesons and the {Omega} baryon to determine the physical quark masses and the values of the lattice spacing. While our data in the mass ranges above are consistent with the predictions of next-to-leading order SU(2) chiral perturbation theory, they are also consistent with a simple analytic ansatz leading to an inherent uncertainty in how best to perform the chiral extrapolation that we are reluctant to reduce with model-dependent assumptions about higher order corrections. In some cases, particularly for f{sub {pi}}, the pion leptonic decay constant, the uncertainty in the chiral extrapolation dominates the systematic error. Our main results include f{sub {pi}} = 124(2){sub stat}(5){sub syst} MeV, f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} = 1.204(7)(25) where f{sub K} is the kaon decay constant, m{sub s}{sup MS} (2 GeV) = (96.2 {+-} 2.7) MeV and m{sub ud}{sup MS} (2 GeV) = (3.59 {+-} 0.21) MeV (m{sub s}/m{sub ud} = 26.8 {+-} 1.4) where m{sub s} and m{sub ud} are the mass of the strange quark and the average of the up and down quark masses, respectively, [{Sigma}{sup MS} (2 GeV)]{sup 1/3} = 256(6) MeV, where {Sigma} is the chiral condensate, the Sommer scale r{sub 0} = 0.487(9) fm and r{sub 1} = 0.333(9) fm.

  10. Nucleon isovector structure functions in (2+1)-flavor QCD with domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasumichi Aoki; Tom Blum; Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta; Shoichi Sasaki; Robert Tweedie; Takeshi Yamazaki; James Zanotti

    2010-03-17

    We report on numerical lattice QCD calculations of some of the low moments of the nucleon structure functions. The calculations are carried out with gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations with (2+1)-flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action ($\\beta = 2.13$). The inverse lattice spacing is $a^{-1} = 1.73$ GeV, and two spatial volumes of ((2.7{\\rm fm})^3) and ((1.8 {\\rm fm})^3) are used. The up and down quark masses are varied so the pion mass lies between 0.33 and 0.67 GeV while the strange mass is about 12 % heavier than the physical one. The structure function moments we present include fully non-perturbatively renormalized iso-vector quark momentum fraction, (_{u-d}), helicity fraction, (_{\\Delta u - \\Delta d}), and transversity, (_{\\delta u - \\delta d}), as well as an unrenormalized twist-3 coefficient, (d_1). The ratio of the momentum to helicity fractions, (_{u-d}/_{\\Delta u - \\Delta d}), does not show dependence on the light quark mass and agrees well with the value obtained from experiment. Their respective absolute values, fully renormalized, show interesting trends toward their respective experimental values at the lightest quark mass. A prediction for the transversity, (0.7 _{\\delta u -\\delta d} < 1.1), in the (\\bar{\\rm MS}) scheme at 2 GeV is obtained. The twist-3 coefficient, (d_1), though yet to be renormalized, supports the perturbative Wandzura-Wilczek relation.

  11. Nucleon structure with two flavors of dynamical domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huey-Wen Lin; Tom Blum; Shigemi Ohta; Shoichi Sasaki; Takeshi Yamazaki

    2008-02-06

    We present a numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics calculation of isovector form factors and the first few moments of the isovector structure functions of the nucleon. The calculation employs two degenerate dynamical flavors of domain-wall fermions, resulting in good control of chiral symmetry breaking. Non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant quark currents is performed where necessary. The inverse lattice spacing, $a^{-1}$, is about 1.7 GeV. We use degenerate up and down dynamical quark masses around 1, 3/4 and 1/2 the strange quark mass. The physical volume of the lattice is about $(1.9{fm})^3$. The ratio of the isovector vector to axial charges, $g_A/g_V$, trends a bit lower than the experimental value as the quark mass is reduced toward the physical point. We calculate the momentum-transfer dependences of the isovector vector, axial, induced tensor and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The Goldberger-Treiman relation holds at low momentum transfer and yields a pion-nucleon coupling, $g_{\\pi NN} = 15.5(1.4)$, where the quoted error is only statistical. We find that the flavor non-singlet quark momentum fraction $_{u-d}$ and quark helicity fraction $_{\\Delta u-\\Delta d}$ overshoot their experimental values after linear chiral extrapolation. We obtain the transversity, $_{\\delta u-\\delta d} = 0.93(6)$ in $\\bar{\\rm MS}$ at 2 GeV and a twist-3 polarized moment, $d_1$, appears small, suggesting that the Wandzura-Wilczek relation holds approximately. We discuss the systematic errors in the calculation, with particular attention paid to finite-volume effects, excited-state contamination, and chiral extrapolations.

  12. Power-law Behavior of Strings Scattered from Domain-wall at High Energies and Breakdown of their Linear Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuan Tsung Chan; Jen-Chi Lee; Yi Yang

    2007-05-18

    In contrast to the common wisdom, we discover that, instead of the exponential fall-off of the form factors with Regge-pole structure, the high-energy scattering amplitudes of string scattered from Domain-wall behave as power-law with Regge-pole structure. This is to be compared with the well-known power-law form factors without Regge-pole structure of the D-instanton scatterings. This discovery makes Domain-wall scatterings an unique example of a hybrid of string and field theory scatterings. The calculation is done for bosonic string scatterings of arbitrary massive string states from D-24 brane. Moreover, we discover that the usual linear relations of high-energy string scattering amplitudes at each fixed mass level break down for the Domain-wall scatterings. This result gives a strong evidence that the existence of the infinite linear relations, or stringy symmetries, of high-energy string scattering amplitudes is responsible for the softer, exponential fall-off high-energy string scatterings than the power-law field theory scatterings.

  13. Temperature dependent nucleation, propagation, and annihilation of domain walls in all-perpendicular spin-valve nanopillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopman, D. B. Kent, A. D.; Bedau, D.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Katine, J. A.

    2014-03-21

    We present a study of the temperature dependence of the switching fields in Co/Ni-based perpendicularly magnetized spin-valves. While magnetization reversal of all-perpendicular Co/Ni spin valves at ambient temperatures is typically marked by a single sharp step change in resistance, low temperature measurements can reveal a series of resistance steps, consistent with non-uniform magnetization configurations. We propose a model that consists of domain nucleation, propagation, and annihilation to explain the temperature dependence of the switching fields. Interestingly, low temperature (<30?K) step changes in resistance that we associate with domain nucleation have a bimodal switching field and resistance step distribution, attributable to two competing nucleation pathways.

  14. On (no) inverse magnetic catalysis in the QCD hard and soft wall models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudal, D; Mertens, T G

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of an external magnetic field in holographic QCD models where the backreaction is modeled in via an appropriate choice of the background metric. We add a phenomenological soft wall dilaton to incorporate better IR behavior (confinement). Elaborating on previous studies conducted by [JHEP 1505 (2015) 121], we first discuss the Hawking-Page transition, the dual of the deconfinement transition, as a function of the magnetic field. We confirm that the critical deconfinement temperature can drop with the magnetic field. Secondly, we study the quark condensate holographically as a function of the applied magnetic field and demonstrate that this model does not exhibit inverse magnetic catalysis at the level of the chiral transition. The quest for a holographic QCD model that qualitatively describes the inverse magnetic catalysis at finite temperature is thus still open. Throughout this work, we pay special attention to the different holographic parameters and we attempt to fix t...

  15. Temperature and ion irradiation dependence of magnetic domains and microstructure in CoPt multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    Temperature and ion irradiation dependence of magnetic domains and microstructure in Co with perpendicular anisotropy were studied as a function of growth temperature (TG) and ion irradiation irradiation has been shown to modify the magnetic properties in such MLs by effectively reducing PMA.5­7 Hence

  16. The Static Approximation to B Meson Mixing using Light Domain-Wall Fermions: Perturbative Renormalization and Ground State Degeneracies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman H. Christ; Thomas T. Dumitrescu; Taku Izubuchi; Oleg Loktik

    2007-10-28

    We discuss the theoretical input into the current RBC-UKQCD calculation of $f_{B_{d, s}}$ and $B_{B_{d, s}}$ using a smeared static heavy quark propagator, light domain-wall quarks and the Iwasaki gauge action. We present the complete one-loop, mean-field improved matching of heavy-light current and four-fermion lattice operators onto the static continuum theory renormalized in $\\bar{\\text{MS}}$(NDR). The large degeneracies present in a static calculation are addressed, and a method for extracting $f_B$ and $B_B$ using only box sources is described; implications for future calculations are discussed.

  17. Fast Domain Wall Switching in a Thin Ferroelectric Polymer Jong Yeog Son,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, EokKyun

    such as nonvolatile memories.8 Meanwhile, scanning probe microscopy SPM on ferroelectric domains has exhibited- namics in PbTiO3 thin films.10,11 Various applications of the SPM method such as piezoresponse force

  18. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    magnetization. In the weak-noise limit, noise-activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula "!$#&% ')(1032547698 . Here 6 is the noise strength, 0 study a spatially extended model of noise-induced magne- tization reversal: a classical Ginzburg

  19. Experimental and theoretical study on effects of magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Daren; Li Hong; Ning Zhongxi; Yan Guojun [Laboratory of Plasma Propulsion, Mail Box 458, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu Zhiwen [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2009-10-15

    An experiment has been made to investigate the effect of curved magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in the ion acceleration region of Hall thrusters. The experimental results show that the electron current due to near wall conductivity is of the minimum in the case of focused topology and increases in the cases of both less-focus and over-focus topologies. This finding cannot be explained properly by the magnetic mirror effect, which is the one and only reported effect related to the magnetic field curvature so far. Based on the analysis of interaction between the plasma and the wall, a new physical effect is proposed. The difference of magnetic field topology causes different electric potential distribution, leads to different ion flux to the wall, results in the change of sheath property and secondary electron emission, and finally affects the electron current due to near wall conductivity. This effect is further justified by the agreement between the experiment and simulation which is performed with a particle-in-cell model. Therefore, we conclude that the ion flow injection is a significant effect to near wall conductivity in the scope of curved magnetic field topology besides the magnetic mirror effect. Moreover, we find that the focus topology of magnetic field is favorable to obtain a high thruster performance from both the ion acceleration aspect and the electron conduction aspect and so is useful practically for thruster optimization.

  20. Domain-Wall Lattices in the Te-W(211) System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STOLZENBERG, M.; Lyuksyutov, Igor F.; BAUER, E.

    1990-01-01

    Knowledge of energy dissipation and relaxation in electron, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance from both a technological and scientific point of view. In this dissertation, the electronic and magnetization dynamics...

  1. Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2010-08-31

    Fish. Dog. Chicken. Shark. Man. Tiger. Dog. Domain. Correspondence. Range. 3. Members of a an instrument the a set of. Rock Band member can play.

  2. Experimental evidence of the increased transport due to the wall bounded magnetic drift in low temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaboriau, F., E-mail: gaboriau@laplace.univ-tlse.fr; Baude, R. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d’énergie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Hagelaar, G. J. M. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d’énergie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062, Toulouse (France)

    2014-05-26

    This paper presents experimental results on plasma transport across the magnetic field (B) in magnetized low-temperature plasma sources. Due to the presence of chamber walls, this transport can be complex even in a non-turbulent regime. In particular, in configurations without cylindrical symmetry, the magnetic drifts tend to be bounded by the chamber walls, thereby inducing plasma asymmetry and reducing magnetic confinement. In this work, we measure electron and ion current densities at metal chamber walls bounding a rectangular magnetic filter and demonstrate that these current densities are asymmetrically nonuniform. We also provide an experimental confirmation of model predictions of increased cross-field electron transport in such filter configuration, scaling as 1/B rather than the classical 1/B{sup 2} scaling.

  3. One-loop operator matching in the static heavy and domain-wall light quark system with O(a) improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomomi Ishikawa; Yasumichi Aoki; Jonathan M. Flynn; Taku Izubuchi; Oleg Loktik

    2011-05-16

    We discuss perturbative O(g^2a) matching with static heavy quarks and domain-wall light quarks for lattice operators relevant to B-meson decays and $B^0$-$\\bar{B}^0$ mixing. The chiral symmetry of the light domain-wall quarks does not prohibit operator mixing at O(a) for these operators. The O(a) corrections to physical quantities are non-negligible and must be included to obtain high-precision simulation results for CKM physics. We provide results using plaquette, Symanzik, Iwasaki and DBW2 gluon actions and applying APE, HYP1 and HYP2 link-smearing for the static quark action.

  4. Non-perturbative renormalization of overlap quark bilinears on 2+1-flavor domain wall fermion configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaofeng Liu; Ying Chen; Shao-Jing Dong; Michael Glatzmaier; Ming Gong; Anyi Li; Keh-Fei Liu; Yi-Bo Yang; Jian-Bo Zhang

    2014-08-19

    We present renormalization constants of overlap quark bilinear operators on 2+1-flavor domain wall fermion configurations. This setup is being used by the chiQCD collaboration in calculations of physical quantities such as strangeness in the nucleon and the strange and charm quark masses. The scale independent renormalization constant for the axial vector current is computed using the Ward Identity. The renormalization constants for scalar, pseudoscalar and vector current are calculated in the RI-MOM scheme. Results in the MS-bar scheme are also given. The step scaling function of quark masses in the RI-MOM scheme is computed as well. The analysis uses, in total, six different ensembles of three sea quarks each on two lattices with sizes 24^3x64 and 32^3x64 at spacings a=(1.73 GeV)^{-1} and (2.28 GeV)^{-1}, respectively.

  5. DOMAIN WALL MOTION IN R. WIESER # , U. NOWAK and K. D. USADEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usadel, K. D.

    nanowires are possible candidates for patterned magnetic storage media (Ross et al. (2000); Nielsch et al. (2002)). For these nanowires and also for other future magneto­electronic devices the understanding.: +49 203 379 2969, fax: +49 203 379 3665, email: robert@thp.uni­duisburg.de 1 #12; of the nanostructure

  6. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities I: parametric amplification of linear fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Braden; J. Richard Bond; Laura Mersini-Houghton

    2014-12-17

    This is the first paper in a series where we study collisions of nucleated bubbles taking into account the effects of small initial (quantum) fluctuations in a fully 3+1-dimensional setting. In this paper, we consider the evolution of linear fluctuations around highly symmetric though inhomogeneous backgrounds. We demonstrate that a large degree of asymmetry develops over time from tiny fluctuations superposed upon planar and SO(2,1) symmetric backgrounds. These fluctuations arise from zero-point vacuum oscillations, so excluding them by enforcing a spatial symmetry is inconsistent in a quantum treatment. We consider the limit of two colliding planar walls, with fluctuation mode functions characterized by the wavenumber transverse to the collision direction and a longitudinal shape along the collision direction $x$, which we solve for. Initially, the fluctuations obey a linear wave equation with a time- and space-dependent mass $m_{eff}(x,t)$. When the walls collide multiple times, $m_{eff}$ oscillates in time. We use Floquet theory to study the fluctuations and generalize techniques familiar from preheating to the case with many coupled degrees of freedom. This inhomogeneous case has bands of unstable transverse wavenumbers $k_\\perp$ with exponentially growing mode functions. From the detailed spatial structure of the mode functions in $x$, we identify both broad and narrow parametric resonance generalizations of the homogeneous $m_{eff}(t)$ case of preheating. The unstable $k_\\perp$ modes are longitudinally localized, yet can be described as quasiparticles in the Bogoliubov sense. We define an effective occupation number to show they are created in bursts for the case of well-defined collisions in the background. The transverse-longitudinal coupling accompanying nonlinearity radically breaks this localized particle description, with nonseparable 3D modes arising.

  7. Contributions of domain wall motion to complex electromechanical coefficients of 0.62Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2/3...O30.38PbTiO3 crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Contributions of domain wall motion to complex electromechanical coefficients of 0.62Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2 electromechanical coefficients and loss factors change dramatically at the coercive field Ec around 250 V, the imaginary parts of the electromechanical coefficients can be used to study the degree of domain wall motions

  8. Single-domain magnetic pillar array of 35 nm diameter and 65 Gbits/ik2 density for ultrahigh density quantum magnetic storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    density quantum magnetic storage Stephen Y Chou, Mark S. Wei, Peter R. Krauss, and Paul 6. FischerSingle-domain magnetic pillar array of 35 nm diameter and 65 Gbits/ik2 density for ultrahigh is 65 Gbits/in.2-over two orders of magnitude greater than the state-of-the-art magnetic storage density

  9. Domain wall freezing in KDP-type ferroelectrics V.H. Schmidt*, G. Bohannan, D. Arbogast, G. Tuthill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperatures, the effect of this interaction is to "flatten" the wall, making it energe- tically unfavorable

  10. Finite temperature QCD using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions at N{sub t}=8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Michael; Christ, Norman H.; Li, Min; Mawhinney, Robert D.; Renfrew, Dwight; Hegde, Prasad; Karsch, Frithjof; Lin Meifeng; Vranas, Pavlos [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA and Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We study the region of the QCD phase transition using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions and a 16{sup 3}x8 lattice volume with a fifth dimension of L{sub s}=32. The disconnected light quark chiral susceptibility, quark number susceptibility, and the Polyakov loop suggest a chiral and deconfining crossover transition lying between 155 and 185 MeV for our choice of quark mass and lattice spacing. In this region the lattice scale deduced from the Sommer parameter r{sub 0} is a{sup -1{approx_equal}}1.3 GeV, the pion mass is {approx_equal}300 MeV, and the kaon mass is approximately physical. The peak in the chiral susceptibility implies a pseudocritical temperature T{sub c}=171(10)(17) MeV where the first error is associated with determining the peak location and the second with our unphysical light quark mass and nonzero lattice spacing. The effects of residual chiral symmetry breaking on the chiral condensate and disconnected chiral susceptibility are studied using several values of the valence L{sub s}.

  11. Parametric Resonance Amplification of Neutrino Oscillations in Electromagnetic Wave with Varying Amplitude and "Castle Wall" Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Dvornikov; A. I. Studenikin

    2001-07-10

    Within the Lorentz invariant formalizm for description of neutrino evolution in electromagnetic fields and matter we consider neutrino spin oscillations in the electromagnetic wave with varying amplitude and in "castle wall" magnetic field. It is shown for the first time that the parametric resonances of neutrino oscillations in such systems can occur.

  12. Neutral $B$ meson mixings and $B$ meson decay constants with static heavy and domain-wall light quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasumichi Aoki; Tomomi Ishikawa; Taku Izubuchi; Christoph Lehner; Amarjit Soni

    2015-06-29

    Neutral $B$ meson mixing matrix elements and $B$ meson decay constants are calculated. Static approximation is used for $b$ quark and domain-wall fermion formalism is employed for light quarks. The calculations are carried out on $2+1$ flavor dynamical ensembles generated by RBC/UKQCD Collaborations with lattice spacings $0.086$fm ($a^{-1}\\sim 2.3$GeV) and $0.11$fm ($1.7$GeV), and a fixed physical spatial volume of about $(2.7{\\rm fm})^3$. In the static quark action, link-smearings are used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We employ two kinds of link-smearings, HYP1 and HYP2, and their results are combined in taking the continuum limit. For the matching between the lattice and the continuum theory, one-loop perturbative $O(a)$ improvements are made to reduce discretization errors. As the most important quantity of this work, we obtain SU(3) breaking ratio $\\xi=1.208(60)$, where the error includes statistical and systematic one. (Uncertainty from infinite $b$ quark mass is not included.) We also find other neutral $B$ meson mixing quantities $f_B\\sqrt{\\hat{B}_B}=240(22)$MeV, $f_{B_s}\\sqrt{\\hat{B}_{B_s}}=290(22)$MeV, $\\hat{B}_B=1.17(22)$, $\\hat{B}_{B_s}=1.22(13)$ and $B_{B_s}/B_B=1.028(74)$, $B$ meson decay constants $f_B=219(17)$MeV, $f_{B_s}=264(19)$MeV and $f_{B_s}/f_B=1.193(41)$, in the static limit of $b$ quark, which do not include infinite $b$ quark mass uncertainty.

  13. Neutral B-meson mixing from unquenched lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and static b-quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrado Albertus; Yasumichi Aoki; Peter A. Boyle; Norman H. Christ; Thomas T. Dumitrescu; Jonathan M. Flynn; Tomomi Ishikawa; Taku Izubuchi; Oleg Loktik; Christopher T. Sachrajda; Amarjit Soni; Ruth S. Van de Water; Jan Wennekers; Oliver Witzel

    2010-01-12

    We demonstrate a method for calculating the neutral B-meson decay constants and mixing matrix elements in unquenched lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and static b-quarks. Our computation is performed on the "2+1" flavor gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations with a lattice spacing of a approx 0.11 fm (a^-1 = 1.729 GeV) and a lattice spatial volume of approximately (1.8 fm)^3. We simulate at three different light sea quark masses with pion masses down to approximately 430 MeV, and extrapolate to the physical quark masses using a phenomenologically-motivated fit function based on next-to-leading order heavy-light meson SU(2) chiral perturbation theory. For the b-quarks, we use an improved formulation of the Eichten-Hill action with static link-smearing to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We also improve the heavy-light axial current used to compute the B-meson decay constant to O(alpha_s p a) using one-loop lattice perturbation theory. We present initial results for the SU(3)-breaking ratios f_{B_s}/f_{B_d} and xi = f_{B_s} sqrt{B_{B_s}}/f_{B_d} sqrt{B_{B_d}}, thereby demonstrating the viability of the method. For the ratio of decay constants, we find f_{B_s}/f_{B_d} = 1.15(12) and for the ratio of mixing matrix elements, we find xi = 1.13(12), where in both cases the errors reflect the combined statistical and systematic uncertainties, including an estimate of the size of neglected O(1/m_b) effects.

  14. Magnetic domain walls for on-chip transport and detection of superparamagnetic beads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapoport, Elizabeth Ashera

    2014-01-01

    Surface-functionalized superparamagnetic (SPM) microbeads are of great interest in biomedical research and diagnostic device engineering for tagging, manipulating, and detecting chemical and biological species in a fluid ...

  15. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largest singleX-RayX-Ray

  16. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind Power

  19. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-Ray

  2. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-RayX-Ray Imaging

  3. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE

  4. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientific andIndividualEventInexpensive

  5. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientific andIndividualEventInexpensiveVortices

  6. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientific

  7. Effect of the magnetic lenses on the electron current due to near wall conductivity in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Zhiwen; Liu Xiangyang; Wang Ningfei [School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Yu Daren [Harbin Plasma Propulsion Lab, Mail Box 458, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-07-15

    The effect of magnetic lens on the electron current due to near wall conductivity (NWC) in a Hall thruster is studied. A Monte Carlo model is employed to simulate the effect of the large magnetic field incidence angle on the electron current. The simulation results show that the electron current due to NWC decreases in the case of large incidence. The simulation qualitatively agrees with the related experimental result. And the simulation also demonstrates that choosing the curvature angle of the magnetic field is also a key factor to design a Hall thruster with high operation performance.

  8. In-situ TEM observation of the interaction between magnetic domain walls and twin domain walls below the Verwey transition in magnetite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    transition is first-order in character and proceeds by the rapid movement of an abrupt phase interface of the monoclinic phase. On cooling through the transition, the [001] easy axis of the monoclinic phase may have performed an in-situ study of the cubic to monoclinic phase transition in synthetic multi

  9. Magnetic Domains in Magnetar Matter as an Engine for Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-Saeng Suh; Grant J. Mathews

    2010-05-12

    Magnetars have been suggested as the most promising site for the origin of observed soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). In this work we investigate the possibility that SGRs and AXPs might be observational evidence for a magnetic phase separation in magnetars. We study magnetic domain formation as a new mechanism for SGRs and AXPs in which magnetar-matter separates into two phases containing different flux densities. We identify the parameter space in matter density and magnetic field strength at which there is an instability for magnetic domain formation. We conclude that such instabilities will likely occur in the deep outer crust for the magnetic Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland (BPS) model and in the inner crust and core for magnetars described in relativistic Hartree theory. Moreover, we estimate that the energy released by the onset of this instability is comparable with the energy emitted by SGRs.

  10. ANNULUS CLOSURE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT INSPECTION/SALT DEPOSIT CLEANING MAGNETIC WALL CRAWLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minichan, R; Russell Eibling, R; James Elder, J; Kevin Kane, K; Daniel Krementz, D; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Nicholas Vrettos, N

    2008-06-01

    The Liquid Waste Technology Development organization is investigating technologies to support closure of radioactive waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Tank closure includes removal of the wastes that have propagated to the tank annulus. Although amounts and types of residual waste materials in the annuli of SRS tanks vary, simple salt deposits are predominant on tanks with known leak sites. This task focused on developing and demonstrating a technology to inspect and spot clean salt deposits from the outer primary tank wall located in the annulus of an SRS Type I tank. The Robotics, Remote and Specialty Equipment (RRSE) and Materials Science and Technology (MS&T) Sections of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collaborated to modify and equip a Force Institute magnetic wall crawler with the tools necessary to demonstrate the inspection and spot cleaning in a mock-up of a Type I tank annulus. A remote control camera arm and cleaning head were developed, fabricated and mounted on the crawler. The crawler was then tested and demonstrated on a salt simulant also developed in this task. The demonstration showed that the camera is capable of being deployed in all specified locations and provided the views needed for the planned inspection. It also showed that the salt simulant readily dissolves with water. The crawler features two different techniques for delivering water to dissolve the salt deposits. Both water spay nozzles were able to dissolve the simulated salt, one is more controllable and the other delivers a larger water volume. The cleaning head also includes a rotary brush to mechanically remove the simulated salt nodules in the event insoluble material is encountered. The rotary brush proved to be effective in removing the salt nodules, although some fine tuning may be required to achieve the best results. This report describes the design process for developing technology to add features to a commercial wall crawler and the results of the demonstration testing performed on the integrated system. The crawler was modified to address the two primary objectives of the task (inspection and spot cleaning). SRNL recommends this technology as a viable option for annulus inspection and salt removal in tanks with minimal salt deposits (such as Tanks 5 and 6.) This report further recommends that the technology be prepared for field deployment by: (1) developing an improved mounting system for the magnetic idler wheel, (2) improving the robustness of the cleaning tool mounting, (3) resolving the nozzle selection valve connections, (4) determining alternatives for the brush and bristle assembly, and (5) adding a protective housing around the motors to shield them from water splash. In addition, SRNL suggests further technology development to address annulus cleaning issues that are apparent on other tanks that will also require salt removal in the future such as: (1) Developing a duct drilling device to facilitate dissolving salt inside ventilation ducts and draining the solution out the bottom of the ducts. (2) Investigating technologies to inspect inside the vertical annulus ventilation duct.

  11. Simulations of fast ion wall loads in ASDEX Upgrade in the presence of magnetic perturbations due to ELM mitigation coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asunta, Otto; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Koskela, Tuomas; Sipilä, Seppo; Snicker, Antti; Garcia-Muñoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The effect of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) ELM mitigation coils on fast ion wall loads was studied with the fast particle following Monte Carlo code ASCOT. Neutral beam injected (NBI) particles were simulated in two AUG discharges both in the presence and in the absence of the magnetic field perturbation induced by the eight newly installed in-vessel coils. In one of the discharges (#26476) beams were applied individually, making it a useful basis for investigating the effect of the coils on different beams. However, no ELM mitigation was observed in #26476, probably due to the low plasma density. Therefore, another discharge (#26895) demonstrating clear ELM mitigation was also studied. The magnetic perturbation due to the in-vessel coils has a significant effect on the fast particle confinement, but only when total magnetic field, $B_{tot}$, is low. When $B_{tot}$ was high, the perturbation did not increase the losses, but merely resulted in redistribution of the wall power loads. Hence, it seems to be possible to ac...

  12. On the Emulation of Sti Walls and Static Friction with a Magnetically Levitated Input Output Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salcudean, Tim

    achiev- able wall damping and sti ness. It is also shown that the perceived surface sti ness can stimuli into the three basic components used in the test: sti ness, damping and inertia. The use

  13. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8?nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  14. The Low Energy Constants of $SU(2)$ Partially Quenched Chiral Perturbation Theory from $N_{f}=2+1$ Domain Wall QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, P A; Garron, N; Jung, C; Jüttner, A; Kelly, C; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, G; Murphy, D J; Ohta, S; Portelli, A; Sachrajda, C T

    2015-01-01

    We have performed fits of the pseudoscalar masses and decay constants, from a variety of RBC-UKQCD domain wall fermion ensembles, to $SU(2)$ partially quenched chiral perturbation theory at next-to leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO). We report values for 9 NLO and 8 linearly independent combinations of NNLO partially quenched low energy constants, which we compare to other lattice and phenomenological determinations. We discuss the size of successive terms in the chiral expansion and use our large set of low energy constants to make predictions for mass splittings due to QCD isospin breaking effects and the S-wave $\\pi \\pi$ scattering lengths. We conclude that, for the range of pseudoscalar masses explored in this work, $115~\\mathrm{MeV} \\lesssim m_{\\rm PS} \\lesssim 430~\\mathrm{MeV}$, the NNLO $SU(2)$ expansion is quite robust and can fit lattice data with percent-scale accuracy.

  15. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Suffian N. [Ames Laboratory; Alam, Aftab [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-11-27

    In BaFe2As2, structural and magnetic planar defects begin to proliferate below the structural phase transition, affecting descriptions of magnetism and superconductivity. We study, using density-functional theory, the stability and magnetic properties of competing antiphase and domain boundaries, twins and isolated nanotwins (twin nuclei), and spin excitations proposed and/or observed. These nanoscale defects have a very low surface energy (22–210 m Jm?2), with twins favorable to the mesoscale. Defects exhibit smaller moments confined near their boundaries—making a uniform-moment picture inappropriate for long-range magnetic order in real samples. Nanotwins explain features in measured pair distribution functions so should be considered when analyzing scattering data. All these defects can be weakly mobile and/or can have fluctuations that lower assessed “ordered” moments from longer spatial and/or time averaging and should be considered directly.

  16. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, S. N. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Alam, A. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2013-01-01

    In BaFe2As2, structural and magnetic planar defects begin to proliferate below the structural phase transition, affecting descriptions of magnetism and superconductivity.We study, using density-functional theory, the stability and magnetic properties of competing antiphase and domain boundaries, twins and isolated nanotwins (twin nuclei), and spin excitations proposed and/or observed. These nanoscale defects have a very low surface energy (22 210 m Jm 2), with twins favorable to the mesoscale. Defects exhibit smaller moments confined near their boundaries making a uniform-moment picture inappropriate for long-range magnetic order in real samples. Nanotwins explain features in measured pair distribution functions so should be considered when analyzing scattering data. All these defects can be weakly mobile and/or can have fluctuations that lower

  17. B-meson decay constants from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman H. Christ; Jonathan M. Flynn; Taku Izubuchi; Taichi Kawanai; Christoph Lehner; Amarjit Soni; Ruth S. Van de Water; Oliver Witzel

    2015-02-02

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants f_B, f_Bs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ~ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as M_pi ~ 290 MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the lattice heavy-light axial-vector current using a mostly nonperturbative method in which we compute the bulk of the matching factor nonperturbatively, with a small correction, that is close to unity, in lattice perturbation theory. We also improve the lattice heavy-light current through O(alpha_s a). We extrapolate our results to the physical light-quark masses and continuum using SU(2) heavy-meson chiral perturbation theory, and provide a complete systematic error budget. We obtain f_B0 = 199.5(12.6) MeV, f_B+ = 195.6(14.9) MeV, f_Bs = 235.4(12.2) MeV, f_Bs/f_B0 = 1.197(50), and f_Bs/f_B+ = 1.223(71), where the errors are statistical and total systematic added in quadrature. These results are in good agreement with other published results and provide an important independent cross check of other three-flavor determinations of $B$-meson decay constants using staggered light quarks.

  18. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickel–phosphorous layers of high magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yi; Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Fan

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Impurities in crude MWNTs were effectively removed after purification treatment. ? Many Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the purified MWNTs. ? The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g. -- Abstract: The multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with nickel–phosphorous (Ni–P) layers were prepared by electroless plating method. To obtain the MWNTs with Ni–P layers of high magnetic properties, an effective purification treatment and a pre-treatment procedure were developed. The crude MWNTs, the purified MWNTs and the MWNTs with Ni–P layers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). SEM results, TEM images and XRD results indicate that impurities in the crude MWNTs were effectively removed after the purification treatment and a large number of Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the surface of the purified MWNTs. According to the VSM test, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g which is higher than results of other researchers.

  19. Magnetic domain tuning and the emergence of bubble domains in the bilayer manganite La2–2xSr1+2xMn2O7(x=0.32)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, Juyoung; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Ayala-Valenzuela, Oscar E.; Wulferding, Dirk; Zhou, J. -S.; Goodenough, John B.; de Lozanne, Alex; Mitchell, J. F.; Leon, Neliza; et al

    2015-08-17

    We report a magnetic force microscopy study of the magnetic domain evolution in the layered manganite La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 (with x=0.32). This strongly correlated electron compound is known to exhibit a wide range of magnetic phases, including a recently uncovered biskyrmion phase. We observe a continuous transition from dendritic to stripelike domains, followed by the formation of magnetic bubbles due to a field- and temperature-dependent competition between in-plane and out-of-plane spin alignments. The magnetic bubble phase appears at comparable field and temperature ranges as the biskyrmion phase, suggesting a close relation between both phases. Based on our real-space images we construct amore »temperature-field phase diagram for this composition.« less

  20. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woolley, Robert D. (Hillsborough, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  1. Simulating net particle production and chiral magnetic current in a CP-odd domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2015-01-29

    We elucidate the numerical formulation to simulate net production of particles and anomalous currents with CP-breaking background fields which cause an imbalance between particles and anti-particles. For a concrete demonstration we numerically impose pulsed electric and magnetic fields to observe that the dynamical chiral magnetic current follows together with the net particle production. The produced particle density is quantitatively consistent with the axial anomaly, while the chiral magnetic current shows a delay before the onset, which leads to a suppression effect, and then approaches what is expected from the axial anomaly.

  2. Simulating net particle production and chiral magnetic current in a CP-odd domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We elucidate the numerical formulation to simulate net production of particles and anomalous currents with CP-breaking background fields which cause an imbalance of particles over anti-particles. For a concrete demonstration we numerically impose pulsed electric and magnetic fields to observe that the dynamical chiral magnetic current follows together with the net particle production. The produced particle density is quantitatively consistent with the axial anomaly, while the chiral magnetic current is suppressed by a delay before the the onset of the current generation.

  3. Magnetic Fields above the Surface of aSuperconductor with Internal Magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRl

    2007-06-26

    The author presents a method for calculating the magnetic fields near a planar surface of a superconductor with a given intrinsic magnetization in the London limit. He computes solutions for various magnetic domain boundary configurations and derives relations between the spectral densities of the magnetization and the resulting field in the vacuum half space, which are useful if the magnetization can be considered as a statistical quantity and its features are too small to be resolved individually. The results are useful for analyzing and designing magnetic scanning experiments. Application to existing data from such experiments on Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} show that a domain wall would have been detectable, but the magnetic field of randomly oriented small domains and small defects may have been smaller than the experimental noise level.

  4. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier 1;2 and D. L. Stein 2;1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    and negative magnetization. In the weak­noise limit, noise­activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula \\Gamma ¸ \\Gamma 0 exp], who worked out a `large deviation theory' of its magnetization reversals, but did not compute

  5. In-situ observation of domain wall motion in Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Dabin; Cai, Changlong [Laboratory of Thin Film Techniques and Optical Test, Xi'an Technological University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Li, Zhenrong, E-mail: zhrli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Fei; Xu, Zhuo [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry and International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Zhang, Shujun, E-mail: soz1@psu.edu [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Cheng, Yaojin [Science and Technology on Low-Light-Level Night Vision Laboratory, Xi'an 710065 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Various domain structures, including wave-like domains, mixed needle-like and laminar domains, typical embedded 90° and 180° domains, have been observed in unpoled rhombohedral, monoclinic, and tetragonal Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} (PIN-PMN-PT) crystals by polarizing light microscope; while in poled tetragonal crystals, the parallel 180° domains were reversed and only vertical 90° domain walls were observed. For 0.24PIN-0.42PMN-0.34PT crystals with morphotropic phase boundary composition, the domain wall motion was in-situ observed as a function of applied electric field along crystallographic [100] direction. With increasing the electric field from 0 to 12?kV/cm, the rhombohedral (R) domains were found to change to monoclinic (M) domains and then to tetragonal (T) domains. The electric field-induced phase transition was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction and the temperature-dependent dielectric behavior.

  6. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 91, 104433 (2015) Autoresonant switching of the magnetization in single-domain nanoparticles: Two-level theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    2015-01-01

    magnetic data storing to waste water decontamination [2] and medical diagnostics and treatments [3­5]. In particular, the ability to precisely control the magnetization dynamics constitutes a major advantage is obviously undesirable for a reliable control of the magnetization dynam- ics. Increasing the magnetic

  7. Magnetic domain structures of focused ion beam-patterned cobalt films using scanning ion microscopy with polarization analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Carl

    in the areas of ultrahigh density magnetic recording, MRAM design, and miniaturized magnetic sensor arrays, it is found that rectangular Co bars of sizes between 10­30 m exhibit S type, whereas circular shaped magnetic elements show C type micromagnetic magnetization patterns. It is shown that SIMPA provides a simple way

  8. Construction of a two-parameter empirical model of left ventricle wall motion using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jack J; Alenezy, Mohammed D.; Smirnova, Irina V.; Bilgen, Mehmet

    2012-10-24

    /Tcardiac=0.4, but read 0.2 for the apex and - 0.08 for the base level. The difference indicated that the apex twisted more than the base. Conclusion It is feasible to empirically model the spatial and temporal evolution of the LV wall motion using a two...

  9. Interaction of mesoscopic magnetic textures with superconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdin, S.; Kayali, AF; Lyuksyutov, Igor F.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2002-01-01

    magnetizatio Th , numbe PHYSICAL REVIEW B 66, 014414 ~2002! proposed and analyzed. Such systems include arrays of mag- netic dots on the top of a SC film,6?8 FM-SC bilayers,9?11 magnetic nanorods embedded into a superconductor,12 mag- netic stripes... in superconducting films,13 a layer of magnetic dipoles between two bulk superconductors,14 an array of magnetic dipoles mimicking the FM dots on SC film,15 and a domain wall in a thick magnetic film on the bulk super- conductor.16,18 Earlier Marmorkos et al.17...

  10. Magnetic structure and domain conversion of the quasi-2D frustrated antiferromagnet CuCrO{sub 2} probed by NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakhratov, Yu. A. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (United States); Svistov, L. E., E-mail: svistov@kapitza.ras.ru [Russian Academy Sciences, Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Kuhns, P. L.; Zhou, H. D.; Reyes, A. P. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (United States)

    2014-11-15

    We have carried out {sup 63,65}Cu NMR spectra measurements in a magnetic field up to about 15.5 T on a single crystal of the multiferroic triangular-lattice antiferromagnet CuCrO{sub 2}. The measurements were performed for perpendicular and parallel orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the c axis of the crystal, and the detailed angle dependence of the spectra on the magnetic field direction in the ab plane was studied. The shape of the spectra can be well described in the model of spiral spin structure proposed by recent neutron diffraction experiments. When the field is rotated perpendicular to the crystal c axis, we observed, directly for the first time, a remarkable reorientation of the spin plane simultaneous with rotation of the incommensurate wavevector, by quantitatively deducing the conversion of the energetically less favorable domain to a more favorable one. At high enough fields parallel to the c axis, the data are consistent with either a field-induced commensurate spiral magnetic structure or an incommensurate spiral magnetic structure with a disorder in the c direction, suggesting that high fields may have influence on interplanar ordering.

  11. Effect of substrate temperature on the magnetic properties of epitaxial sputter-grown Co/Pt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihai, A. P.; Whiteside, A. L.; Canwell, E. J.; Marrows, C. H.; Moore, T. A.; Benitez, M. J.; McGrouther, D.; McVitie, S.; McFadzean, S.

    2013-12-23

    Epitaxial Co/Pt films have been deposited by dc-magnetron sputtering onto heated C-plane sapphire substrates. X-ray diffraction, the residual resistivity, and transmission electron microscopy indicate that the Co/Pt films are highly ordered on the atomic scale. The coercive field and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy increase as the substrate temperature is increased from 100–250?°C during deposition of the Co/Pt. Measurement of the domain wall creep velocity as a function of applied magnetic field yields the domain wall pinning energy, which scales with the coercive field. Evidence for an enhanced creep velocity in highly ordered epitaxial Co/Pt is found.

  12. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is shown in purple and red, emphasizing the anti-phase domain wall. Any points where the wave functions are out of phase with each other can act as an orbital domain boundary. To...

  13. Spin-Orbit Torque Driven Magnetization Dynamics in (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)(As,P) Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vehstedt, Erin Kathleen

    2014-07-18

    . In order to overcome these limits, new methods must be developed to reliably transmit and store data more efficiently. The understanding and manipulation of magnetic domain walls (DWs) may play a pivotal role in the development of new non-volatile and down...

  14. Reversal mechanisms of coupled bi-component magnetic nanostructures G. Shimon,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adekunle

    in applications such as high density information storage,1­3 domain wall (DW) logic,4,5 and memory devices.6Reversal mechanisms of coupled bi-component magnetic nanostructures G. Shimon,1,2 A. O. Adeyeye,1 Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4747446] Thin film ferromagnetic nanostructures have been

  15. The prospects for highbeta tokamaks with Li walls 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    . Why Li walls ? 2. Magnetic propulsion of liquid Li. 3. Plasma profiles in the non­recycling regime. 4 can be magnetically propulsed along the plasma facing surfaces in the tokamak chamber. This allows the stabilizing wall right at the plasma boundary. 2. Intense (V ' 20 m=sec) magnetic propulsion allows to keep Li

  16. Fast chirality reversal of the magnetic vortex by electric current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, W. L. Liu, R. H.; Urazhdin, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Erokhin, S. G.; Berkov, D.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of high-density information encoding in magnetic materials by topologically stable inhomogeneous magnetization configurations such as domain walls, skyrmions, and vortices has motivated intense research into mechanisms enabling their control and detection. While the uniform magnetization states can be efficiently controlled by electric current using magnetic multilayer structures, this approach has proven much more difficult to implement for inhomogeneous states. Here, we report direct observation of fast reversal of magnetic vortex by electric current in a simple planar structure based on a bilayer of spin Hall material Pt with a single microscopic ferromagnetic disk contacted by asymmetric electrodes. The reversal is enabled by a combination of the chiral Oersted field and spin current generated by the nonuniform current distribution in Pt. Our results provide a route for the efficient control of inhomogeneous magnetization configurations by electric current.

  17. The Blue Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The  Blue  Wall   A  Documentary  Film  by     Michael  talking   about,  The  Blue  Wall.   Your  Honor,  as  the  

  18. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abboud, R.G.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed are a magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly. 7 figs.

  19. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abboud, Robert G. (Barrington Hills, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly.

  20. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

    1987-10-06

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  1. System and method for manipulating domain pinning and reversal in ferromagnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silevitch, Daniel M.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2013-10-15

    A method for manipulating domain pinning and reversal in a ferromagnetic material comprises applying an external magnetic field to a uniaxial ferromagnetic material comprising a plurality of magnetic domains, where each domain has an easy axis oriented along a predetermined direction. The external magnetic field is applied transverse to the predetermined direction and at a predetermined temperature. The strength of the magnetic field is varied at the predetermined temperature, thereby isothermally regulating pinning of the domains. A magnetic storage device for controlling domain dynamics includes a magnetic hard disk comprising a uniaxial ferromagnetic material, a magnetic recording head including a first magnet, and a second magnet. The ferromagnetic material includes a plurality of magnetic domains each having an easy axis oriented along a predetermined direction. The second magnet is positioned adjacent to the magnetic hard disk and is configured to apply a magnetic field transverse to the predetermined direction.

  2. Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara, A.; Aliev, F. G.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Prieto, J. L.; Huth, M.

    2014-11-03

    The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

  3. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  4. Permissible symmetries of multi-domain configurations in perovskite ferroelectric crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Permissible symmetries of multi-domain configurations in perovskite ferroelectric crystals Jiri through domain engineering are specified for perovskite ferroelectric crystals having tetragonal walls . Many useful ferroelectric materials have the so-called perovskite structure, which contains

  5. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  6. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Roger R. (Walnut Creek, CA); Fabyan, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  7. DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names Top Level Domains .com .net .org .edu .gov .mil professional or personal life Always aim for a .com Top Level Domain as it is what 99.9% of the web or underscores in the domain name unless there is no other option Web Hosting Web Hosting Providers Web

  8. A hybrid finite-difference/boundary element procedure for the simulation of turbulent MHD duct flow at finite magnetic Reynolds numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Krasnov, Dmitry; Schumacher, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A conservative coupled finite difference-boundary element computational procedure for the simulation of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow in a straight rectangular duct at finite magnetic Reynolds number is presented. The flow is assumed to be periodic in the streamwise direction and is driven by a mean pressure gradient. The duct walls are considered to be electrically insulating. The co-evolution of the velocity and magnetic fields as described respectively by the Navier-Stokes and the magnetic induction equations, together with the coupling of the magnetic field between the conducting domain and the non-conducting exterior is solved using the magnetic field formulation. The aim is to simulate localized magnetic fields interacting with turbulent duct flow. Detailed verification of the implementation of the numerical scheme is conducted in the limiting case of low magnetic Reynolds number by comparing with the results obtained using a quasistatic approach that has no coupling with the exterior. The rigorous...

  9. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  10. Resistive and ferritic-wall plasma dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Kaplan, E. J.; Katz, N.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Rahbarnia, K.; Forest, C. B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States); Spence, E. J. [Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We numerically study the effects of varying electric conductivity and magnetic permeability of the bounding wall on a kinematic dynamo in a sphere for parameters relevant to Madison plasma dynamo experiment. The dynamo is excited by a laminar, axisymmetric flow of von Karman type. The flow is obtained as a solution to the Navier-Stokes equation for an isothermal fluid with a velocity profile specified at the sphere's boundary. The properties of the wall are taken into account as thin-wall boundary conditions imposed on the magnetic field. It is found that an increase in the permeability of the wall reduces the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr}. An increase in the conductivity of the wall leaves Rm{sub cr} unaffected but reduces the dynamo growth rate.

  11. DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names Top Level Domains · .com · .net · .org · .edu · .gov.9% of the web-viewing audience is used to typing in. Chances are, a visitor will type in ".com" even if you tell and simple · Try to avoid dashes or underscores in the domain name unless there is no other option Web

  12. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  13. Domain Bubbles of Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, J R

    2003-01-01

    ``Dimension bubbles'' of the type previously studied by Blau and Guendelman [S.K. Blau and E.I. Guendelman, Phys. Rev. D40, 1909 (1989)], which effectively enclose a region of 5d spacetime and are surrounded by a region of 4d spacetime, can arise in a 5d theory with a compact extra dimension that is dimensionally reduced to give an effective 4d theory. These bubbles with thin domain walls can be stabilized against total collapse in a rather natural way by a scalar field which, as in the case with ``ordinary'' nontopological solitons, traps light scalar particles inside the bubble.

  14. Domain Bubbles of Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2002-11-19

    ``Dimension bubbles'' of the type previously studied by Blau and Guendelman [S.K. Blau and E.I. Guendelman, Phys. Rev. D40, 1909 (1989)], which effectively enclose a region of 5d spacetime and are surrounded by a region of 4d spacetime, can arise in a 5d theory with a compact extra dimension that is dimensionally reduced to give an effective 4d theory. These bubbles with thin domain walls can be stabilized against total collapse in a rather natural way by a scalar field which, as in the case with ``ordinary'' nontopological solitons, traps light scalar particles inside the bubble.

  15. Radiative transfer in decomposed domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Heinemann; W. Dobler; A. Nordlund; A. Brandenburg

    2005-11-09

    An efficient algorithm for calculating radiative transfer on massively parallel computers using domain decomposition is presented. The integral formulation of the transfer equation is used to divide the problem into a local but compute-intensive part for calculating the intensity and optical depth integrals, and a nonlocal part for communicating the intensity between adjacent processors. The waiting time of idle processors during the nonlocal communication part does not have a severe impact on the scaling. The wall clock time thus scales nearly linearly with the inverse number of processors.

  16. Magneto-optical imaging of thin magnetic films using spins in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Simpson; Jean-Philippe Tetienne; Julia McCoey; Kumaravelu Ganesan; Liam T. Hall; Steven Petrou; Robert E. Scholten; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg

    2015-08-10

    Imaging the fields of magnetic materials provides crucial insight into the physical and chemical processes surrounding magnetism, and has been a key ingredient in the spectacular development of magnetic data storage. Existing approaches using the magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE), x-ray and electron microscopy have limitations that constrain further development, and there is increasing demand for imaging and characterisation of magnetic phenomena in real time with high spatial resolution. In this work, we show how the magneto-optical response of an array of negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond can be used to image and map the sub-micron stray magnetic field patterns from thin ferromagnetic films. Using optically detected magnetic resonance, we demonstrate wide-field magnetic imaging over 100x100 {\\mu}m^2 with a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of 440 nm at video frame rates, under ambient conditions. We demonstrate a novel all-optical spin relaxation contrast imaging approach which can image magnetic structures in the absence of an applied microwave field. Straightforward extensions promise imaging with sub-{\\mu}T sensitivity and sub-optical spatial and millisecond temporal resolution. This work establishes practical diamond-based wide-field microscopy for rapid high-sensitivity characterisation and imaging of magnetic samples, with the capability for investigating magnetic phenomena such as domain wall and skyrmion dynamics and the spin Hall effect in metals.

  17. Development of Fiber Bragg Grating Strain, Thermal, and Magnetic Sensors for Smart Structure Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Michael

    2012-01-01

    domain data of magnetic fields oscillating with fourseconds of the magnetic field oscillating at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0,domain data of magnetic fields oscillating with four

  18. PH domains, FYVE domains, ENTH domains, C2 do-mains, Tubby domains, and PX domains, and the list

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    domain and the second SH3 domain (yellow), while the Selected Reading C-terminal tail interacts with the first SH3 domain. Phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues in the C-terminal tail liberates., Tempst, P., Thuring, J.W., Cooper,space and time, and thereby prevent inadvertent dam- M.A., Lim, Z

  19. Tokamak reactor first wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

    1984-11-20

    This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

  20. On new maximal supergravity and its BPS domain-walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolfo Guarino

    2015-03-20

    We revise the SU(3)-invariant sector of $\\mathcal{N}=8$ supergravity with dyonic SO(8) gaugings. By using the embedding tensor formalism, analytic expressions for the scalar potential, superpotential(s) and fermion mass terms are obtained as a function of the electromagnetic phase $\\omega$ and the scalars in the theory. Equipped with these results, we explore non-supersymmetric AdS critical points at $\\omega \

  1. The static quark potential for dynamical domain wall fermion simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Li

    2006-10-18

    We present preliminary results for the static quark potential computed on some of the DWF lattice configurations generated by the RBC-UKQCD collaborations. Most of these results were obtained using Wilson lines joining spatial planes fixed into the Coulomb gauge. We compare the results from this method with the earlier ones on $16^3 \\times 32$ lattices using Bresenham spatial paths with APE smeared link variables. Some preliminary results on $24^3 \\times 64$ lattices are also presented.

  2. In situ measurement of increased ferroelectric/ferroelastic domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _ _1motion in declamped

  3. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switchFlue Gas StreamsConnectArticle) | SciTechfermion

  4. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switchFlue Gas StreamsConnectArticle) |

  5. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Charged Domain Walls in Ferroelectrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing the RichardBudgetIowaOctober 5,December 10,

  6. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  7. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.A.

    2011-01-28

    Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

  8. Tuning of Pectin Methylesterification: Consequences for Cell Wall Biomechanics and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levesque-Tremblay, Gabriel; Pelloux, Jerome; Braybrook, Siobhan A.; Müller, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    residue in the arabinogalactan domain of the arabinogalactan protein ARABINOXYLAN PECTIN ARABINOGALACTAN PROTEIN1 (APAP1) was linked to RG-I and HG (Tan et al., 2013). Mutants lacking this protein and the corresponding wall structure showed...

  9. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. This observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  10. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a patterned structure on a longer mesoscopic length scale. One way for this pattern to emerge from building blocks that are nominally random and disordered is through hidden...

  11. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title: Professor - Research PXHick Shifts Gears

  12. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title: Professor - Research PXHick Shifts

  13. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title: Professor - Research PXHick ShiftsHidden

  14. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-DutyHere�s What�sDuncanHidden

  15. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-DutyHere�s What�sDuncanHiddenHidden

  16. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-DutyHere�s

  17. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-DutyHere�sHidden Rotational

  18. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-DutyHere�sHidden RotationalHidden

  19. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-DutyHere�sHidden

  20. Polarization reversal and domain kinetics in magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Labfer Ltd., 620014 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Chuvakova, M. A. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-13

    The polarization reversal process has been studied in 1?mol.?% MgO doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (LT) single crystal. The revealed stages of domain structure evolution represent (1) continuous nucleation and growth of isolated hexagonal domains with walls oriented along Y directions and (2) continuous motion of the plane domain walls stimulated by merging with isolated domains. The activation field dependence of the switching time has been revealed. The coercive field for quasi-static switching is about 150?V/mm. The bulk screening process has been analyzed. The main parameters of the switching process have been compared with other representatives of LT family.

  1. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  2. Covering Walls With Fabrics. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01

    , grasscloth and many other textures and weaves are available in this type of wall covering. When selecting fabrics to apply to interior walls, consider pattern, color, amount of shrink age and weight. Check to see if the design is printed with the grain... several times over a 12-inch length until fabric is cut through and can be pulled away easily (see Figure 5) . Figure 5 To cover raw edges at top or bottom when . there is no molding, attach an attractive gimp, flat braid or decorative molding...

  3. A Universal Magnetic Helicity Integral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnar Hornig

    2006-06-28

    A magnetic helicity integral is proposed which can be applied to domains which are not magnetically closed, i.e. have a non-vanishing normal component of the magnetic field on the boundary. In contrast to the relative helicity integral, which was previously suggested for magnetically open domains, it does not rely on a reference field and thus avoids all problems related to the choice of a particular reference field. Instead it uses a gauge condition on the vector potential, which corresponds to a particular topologically unique closure of the magnetic field in the external space. The integral has additional elegant properties and is easy to compute numerically in practice. For magnetically closed domains it reduces to the classical helicity integral.

  4. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, Lois; Mantha, Pallavi

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  5. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  6. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  7. Micromagnetic analysis of dynamical bubble-like solitons based on the time domain evolution of the topological density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puliafito, Vito Azzerboni, Bruno; Finocchio, Giovanni; Torres, Luis; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2014-05-07

    Dynamical bubble-like solitons have been recently investigated in nanocontact-based spin-torque oscillators with a perpendicular free layer. Those magnetic configurations can be excited also in different geometries as long as they consist of perpendicular materials. Thus, in this paper, a systematic study of the influence of both external field and high current on that kind of dynamics is performed for a spin-valve point-contact geometry where both free and fixed layers present strong perpendicular anisotropy. The usage of the topological density tool highlights the excitation of complex bubble/antibubble configurations. In particular, at high currents, a deformation of the soliton and its simultaneous shift from the contact area are observed and can be ascribable to the Oersted field. Results provide further detailed information on the excitation of solitons in perpendicular materials for application in spintronics, magnonics, and domain wall logic.

  8. Time Domain Reflectometry Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    Time Domain Reflectometry Theory Application Note 1304-2 For Use with Agilent 86100 Infiniium DCA #12;2 The most general approach to evaluating the time domain response of any electromagnetic system a concise presentation of the fundamentals of TDR and then relates these fundamentals to the parameters

  9. MMMMaaaaggggnnnneeeettttiiiicccc FFFFuuuussssiiiioooonnnn EEEEnnnneeeerrrrggggyyyy MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MINUTES OF FUEL IN PLASMA · LOW RISK OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS PROLIFERATION · CONCENTRATED RELATIVE TO SOLAR FFFFuuuussssiiiioooonnnn EEEEnnnneeeerrrrggggyyyy Schematic of MFE Power Plant Raw Fuel WasteFuel p First Wall Magnet

  10. Antiferromagnetism and domain effects in UPdSn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakotte, H. [Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States); Robinson, R.A.; Purwanto, A. [Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Tun, Z. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (CANADA)] [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (CANADA); Prokes, K.; Brueck, E.; de Boer, F.R. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, 1018 XE Amsterdam (The Netherlands)] [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, 1018 XE Amsterdam (The Netherlands)

    1998-10-01

    Neutron-diffraction experiments have been performed on a single crystal of the hexagonal noncollinear antiferromagnetic compound UPdSn as a function of temperature and magnetic field. The use of a special horizontal-field magnet (with very wide horizontal access to the neutron beams) has allowed the study of the principal magnetic Bragg reflections in all three antiferromagnetic domain pairs throughout the magnetic phase diagram for B{lt}3thinspT and T{gt}6thinspK. The data confirm a picture in which one domain pair (1) grows at the expense of the other two domain pairs (2 and 3), for fields along the [100] axis for domain 1. On the other hand, if the field is applied along the perpendicular axis, [010] for domain 1, the other two domains are preferred. These results are consistent with the picture given in a previous vertical-field study of only one magnetic reflection from one domain, in which the 3-T field-induced transition is viewed as a spin-flop transition. There is, however, a small amount of irreversible moment rotation (from {theta}=43{degree} to 48{degree}, where {theta} is the moment canting angle within the hexagonal basal plane), on passing through the spin-flop transition. This seems to be connected with whether the sample is single or multidomain. In addition, the field independence of the N{acute e}el temperature (T{sub N}=37thinspK) has been measured up to 3 T, and data on the domain kinetics are presented. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Confining quantum particles with a purely magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves Colin De Verdière; Francoise Truc

    2009-10-15

    We consider an open domain with a compact boundary in an Euclidean space and a Schroedinger operator with magnetic field on this domain. We give sufficient conditions on the rate of growth of the magnetic field near the boundary which guarantees essential self-adjointness of this operator. From the physical point of view, it means that the quantum particle is confined in the domain by the magnetic field. We construct examples on polytopes and domains with smooth boundaries; these examples of "magnetic bottles" are highly simplified models of what is done for nuclear fusion in tokamacs.

  12. Liquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    for an attractive fusion energy system 2. Lower the cost and time for R&D · APEX was initiated in November 1997Liquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets Mohamed Abdou Professor, Mechanical as part of the US Restructured Fusion Program Strategy to enhance innovation · Natural Questions

  13. Investigation of coercivity mechanism in hot deformed Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, M., E-mail: masao-yano-aa@mail.toyota.co.jp; Manabe, A.; Shoji, T.; Kato, A. [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Ono, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Harada, M. [Toyota Central R and D Labs, Inc., Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-05-07

    The magnetic reversal behaviors of single domain sized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, with and without isolation between the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains, was clarified using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The SANS patterns obtained arose from changes in the magnetic domains and were analyzed using the Teubner–Stray model, a phenomenological correlation length model, to quantify the periodicity and morphology of the magnetic domains. The results indicated that the magnetic reversal evolved with the magnetic domains that had similar sized grains. The grain isolation enabled us to realize the reversals of single domains.

  14. Oven wall panel construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  15. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  16. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  17. Dynamics of spintronic materials: Exploration in the time and frequency domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabel, Hartmut

    2014-12-14

    X-ray and neutron reflectivity are mature experimental techniques for the exploration of film thicknesses and interface roughnesses on the nanoscale. Combining with photon and neutron polarization, these methods can be carried forward to the analysis of magnetic thin films and magnetic domain structures. New opportunities open up when these methods are used either in the time or in the frequency domain. Then dynamical processes can be studied such as domain oscillations, domain propagation, precession of spins, and damping effects. Two methods are discussed which have been developed recently: polarized neutron reflectivity from magnetic films in an alternating magnetic field and time resolved resonant magnetic x-ray reflectivity of the free precessional dynamics in films and multilayers.

  18. Simulations of Alpha Wall Load in ITER. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsson, Johan

    2010-10-20

    The partially DOE funded International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will produce massive amounts of energetic charged alpha particles, which are imperfectly confined by a strong magnetic field. The wall of the experiment is designed to withstand an estimated wall load from these fusion alpha particles, but the accuracy of this estimate needs to be improved to avoid potentially catastrophic surprises when the experiment becomes operational. We have added a more accurate, gyro-dynamic model of particle motion to the existing drift-dynamic model in the DELTA5D simulation software used for the project. We have also added the ability to load a detailed engineering model of the wall and use it in the simulations.

  19. Building wall construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulford, C.E.

    1987-04-21

    A building wall construction is described comprising, in combination: (a) an elongated top plate; (b) an elongated bottom plate extending in spaced, horizontal, parallel relation to the top plate; (c) elongated studs arranged in spaced, vertical, parallel relation and affixed at their upper and lower ends to the top and bottom plates, respectively; (d) each of the studs, top plates and bottom plates comprises a pair of spaced wooden members of equal length having a substantially rectangular groove centrally disposed in one face thereof extending for the entire length of the wooden members, and at least one web member of fire-rated gypsum board having opposite, marginal edge portions secured in the grooves; (e) sheathing layers affixed to both sides of the stud members and extending vertically between the bottom and top plates, and horizontally between the studs to enclose the space therebetween; and (f) at least one panel member of fire-rated gypsum board extending horizontally between each successive pair of studs parallel to and spaced from each of the sheathing layers, thus providing at least two, separated spaces between the sheathing layers.

  20. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y. S., E-mail: ypark@pppl.gov; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York 10027 (United States); Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable ?{sub N} close to the ideal with-wall limit, ?{sub N}{sup wall}, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n?=?1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at ?{sub N} up to 86% of ?{sub N}{sup wall} but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of ?{sub N}{sup wall} without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  1. Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) D383 005P43 ANL/FPP/TM-165 ARGONNE NATIONAL of Nuclear Data for Science and Technology, September 6-10, 1982, Antwerp, Belgium. #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS References 49 iii #12;LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE NO. TITLE PAGE 1 17Li-83Pb liquid alloy breeder first wall

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  4. Stability of winding cosmic wall lattices with X type junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Carter

    2009-11-30

    This work confirms the stability of a class of domain wall lattice models that can produce accelerated cosmological expansion, with pressure to density ratio $w=-1/3$ at early times, and with $w=-2/3$ at late times when the lattice scale becomes large compared to the wall thickness. For walls of tension $T_{I}$, the relevant X type junctions could be unstable (for a sufficiently acute intersection angle $\\alpha$) against separation into a pair of Y type junctions joined by a compound wall, only if the tension $T_{II}$ of the latter were less than $2T_{I}$ (and for an approximately right-angled intersection if it were less that $\\sqrt{2} T_{I}$) which can not occur in the class considered here. In an extensive category of multicomponent scalar field models of forced harmonic (linear or non-linear) type it is shown how the relevant tension -- which is the same as the surface energy density $U$ of the wall -- can be calculated as the minimum (geodesic) distance between the relevant vacuum states as measured on the space of field values $\\Phi^i$ using a positive definite (Riemannian) energy metric $dU^2=\\tilde G_{ij} d\\Phi^i d\\Phi^j$ that is obtained from the usual kinetic metric (which is flat for a model with ordinary linear kinetic part) by application of a conformal factor proportional to the relevant potential function $V$. For suitably periodic potential functions there will be corresponding periodic configurations -- with parallel walls characterised by incrementation of a winding number -- in which the condition for stability of large scale bunching modes is shown to be satisfied automatically. It is suggested that such a configuration -- with a lattice lengthscale comparable to intergalactic separation distances -- might have been produced by a late stage of cosmological inflation.

  5. A study of magnetically annealed ferromagnetic materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Domingo

    1961-01-01

    some magnetic effects and therefore, the term "magnetic materials" may be said to include all substances. In those ?14 known as "diamagnetics" or "paramagnetics, " the effects are very 15 feeble and they are regarded as non... electron spins break away until the Curie point is reached, the alignment is lost completely and the material behaves like a paramagnetic. The Domain Structure One of the experimental methods that show the existence of domains 14 in ferromagnetics...

  6. Energy dissipation in single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles: Dynamical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Lyutyy; S. I. Denisov; A. Yu. Peletskyi; C. Binns

    2015-02-14

    We study, both analytically and numerically, the phenomenon of energy dissipation in single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles driven by an alternating magnetic field. Our interest is focused on the power loss resulting from the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, which describes the precessional motion of the nanoparticle magnetic moment. We determine the power loss as a function of the field amplitude and frequency and analyze its dependence on different regimes of forced precession induced by circularly and linearly polarized magnetic fields. The conditions to maximize the nanoparticle heating are also analyzed.

  7. Study of interdomain boundary in diamagnetic domain structure in beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Lykov

    2002-11-21

    At low temperatures, in strong magnetic fields, the formation of a non-uniform magnetisation is possible in a single-crystal metal sample whose demagnetising factor along the field is close to unity. Namely, so-called Condon diamagnetic domain structure arises and disappears periodically with magnetic field. In this paper, the diamagnetic domain structure in beryllium single crystalis analysed. Directly, existence of diamagnetic domains in that sample was observed earlier by the muon spin precession (mSR) resonance peak splitting. A method is described that allows to calculate quantitative characteristics of the interdomain boundary using the muon histograms. The technique is based on the Marquardt minimisation procedure that has been modified in order to reduce the influence of noise on iterations convergence. Boundary volume fraction was calculated.

  8. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  9. Green Wall Technologies Objective: Compile a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of green wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Green Wall Technologies Objective: Compile a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of green wall technologies that can be used to jump-start design and engineering proposals for green walls in a variety of urban conditions. Background: Green walls--otherwise referred to as living walls or biowalls

  10. Cosmic magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with the cosmic magnetism in a non-mathematical way. It uses Faraday's very powerful and highly pictorial concept of lines of magnetic force and their associated physical properties to explain the structure and behavior of magnetic fields in extraterrestrial objects. Contents include: forces of nature; magnetic field of earth; solar and interplanetary magnetic fields; magnetic fields in the solar system; stars and pulsars; and magnetic fields of the milky way and other galaxies.

  11. Ternary superlattice boosting interface-stabilized magnetic chirality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K.; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Wu, Yizheng

    2015-02-09

    In cobalt-nickel multilayers grown on iridium surfaces, magnetic homo-chirality can be stabilized by Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI) at the interface with the substrate. When thickness of the multilayers is increased beyond threshold values, then non-chiral bulk properties exceed interface contributions and this type of chirality vanishes. Here, we use spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy to measure these thickness thresholds, and we determine estimates of the strength of the DMI from the measurements. Even though the same 5d heavy metal is used as a substrate, a remarkably large variation is found between the two 3d magnets: our results indicate that the strength of the DMI at Co/Ir interfaces is three times larger than at Ni/Ir interfaces. We show how this finding provides ways to extend interfacial-DMI stabilization of domain wall chirality to 3d/5d/3d ternary multilayers such as [Ni/Ir/Co]{sub n}. Such strategies may extend chirality-control to larger film thickness and a wider range of substrates, which may be useful for designing new spintronics devices.

  12. Thermal breaking systems for metal stud walls -- Can metal stud walls perform as well as wood stud walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Buildings Technology Center

    1997-12-31

    Metal stud wall systems for residential buildings are gaining in popularity. Strong thermal bridges caused by highly conductive metal studs degrade the thermal performance of such walls. Several wall configurations have been developed to improve their thermal performance. The authors tried to evaluate some of these wall systems. The thermal performance of metal stud walls is frequently compared with that of wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. In metal stud walls, thermal bridges generated by the metal components reduce their thermal performance by up to 55%. Today, metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar systems made of wood because steel has much higher thermal conductivity than wood. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is now widely recommended as the remedy for weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of promising metal stud wall configurations was analyzed. Some of these walls were designed and tested by the authors, some were tested in other laboratories, and some were developed and forgotten a long time ago. Several types of thermal breaking systems were used in these walls. Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer simulations were used to analyze 20 metal stud wall configurations. Also, a series of hot-box tests were conducted on several of these walls. Test results for 22 additional metal stud walls were analyzed. Most of these walls contained conventional metal studs. Commonly used fiberglass and EPS were used as insulation materials. The most promising metal stud wall configurations have reductions in the center-of-cavity R-values of less than 20%.

  13. Nernst Effect in Magnetized Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joglekar, Archis S; Ridgers, Christopher P; Kingham, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    We present nanosecond timescale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck-Maxwell modeling of magnetized plasma transport and dynamics in a hohlraum with an applied external magnetic field, under conditions similar to recent experiments. Self-consistent modeling of the kinetic electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's Law, including Nernst advection of magnetic fields. In addition to showing the prevalence of non-local behavior, we demonstrate that effects such as anomalous heat flow are induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. We show magnetic field amplification up to a factor of 3 from Nernst compression into the hohlraum wall. The magnetic field is also expelled towards the hohlraum axis due to Nernst advection faster than frozen-in-flux would suggest. Non-locality contributes to the heat flow towards the hohlraum axis and results in an augmented Nernst advection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling.

  14. Apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oder, Robin R. (Export, PA); Jamison, Russell E. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    2010-02-09

    A magnetic separator vessel (1) for separating magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluid includes a separation chamber having an interior and exterior wall, a top and bottom portion; a magnet (3) having first and second poles (2) positioned adjacent to the exterior wall, wherein the first pole is substantially diametrically opposed to the second pole; a inlet port (5) is directed into the top portion of the separation chamber, wherein the inlet port (5) is positioned adjacent to one of the first and second poles (2), wherein the inlet port (5) is adapted to transfer a mixture into the separation chamber; an underflow port (6) in communication with the bottom portion, wherein the underflow port (6) is adapted to receive the magnetic particles; and an overflow port (9) in communication with the separation chamber, wherein the overflow port (9) is adapted to receive the non-magnetic fluid.

  15. Magnetic shielding of a laboratory Hall thruster. II. Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofer, Richard R., E-mail: richard.r.hofer@jpl.nasa.gov; Goebel, Dan M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    The physics of magnetic shielding in Hall thrusters were validated through laboratory experiments demonstrating essentially erosionless, high-performance operation. The magnetic field near the walls of a laboratory Hall thruster was modified to effectively eliminate wall erosion while maintaining the magnetic field topology away from the walls necessary to retain efficient operation. Plasma measurements at the walls validate our understanding of magnetic shielding as derived from the theory. The plasma potential was maintained very near the anode potential, the electron temperature was reduced by a factor of two to three, and the ion current density was reduced by at least a factor of two. Measurements of the carbon backsputter rate, wall geometry, and direct measurement of plasma properties at the wall indicate that the wall erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 1000 relative to the unshielded thruster. These changes effectively eliminate wall erosion as a life limitation in Hall thrusters, enabling a new class of deep-space missions that could not previously be attempted.

  16. Steel-framed buildings: Impacts of wall detail configurations on the whole wall thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.

    1998-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is the influence of architectural wall details on the whole wall thermal performance. Whole wall thermal performance analysis was performed for six light gage steel-framed wall systems (some with wood components). For each wall system, all wall details were simulated using calibrated 3-D finite difference computer modeling. The thermal performance of the six steel-framed wall systems included various system details and the whole wall system thermal performance for a typical single-story ranch house. Currently, predicted heat losses through building walls are typically based on measurements of the wall system clear wall area using test methods such as ASTM C 236 or are calculated by one of the procedures recommended in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals that often is carried out for the clear wall area exclusively. In this paper, clear wall area is defined as the part of the wall system that is free of thermal anomalies due to building envelope details or thermally unaffected by intersections with other surfaces of the building envelope. Clear wall experiments or calculations normally do not include the effects of building envelope details such as corners, window and door openings, and structural intersections with roofs, floors, ceilings, and other walls. In steel-framed wall systems, these details typically consist of much more structural components than the clear wall. For this situation, the thermal properties measured or calculated for the clear wall area do not adequately represent the total wall system thermal performance. Factors that would impact the ability of today`s standard practice to accurately predict the total wall system thermal performance are the accuracy of the calculation methods, the area of the total wall that is clear wall, and the quantity and thermal performance of the various wall system details.

  17. Intermittency and turbulence in a magnetically confined fusion plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Carbone; L. Sorriso-Valvo; E. Martines; V. Antoni; P. Veltri

    2001-01-30

    We investigate the intermittency of magnetic turbulence as measured in Reversed Field Pinch plasmas. We show that the Probability Distribution Functions of magnetic field differences are not scale invariant, that is the wings of these functions are more important at the smallest scales, a classical signature of intermittency. We show that scaling laws appear also in a region very close to the external wall of the confinement device, and we present evidences that the observed intermittency increases moving towards the wall.

  18. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  19. THE DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A LARGE RECTANGULAR MAGNETIC CUSP PLASMA SOURCE FOR HIGH INTENSITY NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biagi, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    generator should be replaced with a larger-volume "magnetic bucket" plasma source,-* in which the walls are lined with permanent magnetsgenerator (Fi^. 1). Design and Fabrication Techniq The permanent magnets

  20. Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals Richard J. Harrison*, Rafal E. Dunin. Magnetite is the most strongly magnetic mineral in nature. Small particles of magnetite in single-domain (SD and pseudo-SD particles (1). In most igneous rocks, the grain size of primary magnetic minerals exceeds

  1. Response of a partial wall to an external perturbation of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atanasiu, C. V. [Association EURATOM-MEdC, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)] [Association EURATOM-MEdC, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Zakharov, L. E. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we present the response of a 3D thin multiply connected wall to an external kink mode perturbation in axisymmetric tokamak configurations. To calculate the contribution of the plasma perturbed magnetic field in the vacuum region, we have made use of the concept of surface currents [following C. V. Atanasiu, A. H. Boozer, L. E. Zakharov, and A. A. Subbotin, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2781 (1999)]. The wall response is expressed in terms of a stream function of the wall surface currents, which are obtained by solving a diffusion type equation, taking into account the contribution of the wall currents themselves iteratively. The use of stream function makes the approach applicable for both well-studied earlier Resistive Wall Modes and for Wall Touching Kink Modes, which were discovered recently as a key phenomenon in disruptions [L. E. Zakharov, S. A. Galkin, and S. N. Gerasimov, Phys. Plasmas 19, 055703 (2012)]. New analytical expressions, suitable for numerical calculations of toroidal harmonics of the vacuum magnetic fields from the surface currents on axisymmetric shells, are derived.

  2. Promising Technology: Cool Paints for Exterior Walls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cool Paints increase the solar reflectance of exterior walls. By reflecting more sunlight, the wall surface maintains a cooler temperature. This decrease in temperature leads to less heat transfer through the walls into the building. During the cooling season, the addition of cool paints can decrease the cooling load of the building.

  3. Mississippi State Axion Search: A Light Shining though a Wall ALP Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Formaggio, Joseph; Fowler, Nicholas; Gaerlan, Mikhail; Jiang, Yipeng; Madsen, John; Oblath, Noah; Powers, Adam; Ray, Amy; Riehle, Robertson

    2015-01-01

    The elegant solutions to the strong CP problem predict the existence of a particle called axion. Thus, the search for axion like particles (ALP) has been an ongoing endeavor. The possibility that these axion like particles couple to photons in presence of magnetic field gives rise to a technique of detecting these particles known as light shining through a wall (LSW). Mississippi State Axion Search (MASS) is an experiment employing the LSW technique in search for axion like particles. The apparatus consists of two radio frequency (RF) cavities, both under the influence of strong magnetic field and separated by a lead wall. While one of the cavities houses a strong RF generator, the other cavity houses the detector systems. The MASS apparatus looks for excesses in RF photons that tunnel through the wall as a signature of candidate axion-like particles. The concept behind the experiment as well as the projected sensitivities are presented here.

  4. Mississippi State Axion Search: A Light Shining though a Wall ALP Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prajwal Mohanmurthy; Dipangkar Dutta; Joseph Formaggio; Nicholas Fowler; Mikhail Gaerlan; Yipeng Jiang; John Madsen; Noah Oblath; Adam Powers; Amy Ray; Robertson Riehle

    2015-03-08

    The elegant solutions to the strong CP problem predict the existence of a particle called axion. Thus, the search for axion like particles (ALP) has been an ongoing endeavor. The possibility that these axion like particles couple to photons in presence of magnetic field gives rise to a technique of detecting these particles known as light shining through a wall (LSW). Mississippi State Axion Search (MASS) is an experiment employing the LSW technique in search for axion like particles. The apparatus consists of two radio frequency (RF) cavities, both under the influence of strong magnetic field and separated by a lead wall. While one of the cavities houses a strong RF generator, the other cavity houses the detector systems. The MASS apparatus looks for excesses in RF photons that tunnel through the wall as a signature of candidate axion-like particles. The concept behind the experiment as well as the projected sensitivities are presented here.

  5. Linear stability of magnetohydrodynamic flow in a square duct with thin conducting walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priede, J?nis; Bühler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    This study is concerned with numerical linear stability analysis of liquid metal flow in a square duct with thin electrically conducting walls subject to a uniform transverse magnetic field. We derive an asymptotic solution for the base flow which is valid not only for high but also moderate magnetic fields. This solution shows that for low wall conductance ratios $c\\ll1,$ an extremely strong magnetic field with the Hartmann number $Ha\\sim c^{-4}$ is required to attain the asymptotic flow regime considered in the previous studies. We use a vector stream function/vorticity formulation and a Chebyshev collocation method to solve the eigenvalue problem for three-dimensional small-amplitude perturbations in ducts with realistic wall conductance ratios $c=1,0.1,0.01$ and Hartmann numbers up to $10^{4}.$ As for similar flows, instability in a sufficiently strong magnetic field is found to occur in the side-wall jets with the characteristic thickness $\\delta\\sim Ha^{-1/2}.$ This results in the critical Reynolds numb...

  6. Existence and uniqueness of the electric potential profile in the edge of tokamak plasmas when constrained by the plasma-wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negulescu, Claudia

    , the physics of plasma-wall interactions leads to non-linear constraints along the magnetic field to control the interaction of the plasma with the surrounding wall material, but also to define the boundaryExistence and uniqueness of the electric potential profile in the edge of tokamak plasmas when

  7. Influence of wall thickness on the stability of the resistive wall mode in tokamak Richard Fitzpatrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    Influence of wall thickness on the stability of the resistive wall mode in tokamak plasmas Richard.1063/1.2446041 Nonlinear evolution of resistive wall mode in a cylindrical tokamak with poloidal rotation Phys. Plasmas 13); 10.1063/1.1943347 Control of resistive wall modes in a cylindrical tokamak with radial and poloidal

  8. Generalized dilaton-Maxwell cosmic string and wall solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Morris

    2006-08-15

    The class of static solutions found by Gibbons and Wells for dilaton-electrodynamics in flat spacetime, which describe nontopological strings and walls that trap magnetic flux, is extended to a class of dynamical solutions supporting arbitrarily large, nondissipative traveling waves, using techniques previously applied to global and local topological defects. These solutions can then be used in conjunction with S-duality to obtain more general solitonic solutions for various axidilaton-Maxwell theories. As an example, a set of dynamical solutions is found for axion, dilaton, and Maxwell fields in low energy heterotic string theory using the SL(2,R) invariance of the equations of motion.

  9. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  10. Magnets & Magnet Condensed Matter Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Sights from around the Magnet Lab in 2010. On the cover MAGNETS & MAGNET MATERIALS Engineering materials in Mesoporous Silica SBA-15 31 YBCO Pancake Wound Test Coil for 32-T Magnet Development 32 Strong Vortex Pinning from Marine Cyanobacteria 37 Heavy Petroleum Composition 2. Progression of the Boduszynski Model

  11. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Pouransari; L. Biferale; A. V. Johansson

    2015-02-21

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooling effects are influential. In addition, with the aid of PDFs conditioned on the mixture fraction, the significance of the reactive scalar characteristics in the reaction zone is illustrated. We argue that the combined effects of strong intermittency and strong persistency of anisotropy at the small scales in the entire domain can affect mixing and ultimately the combustion characteristics of the reacting flow.

  12. Perceptual Affordances of Wall-Sized Displays for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isenberg, Petra

    .g., HCI)]: Miscellaneous. Introduction Wall-sized displays (PowerWalls) engulf viewers in very large high

  13. Magnetic States in Fe Nanoparticles Imaged by Off-axis Electron Holography Luise Theil Kuhn1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    a procedure that is described elsewhere [1]. In FIG. 1 (d), a magnetic vortex surrounds a flux tube that runs.e. their magnetic configurations may be vortex-like. The critical size for this transition from single domain to vortex behaviour is crucial for determining the net magnetic moments carried by magnetic nanoparticles, i

  14. Magnetic propulsion of liquid Li in tokamaks 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    Magnetic propulsion of liquid Li in tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University, Princeton of liquid lithium, with the tokamak magnetic field is discussed as a mechanism a) for creating fast moving (plasma facing) Li streams along the inner wall of tokamak and b) for mixing the liquid in a closed volume

  15. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  16. Comparative Study of High Triangularity H-mode Plasma Performance in JET with Be/W Wall and CFC Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparative Study of High Triangularity H-mode Plasma Performance in JET with Be/W Wall and CFC Wall

  17. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anna Wall

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:NewsWebmasterWorking With UsAnna Wall Photo of

  18. Inverse transmission problems for magnetic Schrödinger operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsiaryna Krupchyk

    2011-12-16

    This paper is concerned with the study of inverse transmission problems for magnetic Schr\\"odinger operators on bounded domains and in all of the Euclidean space, in the self-adjoint case. Assuming that the magnetic and electric potentials are known outside of a transparent obstacle, in the bounded domain case, we show that the obstacle, the transmission coefficients, as well as the magnetic field and electric potential inside the obstacle are uniquely determined from the knowledge of the set of the Cauchy data for the transmission problem, given on an open subset of the boundary of the domain. In the case of the transmission scattering problem, we obtain the same conclusion, when the scattering amplitude at a fixed frequency is known. The problems studied in this work were proposed in [15].

  19. Wall current probe: A non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baude, R.; Gaboriau, F.; Hagelaar, G. J. M. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d’énergie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France and CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062, Toulouse (France)] [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d’énergie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France and CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062, Toulouse (France)

    2013-08-15

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  20. Voltage-driven perpendicular magnetic domain switching in multiferroic nanoislands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    -dimensional multiferroic nanoislands should provide great flexibilities for designing novel high-density spintronic/microelectronic

  1. Category:Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village,8199089°,Analytical ModelingInformation Controlled

  2. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, EtInformation Control of Well KS-8

  3. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal L P Jump to:OpenOpen Energy

  4. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal L P Jump to:OpenOpen

  5. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  6. Identification of new functions for BRCT domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Duaa H

    2008-01-01

    Our lab identified the tandem BRCT domains of PTIP function as a DNA damage responsive phospho binding domain that recognizes proteins phosphorylated by ATM and ATR after DNA damage. The PTIP tandem BRCT domains are ...

  7. Cross-domain self organizing maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fidelholtz, Estanislao L

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, I present a method for organizing and relating events represented in two domains: the transition-space domain, which focuses on change and the trajectory-space domain, which focuses on movement along paths. ...

  8. Cross Domain Mathematical Concept Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steel, Graham; Colton, Simon; Bundy, Alan; Walsh, Toby

    2000-01-01

    Many interesting concepts in mathematics are essentially "cross-domain" in nature, relating objects from more than one area of mathematics, e.g. prime order groups. These concepts are often vital to the formation of a ...

  9. Membrane adhesion and domain formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Weikl; Reinhard Lipowsky

    2007-09-23

    We review theoretical results for the adhesion-induced phase behavior of biomembranes. The focus is on models in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic sheets with embedded adhesion molecules. We present several mechanism that lead to the formation of domains during adhesion, and discuss the time-dependent evolution of domain patterns obtained in Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulated pattern dynamics has striking similarities to the pattern evolution observed during T cell adhesion.

  10. Textural break foundation wall construction modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Steven J. (Kennewick, WA)

    1990-01-01

    Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

  11. NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    GA­A23223 NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS by C.P.C. WONG OCTOBER 1999 #12;DISCLAIMER Government or any agency thereof. #12;GA­A23223 NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS by C.P.C. WONG by General Atomics IR&D Funds GA PROJECT 4437 OCTOBER 1999 #12;C.P.C. WONG NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK

  12. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, Henry S. (Cranbury, NJ); Budny, Robert V. (Princeton, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Buttonwood, CT)

    1988-01-01

    Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

  13. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

  14. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  15. Low-rise shear wall failure modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Hashimoto, P.S. (EQE Engineering, Inc., Costa Mesa, CA (USA)); Reed, J.W. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the data that are available concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. This data will be used to address two failure modes associated with the shear wall structures. First, data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure are examined. Second, data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary to compute the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional. 23 refs.

  16. Multiple moving wall dry coal extrusion pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2013-05-14

    A pump for transporting particulate material includes a passageway defined on each side between an inlet and an outlet by a moving wall.

  17. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  18. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-29

    A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

  19. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterized by the competition between a pinned orbital domain topology that remains static and mobile domain boundaries that exhibit slow, temporal fluctuations. Speckles in...

  20. A comparison of hydrogen vs. helium glow discharge effects on fusion device first-wall conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1989-09-01

    Hydrogen- and deuterium-fueled glow discharges are used for the initial conditioning of magnetic fusion device vacuum vessels following evacuation from atmospheric pressure. Hydrogenic glow discharge conditioning (GDC) significantly reduces the near-surface concentration of simple adsorbates, such as H/sub 2/O, CO, and CH/sub 4/, and lowers ion-induced desorption coefficients by typically three orders of magnitude. The time evolution of the residual gas production observed during hydrogen-glow discharge conditioning of the carbon first-wall structure of the TFTR device is similar to the time evolution observed during hydrogen GDC of the initial first-wall configuration in TFTR, which was primarily stainless steel. Recently, helium GDC has been investigated for several wall-conditioning tasks on a number of tokamaks including TFTR. Helium GDC shows negligible impurity removal with stainless steel walls. For impurity conditioning with carbon walls, helium GDC shows significant desorption of H/sub 2/O, CO, and CO/sub 2/; however, the total desorption yield is limited to the monolayer range. In addition, helium GDC can be used to displace hydrogen isotopes from the near-surface region of carbon first-walls in order to lower hydrogenic retention and recycling. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  2. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  3. Barkhausen avalanches in anisotropic ferromagnets with 180 # domain walls Bosiljka Tadic 1,# and Ulrich Nowak 2,##

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usadel, K. D.

    with recently observed behavior in amorphous Metglas and Fe­Co­B ribbons when the applied anisotropic stress of the amorphous Metglas Fe­B­Si [1,7,9] and Fe­Co­B alloys [5,6] which are annealed in a paral­ lel field [9

  4. Self-localized domain walls at -conjugated branching junctions Yongwoo Shin and Xi Lin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    's Fermi liquid theory.1 These quasi-particles in conducting polymers, however, are subject to intrinsic, leading to the formation of self- localized charge carriers.2 These phonon-screened charge car- riers the translationally invariant Goldstone mode,5 the am- plitude oscillation mode,3 and a series of other higher order

  5. 2+1 Flavour Domain Wall QCD: light meson spectrum, leptonic decays and neutral kaon mixing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio, David J

    2008-01-01

    We study light hadron phenomenology using Lattice QCD. We focus on the calculations of the light pseudoscalar quantities: masses, decay constants and B-parameters; in particular the calculation of the Kaon B-parameter, ...

  6. Kinks from Dynamical Systems: Domain Walls in a Deformed O(N) Linear Sigma Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Alonso Izquierdo; M. A. Gonzalez Leon; J. Mateos Guilarte

    2000-03-24

    It is shown how a integrable mechanical system provides all the localized static solutions of a deformation of the linear O(N)-sigma model in two space-time dimensions. The proof is based on the Hamilton-Jacobi separability of the mechanical analogue system that follows when time-independent field configurations are being considered. In particular, we describe the properties of the different kinds of kinks in such a way that a hierarchical structure of solitary wave manifolds emerges for distinct N.

  7. Scaling behavior of domain walls at the T =0 ferromagnet to spin-glass transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    ) Disordered model systems, governed by Edwards-Anderson Hamiltonian for Ising spins i =±1: H() = - i,j Jijij Quenched disorder: Jij > 0 : Jij -J2 /2 / 2 + (J -1) =0: SG with Gaussian disorder =1: Ferromagnet Ground states (GSs) Spin

  8. A Domain Wall Model for SMA Characterization Jordan E. Massad 1 and Ralph C. Smith 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    earthquake-proof structures [1, 21]. More recently, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices have used

  9. Current-driven Domain Wall Dynamics And Its Electric Signature In Ferromagnetic Nanowires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang

    2012-10-19

    dramatic reduction in heating power thus greatly expanding the range of materials which can be used for spintronic devices. [10, 14] We also note that DMI suppresses critical current jc and a ects parameter a. For vd < vrc, the optimal current coincides...

  10. Nucleon axial charge from quenched lattice QCD with domain wall fermions and improved gauge action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Sasaki; Tom Blum; Shigemi Ohta; Kostas Orginos

    2001-10-12

    In our previous DWF calculation with the Wilson gauge action at $\\beta=6.0$ ($a^{-1}\\simeq$ 1.9 GeV) on a $16^3 \\times 32 \\times 16$ lattice, we found that $\\Ga$ had a fairly strong dependence on the quark mass. A simple linear extrapolation of $\\Ga$ to the chiral limit yielded a value that was almost a factor of two smaller than the experimental one. Here we report our recent study of this issue. In particular, we investigate possible errors arising from finite lattice volume, especially in the lighter quark mass region. We employ a RG-improved gauge action (DBW2), which maintains very good chiral behavior even on a coarse lattice ($a^{-1}\\simeq$ 1.3 GeV), in order to perform simulations at large physical volume ($> (2{\\rm fm})^3$). Our preliminary results suggest that the finite volume effect is significant.

  11. Domain walls as dark energy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination ofDynamics ModelPorous

  12. Domain walls in a Born-Infeld-dilaton background (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination ofDynamics ModelPorousSciTech

  13. Dynamic domain walls in a Maxwell-dilaton background (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discriminationquenchedwithimpact on

  14. 7/1/08 14:51Chemical & Engineering News | Reel Science --WALL-E Page 1 of 2http://pubs.acs.org/cen/reelscience/reviews/walle/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    that WALL-E and EVE show are the holy grails for robotics researchers, he adds. Living on Axiom may seem

  15. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  16. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  17. How wood waters down wall insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunde, P.J.

    1984-02-01

    Wood framing in walls can lower the actual insulating values, since the R-value of wood is only one per inch of thickness. A chart is presented that shows how wood in the stud space reduces insulating values. Several wall systems and the nominal R-value of insulation for each is presented.

  18. Risk Assessment of Energy-Efficient Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B.; Hun, Diana E.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Kehrer, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    This multi-year project aims to provide the residential construction industry with energy-efficient wall designs that are moisture durable. The present work focused on the initial step of this project, which is to develop a moisture durability protocol that identifies energy efficient wall designs that have a low probability of experiencing moisture problems.

  19. Metal stud wall systems -- Thermal disaster, or modern wall systems with highly efficient thermal insulation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Buildings Technology Center

    1997-11-01

    Because steel has higher thermal conductivity than wood and intense heat transfer occurs through the metal wall components, thermal performances of a metal stud wall are significantly lower than for similar wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. That is why metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar made of wood. However, properly designed metal stud walls can be as thermally effective as wood stud walls. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is widely used as a remedy for a weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of the promising metal stud wall configurations is analyzed using results of finite difference computer modeling and guarded hotbox tests. Some of these walls were designed and tested in the ORNL Building Technology Center, some were tested in other laboratories, and some walls were developed and forgotten long time ago. Also, a novel concept of combined foam-metal studs is considered. The main aim of the present paper is to prove that it is possible to build metal stud walls which perform as well as wood stud walls. The key lies in designing; metal stud wall systems have to be treated in a special way with particular consideration to the high thermal conduction of metal components. In the discussed collection of the efficient metal stud wall configurations, reductions of the in-cavity R-value caused by metal studs are between 10 and 20%.

  20. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  1. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1” to 1 ½”), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  2. Axial current generation by P-odd domains in QCD matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Yin, Yi; Lin, Shu

    2015-06-23

    The dynamics of topological domains which break parity (P) and charge-parity (CP) symmetry of QCD are studied. We derive in a general setting that those local domains will generate an axial current and quantify the strength of the induced axial current. Thus, our findings are verified in a top-down holographic model. The relation between the real time dynamics of those local domains and the chiral magnetic field is also elucidated. We finally argue that such an induced axial current would be phenomenologically important in a heavy-ion collisions experiment.

  3. Ads-Portal Domains: Identification and Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaowei

    4 Ads-Portal Domains: Identification and Measurements MISHARI ALMISHARI University of California, Irvine and XIAOWEI YANG Duke University An ads-portal domain refers to a Web domain that shows only develop a machine-learning- based classifier to identify ads-portal domains, which has 96% accuracy. We

  4. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 40, NO. 1, JANUARY 2004 43 Mechanical Damage Detection With Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapham, Lynann

    pipe wall. In addition to corrosion defects, dents or "mechanical damage" in pipelines are also, stress. I. INTRODUCTION NONDESTRUCTIVE evaluation of in-service oil and gas pipelines by the magnetic to study MFL signals from corrosion pits [3]­[7]. Because these defects produce MFL signals mainly due

  6. WIKIPEDIA AS DOMAIN KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS: Domain Extraction and Statistical Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Benyuan

    networks on, respectively, mathematics, physics, biology, and chemistry. We compare the mathematics domain, has developed and evolved rapidly into the most comprehensive online encyclopedia. While people enjoy of the target knowledge network with a trusted knowledge source, such as paper-based encyclopedia. Restricted

  7. Why Walls Don't Work, by Michael Dear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Leo, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    the role of the wall as a power device does not allow for anat that. Walls work by serving as devices of power—devicessense, the wall can be understood as a device of power that

  8. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01

    In Phase II the main load bearing wall was reconfigured as aIn Phase II the main load bearing wall was reconfigured as aa rectangular load bearing wall acting as the main lateral

  9. Improving Glass Walls Thermal Resistance In Air-Conditioned Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Alajmi, R.; Al-Ansary. A; Abuzaid, M.

    2010-01-01

    walls; as one of envelope surfaces; has an important impact on solar radiation. Design and construction of glass walls have significant effects on building comfort and energy consumption. This paper describes methods of improving glass walls thermal...

  10. Method and apparatus for coupling seismic sensors to a borehole wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2005-03-15

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  11. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  12. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  13. Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

  14. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis This report considers a...

  15. Transglucosylation of cell wall polysaccharides in equisetum fluviatile. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohler, Kyle Edward

    2012-06-22

    Plant cell walls determine cellular shape and provide structural support for the entire plant. Polysaccharides, comprising the major components of the wall, are actively remodelled throughout development. Xyloglucan ...

  16. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

  17. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matsui, Hiroshi (Glen Rock, NJ); Matsunaga, Tadashi (Tokyo, JP)

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  18. Structure and magnetic properties of low-temperature phase Mn-Bi nanosheets with ultra-high coercivity and significant anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Rongming, E-mail: rmliu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: shenbg@iphy.ac.cn; Zhang, Ming; Niu, E; Li, Zhubai; Zheng, Xinqi; Wu, Rongrong; Zuo, Wenliang; Shen, Baogen; Hu, Fengxia; Sun, Jirong [State Key Laboratory for Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-05-07

    The microstructure, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of low-temperature phase (LTP) Mn-Bi nanosheets, prepared by surfactant assistant high-energy ball milling (SA-HEBM) with oleylamine and oleic acid as the surfactant, were examined with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer, respectively. Effect of ball-milling time on the coercivity of LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets was systematically investigated. Results show that the high energy ball milling time from tens of minutes to several hours results in the coercivity increase of Mn-Bi powders and peak values of 14.3 kOe around 10 h. LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets are characterized by an average thickness of tens of nanometers, an average diameter of ?1.5??m, and possess a relatively large aspect ratio, an ultra-high room temperature coercivity of 22.3 kOe, a significant geometrical and magnetic anisotropy, and a strong (00l) crystal texture. Magnetization and demagnetization behaviors reveal that wall pinning is the dominant coercivity mechanism in these LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets. The ultrafine grain refinement introduced by the SA-HEBM process contribute to the ultra-high coercivity of LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets and a large number of defects put a powerful pinning effect on the magnetic domain movement, simultaneously. Further magnetic measurement at 437?K shows that a high coercivity of 17.8 kOe and a strong positive temperature coefficient of coercivity existed in the bonded permanent magnet made by LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets.

  19. A SURVEY OF WALL'S FINITENESS OBSTRUCTION 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferry, Steve; Ranicki, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Wall's finiteness obstruction is an algebraic K-theory invariant which decides if a finitely dominated space is homotopy equivalent to a finite CW complex. The invariant was originally formulated in the context of surgery ...

  20. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01

    's ability to dry is not considered during the design or material selection process. No cladding system or installation is perfect, therefore wall systems should be designed with the assumption that some moisture will enter and then consider the effects...

  1. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  2. Numerical solution of eddy current problems in bounded domains using realistic boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Rodolfo

    Numerical solution of eddy current problems in bounded domains using realistic boundary conditions-called eddy currents. The problem is formulated in terms of the magnetic field. This formulation in a metallurgical arc furnace. Key words: low-frequency harmonic Maxwell equations, eddy current problems, finite

  3. Chaotic Transitions in Wall Following Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry W. Bullen IV; Priya Ranjan

    2009-08-25

    In this paper we examine how simple agents similar to Braitenberg vehicles can exhibit chaotic movement patterns. The agents are wall following robots as described by Steve Mesburger and Alfred Hubler in their paper "Chaos in Wall Following Robots". These agents uses a simple forward facing distance sensor, with a limited field of view "phi" for navigation. An agent drives forward at a constant velocity and uses the sensor to turn right when it is too close to an object and left when it is too far away. For a flat wall the agent stays a fixed distance from the wall and travels along it, regardless of the sensor's capabilities. But, if the wall represents a periodic function, the agent drives on a periodic path when the sensor has a narrow field of view. The agent's trajectory transitions to chaos when the sensor's field of view is increased. Numerical experiments were performed with square, triangle, and sawtooth waves for the wall, to find this pattern. The bifurcations of the agents were analyzed, finding both border collision and period doubling bifurcations. Detailed experimental results will be reported separately.

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures – In-situ TEM Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Xiaoqing

    2015-06-30

    The goal of this project was to explore the structure and dynamic behaviors of ferroelectric domains in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques in close collaboration with phase field modeling. The experimental techniques used include aberration-corrected sub-Å resolution TEM and in-situ TEM using a novel scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) - TEM holder that allows the direct observation of nucleation and dynamic evolution of ferroelectric domains under applied electric field. Specifically, this project was aimed to (1) to study the roles of static electrical boundary conditions and electrical charge in controlling the equilibrium domain structures of BiFeO3 thin films with controlled substrate constraints, (2) to explore the fundamental mechanisms of ferroelectric domain nucleation, growth, and switching under an applied electric field in both uniform thin films and nanostructures, and to understand the roles of crystal defects such as dislocations and interfaces in these processes, (3) to understand the physics of ferroelectric domain walls and the influence of defects on the electrical switching of ferroelectric domains.

  5. Acoustic Attenuation Employing Variable Wall Admittance H. T. Banks K. M. Furati y K. Ito N. S. Luke C. J. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    satis#12;es the acoustic wave equation p #28;#28; c 2 r 2 p = 0; (2.1) and pressure and velocity: An acoustic array in half plane acoustic domain. The interaction of waves with the boundary is describedAcoustic Attenuation Employing Variable Wall Admittance H. T. Banks #3; K. M. Furati #3;y K. Ito #3

  6. Performance Assessment Report Domain CHP System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Performance Assessment Report for the Domain CHP System November 2005 By Burns & McDonnell Engineering #12;Domain CHP System Performance Assessment Report for the Packaged Cooling, Heating and Power

  7. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references.

  8. Poster: Measuring the Lifecycles of Malicious Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kang

    the lifecycles of malicious domain names will provide insight into the many classes of criminal networks- measures such as blacklisting. Fast-flux is characterized by domain name records with low (time other types of criminal networks abuse the DNS and leverage domain names to provide agility

  9. Domain embedding preconditioners for mixed systems 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winther, Ragnar

    Domain embedding preconditioners for mixed systems 1 Torgeir Rusten SINTEF, P. O. Box 124 Blindern preconditioners for the corresponding discrete linear systems where an embedding of the domain papers discussing domain embedding as a tool for solving discrete systems we refer to Astrakhantsev [4

  10. Labelling Heuristics for CSP Application Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Francesca

    Labelling Heuristics for CSP Application Domains Zeynep K#16;z#16;ltan Computer Science Division an application domain as a family of CSP models, so as to exhibit the generic constraint store for all models store and the domain propagation during search is analysed, so as to infer | before modelling any CSP

  11. 2007,KevinSkadron Implications of the Power Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    ©2007,KevinSkadron Implications of the Power Wall in a Manycore Era Sustaining Growth in Computing cost #12;5 ©2007,KevinSkadron Barriers to Performance Growth (2) · Power wall, ILP wall, and slow is a paradigm shift for parallel programming · Power wall will eventually constrain multicore too ­ If power per

  12. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, D. P. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Finn, J. M. [Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite ? and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for ??=?0 and the marginal stability values ?{sub rp,rw}?wall; resistive plasma, ideal wall; ideal plasma, resistive wall; and ideal plasma, ideal wall) are computed for both models. The main results are: (a) imaginary gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below ?{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above ?{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with ??>??{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below ?{sub rp,iw}.

  13. Domain architecture evolution of pattern-recognition receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qing; Zmasek, Christian M.; Godzik, Adam

    2010-01-01

    1 ORIGINAL PAPER Domain architecture evolution of pattern-in the same domain architectures evolving independentlythe choices of domain architectures for new members in the

  14. Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling and Simulation of Surface and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling and Simulation of Surface and Embedded NPPS Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling and Simulation of Surface and Embedded NPPS Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling...

  15. Time-dependent Maxwell field operators and field energy density for an atom near a conducting wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Vasile; R. Messina; R. Passante

    2009-03-18

    We consider the time evolution of the electric and magnetic field operators for a two-level atom, interacting with the electromagnetic field, placed near an infinite perfectly conducting wall. We solve iteratively the Heisenberg equations for the field operators and obtain the electric and magnetic energy density operators around the atom (valid for any initial state). Then we explicitly evaluate them for an initial state with the atom in its bare ground state and the field in the vacuum state. We show that the results can be physically interpreted as the superposition of the fields propagating directly from the atom and the fields reflected on the wall. Relativistic causality in the field propagation is discussed. Finally we apply these results to the calculation of the dynamical Casimir-Polder interaction energy in the far zone between two atoms when a boundary condition such as a conducting wall is present. Magnetic contributions to the interatomic Casimir-Polder interaction in the presence of the wall are also considered. We show that, in the limit of large times, the known results of the stationary case are recovered.

  16. Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-04

    Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

  17. Pattern-Oriented Application Frameworks for Domain Experts to Effectively Utilize Highly Parallel Manycore Microprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Jike

    2010-01-01

    scaling challenges: 1. “Power Wall”: Although power is ato mitigate the “Power Wall”. The manycore architecturelimited. Summary The “Power Wall”, “Memory Wall” and “ILP

  18. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  19. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  20. Cell Wall Recipe: A Lesson on Biofuels

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will investigate how changes in the DNA sequence that codes for cell wall formation can have a favorable outcome in producing plants that have higher levels of cellulose than the parent plant. The cellulose yield is most important in the production of ethanol: the greater the amount of cellulose within the cell wall, the greater the amount of ethanol that can be produced. To engage students, the first part of this lesson has students participating in a discovery activity where they will extract DNA from wheat germ.

  1. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, Scott D. (Broomfield, CO); Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  2. Magnet Cable Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royet, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    J. Royet, "Magnet Cable Manufacturing", oral presentation atDivision Magnet Cable Manufacturing J. Royet October 1990J I Magnet Cable Manufacturing* John Royet Accelerator &

  3. Ionic field effect and memristive phenomena in single-point ferroelectric domain switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ievlev, Anton; Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Electric field induced polarization switching underpins most functional applications of ferroelectric materials in information technology, materials science, and optoelectronics. In the last 20 years, much attention has been focused on the switching of individual domains using scanning probe microscopy, both as model of ferroelectric data storage and approach to explore fundamental physics of ferroelectric switching. The classical picture of tip induced switching includes formation of cylindrical domain oriented along the tip field, with the domain size is largely determined by the tip-induced field distribution and domain wall motion kinetics. The polarization screening is recognized as a necessary precondition to the stability of ferroelectric phase; however, screening processes are generally considered to be uniformly efficient and not leading to changes in switching behavior. Here, we demonstrate that single-point tip-induced polarization switching can give rise to a surprisingly broad range of domain morphologies, including radial and angular instabilities. These behaviors are traced to the surface screening charge dynamics, which in some cases can even give rise to anomalous switching against the electric field (ionic field effect). The implications of these behaviors for ferroelectric materials and devices are discussed.

  4. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of ?-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single ?-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domainsmore »on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.« less

  5. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

    2010-10-26

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotube, SWNT(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Technology Roadmap, Journal of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, Vol. 110, No. 1067 (2007). (2 1 c-e 97 % (5) *1 *1 *2 *2 *2 *2 *2 *2 Scattering Process of Transmitted Gas Molecules through process of gas molecules on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (VA-SWNT) films

  7. 2004 11 -2-(Single-Walled Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    ~~ 2004 11 -2- 1. (Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, SWNTs) 13 nm [1] SWNT van Hove [1 SWNT TEM 0.83 nm 2.0 nm SWNT MWNT SWNT 5(a) [11] 5(b) SWNT 1 nm SWNT [12] #12; 2004., Physical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes, Imperial College Press, London, 1998. (2004). [2] S. Maruyama et

  8. Liquid Walls Innovative High Power Density Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    erosion as limiting factors -Results in smaller and lower cost components (chambLiquid Walls Innovative High Power Density Concepts (Based on the APEX Study) http for the Chamber Technology that can: 1. Improve the vision for an attractive fusion energy system 2. Lower

  9. Program Induction: Building a Wall Dan Ashlock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashlock, Dan

    moving off of the grid are lost. A s a wall out of blocks that impede progress in one direction across a grid of squares. Specifically, two at a time in a fixed location on the grid. The robot must move the currently presented block to enable

  10. CHALLENGE 2015 WALL OF WIND MITIGATION CHALLENGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    with the development of the building model. Is wind mitigation being addressed by your solution? What is wind science, sociology, and urban planning when discussing wind mitigation and your solution. WrittenW W! CHALLENGE 2015 WALL OF WIND MITIGATION CHALLENGE Competition at FIU's Engineering & Computing

  11. Magnetic Stereoscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester

    2006-12-21

    The space mission STEREO will provide images from two viewpoints. An important aim of the STEREO mission is to get a 3D view of the solar corona. We develop a program for the stereoscopic reconstruction of 3D coronal loops from images taken with the two STEREO spacecraft. A pure geometric triangulation of coronal features leads to ambiguities because the dilute plasma emissions complicates the association of features in image 1 with features in image 2. As a consequence of these problems the stereoscopic reconstruction is not unique and multiple solutions occur. We demonstrate how these ambiguities can be resolved with the help of different coronal magnetic field models (potential, linear and non-linear force-free fields). The idea is that, due to the high conductivity in the coronal plasma, the emitting plasma outlines the magnetic field lines. Consequently the 3D coronal magnetic field provides a proxy for the stereoscopy which allows to eliminate inconsistent configurations. The combination of stereoscopy and magnetic modelling is more powerful than one of these tools alone. We test our method with the help of a model active region and plan to apply it to the solar case as soon as STEREO data become available.

  12. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  13. Low-temperature magnetic properties of greigite (Fe3S4) Liao Chang and Andrew P. Roberts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Low-temperature magnetic properties of greigite (Fe3S4) Liao Chang and Andrew P. Roberts National 115, Taiwan [1] We provide comprehensive low-temperature magnetic results for greigite (Fe3S4) across no low- temperature magnetic transitions, but we also document that it has strong domain-state dependence

  14. Remarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    rrr ×= BJF rrr ×= BJF rrr ×= BJF rrr ×= J r V r+- g r B r J r #12;· Magnetic Propulsion Liquid Metal Forces" · Gravity-Momentum Drive (GMD) · GMD with Swirl Flow · Electromagnetically Restrained · Magnetic Propulsion Plasma-Liquid Interface · Fluids with low vapor pressure at high temperature (e.g. Sn

  15. Detecting Networks Employing Algorithmically Generated Domain Names 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashwath Kumar Krishna Reddy

    2011-10-21

    , current botnets use simple pseudo-random generators which may not preserve the distribution of alphabets or bigrams (two consecutive alphabets) as usually occur in legitimate domain name strings. In this regards, we propose several metrics to classify a... generates. For instance, in the extreme scenario that a botnet generates 50 domains mapped to the same TLD, we show that KL-divergence over unigrams achieves 100% detection accuracy albeit at 15% false positive rate (legitimate domain groups clas- 7 si ed...

  16. Standard guide for mutual inductance bridge applications for wall thickness determinations in boiler tubing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes a procedure for obtaining relative wall thickness indications in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic steels using the mutual inductance bridge method. The procedure is intended for use with instruments capable of inducing two substantially identical magnetic fields and noting the change in inductance resulting from differing amounts of steel. It is used to distinguish acceptable wall thickness conditions from those which could place tubular vessels or piping at risk of bursting under high temperature and pressure conditions. 1.2 This guide is intended to satisfy two general needs for users of industrial Mutual Inductance Bridge (MIB) equipment: (1) the need for a tutorial guide addressing the general principles of Mutual Inductance Bridges as they apply to industrial piping; and (2) the need for a consistent set of MIB performance parameter definitions, including how these performance parameters relate to MIB system specifications. Potential users and buyers, as well as experienced M...

  17. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0?57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  18. Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology Justin Coleman, P.E. Nuclear Science and Technology Idaho National Laboratory October 22, 2014

  19. Integral Domains Inside Noetherian Power Series Rings ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-05-21

    Another theme is an analysis of extensions of integral domains R ?? S ...... TOOLS. Flatness is preserved by several standard ring constructions as we record in.

  20. Regional characteristics, tilt domains, and extensional history...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report Number 303 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional characteristics, tilt domains, and extensional history of the...

  1. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  2. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowring, D.L.; DeMello, A.J.; Lambert, A.R.; Li, D.; Virostek,, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R.B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  3. Inversion of marine magnetic anomalies by deconvolution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry, Dennis Lee

    1983-01-01

    magnetization, j(x), with a transfer function, g(x), which is dependant upon the location and orientation of the anomaly profile and the ridge axis relative to the earth's present magnetic field [Bott, 1967]. This is expressed as f(x) f g(x-C) ](C) d0... and Cox, 1972]. The inversion procedure used is to; 1) Numerically transform f(x) into the wavenumber domain, 2) Divide F(k) by the analytical expression for G(k) to obtain J(k), 3) Numerically inverse transform J(k) to obtain J(x). The normalized...

  4. Interaction between Drilled Shaft and Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghahadi Forooshani, Mohammad

    2014-08-28

    Drilled shafts under horizontal loads are being constructed within Mechanically Stabled Earth (MSE) walls in the reinforced zone especially in overpass bridges and traffic signs. The interaction between the drilled shafts and the MSE wall...

  5. Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites Z. Ounaiesa of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) reinforced polyimide composites were investigated as a function nanotube; Composites 1. Introduction Polyimides are widely used in applications ranging from

  6. After Exodus : re-occupation of the metropolitan wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, Jordan Lloyd Norman

    2012-01-01

    The title "Exodus alludes to a restricted exclave encircled by a forbidding wall -- effect, a prison on the scale of a metropolis, and one in which people sought refuge voluntarily. Over the past forty years, similar walls ...

  7. Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01

    Hazard volatilization emitted from walls enters into airflow in the room, making the indoor air quality worse. An exterior wall of some thickness is affected on its surface by the outdoor air environment. In this paper, ...

  8. DESIGN OF A TOKAMAK FUSION REACTOR FIRST WALL ARMOR AGAINST NEUTRAL BEAM IMPINGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Richard Allen

    2011-01-01

    exceed that of fusion power reactors for wall loadings up toplasma. The vessel wall temperatures in power reactors isfor· the first wall of fusion power reactors. However, for

  9. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowring, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    ON A CAVITY WITH BERYLLIUM WALLS FOR MUON IONIZATION COOLINGFabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigatepillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate

  10. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  11. Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  12. Diary of a domain analyst: a domain analysis case-study from avionics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    . In this paper, we describe a domain analysis case-study in the domain of aero-engine systems. The principle-STUDY: AERO-ENGINE STARTING SYSTEMS We chose aero-engine starting systems as the domain to be analysed, taking

  13. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howson, P.E.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-08-06

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  14. Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBXM 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBX­M 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University; OUTLINE 1. Mini­conference on Lithium walls and low recycling regime. 2. PBX­M Capabilities. 3. Motivation "Lithium covered walls and low recycling regimes in toka­ maks". APS meeting, October 23­27, 2000, Quebec

  15. Patterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -increasing demands in data storage and to new applications of magnetic devices in the field of sensors. NewPatterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks STEPHEN Y. CHOU Invited Paper, opens up new opportunities for engineering innovative magnetic materials and devices, developing ultra

  16. NATIONAL PLAN TO ACHIEVE MARITIME DOMAIN AWARENESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    NATIONAL PLAN TO ACHIEVE MARITIME DOMAIN AWARENESS FOR THE NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR MARITIME SECURITY OCTOBER 2005 #12;National Strategy for Maritime Security: National Plan to Achieve Maritime Domain Awareness i FOREWORD By signing National Security Presidential Directive-41/Homeland Security Presidential

  17. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-09-22

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

  18. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA); Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Kirbie, Hugh C. (Dublin, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  19. Soft wall model for a holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Afonin; I. V. Pusenkov

    2015-06-17

    We apply the soft wall holographic model from hadron physics to a description of the high-$T_c$ superconductivity. In comparison with the existing bottom-up holographic superconductors, the proposed approach is more phenomenological. On the other hand, it is much simpler and has more freedom for fitting the conductivity properties of the real high-$T_c$ materials. We demonstrate some examples of emerging models and discuss a possible origin of the approach.

  20. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  1. Soft wall model for a holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afonin, S S

    2015-01-01

    We apply the soft wall holographic model from hadron physics to a description of the high-$T_c$ superconductivity. In comparison with the existing bottom-up holographic superconductors, the proposed approach is more phenomenological. On the other hand, it is much simpler and has more freedom for fitting the conductivity properties of the real high-$T_c$ materials. We demonstrate some examples of emerging models and discuss a possible origin of the approach.

  2. Protective interior wall and attach8ing means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, Richard D. (Greeley, CO); Upham, Gerald A. (Valley Center, CA); Anderson, Paul M. (San Diego, CA)

    1988-01-01

    An array of connected plates mounted on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel of a magnetic confinement reactor in order to provide a protective surface for energy deposition inside the vessel. All fasteners are concealed and protected beneath the plates, while the plates themselves share common mounting points. The entire array is installed with torqued nuts on threaded studs; provision also exists for thermal expansion by mounting each plate with two of its four mounts captured in an oversize grooved spool. A spool-washer mounting hardware allows one edge of a protective plate to be torqued while the other side remains loose, by simply inverting the spool-washer hardware.

  3. Spontaneous Liquid Crystal and Ferromagnetic Ordering of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoplates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Shuai; Arthur Klittnick; Yongqiang Shen; Gregory P. Smith; Michael R. Tuchband; Chenhui Zhu; Rolfe G. Petschek; Alenka Mertelj; Darja Lisjak; Martin ?opi?; Joseph E. Maclennan; Matthew A. Glaser; Noel A. Clark

    2015-10-07

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magneto-mechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates which spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, including liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth's magnetic field.

  4. Inverse magnetic catalysis in holographic models of QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiminad A. Mamo

    2015-05-11

    We study the effect of magnetic field $B$ on the critical temperature $T_{c}$ of the confinement-deconfinement phase transition in hard-wall AdS/QCD, and holographic duals of flavored and unflavored $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang Mills theories on $\\mathbb{R}^3\\times \\rm S^1$. For all of the holographic models, we find that $T_{c}(B)$ decreases with increasing magnetic field $B\\ll T^2$, consistent with the inverse magnetic catalysis recently observed in lattice QCD for $B\\lesssim 1~GeV^2$. We also predict that, for large magnetic field $B\\gg T^2$, the critical temperature $T_{c}(B)$, eventually, starts to increase with increasing magnetic field $B\\gg T^2$ and asymptotes to a constant value.

  5. Cutting assembly including expanding wall segments of auger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treuhaft, Martin B. (San Antonio, TX); Oser, Michael S. (San Antonio, TX)

    1983-01-01

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  6. Local domain structure of exchange-coupled NiFe/CoO nanowire probed by nonlocal spin valve measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otani, Yoshichika

    Local domain structure of exchange-coupled NiFe/CoO nanowire probed by nonlocal spin valve magnetization process in a 100-nm-wide Permalloy/CoO exchange-coupled wire by means of nonlocal spin valve valve structures.1 This phenomenon is described by the Meiklejohn­Bean model, which is based

  7. Ordered Mesoporous CMK-5 Carbon with Ultra-Thin Pore Walls and Highly Dispersed Nickel Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulvio, Pawquale F; Liang, Chengdu; Dai, Sheng; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2009-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous CMK-5 carbons with ultra-thin carbon pore walls and highly dispersed Ni nanoparticles have been successfully prepared by using two different SBA-15 silicas as hard templates and 2, 3-di-hydroxynaphtalene (DHN) as a carbon precursor. The nickel precursor was a concentrated nickel nitrate hexahydrate [Ni(NO3)2.6H2O] solution in isopropanol added to the carbon-silica nanocomposites prior to thermal treatments. The samples studied were analyzed by thermogravimetry (TG), nitrogen adsorption at -196 C, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and in situ electron diffraction X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). While TG revealed carbon contents lower than 30 wt%, nitrogen adsorption provided information about homogeneity of carbon thin film deposited onto mesopore walls of ordered silica templates, SBA-15. The templates, carbon-silica nanocomposites and carbon inverse replicas with nickel nanoparticles exhibited uniform pores, high surface areas and large pore volumes. Graphitic carbon was identified by the presence of a characteristic G band on Raman spectra, whereas the diffraction peak attributed to the stacking of graphene planes was not observed by powder XRD.The presence of ordered domains in the carbon materials studied was confirmed by small angle XRD and STEM imaging. In addition, the STEM images revealed that the nickel nanoparticles were uniform in size, ~3nm, and were homogeneously dispersed within ordered tubular carbon walls. A few larger clusters of nickel, ~60nm, present on the external surface, were identified by powder XRD as metallic Ni. The in situ EDX revealed that the small nanoparticles were largely composed of Ni with traces of NiO. Similar nanoparticles dispersions have been reported only for Ni-containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), whereas previously reported ordered mesoporous carbons possessed larger Ni/NiO nanoparticles within CMK-3 nanostructure.

  8. Ar/Ar ages from transitionally magnetized lavas on La Palma, Canary Islands, and the geomagnetic instability timescale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Bradley S.

    Ar/Ar ages from transitionally magnetized lavas on La Palma, Canary Islands, and the geomagnetic the north and south walls of Barranco de los Tilos on the island of La Palma, Canary Islands, reveals from transitionally magnetized lavas on La Palma, Canary Islands, and the geomagnetic instability

  9. The role of Z-pinches and related configurations in magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1997-07-10

    The use of a magnetic field within a fusion target is now known as Magnetized Target Fusion in the US and as MAGO (Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) in Russia. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (e.g., ICF), MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm, magnetized, wall-confined plasma of intermediate density within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression and heating of the plasma by imploding the confining wall, or pusher. In many ways, MTF can be considered a marriage between the more mature MFE and ICF approaches, and this marriage potentially eliminates some of the hurdles encountered in the other approaches. When compared to ICF, MTF requires lower implosion velocity, lower initial density, significantly lower radial convergence, and larger targets, all of which lead to substantially reduced driver intensity, power, and symmetry requirements. When compared to MFE, MTF does not require a vacuum separating the plasma from the wall, and, in fact, complete magnetic confinement, even if possible, may not be desirable. The higher density of MTF and much shorter confinement times should make magnetized plasma formation a much less difficult step than in MFE. The substantially lower driver requirements and implosion velocity of MTF make z-pinch magnetically driven liners, magnetically imploded by existing modern pulsed power electrical current sources, a leading candidate for the target pusher of an MTF system.

  10. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    Superconducting Magnet Division Permanent Magnet Designs with Large Variations in Field Strength the residual field of the magnetized bricks by concentrating flux lines at the iron pole. Low Field Design Medium Field Design Superconducting Magnet Division Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets for RHIC e

  11. Superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  12. Magnetic flux concentrations from turbulent stratified convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Käpylä, P J; Kleeorin, N; Käpylä, M J; Rogachevskii, I

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) Context: The mechanisms that cause the formation of sunspots are still unclear. Aims: We study the self-organisation of initially uniform sub-equipartition magnetic fields by highly stratified turbulent convection. Methods: We perform simulations of magnetoconvection in Cartesian domains that are $8.5$-$24$ Mm deep and $34$-$96$ Mm wide. We impose either a vertical or a horizontal uniform magnetic field in a convection-driven turbulent flow. Results: We find that super-equipartition magnetic flux concentrations are formed near the surface with domain depths of $12.5$ and $24$ Mm. The size of the concentrations increases as the box size increases and the largest structures ($20$ Mm horizontally) are obtained in the 24 Mm deep models. The field strength in the concentrations is in the range of $3$-$5$ kG. The concentrations grow approximately linearly in time. The effective magnetic pressure measured in the simulations is positive near the surface and negative in the bulk of the convection zone. Its ...

  13. Localized Domains of Disoriented Chiral Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; B. Mohanty; D. P. Mahapatra; Y. P. Viyogi

    1999-03-12

    A new method to search for localized domains of disoriented chiral condensates (DCC) has been proposed by utilising the (eta-phi) phase space distributions of charged particles and photons. Using the discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) analysis technique, it has been found that the presence of DCC domains broadens the distribution of wavelet coefficients in comparison to that of normal events. Strength contours have been derived from the differences in rms deviations of these distributions by taking into account the size of DCC domains and the probability of DCC production in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. This technique can be suitably adopted to experiments measuring multiplicities of charged particles and photons.

  14. Bijels Containing Magnetic Particles: A Simulation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kim; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates

    2011-01-17

    Bicontinuous, interfacially jammed emulsion gels (bijels) represent a class of soft solid materials in which interpenetrating domains of two immiscible fluids are stabilized by an interfacial colloidal monolayer. Such structures can be formed by arrested spinodal decomposition from an initially single-phase colloidal suspension. Here we explore by lattice Boltzmann simulation the possible effects of using magnetic colloids in bijels. This may allow additional control over the structure, during or after formation, by application of a magnetic field or field gradient. These effects are modest for typical parameters based on the magnetic nanoparticles used in conventional ferrofluids, although significantly larger particles might be appropriate here. Field gradient effects, which are cumulative across a sample, could then allow a route for controlled breakdown of bijels as they do for particle-stabilized droplet emulsions.

  15. Learning Energy Demand Domain Knowledge via Feature Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    -- Domain knowledge is an essential factor for forecasting energy demand. This paper introduces a method knowledge substantially improves energy demand forecasting accuracy. However, domain knowledge may differ. The first stage automatically captures energy demand forecasting domain knowledge through nonlinear

  16. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  17. Living Walls | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds, UnitedLibertyLite On TechnologyCornLiuzhouLiving Walls

  18. Nanostructured magnetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

  19. Domain Decomposition Methods for a Complementarity Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    Domain Decomposition Methods for a Complementarity Problem Haijian Yang1 and Xiao-Chuan Cai2 1 under grants CCF-0634894 and CNS-0722023. 1 #12;2 Haijian Yang and Xiao-Chuan Cai with partial

  20. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technique with photons of light that have wavelengths a billion times smaller than radio waves in order to study their domain motion. By using these soft x rays generated at...

  1. Transmission eigenvalues for strictly concave domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgi Vodev

    2015-01-05

    We prove that for strictly concave domains much larger transmission eigenvalue-free regions exist. As a consequence, we get Weyl asymptotics for the total counting function with an almost optimal remainder term.

  2. Antiferromagnetic domain size and exchange bias 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Lederman, D.; Cheon, M.; Shi, H.; Olamit, J.; Roshchin, Igor V.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2008-01-01

    Using neutron diffraction, we measured the sizes of antiferromagnetic domains in three ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayer samples as a function of the magnitude and sign of exchange bias, temperature, and antiferromagnet composition. Neutron...

  3. Zeros of Eigenfunctions of the Schrodinger Operator on Graphs and Their Relation to the Spectrum of the Magnetic Schrodinger Operator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weyand, Tracy Kathleen

    2014-07-07

    on infinite periodic graphs by analyzing the eigenvalues of the magnetic Schrödinger operator on a fundamental domain. Here we consider both discrete and quantum graphs. We find a characterization of critical points of the dispersion relation that occur inside...

  4. Thermal performance of steel-framed walls. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, E. [NAHB Research Center, Inc., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Goodrow, J. [Holometrix, Inc., Bedford, MA (United States); Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-11-21

    In wall construction, highly conductive members spaced along the wall, which allow higher heat transfer than that through less conductive areas, are referred to as thermal bridges. Thermal bridges in walls tend to increase heat loss and, under certain adverse conditions, can cause dust streaking (``ghosting``) on interior walls over studs due to temperature differentials, as well as condensation in and on walls. Although such adverse conditions can be easily avoided by proper thermal design of wall systems, these effects have not been well understood and thermal data has been lacking. Therefore, the present study was initiated to provide (1) a better understanding of the thermal behavior of steel-framed walls, (2) a set of R-values for typical wall constructions, and (3) information that could be used to develop improved methods of predicting R-values. An improved method for estimating R-value would allow an equitable comparison of thermal performance with other construction types and materials. This would increase the number of alternative materials for walls available to designers, thus allowing them to choose the optimum choice for construction. Twenty-three wall samples were tested in a calibrated hot box (ASTM C9761) to measure the thermal performance of steel-framed wall systems. The tests included an array of stud frame configurations, exterior sheathing and fiberglass batt insulations. Other studies have not included the use of insulating sheathing, which reduces the extent of the thermal bridges and improves total thermal performance. The purpose of the project was to provide measured R-values for commonly used steel-framed wall configurations and to improve R-value estimating methods. Test results were compared to R-value estimates using the parallel path method, the isothermal planes method and the ASHRAE Zone method. The comparison showed that the known procedures do not fully account for the three-dimensional effects created by steel framing in a wall.

  5. Frequency domain design of interval controller 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Wunyong

    1993-01-01

    Subject: Electrical Engineering FREQUENCY DOMAIN DFSIGN OF INTERVAL CONTROLLER A Thesis by WUNYONG PARK Approved as to style and content by: S. P. Bhattacharyyd (Chair of Committee) C. N. Georghiades (Member) A. Datta (Member) S. Jayasuriya... (Member) . H. Keel (Member) A. Patton (Head of Department) May 1993 111 ABSTRACT Frequency Domain Design of Interval Controller. (May 1993) Wunyong Park, B. S. , Yon Sei University; M. S. , Yon Sei University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. S...

  6. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur 782 402 (India)] [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur 782 402 (India)

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup ?4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (?pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  7. Mechanism of Synthesis of Ultra-Long Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keidar, Michael

    2013-06-23

    In this project fundamental issues related to synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which is relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics were investigated. Given that among plasma-based techniques arc discharge stands out as very advantageous in several ways (fewer defects, high flexibility, longer lifetime) this techniques warrants attention from the plasma physics and plasma technology standpoint. Both experimental and theoretical investigations of the plasma and SWNTs synthesis were conducted. Experimental efforts focused on plasma diagnostics, measurements of nanostructures parameters, and nanoparticle characterization. Theoretical efforts focused to focus on multi-dimensional modeling of the arc discharge and single wall nanotube synthesis in arc plasmas. It was demonstrated in experiment and theoretically that controlling plasma parameters can affect nanostucture synthesis altering SWNT properties (length and diameter) and leading to synthesis of new structures such as a few-layer graphene. Among clearly identified parameters affecting synthesis are magnetic and electric fields. Knowledge of the plasma parameters and discharge characteristics is crucial for ability to control synthesis process by virtue of both magnetic and electric fields. New graduate course on plasma engineering was introduced into curriculum. 3 undergraduate students were attracted to the project and 3 graduate students (two are female) were involved in the project. Undergraduate student from Historically Black University was attracted and participated in the project during Summer 2010.

  8. Structured hints : extracting and abstracting domain expertise.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hereld, M.; Stevens, R.; Sterling, T.; Gao, G. R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; California Inst. of Tech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ. of Delaware

    2009-03-16

    We propose a new framework for providing information to help optimize domain-specific application codes. Its design addresses problems that derive from the widening gap between the domain problem statement by domain experts and the architectural details of new and future high-end computing systems. The design is particularly well suited to program execution models that incorporate dynamic adaptive methodologies for live tuning of program performance and resource utilization. This new framework, which we call 'structured hints', couples a vocabulary of annotations to a suite of performance metrics. The immediate target is development of a process by which a domain expert describes characteristics of objects and methods in the application code that would not be readily apparent to the compiler; the domain expert provides further information about what quantities might provide the best indications of desirable effect; and the interactive preprocessor identifies potential opportunities for the domain expert to evaluate. Our development of these ideas is progressing in stages from case study, through manual implementation, to automatic or semi-automatic implementation. In this paper we discuss results from our case study, an examination of a large simulation of a neural network modeled after the neocortex.

  9. arXiv:1205.2327v1[math.AP]10May2012 Impact of strong magnetic fields on collision mechanism for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fusion is achieved by magnetic confinement i.e., the plasma is confined into a toroidal domain (tokamak of magnetic confinement. We investigate both first and second order asymptotic approxima- tions, when properties hold true. Motivated by the magnetic fusion, many research programs in plasma physics concern

  10. Direct Visualization of Magnetoelectric Domains | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    image of ferroelectric domains in hexagonal erbium manganite. Image size: 16 x 16 m2. Blue (red) color denotes domains with up (down) electric polarization. Right:...

  11. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain...

  12. Magnets and Power Supplies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power...

  13. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

  14. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE MEASURE OF THE FUNCTIONALITY OF FRAME WALLS ENHANCED WITH PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evers, Angela C.

    2008-07-25

    Frame walls enhanced with phase change materials (paraffin-based, hydrated salt-based, and eutectic) mixed in cellulose insulation were developed and tested. The frame walls were heated and allowed to cool in a dynamic wall simulator that replicated...

  16. Thermal Performance of Uninsulated and Partially Filled Wall Cavities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

    2011-08-01

    Low-rise, wood-framed homes are the most common type of residential structures in the United States. Wood wall construction supports roofs efficiently and provides a stable frame for attaching interior and exterior wall coverings. Wall cavities are prevalent and increase thermal resistance, particularly when they are filled with insulating material. This paper describes detailed computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially filled wall cavities and accounts for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. Parameters are ambient outdoor temperature, cavity surface emissivity, cavity aspect ratio, and insulation height. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially insulated wall cavities is essential for conserving energy in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of new and older homes with uninsulated or partially insulated walls.

  17. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  18. Spectroscopic investigation of heavy impurity behaviour during ICRH with the JET ITER-like wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czarnecka, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Hery 23 Str., 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Bobkov, V.; Maggi, C.; Pütterich, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Coffey, I. H. [Department of Physics, Queen's University, Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jacquet, P.; Lawson, K. D. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D. [Association EURATOM - Belgian State, ERM-KMS, TEC Partner (Belgium); Mayoral, M.-L. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK and EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    Magnetically confined plasmas, such as those produced in the tokamak JET, contain measurable amounts of impurity ions produced during plasma-wall interactions (PWI) from the plasma-facing components and recessed wall areas. The impurities, including high- and mid-Z elements such as tungsten (W) from first wall tiles and nickel (Ni) from Inconel structure material, need to be controlled within tolerable limits, to ensure they do not significantly affect the performance of the plasma. This contribution focuses on documenting W and Ni impurity behavior during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) operation with the new ITER-Like Wall (ILW). Ni- and W-concentration were derived from VUV spectroscopy and the impact of applied power level, relative phasing of the antenna straps, plasma separatrix - antenna strap distance, IC resonance position, edge density and different plasma configuration, on the impurity release during ICRH are presented. For the same ICRH power the Ni and W concentration was lower with dipole phasing than in the case of ??/2 phasing. The Ni concentration was found to increase with ICRH power and for the same NBI power level, ICRH-heated plasmas were characterized by two times higher Ni impurity content. Both W and Ni concentrations increased strongly with decreasing edge density which is equivalent to higher edge electron temperatures and more energetic ions responsible for the sputtering. In either case higher levels were found in ICRH than in NBI heated discharges. When the central plasma temperature was similar, ICRH on-axis heating resulted in higher core Ni impurity concentration in comparison to off-axis ICRH in L-mode. It was also found that the main core radiation during ICRH came from W.

  19. Perspective Systems in Roman Second Style Wall-painting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stinson, Philip T.

    2011-07-01

    Perspective Systems in Roman Second Style Wall Painting PHILIP STINSON Abstract There is still much to be learned about architectural perspective from the study of Roman wall paintings dat- ing to the first century B.C.E. This article... demonstrates that Second Style wall paintings of houses and villas in Rome and Campania hold evidence for different types of perspective: convergence perspective and parallel perspective. A special variation involves multiple systems of convergence...

  20. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P. (5239 Miles Ave., Apt. A, Oakland, CA 94618); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (1195 Keeler Ave., Berkeley, CA 94708)

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  1. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of...

  2. Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

  3. Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  4. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C.

    2009-03-15

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  5. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  6. The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses in material bottles coated with deuterated polystryene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The...

  7. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    building science.com 2009 Building Science Press All rights of reproduction in any form reserved. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis...

  8. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01

    combined elements of structural design, testing andcontrol and design of structural and nonstructural response.for Seismic Design of Structural Walls. ACI Structural

  9. arXiv:0907.4194v1[hep-lat]24Jul2009 MIT-CTP-4032 Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors from Lattice QCD using 2+1 Flavor Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Wolfram

    Electromagnetic form factors characterize fundamental aspects of the structure of protons and neutronsarXiv:0907.4194v1[hep-lat]24Jul2009 MIT-CTP-4032 Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors from Lattice QCD using 2+1 Flavor Domain Wall Fermions on Fine Lattices and Chiral Perturbation Theory S. N

  10. Magnetic properties on the surface of FeAl stripes induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiju, H., E-mail: kaiju@es.hokudai.ac.jp; Kondo, K.; Ishibashi, A. [Laboratory of Nano-Structure Physics, Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan); Yoshida, Y. [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Creative Research Institution Sousei, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0021 (Japan); Watanabe, S. [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Yoshimi, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrate the formation of magnetic nanostripes on the surface of Fe{sub 52}Al{sub 48} induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation and investigate their magnetic properties. The magnetic stripe consists of a disordered A2 phase of Fe-Al alloys with Al-oxide along the [110] direction on the (111)-oriented plane. According to the focused magneto-optical Kerr effect measurement, the coercive force of the magnetic stripe obeys the 1/cos?? law, where ? is the field rotation angle estimated from the stripe direction. Also, the jump field can be observed in the magnetic hysteresis loop. These results indicate that the magnetization reversal in the magnetic stripe originates from the domain pinning, showing that the magnetization rotates incoherently.

  11. Magnetic shielding of Hall thrusters at high discharge voltages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G., E-mail: Ioannis.G.Mikellides@jpl.nasa.gov; Hofer, Richard R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    A series of numerical simulations and experiments have been performed to assess the effectiveness of magnetic shielding in a Hall thruster operating in the discharge voltage range of 300–700?V (I{sub sp}???2000–2700?s) at 6?kW, and 800?V (I{sub sp} ? 3000) at 9?kW. At 6?kW, the magnetic field topology with which highly effective magnetic shielding was previously demonstrated at 300?V has been retained for all other discharge voltages; only the magnitude of the field has been changed to achieve optimum thruster performance. It is found that magnetic shielding remains highly effective for all discharge voltages studied. This is because the channel is long enough to allow hot electrons near the channel exit to cool significantly upon reaching the anode. Thus, despite the rise of the maximum electron temperature in the channel with discharge voltage, the electrons along the grazing lines of force remain cold enough to eliminate or reduce significantly parallel gradients of the plasma potential near the walls. Computed maximum erosion rates in the range of 300–700?V are found not to exceed 10{sup ?2}?mm/kh. Such rates are ?3 orders of magnitude less than those observed in the unshielded version of the same thruster at 300?V. At 9?kW and 800?V, saturation of the magnetic circuit did not allow for precisely the same magnetic shielding topology as that employed during the 6-kW operation since this thruster was not designed to operate at this condition. Consequently, the maximum erosion rate at the inner wall is found to be ?1 order of magnitude higher (?10{sup ?1}?mm/kh) than that at 6?kW. At the outer wall, the ion energy is found to be below the sputtering yield threshold so no measurable erosion is expected.

  12. Upgrade of the Power Deposition and Thermal Models for the First Wall Protection of JET with an ITER-like Be Combination of Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upgrade of the Power Deposition and Thermal Models for the First Wall Protection of JET with an ITER-like Be Combination of Wall

  13. Quantum Dynamics of Spin Wave Propagation through Domain Walls S. YUAN, H. DE RAEDT and S. MIYASHITA1;2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a concept for a new generation of nonvolatile memory storage and logical devices.8) On the other hand nanostructures which is treated as a kind of soliton in a continuous medium. Such structure can be created of storing information or even performing logic functions, and to offer new types of electronics devices1

  14. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities III: The role of oscillons in three-dimensional bubble collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Richard Bond; Jonathan Braden; Laura Mersini-Houghton

    2015-06-09

    We study collisions between pairs of bubbles nucleated in an ambient false vacuum. For the first time, we include the effects of small initial (quantum) fluctuations around the instanton profiles describing the most likely initial bubble profile. Past studies of this problem neglect these fluctuations and work under the assumption that the collisions posess an exact SO(2,1) symmetry. We use three-dimensional lattice simulations to demonstrate that for double-well potentials, small initial perturbations to this symmetry can be amplified as the system evolves. Initially the amplification is well-described by linear perturbation theory around the SO(2,1) background, but the onset of strong nonlinearities amongst the fluctuations quickly leads to a drastic breaking of the original SO(2,1) symmetry and the production of oscillons in the collision region. We explore several single-field models, and we find it is hard to both realize inflation inside of a bubble and produce oscillons in a collision. Finally, we extend our results to a simple two-field model. The additional freedom allowed by the second field allows us to construct viable inflationary models that allow oscillon production in collisions. The breaking of the SO(2,1) symmetry allows for a new class of observational signatures from bubble collisions that do not posess azimuthal symmetry, including the production of gravitational waves which cannot be supported by an SO(2,1) spacetime.

  15. f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} in full QCD with domain wall valence quarks (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonfor DirectSciTechConnectXOP:(Journal Article) |CapArticle) |

  16. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Withers, Gregory J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Meier, Stephen W. (Bolingbrook, IL); Walter, Robert J. (Batavia, IL); Child, Michael D. (Naperville, IL); DeGraaf, Douglas W. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  17. The plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Nicholas A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Young, Aleida K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States) [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Chengcai [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States) [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Lin, Jun [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States) [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Ni, Lei [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)] [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Theoretical studies of the plasmoid instability generally assume that the reconnecting magnetic fields are symmetric. We relax this assumption by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection. Magnetic asymmetry modifies the onset, scaling, and dynamics of this instability. Magnetic islands develop preferentially into the weak magnetic field upstream region. Outflow jets from individual X-points impact plasmoids obliquely rather than directly as in the symmetric case. Consequently, deposition of momentum by the outflow jets into the plasmoids is less efficient, the plasmoids develop net vorticity, and shear flow slows down secondary merging between islands. Secondary merging events have asymmetry along both the inflow and outflow directions. Downstream plasma is more turbulent in cases with magnetic asymmetry because islands are able to roll around each other after exiting the current sheet. As in the symmetric case, plasmoid formation facilitates faster reconnection for at least small and moderate magnetic asymmetries. However, when the upstream magnetic field strengths differ by a factor of 4, the reconnection rate plateaus at a lower value than expected from scaling the symmetric results. We perform a parameter study to investigate the onset of the plasmoid instability as a function of magnetic asymmetry and domain size. There exist domain sizes for which symmetric simulations are stable but asymmetric simulations are unstable, suggesting that moderate magnetic asymmetry is somewhat destabilizing. We discuss the implications for plasmoid and flux rope formation in solar eruptions, laboratory reconnection experiments, and space plasmas. The differences between symmetric and asymmetric simulations provide some hints regarding the nature of the three-dimensional plasmoid instability.

  18. The evolution of magnetic tower jets in the laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ciardi; S. V. Lebedev; A. Frank; E. G. Blackman; J. P. Chittenden; C. J. Jennings; D. J. Ampleford; S. N. Bland; S. C. Bott; J. Rapley; G. N. Hall; F. A. Suzuki-Vidal; A. Marocchino; T. Lery; C. Stehle

    2006-11-14

    The evolution of laboratory produced magnetic jets is followed numerically through three-dimensional, non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The experiments are designed to study the interaction of a purely toroidal field with an extended plasma background medium. The system is observed to evolve into a structure consisting of an approximately cylindrical magnetic cavity with an embedded magnetically confined jet on its axis. The supersonic expansion produces a shell of swept-up shocked plasma which surrounds and partially confines the magnetic tower. Currents initially flow along the walls of the cavity and in the jet but the development of current-driven instabilities leads to the disruption of the jet and a re-arrangement of the field and currents. The top of the cavity breaks-up and a well collimated, radiatively cooled, 'clumpy' jet emerges from the system.

  19. Magnetic confinement of a high-density cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahedo, Eduardo [E. T. S. Ingenieros Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The stationary structure of a weakly collisional plasma column, confined by an axial magnetic field and a cylindrical vessel, is studied for the high-density case, when the diamagnetic azimuthal current is large enough to demagnetize partially the plasma. The plasma response is characterized mainly by two dimensionless parameters: the ratios of the electron gyroradius and the electron skin-depth to the plasma radius, and each of them measures the independent influence of the applied magnetic field and the plasma density on the plasma response. The strong magnetic confinement regime, characterized by very small wall losses, is limited to the small gyroradius and large skin-depth ranges. In the high-density case, when the electron skin-depth is smaller than the electron gyroradius, the skin-depth turns out to be the magnetic screening length, so that the bulk of the plasma behaves as unmagnetized.

  20. Light-shining-through-walls with lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friederike Januschek

    2014-10-07

    Light-shining-through-walls experiments are the search experiments for weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs) with the smallest model dependence. They have the advantage that not only the detection, but also the production of the WISPs takes place in the laboratory and can thus be controlled. Using lasers is the preferred option for most of the mass region and has led to the world's most stringent laboratory limits (ALPS I) there. At CERN, OSQAR promises to surpass these and at DESY ALPS II is currently set up, which is planning to probe the axion-like particle to photon coupling down to $|g_{a\\gamma}|\\gtrsim 2\\cdot10^{-11}$ GeV$^{-1}$, which is in a region favored by many astrophysical hints.

  1. The height of watermelons with wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Feierl

    2012-04-11

    We derive asymptotics for the moments as well as the weak limit of the height distribution of watermelons with p branches with wall. This generalises a famous result of de Bruijn, Knuth and Rice on the average height of planted plane trees, and results by Fulmek and Katori et al. on the expected value, respectively the higher moments, of the height distribution of watermelons with two branches. The asymptotics for the moments depend on the analytic behaviour of certain multidimensional Dirichlet series. In order to obtain this information we prove a reciprocity relation satisfied by the derivatives of one of Jacobi's theta functions, which generalises the well known reciprocity law for Jacobi's theta functions.

  2. Domain Assignment to Transcription FactorsDomain Assignment to Transcription Factors 412 Proteins with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    Domain Assignment to Transcription FactorsDomain Assignment to Transcription Factors 412 Proteins with at least one SCOP DBD assignment 412 Proteins with at least one SCOP DBD assignment 7 proteins with PFAM DBD assignment 7 proteins with PFAM DBD assignment 419 proteins with DBD assignment419 proteins

  3. PERFORMANCE SUMMARY OF THE HELICAL MAGNETS FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLEN,E.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.; JAIN,A.; MACKAY,W.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PLATE,S.; THOMAS,R.; WANDERER,P.; WU,K.C.; OKAMURA,M.

    2003-05-12

    A series of four Snake and eight Rotator superconducting helical magnet assemblies has been built and installed in RHIC to control the polarization of protons during acceleration and storage in that machine. Each of these assemblies consists of four 2.4 m long dipole magnets in each of which the field rotates through 360 degrees along the magnet's length. The magnets were made by winding one millimeter diameter superconducting 7-strand cable into slots milled into thick-walled aluminum tubes. The magnets produce 4 Tesla field at a current of 320 amperes and are quench-protected with 0.050 ohm resistors placed across the winding in each slot. A total of 48 of these 2.4 m magnets has been built, tested and installed. This paper summarizes their quench performance as well as their field uniformity, of which the integral field is the most critical. All magnets reached the required operating field level of 4 T, and the integral field of the magnets was generally about half of the maximum permissible level of 0.050 Tesla meters.

  4. The thermal performance of steel-framed walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, C.E. [NAHB Research Center, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States). Building Systems Div.; Goodrow, J. [Holometrix, Bedford, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Thermal bridges are areas in constructions that have highly conductive materials, allowing higher heat transfer through less conductive areas. In a wall, thermal bridges can increase heat loss, cause dust to accumulate on the studs (ghosting) due to temperature distribution, and cause condensation to form in and on the walls. The effects of thermal bridges are often misunderstood by engineers, buildings, and manufacturers of construction products. This study attempts to provide a better understanding of the effects of thermal bridges in steel-framed walls, as well as information leading to improved methods of predicting R-value of walls containing thermal bridges. An improved method for estimating R-value would allow an equitable comparison of thermal performance with other construction types and materials. This would increase the number of alternative materials for walls available to designers, thus allowing them the freedom to correctly choose the optimum choice for construction. In order to arrive at an improved method, experimental data on the heat transfer characteristics of steel-framed walls were collected. Twenty-three wall samples were tested in a calibrated hot box (ASTM C976) to measure the thermal performance of steel-framed wall systems. The tests included an array of stud frame configurations, exterior sheathing, and fiberglass batt insulations. Other studies of thermal bridging in steel-framed walls have not included the use of insulating sheathing, which reduces the extent of the thermal bridges and improves total thermal performance. The purpose of the project was to provide measured R-values for commonly used steel-framed wall configurations and to improve R-value estimating methods. Also, detailed monitoring of temperature gradients in the test walls combined with numerical analysis provided new insights into heat transfer phenomena concerning thermal bridges.

  5. Rings & Arithmetic 2: Integral domains Thursday, 13 October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Rings & Arithmetic 2: Integral domains and fields Thursday, 13 October 2005 Lectures for Part A of Oxford FHS in Mathematics and Joint Schools · Units in a ring · Integral domains; examples · Fields; examples · Characteristic of an integral domain · Field of fractions of an integral domain 0 #12;Units

  6. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  7. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rote, D.M.; He, J.; Johnson, L.R.

    1994-01-04

    A propulsion and stabilization system are described comprising a series of coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance, and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension. 8 figures.

  8. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL); He, Jianliang (Woodridge, IL); Johnson, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of FIG. 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the FIG. 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  9. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rote, D.M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses a propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of figure 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the figure 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  10. Vectorial Growth of Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Wall Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joselevich, Ernesto

    obstacles toward nanotube-based electronic technology. Vectorial growth of SWNTs is a new approach wherebyVectorial Growth of Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Ernesto Joselevich growth of single-wall carbon nanotube arrays is presented. The origin of growth is defined by patterning

  11. Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liska, Richard

    Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1 R. LISKA,2 AND F.B. ROSMEJ3,4 1 Institute, France (RECEIVED 30 August 2009; ACCEPTED 21 September 2009) Abstract Jets of laser­generated plasma surfaces (walls). The pilot experiments carried out on the iodine laser system (5­200 J, 0.44 mm, 0

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Moisture Management of High-Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    Moisture management of high-R walls is important to ensure optimal performance. This case study, developed by Building America team Building Science Corporation, focuses on how eight high-R walls handle the three main sources of moisture—construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leaks.

  13. Doctoral Defense "Feasibility Study of High Performance Cutoff Walls for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    for a candidate ECC mix. Also, revisions to existing levee seismic design guidelines are proposed, basedDoctoral Defense "Feasibility Study of High Performance Cutoff Walls for Levees in Seismic Regions state or length of their cutoff walls, and 2) seismic activity poses serious risks to many existing

  14. Disruption of cell walls for enhanced lipid recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Donohoe, Bryon S; Gerken, Henri; Laurens, Lieve; Van Wychen, Stefanie Rose

    2015-03-24

    Presented herein are methods of using cell wall degrading enzymes for recovery of internal lipid bodies from biomass sources such as algae. Also provided are algal cells that express at least one exogenous gene encoding a cell wall degrading enzyme and methods for recovering lipids from the cells.

  15. Ultrathin Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Framed Graphene Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Ultrathin Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Framed Graphene Hybrids Rui Wang, Tu Hong, and Ya ABSTRACT: Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown superior potential in electronics method is developed to synthesize ultrathin SWNT-graphene films through chemical vapor deposition

  16. technology offer HPC/UHPC double wall elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    buildings and towers like wind turbines, power plants or cooling towers. Fig. 1: UHPC double wall element to 20-45 mm in an easy and cost efficient way. Background Double wall elements are precast reinforced · Savings in material and weight · Savings in transport and crane costs · Dense structure of the precast

  17. TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP From: Anter El-Azab (anter@seas.ucla.edu) Re with Lithium will can not work and this concept should be terminated. For the case of vanadium alloy on this concept should be terminated. #12;TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT Best Regards, Anter #12;

  18. Controlled Multistep Purification of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Controlled Multistep Purification of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Ya-Qiong Xu,,§ Haiqing Peng materials from raw single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) produced in the HiPco (high-pressure CO) process at increasing temperatures. To avoid catalytic oxidation by iron oxide of carbon nanotubes, the exposed

  19. Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Majeski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Kaita, a R. Majeski, a S. Luckhardt, b R. Doerner, b M ABSTRACT The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used

  20. Nanocomposite Magnets: Transformational Nanostructured Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GE is using nanomaterials technology to develop advanced magnets that contain fewer rare earth materials than their predecessors. Nanomaterials technology involves manipulating matter at the atomic or molecular scale, which can represent a stumbling block for magnets because it is difficult to create a finely grained magnet at that scale. GE is developing bulk magnets with finely tuned structures using iron-based mixtures that contain 80% less rare earth materials than traditional magnets, which will reduce their overall cost. These magnets will enable further commercialization of HEVs, EVs, and wind turbine generators while enhancing U.S. competitiveness in industries that heavily utilize these alternatives to rare earth minerals.