National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for magnetic domain walls

  1. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray

  2. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that

  3. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that

  4. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that

  5. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that

  6. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that

  7. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that

  8. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that

  9. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concept called a racetrack memory, for example, the electron spin provides the driving force that moves a domain wall (boundary between regions of different magnetization) down...

  10. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  11. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads{sup ®} MyOne{sup ™}) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔB{sub dep} = 4.5–27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  12. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the ...

  13. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    permalloy magnetic nanowires (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires Authors: Im, Mi-Young ; Bocklage, Lars ; Meier, Guido ; Fischer, Peter Publication Date: 2011-10-27 OSTI Identifier: 1172969 Report Number(s): LBNL-5866E DOE Contract Number:

  14. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be

  15. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be

  16. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be

  17. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be

  18. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print Wednesday, 26 September 2007 00:00 The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray

  19. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be

  20. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be

  1. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be

  2. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Wednesday, 27 August 2008 00:00 Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in ultrafast computer memories. In such systems, the otherwise in-plane magnetization turns perpendicular to the plane at the center of the vortex, forming the vortex core.

  3. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications. ... included under the umbrella of "spintronics," a technology based on using the ...

  4. Electric field driven magnetic domain wall motion in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Laurson, Lasse; Franke, Kvin J. A.; Dijken, Sebastiaan van

    2014-01-06

    We investigate magnetic domain wall (MDW) dynamics induced by applied electric fields in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric thin-film heterostructures. In contrast to conventional driving mechanisms where MDW motion is induced directly by magnetic fields or electric currents, MDW motion arises here as a result of strong pinning of MDWs onto ferroelectric domain walls (FDWs) via local strain coupling. By performing extensive micromagnetic simulations, we find several dynamical regimes, including instabilities such as spin wave emission and complex transformations of the MDW structure. In all cases, the time-averaged MDW velocity equals that of the FDW, indicating the absence of Walker breakdown.

  5. Stability of a pinned magnetic domain wall as a function of its internal configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montaigne, F.; Duluard, A.; Briones, J.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-01-14

    It is shown that there are many stable configurations for a domain wall pinned by a notch along a magnetic stripe. The stability of several of these configurations is investigated numerically as a function of the thickness of the magnetic film. The depinning mechanism depends on the structure of the domain wall and on the thickness of the magnetic film. In the case of a spin-valve structure, it appears that the stray fields emerging from the hard layer at the notch location influence the stability of the micromagnetic configuration. Different depinning mechanisms are thus observed for the same film thickness depending on the magnetization orientation of the propagating domain. This conclusion qualitatively explains experimental magnetoresistance measurements.

  6. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    while. Such is the dream for novel magnetic data storage devices included under the umbrella of "spintronics," a technology based on using the electron's quantum-mechanical spin...

  7. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferromagnetic wires of nanometer sizes are considered to be key components in future spintronic applications for novel classes of magnetic storage devices. One example is the ...

  8. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferromagnetic wires of nanometer sizes are considered to be key components in future spintronic applications for novel classes of magnetic storage devices. One example is the...

  9. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in ultrafast computer memories. In such systems, the otherwise in-plane magnetization turns perpendicular to the plane at the center of the vortex, forming the vortex core. Because such a core has two possible polarizations (up or down) and can be switched between these two states

  10. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in ultrafast computer memories. In such systems, the otherwise in-plane magnetization turns perpendicular to the plane at the center of the vortex, forming the vortex core. Because such a core has two possible polarizations (up or down) and can be switched between these two states

  11. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in ultrafast computer memories. In such systems, the otherwise in-plane magnetization turns perpendicular to the plane at the center of the vortex, forming the vortex core. Because such a core has two possible polarizations (up or down) and can be switched between these two states

  12. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in ultrafast computer memories. In such systems, the otherwise in-plane magnetization turns perpendicular to the plane at the center of the vortex, forming the vortex core. Because such a core has two possible polarizations (up or down) and can be switched between these two states

  13. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in ultrafast computer memories. In such systems, the otherwise in-plane magnetization turns perpendicular to the plane at the center of the vortex, forming the vortex core. Because such a core has two possible polarizations (up or down) and can be switched between these two states

  14. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in ultrafast computer memories. In such systems, the otherwise in-plane magnetization turns perpendicular to the plane at the center of the vortex, forming the vortex core. Because such a core has two possible polarizations (up or down) and can be switched between these two states

  15. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vortices Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in ultrafast computer memories. In such systems, the otherwise in-plane magnetization turns perpendicular to the plane at the center of the vortex, forming the vortex core. Because such a core has two possible polarizations (up or down) and can be switched between these two states

  16. Magnetic domain wall manipulation in (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures for spintronic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Figielski, Tadeusz; Olender, Karolina; Wrobel, Jerzy

    2014-02-21

    Ring-shaped nanostructures have been designed and fabricated by electron-beam lithography patterning and chemical etching from thin epitaxial layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. The nanostructures, in a form of planar rings with a slit, were supplied with four electrical terminals and subjected to magneto-transport studies under planar weak magnetic field. Magnetoresistive effects caused by manipulation of magnetic domain walls and magnetization reversal in the nanostructures have been investigated and possible applications of the nanostructures as four-terminal spintronic devices are discussed.

  17. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  18. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  19. Domain wall assisted magnetization switching in (111) oriented L1{sub 0} FePt grown on a soft magnetic metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaushik, Neelam; Sharma, Parmanand; Yubuta, Kunio; Makino, Akihiro; Inoue, Akihisa

    2010-08-16

    We report on growth and magnetic properties of exchange-coupled (111)-L1{sub 0} FePt hard/CoFeTaB soft magnetic metallic glass bilayered structure processed at lower temperature ({approx}400 deg. C). Single phaselike hysteresis loops with tailorable coercivity (<8.2 kOe) in out of plane direction are obtained. The magnetization switching mechanism is identified as domain wall assisted. In views of excellent nanofabrication abilities of metallic glass thin film and the ability to grow preferred oriented L1{sub 0} FePt, the present bilayered structure is very promising for the fabrication of high density bit--patterned magnetic recording media and other spintronic devices.

  20. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of these, called racetrack memory, involves no rotating disk at all. Instead, it is based on wires made of a magnetic ... by applying and releasing an external magnetic field (Hext). ...

  1. Magnetic domain structure and domain-wall energy in UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2} intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyslocki, J.J.; Suski, W.; Wochowski, K.

    1994-03-01

    Magnetic domain structures in the UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2} compounds were studied using the powder pattern method. The domain structure observed is typical for uniaxial materials. The domain-wall energy density {gamma} was determined from the average surface domain width D{sub s} observed on surfaces perpendicular to the easy axis as equal to 16 erg/cm{sup 2} for UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and 10 erg/cm{sup 2} for UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2}. Moreover, the critical diameter for single domain particle D{sub c} was calculated for the studied compounds.

  2. Domain wall conduction in multiaxial ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Maksymovych, Petro; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    The conductance of domain wall structures consisting of either stripes or cylindrical domains in multiaxial ferroelectric-semiconductors is analyzed. The effects of the flexoelectric coupling, domain size, wall tilt, and curvature on charge accumulation are analyzed using the Landau-Ginsburg Devonshire theory for polarization vector combined with the Poisson equation for charge distributions. The proximity and size effect of the electron and donor accumulation/depletion by thin stripe domains and cylindrical nanodomains are revealed. In contrast to thick domain stripes and wider cylindrical domains, in which the carrier accumulation (and so the static conductivity) sharply increases at the domain walls only, small nanodomains of radii less than 5-10 correlation lengths appeared conducting across the entire cross-section. Implications of such conductive nanosized channels may be promising for nanoelectronics.

  3. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Myrzakul, Shynaray; Singleton, Douglas

    2009-07-15

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of 'stiff' matter, i.e., matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era, the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact nonlinear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  4. Temperature dependence of carrier spin polarization determined from current-induced domain wall motion in a Co/Ni nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, K.; Koyama, T.; Hiramatsu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Chiba, D.; Fukami, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Suzuki, T.; Ohshima, N.; Ishiwata, N.; Nakatani, Y.

    2012-05-14

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowire at various temperatures and with various applied currents. The carrier spin polarization was estimated from the measured domain wall velocity. We found that it decreased more with increasing temperature from 100 K to 530 K than the saturation magnetization did.

  5. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Akrami, Yashar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R.; Wang, Yi E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no E-mail: a.r.solomon@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  6. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Wednesday, 27 June 2012 00:00 Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and

  7. Depinning transition of a domain wall in ferromagnetic films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xi, Bin; Luo, Meng -Bo; Vinokur, Valerii M.; Hu, Xiao

    2015-09-14

    We report first principle numerical study of domain wall (DW) depinning in two-dimensional magnetic film, which is modeled by 2D random-field Ising system with the dipole-dipole interaction. We observe non-conventional activation-type motion of DW and reveal the fractal structure of DW near the depinning transition. We determine scaling functions describing critical dynamics near the transition and obtain universal exponents establishing connection between thermal softening of pinning potential and critical dynamics. In addition, we observe that tuning the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction switches DW dynamics between two different universality classes, corresponding to two distinct dynamic regimes characterized by non-Arrhenius andmore » conventional Arrhenius-type DW motions.« less

  8. Depinning transition of a domain wall in ferromagnetic films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, Bin; Luo, Meng -Bo; Vinokur, Valerii M.; Hu, Xiao

    2015-09-14

    We report first principle numerical study of domain wall (DW) depinning in two-dimensional magnetic film, which is modeled by 2D random-field Ising system with the dipole-dipole interaction. We observe non-conventional activation-type motion of DW and reveal the fractal structure of DW near the depinning transition. We determine scaling functions describing critical dynamics near the transition and obtain universal exponents establishing connection between thermal softening of pinning potential and critical dynamics. In addition, we observe that tuning the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction switches DW dynamics between two different universality classes, corresponding to two distinct dynamic regimes characterized by non-Arrhenius and conventional Arrhenius-type DW motions.

  9. In situ measurement of increased ferroelectric/ferroelastic domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    motion in declamped tetragonal lead zirconate titanate thin films (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: In situ measurement of increased ferroelectric/ferroelastic domain wall motion in declamped tetragonal lead zirconate titanate thin films « Prev Next » Title: In situ measurement of increased ferroelectric/ferroelastic domain wall motion in declamped tetragonal lead zirconate titanate thin films Authors: Wallace, M. [1] Search DOE PAGES for author "Wallace,

  10. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass Lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a

  11. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and intuitively we do not expect to observe any symmetry in such systems. Scientists at the

  12. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and intuitively we do not expect to observe any symmetry in such systems. Scientists at the

  13. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and intuitively we do not expect to observe any symmetry in such systems. Scientists at the

  14. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and intuitively we do not expect to observe any symmetry in such systems. Scientists at the

  15. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and intuitively we do not expect to observe any symmetry in such systems. Scientists at the

  16. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and intuitively we do not expect to observe any symmetry in such systems. Scientists at the

  17. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and intuitively we do not expect to observe any symmetry in such systems. Scientists at the

  18. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns Print Magnetic thin films have complicated domain patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are disordered over a macroscopic length scale, and intuitively we do not expect to observe any symmetry in such systems. Scientists at the

  19. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for example, commonly exhibits labyrinthine domain patterns. These patterns are...

  20. Magnetoelectric domain wall dynamics and its implications for magnetoelectric memory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Belashchenko, K. D.; Tchernyshyov, O.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; Tretiakov, O. A.

    2016-03-30

    Domain wall dynamics in a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet is analyzed, and its implications for magnetoelectric memory applications are discussed. Cr2O3 is used in the estimates of the materials parameters. It is found that the domain wall mobility has a maximum as a function of the electric field due to the gyrotropic coupling induced by it. In Cr2O3, the maximal mobility of 0.1 m/(s Oe) is reached at E≈0.06 V/nm. Fields of this order may be too weak to overcome the intrinsic depinning field, which is estimated for B-doped Cr2O3. These major drawbacks for device implementation can be overcome by applying amore » small in-plane shear strain, which blocks the domain wall precession. Domain wall mobility of about 0.7 m/(s Oe) can then be achieved at E = 0.2 V/nm. Furthermore, a split-gate scheme is proposed for the domain-wall controlled bit element; its extension to multiple-gate linear arrays can offer advantages in memory density, programmability, and logic functionality.« less

  1. Control of domain wall pinning by localised focused Ga {sup +} ion irradiation on Au capped NiFe nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burn, D. M. Atkinson, D.

    2014-10-28

    Understanding domain wall pinning and propagation in nanowires are important for future spintronics and nanoparticle manipulation technologies. Here, the effects of microscopic local modification of the magnetic properties, induced by focused-ion-beam intermixing, in NiFe/Au bilayer nanowires on the pinning behavior of domain walls was investigated. The effects of irradiation dose and the length of the irradiated features were investigated experimentally. The results are considered in the context of detailed quasi-static micromagnetic simulations, where the ion-induced modification was represented as a local reduction of the saturation magnetization. Simulations show that domain wall pinning behavior depends on the magnitude of the magnetization change, the length of the modified region, and the domain wall structure. Comparative analysis indicates that reduced saturation magnetisation is not solely responsible for the experimentally observed pinning behavior.

  2. Domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems in axion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yoshino, Kazuyoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T. E-mail: tsutomu.tyanagida@ipmu.jp

    2013-11-01

    Axion models have two serious cosmological problems, domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems. In order to solve these problems we investigate the Linde's model in which the field value of the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) scalar is large during inflation. In this model the fluctuations of the PQ field grow after inflation through the parametric resonance and stable axionic strings may be produced, which results in the domain wall problem. We study formation of axionic strings using lattice simulations. It is found that in chaotic inflation the axion model is free from both the domain wall and the isocurvature perturbation problems if the initial misalignment angle ?{sub a} is smaller than O(10{sup ?2}). Furthermore, axions can also account for the dark matter for the breaking scale v ? 10{sup 12?16}GeV and the Hubble parameter during inflation H{sub inf}?<10{sup 11?12}GeV in general inflation models.

  3. Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360 domain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2014-01-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360 domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360 domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360 domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360 domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360 domain wall normal mode, the 360 domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360 domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360 domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360 domain walls that spin wave passing through.

  4. Category:Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Controlled Source Frequency-Domain...

  5. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1?mT to 1?mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5?nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300?nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  6. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Bruno S.; Fuelling, Stephan

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  7. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities II: fracturing of colliding walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braden, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2015-08-26

    We study collisions between nearly planar domain walls including the effects of small initial nonplanar fluctuations. These perturbations represent the small fluctuations that must exist in a quantum treatment of the problem. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that at the linear level a subset of these fluctuations experience parametric amplification as a result of their coupling to the planar symmetric background. Here we study the full three-dimensional nonlinear dynamics using lattice simulations, including both the early time regime when the fluctuations are well described by linear perturbation theory as well as the subsequent stage of fully nonlinear evolution. We find that the nonplanar fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the overall evolution of the system. Specifically, once these fluctuations begin to interact nonlinearly the split into a planar symmetric part of the field and the nonplanar fluctuations loses its utility. At this point the colliding domain walls dissolve, with the endpoint of this being the creation of a population of oscillons in the collision region. The original (nearly) planar symmetry has been completely destroyed at this point and an accurate study of the system requires the full three-dimensional simulation.

  8. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Chanthbouala, Andre; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2013-12-09

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600 m/s) at current densities below 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (≈1 ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  9. Evolution of domain wall networks: The Press-Ryden-Spergel algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sousa, L.; Avelino, P. P.

    2010-04-15

    The Press-Ryden-Spergel (PRS) algorithm is a modification to the field theory equations of motion, parametrized by two parameters ({alpha} and {beta}), implemented in numerical simulations of cosmological domain wall networks, in order to ensure a fixed comoving resolution. In this paper we explicitly demonstrate that the PRS algorithm provides the correct domain wall dynamics in (N+1)-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes if {alpha}+{beta}/2=N, fully validating its use in numerical studies of cosmic domain evolution. We further show that this result is valid for generic thin featureless domain walls, independently of the Lagrangian of the model.

  10. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics (Montgomery, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics (Montgomery, Et Al.,...

  11. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At...

  12. Current-driven domain wall motion enhanced by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Wang, Dao-wei; Li, Zhi-xiong; Tang, Wei; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2014-07-14

    The magnetic domain wall (DW) motion driven by a spin-polarized current opens a new concept for memory and logic devices. However, the critical current density required to overcome the intrinsic and/or extrinsic pinning of DW remains too large for practical applications. Here, we show, by using micromagnetic simulations and analytical approaches, that the application of a microwave field offers an effective solution to this problem. When a transverse microwave field is applied, the adiabatic spin-transfer torque (STT) alone can sustain a steady-state DW motion without the sign of Walker breakdown, meaning that the intrinsic pinning disappears. The extrinsic pinning can also be effectively reduced. Moreover, the DW velocity is increased greatly for the microwave-assisted DW motion. This provides a new way to manipulate the DW motion at low current densities.

  13. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California, San Diego, have recently used coherent soft x-ray scattering with angular Fourier analysis to discover that the disordered domain patterns do, in fact, exhibit...

  14. Magnetic anisotropy and domain structure of the layered manganite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1.64Mnsub 2Osub 7 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic anisotropy and domain structure of the layered manganite Lasub 1.36Srsub 1.64Mnsub 2Osub ...

  15. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and magnetization history. Left: A typical speckle pattern from the CoPd multilayer. Color bar at bottom indicates relative intensity. The rotational symmetry of a scattering...

  16. Gravitational waves from domain walls in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadota, Kenji; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken’ichi

    2015-10-16

    The next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model predicts the formation of domain walls due to the spontaneous breaking of the discrete Z{sub 3}-symmetry at the electroweak phase transition, and they collapse before the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis if there exists a small bias term in the potential which explicitly breaks the discrete symmetry. Signatures of gravitational waves produced from these unstable domain walls are estimated and their parameter dependence is investigated. It is shown that the amplitude of gravitational waves becomes generically large in the decoupling limit, and that their frequency is low enough to be probed in future pulsar timing observations.

  17. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    patterns that may or may not repeat with each cycle through a hysteresis loop. A magnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy, such as that used in computer hard drives, for...

  18. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-temperature control, and high coherent x-ray flux. The sample used was a CoPd multilayer film that shows perpendicular anisotropy, meaning the magnetization points...

  19. Fast strain wave induced magnetization changes in long cobalt bars: Domain motion versus coherent rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.; Adenwalla, S.; Borchers, J. A.; Maranville, B. B.

    2015-02-14

    A high frequency (88 MHz) traveling strain wave on a piezoelectric substrate is shown to change the magnetization direction in 40 μm wide Co bars with an aspect ratio of 10{sup 3}. The rapidly alternating strain wave rotates the magnetization away from the long axis into the short axis direction, via magnetoelastic coupling. Strain-induced magnetization changes have previously been demonstrated in ferroelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructures, with excellent fidelity between the ferromagnet and the ferroelectric domains, but these experiments were limited to essentially dc frequencies. Both magneto-optical Kerr effect and polarized neutron reflectivity confirm that the traveling strain wave does rotate the magnetization away from the long axis direction and both yield quantitatively similar values for the rotated magnetization. An investigation of the behavior of short axis magnetization with increasing strain wave amplitude on a series of samples with variable edge roughness suggests that the magnetization reorientation that is seen proceeds solely via coherent rotation. Polarized neutron reflectivity data provide direct experimental evidence for this model. This is consistent with expectations that domain wall motion cannot track the rapidly varying strain.

  20. A time-domain estimation of wall conduction transfer function coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, M.G.

    1996-11-01

    The wall and roof transfer function coefficients, b{sub n} and d{sub n}, listed in the 1993 ASHRAE Fundamentals Handbook, have up to now been derived using laplace and Z-transform methods. This paper shows that they can be readily evaluated using straightforward time-domain solutions of the Fourier continuity equation. These include the response of a wall to a ramp increase in temperature and its transient response. The values of d{sub n} can be found from the first few terms in the series of wall decay times in the transient solution. The solutions are combined using a form of Fourier analysis. Appropriate layer transmission matrices enable one to find the wall`s overall characteristics readily. The wall response factors {phi}{sub j} can thus be found. The b{sub n} transfer coefficients are related to the {phi}{sub j} and d{sub n} values. The approach is illustrated using the data for wall group 6. Allowing for conversion from I-P to SI units, the present approach gives results that are almost identical to those listed. It shows, however, that the performance of the coefficients is very specific to the wall from which they were derived. The b{sub n} and d{sub n} values listed in the Handbook permit an estimate to be made of the wall response factors, including the time of peak flow and the first decay time. For heavy walls, however, values beyond d{sub 6} may be needed.

  1. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    today's spinning disk, such a dialog could become ancient history. Not only that, the computer could hold more information, retrieve it more quickly, and consume less power all the...

  2. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moving parts, in contrast to today's spinning disk, such a dialog could become ancient history. Not only that, the computer could hold more information, retrieve it more...

  3. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  4. f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} in full QCD with domain wall valence quarks (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} in full QCD with domain wall valence quarks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} in full QCD with domain wall valence quarks We compute the ratio of pseudoscalar decay constants f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} using domain-wall valence quarks and rooted improved Kogut-Susskind sea quarks, at a lattice spacing of b{approx}0.125 fm. By employing continuum chiral perturbation theory, we extract the Gasser-Leutwyler low-energy

  5. Axial couplings of heavy hadrons from domain-wall lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Detmold, C.J.D. Lin, S. Meinel

    2011-12-01

    We calculate matrix elements of the axial current for static-light mesons and baryons in lattice QCD with dynamical domain wall fermions. We use partially quenched heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory in a finite volume to extract the axial couplings g{sub 1}, g{sub 2}, and g{sub 3} from the data. These axial couplings allow the prediction of strong decay rates and enter chiral extrapolations of most lattice results in the b sector. Our calculations are performed with two lattice spacings and with pion masses down to 227 MeV.

  6. An in-situ study of magnetic domain structures in undercooled Fe-29.5 at. %Pd magnetostrictive alloys by Lorentz microscopy and electron holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wen; Xu, Xianhui; Liu, Jian E-mail: xiawxing@nimte.ac.cn; Xia, Weixing E-mail: xiawxing@nimte.ac.cn; Yan, Aru

    2015-04-28

    Understanding of correlation between magnetic domain structure and functional properties is of importance for the magnetic field driven phase transition (e.g., martensitic transformation) or microstructure variation (e.g., twin boundary motion) materials. In this work, we report a Fe-29.5 at. %Pd shape memory alloy treated by undercooling processing upon a degree of 320?K below the liquid temperature. The effect of high undercooling on the solidified microstructure and martensitic transformation temperatures was investigated. By in-situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy and electron holography, magnetic domain structure and the field-induced domain wall motion behavior in as-cast and undercooled samples have been schematically studied. The irregular domain structure can be observed in these alloys. On the application of a field up to 300?Oe, the domain walls for both samples are able to move along the direction of the external magnetic field, but structural transition and rearrangement of variants are not observed in the undercooled alloy. The large magnetostriction of Fe-29.5 at. %Pd undercooled alloy originates from the irregular domain walls motion instead of the rearrangement of martensitic twin variants.

  7. Insights into substrate specificity of NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases containing bacterial SH3 domains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu -Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; et al

    2015-09-15

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. In addition, these enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting ofmore » two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.Peptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural analysis of three modular NlpC/P60 hydrolases, one lysin, and two recycling enzymes, show that they may have evolved from a common molecular architecture, where the substrate preference is modulated by local changes. These results also suggest that new pathways for recycling PG turnover products, such as tracheal cytotoxin, may have evolved in bacteria in the human gut microbiome that involve NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases.« less

  8. Insights into substrate specificity of NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases containing bacterial SH3 domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu -Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc -André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-09-15

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. In addition, these enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.

    Peptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural analysis of three modular NlpC/P60 hydrolases, one lysin, and two recycling enzymes, show that they may have evolved from a common molecular architecture, where the substrate preference is modulated by local changes. These results also suggest that new pathways for recycling PG turnover products, such as tracheal cytotoxin, may have evolved in bacteria in the human gut microbiome that involve NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases.

  9. Steady-state domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin-transfer torque with assistance of microwave field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Tang, Wei; Wang, D.; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2013-12-23

    We have studied the current-induced displacement of a 180° Bloch wall by means of micromagnetic simulation and analytical approach. It is found that the adiabatic spin-transfer torque can sustain a steady-state domain wall (DW) motion in the direction opposite to that of the electron flow without Walker Breakdown when a transverse microwave field is applied. This kind of motion is very sensitive to the microwave frequency and can be resonantly enhanced by exciting the domain wall thickness oscillation mode. A one-dimensional analytical model was established to account for the microwave-assisted wall motion. These findings may be helpful for reducing the critical spin-polarized current density and designing DW-based spintronic devices.

  10. Magnetic thin-film split-domain current sensor-recorder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Edmund J.

    1979-01-01

    A sensor-recorder for recording a representation of the direction and peak amplitude of a transient current. A magnetic thin film is coated on a glass substrate under the influence of a magnetic field so that the finished film is magnetically uniaxial and anisotropic. The film is split into two oppositely magnetized contiguous domains with a central boundary by subjecting adjacent portions of the film simultaneously to magnetic fields that are opposed 180.degree.. With the split-domain sensor-recorder placed with the film plane and domain boundary either perpendicular or parallel to the expected conductive path of a transient current, the occurrence of the transient causes switching of a portion of one domain to the direction of the other domain. The amount of the switched domain portion is indicative of the amplitude of the peak current of the transient, while the particular domain that is switched is indicative of the direction of the current. The resulting domain patterns may be read with a passive magnetic tape viewer.

  11. Temperature dependent nucleation, propagation, and annihilation of domain walls in all-perpendicular spin-valve nanopillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopman, D. B. Kent, A. D.; Bedau, D.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Katine, J. A.

    2014-03-21

    We present a study of the temperature dependence of the switching fields in Co/Ni-based perpendicularly magnetized spin-valves. While magnetization reversal of all-perpendicular Co/Ni spin valves at ambient temperatures is typically marked by a single sharp step change in resistance, low temperature measurements can reveal a series of resistance steps, consistent with non-uniform magnetization configurations. We propose a model that consists of domain nucleation, propagation, and annihilation to explain the temperature dependence of the switching fields. Interestingly, low temperature (<30?K) step changes in resistance that we associate with domain nucleation have a bimodal switching field and resistance step distribution, attributable to two competing nucleation pathways.

  12. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the ground where magnetic field measurements are recorded. The locations of the field measurement stations are identified using a Global Positioning System (GPS). The measured...

  13. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  14. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Engelhardt, M.; Musch, B.; Bhattacharya, T.; Gupta, R.; Hagler, P.; Negele, J.; Pochinsky, A.; Schafer, A.; Syritsyn, S.; Yoon, B.

    2014-06-23

    Here, lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a definition of TMDs via hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for the lattice calculation. Using a RBC/UKQCD domain wall fermion ensemble corresponding to a pion mass of 297 MeV, on a lattice with spacing 0.084 fm, selected TMD observables are accessed and compared to previous exploration at heavier pion masses on coarser lattices.

  15. Comprehensive kinetic analysis of the plasma-wall transition layer in a strongly tilted magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.

    2014-10-15

    The magnetized plasma-wall transition (MPWT) layer at the presence of the obliquity of the magnetic field to the wall consists of three sub-layers: the Debye sheath (DS), the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS), and the collisional pre-sheath (CPS) with characteristic lengths ?{sub D} (electron Debye length), ?{sub i} (ion gyro-radius), and ? (the smallest relevant collision length), respectively. Tokamak plasmas are usually assumed to have the ordering ?{sub D}??{sub i}??, when the above-mentioned sub-layers can be distinctly distinguished. In the limits of ?{sub Dm}(?{sub D}/?{sub i})?0 and ?{sub mc}(?{sub i}/?)?0 (asymptotic three-scale (A3S) limits), these sub-layers are precisely defined. Using the smallness of the tilting angle of the magnetic field to the wall, the ion distribution functions are found for three sub-regions in the analytic form. The equations and characteristic length-scales governing the transition (intermediate) regions between the neighboring sub-layers (CPS MPS and MPS DS) are derived, allowing to avoid the singularities arising from the ?{sub Dm}?0 and ?{sub mc}?0 approximations. The MPS entrance and the related kinetic form of the BohmChodura condition are successfully defined for the first time. At the DS entrance, the Bohm condition maintains its usual form. The results encourage further study and understanding of physics of the MPWT layers in the modern plasma facilities.

  16. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities I: parametric amplification of linear fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braden, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2015-03-03

    This is the first paper in a series where we study collisions of nucleated bubbles taking into account the effects of small initial (quantum) fluctuations in a fully 3+1-dimensional setting. In this paper, we consider the evolution of linear fluctuations around highly symmetric though inhomogeneous backgrounds. In particular, we demonstrate that a large degree of asymmetry develops over time from tiny initial fluctuations superposed upon planar and SO(2,1) symmetric backgrounds. These fluctuations are inevitable consequences of zero-point vacuum oscillations, so excluding them by enforcing a high degree of spatial symmetry is inconsistent in a quantum treatment. To simplify the analysis we consider the limit of two colliding planar walls, with mode functions for the fluctuations characterized by the wavenumber transverse to the collision direction and a longitudinal shape along the collision direction x, which we solve for. In the linear regime, the fluctuations obey a linear wave equation with a time- and space-dependent mass m{sub eff}(x,t). In situations where the walls collide multiple times, m{sub eff} oscillates in time. We use Floquet theory to study the evolution of the fluctuations and generalize the calculations familiar from the preheating literature to the case with many coupled degrees of freedom. The inhomogeneous case has bands of unstable transverse wavenumbers k{sub ⊥} whose corresponding mode functions grow exponentially. By examining the detailed spatial structure of the mode functions in x, we identify both broad and narrow parametric resonance generalizations of the homogeneous m{sub eff}(t) case of preheating. The unstable k{sub ⊥} modes are longitudinally localized, yet can be described as quasiparticles in the Bogoliubov sense. We define an effective occupation number and show they are created in bursts for the case of well-defined collisions in the background. The transverse-longitudinal coupling accompanying nonlinearity radically breaks this localized particle description, with nonseparable 3D modes arising that will be studied in subsequent papers.

  17. Magnetic domain structure in nanocrystalline Ni-Zn-Co spinel ferrite thin films using off-axis electron holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D.; Ray, N. M.; Petuskey, W. T.; Smith, D. J.; McCartney, M. R.

    2014-08-28

    We report a study of the magnetic domain structure of nanocrystalline thin films of nickel-zinc ferrite. The ferrite films were synthesized using aqueous spin-spray coating at low temperature (?90?C) and showed high complex permeability in the GHz range. Electron microscopy and microanalysis revealed that the films consisted of columnar grains with uniform chemical composition. Off-axis electron holography combined with magnetic force microscopy indicated a multi-grain domain structure with in-plane magnetization. The correlation between the magnetic domain morphology and crystal structure is briefly discussed.

  18. Imaging magnetic domain structure in sub-500 nm thin film elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, K. J.; McVitie, S.; Chapman, J. N.; Wilkinson, C. D. W.

    2001-06-01

    Magnetic imaging in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been used to examine submicron elements with the aim of discovering down to what element size complex domain patterns can form. The elements were squares, circles, triangles, and pentagons in the size range 100{endash}500 nm and were made from 36 nm Co films or 8 nm Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} (NiFe) with in-plane magnetization. The magnetic domain structures in these elements were imaged at high resolution using the differential phase contrast imaging mode in a TEM. Nonuniform magnetization structures were seen in the images. Vortices were present at remanence in all shapes of 36-nm-thick Co elements down to 100 nm size and in circular NiFe elements down to 116 nm diameter. Triangular NiFe elements did not have a vortex state at remanence, instead the magnetization curved round within the element but did not achieve complete flux closure. In simulations of square and circular NiFe elements, it was found that defects at the edges of the elements encouraged reversal by a vortex mechanism, whereas for simulated elements with no defects, reversal was by rotation and occurred at much lower fields. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Interplay between intrinsic and stacking-fault magnetic domains in bi-layered manganites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, M.A; Burkhardt, Mark H.; Sarkar, S.; Ohldag, H.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Scholl, A.; Young, A.T.; Doran, A.; Dessau, D.S.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J.F.; Durr, H.A.; Stohr, J.

    2012-09-11

    We present a low temperature X-ray photoemission electron microscopy study of the bi-layered manganite compound La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} (BL-LSMO) to investigate the influence of stacking faults, which are structurally and magnetically different from the bi-layered host. In BL-LSMO small magnetic moment persists to T* = 300K, well above the Curie temperature of 120K (T{sub C}). Our magnetic images show that 3D stacking faults are responsible for the T* transition. Furthermore, close to the T{sub C}, stacking faults are well coupled to the bi-layered host with latter magnetic domains controlling the spin direction of the stacking faults. Contrary to recent reports, we find that stacking faults do not seed magnetic domains in the host via an exchange spring mechanism and the intrinsic T{sub C} of the BL-LSMO is not lower than 120K.

  20. Neutron and proton electric dipole moments from Nf=2+1 domain-wall fermion lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shintani, Eigo; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Soni, Amarjit

    2016-05-05

    We present a lattice calculation of the neutron and proton electric dipole moments (EDM’s) with Nf = 2 + 1 flavors of domain-wall fermions. The neutron and proton EDM form factors are extracted from three-point functions at the next-to-leading order in the θ vacuum of QCD. In this computation, we use pion masses 330 and 420 MeV and 2.7 fm3 lattices with Iwasaki gauge action and a 170 MeV pion and 4.6 fm3 lattice with I-DSDR gauge action, all generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations. The all-mode-averaging technique enables an efficient, high statistics calculation; however the statistical errors onmore » our results are still relatively large, so we investigate a new direction to reduce them, reweighting with the local topological charge density which appears promising. Furthermore, we discuss the chiral behavior and finite size effects of the EDM’s in the context of baryon chiral perturbation theory.« less

  1. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Van Waeyenberge (Ghent University, Belgium), K.W. Chou, H. Stoll, M. Curcic, G. Schutz (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Germany), T. Tyliszczak (ALS), G....

  2. ANNULUS CLOSURE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT INSPECTION/SALT DEPOSIT CLEANING MAGNETIC WALL CRAWLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minichan, R; Russell Eibling, R; James Elder, J; Kevin Kane, K; Daniel Krementz, D; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Nicholas Vrettos, N

    2008-06-01

    The Liquid Waste Technology Development organization is investigating technologies to support closure of radioactive waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Tank closure includes removal of the wastes that have propagated to the tank annulus. Although amounts and types of residual waste materials in the annuli of SRS tanks vary, simple salt deposits are predominant on tanks with known leak sites. This task focused on developing and demonstrating a technology to inspect and spot clean salt deposits from the outer primary tank wall located in the annulus of an SRS Type I tank. The Robotics, Remote and Specialty Equipment (RRSE) and Materials Science and Technology (MS&T) Sections of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collaborated to modify and equip a Force Institute magnetic wall crawler with the tools necessary to demonstrate the inspection and spot cleaning in a mock-up of a Type I tank annulus. A remote control camera arm and cleaning head were developed, fabricated and mounted on the crawler. The crawler was then tested and demonstrated on a salt simulant also developed in this task. The demonstration showed that the camera is capable of being deployed in all specified locations and provided the views needed for the planned inspection. It also showed that the salt simulant readily dissolves with water. The crawler features two different techniques for delivering water to dissolve the salt deposits. Both water spay nozzles were able to dissolve the simulated salt, one is more controllable and the other delivers a larger water volume. The cleaning head also includes a rotary brush to mechanically remove the simulated salt nodules in the event insoluble material is encountered. The rotary brush proved to be effective in removing the salt nodules, although some fine tuning may be required to achieve the best results. This report describes the design process for developing technology to add features to a commercial wall crawler and the results of the demonstration testing performed on the integrated system. The crawler was modified to address the two primary objectives of the task (inspection and spot cleaning). SRNL recommends this technology as a viable option for annulus inspection and salt removal in tanks with minimal salt deposits (such as Tanks 5 and 6.) This report further recommends that the technology be prepared for field deployment by: (1) developing an improved mounting system for the magnetic idler wheel, (2) improving the robustness of the cleaning tool mounting, (3) resolving the nozzle selection valve connections, (4) determining alternatives for the brush and bristle assembly, and (5) adding a protective housing around the motors to shield them from water splash. In addition, SRNL suggests further technology development to address annulus cleaning issues that are apparent on other tanks that will also require salt removal in the future such as: (1) Developing a duct drilling device to facilitate dissolving salt inside ventilation ducts and draining the solution out the bottom of the ducts. (2) Investigating technologies to inspect inside the vertical annulus ventilation duct.

  3. Peculiar long-range supercurrent in superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor junction containing a noncollinear magnetic domain in the ferromagnetic region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Hao; Wu, Xiuqiang; Ren, Yajie

    2015-01-14

    We study the supercurrent in clean superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor heterostructure containing a noncollinear magnetic domain in the ferromagnetic region. It is demonstrated that the magnetic domain can lead to a spin-flip scattering process, which reverses the spin orientations of the singlet Cooper pair and simultaneously changes the sign of the corresponding electronic momentum. If the ferromagnetic layers on both sides of magnetic domain have the same features, the long-range proximity effect will take place. That is because the singlet Cooper pair will create an exact phase-cancellation effect and gets an additional π phase shift as it passes through the entire ferromagnetic region. Then, the equal spin triplet pair only exists in the magnetic domain region and can not diffuse into the other two ferromagnetic layers. So, the supercurrent mostly arises from the singlet Cooper pairs, and the equal spin triplet pairs are not involved. This result can provide a approach for generating the long-range supercurrent.

  4. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  5. Analysis of magnetic probe signals including effect of cylindrical conducting wall for field-reversed configuration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeyama, Taeko; Hiroi, Masanori; Nemoto, Yuuichi; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2008-06-15

    A confinement field is disturbed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) motions of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in a cylindrical conductor. The effect of the conductor should be included to obtain a spatial structure of the disturbed field with a good precision. For this purpose, a toroidal current in the plasma and an eddy current on a conducting wall are replaced by magnetic dipole and image magnetic dipole moments, respectively. Typical spatial structures of the disturbed field are calculated by using the dipole moments for such MHD motions as radial shift, internal tilt, external tilt, and n=2 mode deformation. Then, analytic formulas for estimating the shift distance, tilt angle, and deformation rate of the MHD motions from magnetic probe signals are derived. It is estimated from the calculations by using the dipole moments that the analytic formulas include an approximately 40% error. Two kinds of experiment are carried out to investigate the reliability of the calculations. First, a magnetic field produced by a circular current is measured in an aluminum pipe to confirm the replacement of the eddy current with the image magnetic dipole moments. The measured fields coincide well with the calculated values including the image magnetic dipole moments. Second, magnetic probe signals measured from the FRC plasma are substituted into the analytic formulas to obtain shift distance and deformation rate. The experimental results are compared to the MHD motions measured by using a radiation from the plasma. If the error included in the analytic formulas and the difference between the magnetic and optical structures in the plasma are considered, the results of the radiation measurement support well those of the magnetic analysis.

  6. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Suffian N. [Ames Laboratory; Alam, Aftab [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-11-27

    In BaFe2As2, structural and magnetic planar defects begin to proliferate below the structural phase transition, affecting descriptions of magnetism and superconductivity. We study, using density-functional theory, the stability and magnetic properties of competing antiphase and domain boundaries, twins and isolated nanotwins (twin nuclei), and spin excitations proposed and/or observed. These nanoscale defects have a very low surface energy (22210 m Jm?2), with twins favorable to the mesoscale. Defects exhibit smaller moments confined near their boundariesmaking a uniform-moment picture inappropriate for long-range magnetic order in real samples. Nanotwins explain features in measured pair distribution functions so should be considered when analyzing scattering data. All these defects can be weakly mobile and/or can have fluctuations that lower assessed ordered moments from longer spatial and/or time averaging and should be considered directly.

  7. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, S. N. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Alam, A. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2013-01-01

    In BaFe2As2, structural and magnetic planar defects begin to proliferate below the structural phase transition, affecting descriptions of magnetism and superconductivity.We study, using density-functional theory, the stability and magnetic properties of competing antiphase and domain boundaries, twins and isolated nanotwins (twin nuclei), and spin excitations proposed and/or observed. These nanoscale defects have a very low surface energy (22 210 m Jm 2), with twins favorable to the mesoscale. Defects exhibit smaller moments confined near their boundaries making a uniform-moment picture inappropriate for long-range magnetic order in real samples. Nanotwins explain features in measured pair distribution functions so should be considered when analyzing scattering data. All these defects can be weakly mobile and/or can have fluctuations that lower

  8. B-meson decay constants from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christ, Norman H.; Flynn, Jonathan M.; Izubuchi, Taku; Kawanai, Taichi; Lehner, Christoph; Soni, Amarjit; Van de Water, Ruth S.; Witzel, Oliver

    2015-03-10

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants fB, fBs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ≈ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ ≈ 290 MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the lattice heavy-light axial-vector current using a mostly nonperturbative method in which we compute the bulk of the matching factor nonperturbatively, with a small correction, that is close to unity, in lattice perturbation theory. We also improve the lattice heavy-light current through O(αsa). We extrapolate our results to the physical light-quark masses and continuum using SU(2) heavy-meson chiral perturbation theory, and provide a complete systematic error budget. We obtain fB0 = 196.2(15.7) MeV, fB+ = 195.4(15.8) MeV, fBs = 235.4(12.2) MeV, fBs/fB0 = 1.193(59), and fBs/fB+ = 1.220(82), where the errors are statistical and total systematic added in quadrature. In addition, these results are in good agreement with other published results and provide an important independent cross check of other three-flavor determinations of B-meson decay constants using staggered light quarks.

  9. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickelphosphorous layers of high magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yi; Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Fan

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Impurities in crude MWNTs were effectively removed after purification treatment. ? Many Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the purified MWNTs. ? The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with NiP layers is 91.5 emu/g. -- Abstract: The multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with nickelphosphorous (NiP) layers were prepared by electroless plating method. To obtain the MWNTs with NiP layers of high magnetic properties, an effective purification treatment and a pre-treatment procedure were developed. The crude MWNTs, the purified MWNTs and the MWNTs with NiP layers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). SEM results, TEM images and XRD results indicate that impurities in the crude MWNTs were effectively removed after the purification treatment and a large number of Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the surface of the purified MWNTs. According to the VSM test, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with NiP layers is 91.5 emu/g which is higher than results of other researchers.

  10. Magnetic domain tuning and the emergence of bubble domains in the bilayer manganite La2–2xSr1+2xMn2O7(x=0.32)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, Juyoung; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Ayala-Valenzuela, Oscar E.; Wulferding, Dirk; Zhou, J. -S.; Goodenough, John B.; de Lozanne, Alex; Mitchell, J. F.; Leon, Neliza; et al

    2015-08-17

    We report a magnetic force microscopy study of the magnetic domain evolution in the layered manganite La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 (with x=0.32). This strongly correlated electron compound is known to exhibit a wide range of magnetic phases, including a recently uncovered biskyrmion phase. We observe a continuous transition from dendritic to stripelike domains, followed by the formation of magnetic bubbles due to a field- and temperature-dependent competition between in-plane and out-of-plane spin alignments. The magnetic bubble phase appears at comparable field and temperature ranges as the biskyrmion phase, suggesting a close relation between both phases. Based on our real-space images we construct amore »temperature-field phase diagram for this composition.« less

  11. Magnetic domain tuning and the emergence of bubble domains in the bilayer manganite La2–2xSr1+2xMn2O7(x=0.32)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, Juyoung; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Ayala-Valenzuela, Oscar E.; Wulferding, Dirk; Zhou, J. -S.; Goodenough, John B.; de Lozanne, Alex; Mitchell, J. F.; Leon, Neliza; et al

    2015-08-17

    We report a magnetic force microscopy study of the magnetic domain evolution in the layered manganite La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 (with x=0.32). This strongly correlated electron compound is known to exhibit a wide range of magnetic phases, including a recently uncovered biskyrmion phase. We observe a continuous transition from dendritic to stripelike domains, followed by the formation of magnetic bubbles due to a field- and temperature-dependent competition between in-plane and out-of-plane spin alignments. The magnetic bubble phase appears at comparable field and temperature ranges as the biskyrmion phase, suggesting a close relation between both phases. Based on our real-space images we construct amore » temperature-field phase diagram for this composition.« less

  12. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  13. MAGNETS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  14. Wall Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-10-01

    This fact sheet provides information on advanced wall framing, including insulating walls, airtight construction, and moisture control.

  15. In-situ observation of domain wall motion in Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Dabin; Cai, Changlong [Laboratory of Thin Film Techniques and Optical Test, Xi'an Technological University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Li, Zhenrong, E-mail: zhrli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Fei; Xu, Zhuo [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry and International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Zhang, Shujun, E-mail: soz1@psu.edu [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Cheng, Yaojin [Science and Technology on Low-Light-Level Night Vision Laboratory, Xi'an 710065 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Various domain structures, including wave-like domains, mixed needle-like and laminar domains, typical embedded 90 and 180 domains, have been observed in unpoled rhombohedral, monoclinic, and tetragonal Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} (PIN-PMN-PT) crystals by polarizing light microscope; while in poled tetragonal crystals, the parallel 180 domains were reversed and only vertical 90 domain walls were observed. For 0.24PIN-0.42PMN-0.34PT crystals with morphotropic phase boundary composition, the domain wall motion was in-situ observed as a function of applied electric field along crystallographic [100] direction. With increasing the electric field from 0 to 12?kV/cm, the rhombohedral (R) domains were found to change to monoclinic (M) domains and then to tetragonal (T) domains. The electric field-induced phase transition was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction and the temperature-dependent dielectric behavior.

  16. Magnetization Reversal Process of Single Crystal α-Fe Containing a Nonmagnetic Particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiu-Lin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    The magnetization reversal process and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated in this work based on the Landau-Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The evolutions of the magnetic domain morphology are studied, and our analyses show that the magnetization reversal process is affected by the interaction between the moving domain wall and the existing nonmagnetic particles. This interaction strongly depends on the size of the particles, and it is found that particles with a particular size contribute the most to magnetic hardening.

  17. Effect of substrate temperature on the magnetic properties of epitaxial sputter-grown Co/Pt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihai, A. P.; Whiteside, A. L.; Canwell, E. J.; Marrows, C. H.; Moore, T. A.; Benitez, M. J.; McGrouther, D.; McVitie, S.; McFadzean, S.

    2013-12-23

    Epitaxial Co/Pt films have been deposited by dc-magnetron sputtering onto heated C-plane sapphire substrates. X-ray diffraction, the residual resistivity, and transmission electron microscopy indicate that the Co/Pt films are highly ordered on the atomic scale. The coercive field and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy increase as the substrate temperature is increased from 100250?C during deposition of the Co/Pt. Measurement of the domain wall creep velocity as a function of applied magnetic field yields the domain wall pinning energy, which scales with the coercive field. Evidence for an enhanced creep velocity in highly ordered epitaxial Co/Pt is found.

  18. Imaging the magnetic nanodomains in Nd2Fe14B

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Lunan; Taufour, Valentin; Lamichhane, T. N.; Schrunk, Benjamin; Bud'ko, Sergei L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-03-08

    Here, we study magnetic domains in Nd2Fe14B single crystals using high resolution magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Previous MFM studies and small angle neutron scattering experiments suggested the presence of nanoscale domains in addition to optically detected micrometer-scale ones. We find, in addition to the elongated, wavy nanodomains reported by a previous MFM study, that the micrometer-sized, star-shaped fractal pattern is constructed of an elongated network of nanodomains ~20 nm in width, with resolution-limited domain walls thinner than 2 nm. While the microscopic domains exhibit significant resilience to an external magnetic field, some of the nanodomains are sensitive to the magneticmore » field of the MFM tip.« less

  19. Current induced perpendicular-magnetic-anisotropy racetrack memory with magnetic field assistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Klein, J.-O.; Chappert, C.; Ravelosona, D.; Zhao, W. S.

    2014-01-20

    High current density is indispensable to shift domain walls (DWs) in magnetic nanowires, which limits the using of racetrack memory (RM) for low power and high density purposes. In this paper, we present perpendicular-magnetic-anisotropy (PMA) Co/Ni RM with global magnetic field assistance, which lowers the current density for DW motion. By using a compact model of PMA RM and 40 nm design kit, we perform mixed simulation to validate the functionality of this structure and analyze its density potential. Stochastic DW motion behavior has been taken into account and statistical Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out to evaluate its reliability performance.

  20. Modeling the Sedimentation of Red Blood Cells in Flow under Strong External Magnetic Body Force using a Lattice Boltzmann Fictitious Domain Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xing; Lin, Guang

    2014-11-01

    To model the sedimentation of the red blood cell (RBC) in a square duct and a circular pipe, the recently developed technique derived from the lattice Boltzmann method and the distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain method (LBM-DLM/FD) is extended to employ the mesoscopic network model for simulations of the sedimentation of the RBC in flow. The flow is simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method with a strong magnetic body force, while the network model is used for modeling RBC deformation. The fluid-RBC interactions are enforced by the Lagrange multiplier. The sedimentation of the RBC in a square duct and a circular pipe is simulated, revealing the capacity of the current method for modeling the sedimentation of RBC in various flows. Numerical results illustrate that that the terminal setting velocity increases with the increment of the exerted body force. The deformation of the RBC has significant effect on the terminal setting velocity due to the change of the frontal area. The larger the exerted force is, the smaller the frontal area and the larger deformation of the RBC are.

  1. Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Walls | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned Carbon Walls American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned Carbon Walls

  2. Fast chirality reversal of the magnetic vortex by electric current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, W. L. Liu, R. H.; Urazhdin, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Erokhin, S. G.; Berkov, D.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of high-density information encoding in magnetic materials by topologically stable inhomogeneous magnetization configurations such as domain walls, skyrmions, and vortices has motivated intense research into mechanisms enabling their control and detection. While the uniform magnetization states can be efficiently controlled by electric current using magnetic multilayer structures, this approach has proven much more difficult to implement for inhomogeneous states. Here, we report direct observation of fast reversal of magnetic vortex by electric current in a simple planar structure based on a bilayer of spin Hall material Pt with a single microscopic ferromagnetic disk contacted by asymmetric electrodes. The reversal is enabled by a combination of the chiral Oersted field and spin current generated by the nonuniform current distribution in Pt. Our results provide a route for the efficient control of inhomogeneous magnetization configurations by electric current.

  3. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Bergren, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  4. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

    1987-10-06

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  5. System and method for manipulating domain pinning and reversal in ferromagnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silevitch, Daniel M.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2013-10-15

    A method for manipulating domain pinning and reversal in a ferromagnetic material comprises applying an external magnetic field to a uniaxial ferromagnetic material comprising a plurality of magnetic domains, where each domain has an easy axis oriented along a predetermined direction. The external magnetic field is applied transverse to the predetermined direction and at a predetermined temperature. The strength of the magnetic field is varied at the predetermined temperature, thereby isothermally regulating pinning of the domains. A magnetic storage device for controlling domain dynamics includes a magnetic hard disk comprising a uniaxial ferromagnetic material, a magnetic recording head including a first magnet, and a second magnet. The ferromagnetic material includes a plurality of magnetic domains each having an easy axis oriented along a predetermined direction. The second magnet is positioned adjacent to the magnetic hard disk and is configured to apply a magnetic field transverse to the predetermined direction.

  6. Dielectric and magnetic investigations of GaFeO{sub 3} single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srimathy, B. Bhaumik, Indranil Ganesamoorthy, S. Karnal, A. K. Kumar, J.

    2014-04-24

    Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties have been investigated for the polar ferrimagnet, GaFeO{sub 3} single crystals grown by optical floating zone technique. Phase formation was confirmed from X-ray diffraction. Hopping conduction mechanism of Fe{sup 2+} ions and oxygen vacancies contribute to the electric polarization and dielectric constant of the material. Disorderness in the cation site gives rise to the magnetic ordering and the splitting in the zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) magnetization curves reveals the movement of the domain walls.

  7. Critical role of domain crystallinity, domain purity and domain interface

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sharpness for reduced bimolecular recombination in polymer solar cells (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Critical role of domain crystallinity, domain purity and domain interface sharpness for reduced bimolecular recombination in polymer solar cells Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 30, 2017 Title: Critical role of domain crystallinity, domain purity and domain interface sharpness for reduced bimolecular recombination in polymer solar

  8. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abboud, R.G.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed are a magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly. 7 figs.

  9. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abboud, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly.

  10. FINAL REPORT: FG02-01ER-45906 - A novel class of artificially modulated magnetic multilayers based on magnetic shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, H. D.

    2005-06-20

    The temperature dependent micromagnetic behavior, structural phase transitions, magnetic transition, and the dynamics of phase transitions have been investigated using magnetic shape memory alloys. Results provide a novel concept of ?polymagnets?. In thin film form the number of martensite variants is greatly reduced. A new technique to study dynamics of magnetic phase transitions has been developed applicable to bulk, thin films or multilayers. Transition pathways in magnetic shape memory alloys are as follows: Structural transitions followed by magnetic transition on cooling, and magnetic transition followed by structural transition on heating. The anisotropy of exchange spring mulilayers is greatly sensitive to substrate constraints, and shows a marked rotational hysteresis at lower temperatures. Results also show that a large reduction in coercivity of multilayers is a direct result of broadening of domain wall width by interlayer magnetostatic interactions.

  11. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  12. Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara, A.; Aliev, F. G.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Prieto, J. L.; Huth, M.

    2014-11-03

    The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

  13. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  14. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  15. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  16. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant with Thick Liquid-Walls Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant with Thick ...

  17. Resistive and ferritic-wall plasma dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Kaplan, E. J.; Katz, N.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Rahbarnia, K.; Forest, C. B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States); Spence, E. J. [Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We numerically study the effects of varying electric conductivity and magnetic permeability of the bounding wall on a kinematic dynamo in a sphere for parameters relevant to Madison plasma dynamo experiment. The dynamo is excited by a laminar, axisymmetric flow of von Karman type. The flow is obtained as a solution to the Navier-Stokes equation for an isothermal fluid with a velocity profile specified at the sphere's boundary. The properties of the wall are taken into account as thin-wall boundary conditions imposed on the magnetic field. It is found that an increase in the permeability of the wall reduces the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr}. An increase in the conductivity of the wall leaves Rm{sub cr} unaffected but reduces the dynamo growth rate.

  18. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  19. The effect of boron doping on crystal structure, magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect of DyCo2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, C. L.; Liu, J.; Mudryk, Y.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Long, Y.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2015-12-19

    In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic entropy changes of DyCo2Bx (x=0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2) alloys were investigated. The Curie temperature (TC) increases with increasing B concentration. The frequency dependence of ac magnetic susceptibility of DyCo2 caused by the narrow domain wall pinning effect is depressed by B doping, but the coercivity and the magnetic viscosity are prominently increased in the B doped alloys. The magnetic transition nature of DyCo2Bx changes from the first-order to the second-order with increasing x, which leads to the decrease of the maximum magnetic entropy change. However, the relative cooling power (RCP) ofmore » DyCo2 and the B doped alloys remains nearly constant.« less

  20. The effect of boron doping on crystal structure, magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect of DyCo2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, C. L.; Liu, J.; Mudryk, Y.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Long, Y.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2015-12-19

    The magnetic properties and magnetic entropy changes of DyCo2Bx (x=0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2) alloys were investigated. The Curie temperature (TC) increases with increasing B concentration. The frequency dependence of ac magnetic susceptibility of DyCo2 caused by the narrow domain wall pinning effect is depressed by B doping, but the coercivity and the magnetic viscosity are prominently increased in the B doped alloys. The magnetic transition nature of DyCo2Bx changes from the first-order to the second-order with increasing x, which leads to the decrease of the maximum magnetic entropy change. Furthermore, the relative cooling power (RCP) of DyCo2 and themore » B doped alloys remains nearly constant.« less

  1. Imaging of magnetic DW injection processed in patterened Ni80Fe20 structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, M. T.; Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Schrefl, T.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-03-23

    Magnetization reversal in patterned ferromagnetic nanowires usually occurs via domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation from one end (or both ends) of the wire which can be significantly reduced by a large, magnetically soft pad on one of the wire ends. These 'nucleation pads' reverse at lower fields than an isolated nanowire and introduce a DW to the wire from the wire end attached to the pad. Once a critical 'injection' field is reached, the DW sweeps through the wire, reversing its magnetization. Nucleation pads are frequently used as part of nanowire devices and experimental structures. Magnetic-field-driven shift register memory can include an injection pad to write data while those attached to nanowire spiral turn sensors act as both a source and sink of domain walls. Both of these devices use two-dimensional wire circuits and therefore require the use of orthogonal in-plane magnetic fields to drive domain walls through wires of different orientations. These bi-axial fields can significantly alter the fields at which DW injection occurs and control the number of different injection modes. We have used magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) [6] providing 25nm spatial resolution to image the evolution of magnetization configurations in patterned 24nm thick Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} rectangular nucleation pads and attached wires during DW injection. The structures consisted of 2 {micro}m x 3 {micro}m nucleation pads with wires of width 200 nm, 300 nm or 500 nm attached Comparing the magnetic configuration of the injection pads with micromagnetic models, we find that the relative orientation of closure domains in the remanent magnetization configuration of injection pads determines the reversal pathway that follows, although this is further affected by applied transverse fields. Micromagnetic simulations were performed using a hybrid finite element/boundary element code. The magnetic elements were designed with 20 nm thickness and discretized into a mesh of tetrahedral elements with a maximum cell size of 20 nm. Material properties for bulk permalloy were used, i.e. exchange stiffness A = 1.3 x 10{sup -11} J/m, saturation magnetization M{sub S} = 800 kA/m, magneto-crystalline anisotropy K = 0 Jm{sup -3}, damping constant a = 0.01. A linearly increasing magnetic field (1 Oe/ns) was applied parallel to the wire long axis to simulate switching fields. The dimensions of the simulated structures mimicked the essential features of the experimental structures, although edge roughness was neglected from the model. The remanent magnetization state of the pad with no transverse field consists of a uniform magnetization aligned with the wire axis, with closure domains at the edges facing and joining the wire. When H{sub y} = 0 Oe and H{sub x} = 20 Oe, the magnetization state of the pad buckles, forming eight domains, half of which have magnetizations rotated away from the x-axis. As H{sub x} is increased, the rotation of the domains become larger and the non-rotated domains shrink A transverse field applied in addition to the axial field exhibits a more complex modes of magnetization reversal in the pad (Fig. 1). We understand the pathway of pad magnetization more generally by using micromagnetic simulations. Two initial configurations are shown in Fig. 2 with the closure domain on the left-hand edge of the pad either parallel or anti-parallel to both closure domains on the righthand edges of the pad. As H{sub x} is increased to inject a domain wall, the pad magnetization states changed to vortex states, as observed by M-TXM. At higher fields, the magnetization of the modeled pad became single-domain, although closure domains remained at fields up to H{sub x} = 90 Oe. This supports the suggestion that experimentally observed multi-modal injection is due to the magnetization state of the pad. In summary, the relative orientation of closure domains in the pads determines the magnetization reversal pathway under an axial field. However, the addition of transverse fields can alter these and lead to the pads undergoing reversal under lower axial fields. Our observations have wider implications for experiments and devices using patterned magnetic wires.

  2. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-06-26

    Heterogeneity in magnetization (M) is ubiquitous in modern systems. Even in nominally homogeneous materials, domains or pinning centers typically mediate magnetization reversal. Fundamental lengths determining M structure include the domain wall width and the exchange stiffness length, typically in the 4-400 nm range. Chemical heterogeneity (phase separation, polycrystalline microstructure, lithographic or other patterning, etc.) with length scales from nanometers to microns is often introduced to influence magnetic properties. With 1-2 nm wavelengths {lambda}, soft x-rays in principle can resolve structure down to {lambda}/2, and are well suited to study these mesoscopic length scales [1, 2]. This article highlights recent advances in resonant soft x-ray methods to resolve lateral magnetic structure [3], and discusses some of their relative merits and limitations. Only techniques detecting x-ray photons (rather than photo-electrons) are considered [4], since they are compatible with strong applied fields to probe relatively deeply into samples. The magneto-optical (MO) effects discovered by Faraday and Kerr were observed in the x-ray range over a century later, first at ''hard'' wavelengths in diffraction experiments probing interatomic magnetic structure [5]. In the soft x-ray range, magnetic linear [6] and circular [7] dichroism spectroscopies first developed that average over lateral magnetic structure. These large resonant MO effects enable different approaches to study magnetic structure or heterogeneity that can be categorized as microscopy or scattering [1]. Direct images of magnetic structure result from photo-emission electron microscopes [4, 8] and zone-plate microscopes [9, 10]. Scattering techniques extended into the soft x-ray include familiar specular reflection that laterally averages over structure but can provide depth-resolved information, and diffuse scattering and diffraction that provide direct information about lateral magnetic structure. Scattering techniques are further classified as partially for fully coherent according to the extent of transverse coherence of the incident beam.

  3. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Charged Domain Walls in Ferroelectrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ceramics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) Lausanne 1015, Switzerland CNMS D D I I S S C C O O V V E E R R Y Y SEMINAR SERIES Abstract: A ferroelectric...

  4. Dynamic domain walls in a Maxwell-dilaton background (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10.1103PhysRevD.78.084008; (c) 2008 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Country of Publication: United States Language: ...

  5. Tokamak reactor first wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

    1984-11-20

    This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

  6. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  7. Jamming Behavior of Domains in a Spiral Antiferromagnetic System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jamming Behavior of Domains in a Spiral Antiferromagnetic System Jamming Behavior of Domains in a Spiral Antiferromagnetic System Print Tuesday, 04 June 2013 13:34 This schematic of x-ray scattering is from a spiral antiferromagnet with a spin structure that gives rise to domains with jamming behavior. Using resonant magnetic x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, this research shows that the domains of a spiral antiferromagnet enter a jammed state at the onset of long-range order. Researchers

  8. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  9. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant with Thick

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Liquid-Walls (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant with Thick Liquid-Walls Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant with Thick Liquid-Walls A fusion power plant is described that utilizes a new version of the tandem mirror device including spinning liquid walls. The magnetic configuration is evaluated with an axisymmetric equilibrium code predicting an average

  10. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a patterned structure on a longer mesoscopic length scale. One way for this pattern to emerge from building blocks that are nominally random and disordered is through hidden...

  11. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of the most powerful tools in the mathematics of science, from the physics of elementary particles to macroscopic matter, is symmetry, no doubt reflecting the...

  12. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.A.

    2011-01-28

    Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

  13. Lifshitz metal–insulator transition induced by the all-in/all-out magnetic order in the pyrochlore oxide Cd{sub 2}Os{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiroi, Z. Hirose, T.; Nagashima, I.; Okamoto, Y.; Yamaura, J.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the metal–insulator transition (MIT) of the osmium pyrochlore oxide Cd{sub 2}Os{sub 2}O{sub 7} through transport and magnetization measurements. The MIT and a magnetic transition to the all-in/all-out (AIAO) order occur simultaneously at 227 K. We propose a mechanism based on a Lifshitz transition induced by the AIAO magnetic order probably via strong spin–orbit couplings in the specific semimetallic band structure. It is suggested, moreover, that two observed puzzles, a finite conductivity near T = 0 and an emergence of weak ferromagnetic moments, are not bulk properties but originate at magnetic domain walls between two kinds of AIAO domains.

  14. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  15. Polarization reversal and domain kinetics in magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Labfer Ltd., 620014 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Chuvakova, M. A. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-13

    The polarization reversal process has been studied in 1?mol.?% MgO doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (LT) single crystal. The revealed stages of domain structure evolution represent (1) continuous nucleation and growth of isolated hexagonal domains with walls oriented along Y directions and (2) continuous motion of the plane domain walls stimulated by merging with isolated domains. The activation field dependence of the switching time has been revealed. The coercive field for quasi-static switching is about 150?V/mm. The bulk screening process has been analyzed. The main parameters of the switching process have been compared with other representatives of LT family.

  16. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, Lois; Mantha, Pallavi

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  17. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  18. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  19. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anna Wall

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anna Wall Photo of Anna Wall Anna Wall is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Energy Technologies Analyst On staff since April 2014 Phone number: 303-384-6887 E-mail: anna.wall@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geochemistry (aqueous and hard rock), with applications to geothermal resource characterization and mineral carbon sequestration Ratings methodologies and energy resource reporting standards Sustainable equity finance:

  20. Bumper wall for plasma device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coultas, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    Operation of a plasma device such as a reactor for controlled thermonuclear fusion is facilitated by an improved bumper wall enclosing the plasma to smooth the flow of energy from the plasma as the energy impinges upon the bumper wall. The bumper wall is flexible to withstand unequal and severe thermal shocks and it is readily replaced at less expense than the cost of replacing structural material in the first wall and blanket that surround it.

  1. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print Wednesday, 26 October 2005 00:00 The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over

  2. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fusion Energy PowerPlant with Thick Liquid-Walls Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant with Thick ...

  3. Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains in laser-irradiated Fe3%Si(110) steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwata, Keiji; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Orihara, Hideto; Sakai, Yusuke; Ohya, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Tamaki; Shobu, Takahisa; Akita, Koichi; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2015-05-07

    Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains occurring in laser-irradiated Fe3%Si(110) steels was investigated using high-energy X-ray analysis and domain theory based on the variational principle. The measured triaxial stresses inside the specimen were compressive and the stress in the rolling direction became more dominant than stresses in the other directions. The calculations based on the variational principle of magnetic energy for closure domains showed that the measured triaxial stresses made the closure domains more stable than the basic domain without closure domains. The experimental and calculation results reveal that the laser-introduced internal stresses result in the occurrence of the closure domains.

  4. MAYmw Wall0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,...-. ~_I : Cd.0 / ., j: ' ! -;:---- /,5l2 MAYmw Wall0 50 l/89 NE-23 NE-23 List of California Sites Hattie Carwell. SAN/NSQA Division Attached for your information is the list of California sites we identified in our search of Manhattdn Engineer District records for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). None of the facilities listed qualified for FUSRAP,'Vhe;:only'site in California that was included in FUSRAP was Gilman Hall on the University of California-Berkeley

  5. Micromagnetic analysis of dynamical bubble-like solitons based on the time domain evolution of the topological density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puliafito, Vito Azzerboni, Bruno; Finocchio, Giovanni; Torres, Luis; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2014-05-07

    Dynamical bubble-like solitons have been recently investigated in nanocontact-based spin-torque oscillators with a perpendicular free layer. Those magnetic configurations can be excited also in different geometries as long as they consist of perpendicular materials. Thus, in this paper, a systematic study of the influence of both external field and high current on that kind of dynamics is performed for a spin-valve point-contact geometry where both free and fixed layers present strong perpendicular anisotropy. The usage of the topological density tool highlights the excitation of complex bubble/antibubble configurations. In particular, at high currents, a deformation of the soliton and its simultaneous shift from the contact area are observed and can be ascribable to the Oersted field. Results provide further detailed information on the excitation of solitons in perpendicular materials for application in spintronics, magnonics, and domain wall logic.

  6. Antiferromagnetism and domain effects in UPdSn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakotte, H. [Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States); Robinson, R.A.; Purwanto, A. [Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Tun, Z. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (CANADA)] [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (CANADA); Prokes, K.; Brueck, E.; de Boer, F.R. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, 1018 XE Amsterdam (The Netherlands)] [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, 1018 XE Amsterdam (The Netherlands)

    1998-10-01

    Neutron-diffraction experiments have been performed on a single crystal of the hexagonal noncollinear antiferromagnetic compound UPdSn as a function of temperature and magnetic field. The use of a special horizontal-field magnet (with very wide horizontal access to the neutron beams) has allowed the study of the principal magnetic Bragg reflections in all three antiferromagnetic domain pairs throughout the magnetic phase diagram for B{lt}3thinspT and T{gt}6thinspK. The data confirm a picture in which one domain pair (1) grows at the expense of the other two domain pairs (2 and 3), for fields along the [100] axis for domain 1. On the other hand, if the field is applied along the perpendicular axis, [010] for domain 1, the other two domains are preferred. These results are consistent with the picture given in a previous vertical-field study of only one magnetic reflection from one domain, in which the 3-T field-induced transition is viewed as a spin-flop transition. There is, however, a small amount of irreversible moment rotation (from {theta}=43{degree} to 48{degree}, where {theta} is the moment canting angle within the hexagonal basal plane), on passing through the spin-flop transition. This seems to be connected with whether the sample is single or multidomain. In addition, the field independence of the N{acute e}el temperature (T{sub N}=37thinspK) has been measured up to 3 T, and data on the domain kinetics are presented. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Influence of microstructural changes due to tempering at 923 K and 1,023 K on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior in normalized 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj, B.; Moorthy, V.; Vaidyanathan, S.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis has been used to characterize the microstructural changes in normalized and tempered 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel. It is observed that tempering at 923 K shows a single peak behavior up to 20 h and tempering at 1,023 K shows a two peak behavior. This has been explained on the basis of the two stage process of irreversible domain wall movement during magnetization, associated with two major obstacles to domain wall movement: namely lath/grain boundaries and secondary phase precipitates. At lower fields, existing reverse domain walls at lath/grain boundaries overcome the resistance offered by the grain boundaries and move to a distance before they are pined by the precipitates. Then, at higher field, they overcome these precipitates. These two processes occur over a range of critical field strengths with some mean values. If these two mean values are close to each other, then a single peak in the rms voltage of the magnetic Barkhausen noise, with the associated changes in its shape, is observed. On the other hand, if the mean values of the critical fields for these two barriers are widely separated, then a two peak behavior is the clear possibility. The effect of the microstructural changes due to tempering for different durations at 923 K and 1,023 K in 2.25 Cr-1Mo ferritic steel on magnetic Barkhausen noise is explained based on these two stage processes. The influence of high dislocation density in bainitic structure, dissociation of bainite, and precipitation of different carbides such as Fe{sub 3}C, Mo{sub 2}C, Cr{sub 7}Ce{sub 3}, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, etc., on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior has been analyzed in this study.

  8. Oven wall panel construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  9. Todd Vander Wall | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vander Wall Research Scientist Todd.Vander.Wall@nrel.gov | 303-384-7783 Research Interests Todd Vander Wall comes to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from the environmental and chemical engineering industry, where he focused on environmental chemistry. He originally designed and implemented methanogenesis systems for the growth and collection of biogenic methane from municipal solid waste. Following that, he performed in-situ investigations on thermogenic methane from subsurface

  10. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  11. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  12. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  13. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  14. Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments,

  15. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  17. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  18. Dynamics of spintronic materials: Exploration in the time and frequency domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabel, Hartmut

    2014-12-14

    X-ray and neutron reflectivity are mature experimental techniques for the exploration of film thicknesses and interface roughnesses on the nanoscale. Combining with photon and neutron polarization, these methods can be carried forward to the analysis of magnetic thin films and magnetic domain structures. New opportunities open up when these methods are used either in the time or in the frequency domain. Then dynamical processes can be studied such as domain oscillations, domain propagation, precession of spins, and damping effects. Two methods are discussed which have been developed recently: polarized neutron reflectivity from magnetic films in an alternating magnetic field and time resolved resonant magnetic x-ray reflectivity of the free precessional dynamics in films and multilayers.

  19. Magnetic charge crystals imaged in artificial spin ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    image of emergent domains of ordered magnetic charges in honeycomb artificial spin ice. The black and white dots in the image are the north and south magnetic poles of the...

  20. Investigation of coercivity mechanism in hot deformed Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, M., E-mail: masao-yano-aa@mail.toyota.co.jp; Manabe, A.; Shoji, T.; Kato, A. [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Ono, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Harada, M. [Toyota Central R and D Labs, Inc., Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-05-07

    The magnetic reversal behaviors of single domain sized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, with and without isolation between the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains, was clarified using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The SANS patterns obtained arose from changes in the magnetic domains and were analyzed using the TeubnerStray model, a phenomenological correlation length model, to quantify the periodicity and morphology of the magnetic domains. The results indicated that the magnetic reversal evolved with the magnetic domains that had similar sized grains. The grain isolation enabled us to realize the reversals of single domains.

  1. Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

  2. Security_Walls_VPP_Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recognized for Outstanding Safety CARLSBAD, N.M., May 10, 2013 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Security Walls, LLC, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP)...

  3. Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Print Tuesday, 21 May 2013 00:00 Research at the Advanced Light Source may lead to four-bit magnetic cells housed on nanoscale metal disks, instead of the two-bit magnetic domains of standard magnetic memories. In magnetic vortices, parallel electron spins point either clockwise or counterclockwise, while in their crowded centers the spins point either down or up. "From the

  4. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  5. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  6. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    Hysteresis loops and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in a single crystal α-iron containing a nonmagnetic particle were simulated based on the Laudau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The analyses of domain morphologies and hysteresis loops show that reversal magnetization process is control by nucleation of reversed domains at nonmagnetic particle when the particle size reaches a particle value. In such a situation, the value of nucleation field is determined by the size of nonmagnetic particles, and moreover, coercive field and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal are strongly affected by the nucleation field of reversed domains.

  7. Cosmic magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with the cosmic magnetism in a non-mathematical way. It uses Faraday's very powerful and highly pictorial concept of lines of magnetic force and their associated physical properties to explain the structure and behavior of magnetic fields in extraterrestrial objects. Contents include: forces of nature; magnetic field of earth; solar and interplanetary magnetic fields; magnetic fields in the solar system; stars and pulsars; and magnetic fields of the milky way and other galaxies.

  8. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  9. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  10. Apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oder, Robin R.; Jamison, Russell E.

    2010-02-09

    A magnetic separator vessel (1) for separating magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluid includes a separation chamber having an interior and exterior wall, a top and bottom portion; a magnet (3) having first and second poles (2) positioned adjacent to the exterior wall, wherein the first pole is substantially diametrically opposed to the second pole; a inlet port (5) is directed into the top portion of the separation chamber, wherein the inlet port (5) is positioned adjacent to one of the first and second poles (2), wherein the inlet port (5) is adapted to transfer a mixture into the separation chamber; an underflow port (6) in communication with the bottom portion, wherein the underflow port (6) is adapted to receive the magnetic particles; and an overflow port (9) in communication with the separation chamber, wherein the overflow port (9) is adapted to receive the non-magnetic fluid.

  11. Household magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Household magnets Chances are very good that you have experimented with magnets. People have been fascinated with magnetism for thousands of years. As familiar to us as they may be, magnets still have some surprises for us. Here is a small collection of some of our favorite magnet experiments. What happens when we break a magnet in half? Radio Shack sells cheap ceramic magnets in several shapes. Get a ring shaped magnet and break it with pliers or a tap with a hammer. Try to put it back

  12. Ternary superlattice boosting interface-stabilized magnetic chirality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K.; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Wu, Yizheng

    2015-02-09

    In cobalt-nickel multilayers grown on iridium surfaces, magnetic homo-chirality can be stabilized by Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI) at the interface with the substrate. When thickness of the multilayers is increased beyond threshold values, then non-chiral bulk properties exceed interface contributions and this type of chirality vanishes. Here, we use spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy to measure these thickness thresholds, and we determine estimates of the strength of the DMI from the measurements. Even though the same 5d heavy metal is used as a substrate, a remarkably large variation is found between the two 3d magnets: our results indicate that the strength of the DMI at Co/Ir interfaces is three times larger than at Ni/Ir interfaces. We show how this finding provides ways to extend interfacial-DMI stabilization of domain wall chirality to 3d/5d/3d ternary multilayers such as [Ni/Ir/Co]{sub n}. Such strategies may extend chirality-control to larger film thickness and a wider range of substrates, which may be useful for designing new spintronics devices.

  13. disrupting the plant cell wall

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dirty bomb About Counterterrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy recommendations required to advance U.S. nuclear counterterrorism and counterproliferation objectives. It executes a unique program of work focused solely on these missions and builds partnerships with U.S. government

    disrupting the plant cell wall - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy

  14. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain...

  15. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  16. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  17. Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon wall_system_innovations_kochkin.pdf More Documents & Publications Building America New Homes Case Study: Advanced Extended Plate and Beam Wall System in a Cold-Climate House Building

  18. Promising Technology: Cool Paints for Exterior Walls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cool Paints increase the solar reflectance of exterior walls. By reflecting more sunlight, the wall surface maintains a cooler temperature. This decrease in temperature leads to less heat transfer through the walls into the building. During the cooling season, the addition of cool paints can decrease the cooling load of the building.

  19. Magnetic anisotropy and domain patterning of amorphous films...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANISOTROPY; BORON ALLOYS; COBALT ALLOYS; FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; HELIUM IONS; ION BEAMS; IRON ALLOYS; IRRADIATION; KERR EFFECT; ...

  20. Response of a partial wall to an external perturbation of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atanasiu, C. V.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we present the response of a 3D thin multiply connected wall to an external kink mode perturbation in axisymmetric tokamak configurations. To calculate the contribution of the plasma perturbed magnetic field in the vacuum region, we have made use of the concept of surface currents [following C. V. Atanasiu, A. H. Boozer, L. E. Zakharov, and A. A. Subbotin, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2781 (1999)]. The wall response is expressed in terms of a stream function of the wall surface currents, which are obtained by solving a diffusion type equation, taking into account the contribution of the wall currents themselves iteratively. The use of stream function makes the approach applicable for both well-studied earlier Resistive Wall Modes and for Wall Touching Kink Modes, which were discovered recently as a key phenomenon in disruptions [L. E. Zakharov, S. A. Galkin, and S. N. Gerasimov, Phys. Plasmas 19, 055703 (2012)]. New analytical expressions, suitable for numerical calculations of toroidal harmonics of the vacuum magnetic fields from the surface currents on axisymmetric shells, are derived.

  1. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  2. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  3. Domain walls in a Born-Infeld-dilaton background (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10.1103PhysRevD.78.084023; (c) 2008 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Country of Publication: United States Language: ...

  4. Domain walls as dark energy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): LBNL--50255 R&D Project: PTHOPS; TRN: US0502453 DOE Contract Number: AC03-76SF00098 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical ...

  5. 2013 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wall Street Perspective on SMRs 2013 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs Summary of results of a 2013 survey on Wall Street attitudes toward small modular reactors. PDF icon 2013 Wall ...

  6. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  7. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  8. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  9. Textural break foundation wall construction modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

  10. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, Henry S.; Budny, Robert V.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.

    1988-01-01

    Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

  11. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  12. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-29

    A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

  13. CXD 4606, 9831 Wall Construction Project (4606)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9831 Wall Construction Project (4606) Y-12 Site Office Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee The proposed action is to upgrade of the existing contamination area associated with an...

  14. Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3936801, -79.7861577 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  15. Multiple moving wall dry coal extrusion pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2013-05-14

    A pump for transporting particulate material includes a passageway defined on each side between an inlet and an outlet by a moving wall.

  16. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  17. Living Walls | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems and the new field of biomimicry. Biomimicry is the science of imitating nature to solve human design problems. The Living Wall concept takes the principles behind...

  18. Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Water Wall Turbine Region: Canada Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.wwturbine.com This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  19. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  20. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  1. Mineral Magnetism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Magnetism 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:March 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Mineral Magnetism By understanding what makes a material magnetic, scientists want to create new strongly magnetic materials that don't rely on hard-to-get precursor elements. March 8, 2016 Small piles of rare earth elements In the United States, rare-earth elements used in strong magnets, such as neodymium and samarium, are scarce due to limits on foreign sources. CREDIT:

  2. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1 to 1 ), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  3. Wall current probe: A non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baude, R.; Gaboriau, F.; Hagelaar, G. J. M. [Universit de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion dnergie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France and CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062, Toulouse (France)] [Universit de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion dnergie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France and CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062, Toulouse (France)

    2013-08-15

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  4. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

  5. Liquid Wall Chambers (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Liquid Wall Chambers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Liquid Wall Chambers The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various

  6. Risk Assessment of Energy-Efficient Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B.; Hun, Diana E.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Kehrer, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    This multi-year project aims to provide the residential construction industry with energy-efficient wall designs that are moisture durable. The present work focused on the initial step of this project, which is to develop a moisture durability protocol that identifies energy efficient wall designs that have a low probability of experiencing moisture problems.

  7. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  8. Axial current generation by P-odd domains in QCD matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Yin, Yi; Lin, Shu

    2015-06-23

    The dynamics of topological domains which break parity (P) and charge-parity (CP) symmetry of QCD are studied. We derive in a general setting that those local domains will generate an axial current and quantify the strength of the induced axial current. Thus, our findings are verified in a top-down holographic model. The relation between the real time dynamics of those local domains and the chiral magnetic field is also elucidated. We finally argue that such an induced axial current would be phenomenologically important in a heavy-ion collisions experiment.

  9. A comparison of hydrogen vs. helium glow discharge effects on fusion device first-wall conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1989-09-01

    Hydrogen- and deuterium-fueled glow discharges are used for the initial conditioning of magnetic fusion device vacuum vessels following evacuation from atmospheric pressure. Hydrogenic glow discharge conditioning (GDC) significantly reduces the near-surface concentration of simple adsorbates, such as H/sub 2/O, CO, and CH/sub 4/, and lowers ion-induced desorption coefficients by typically three orders of magnitude. The time evolution of the residual gas production observed during hydrogen-glow discharge conditioning of the carbon first-wall structure of the TFTR device is similar to the time evolution observed during hydrogen GDC of the initial first-wall configuration in TFTR, which was primarily stainless steel. Recently, helium GDC has been investigated for several wall-conditioning tasks on a number of tokamaks including TFTR. Helium GDC shows negligible impurity removal with stainless steel walls. For impurity conditioning with carbon walls, helium GDC shows significant desorption of H/sub 2/O, CO, and CO/sub 2/; however, the total desorption yield is limited to the monolayer range. In addition, helium GDC can be used to displace hydrogen isotopes from the near-surface region of carbon first-walls in order to lower hydrogenic retention and recycling. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  11. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  12. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print Wednesday, 25 June 2008 00:00 At the ALS, an international team of researchers has...

  13. Magnetic filtration process, magnetic filtering material, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The present invention provides magnetically responsive activated carbon, and a method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon. The method of forming magnetically ...

  14. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates High performance walls represent a high priority...

  15. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  16. Method and apparatus for coupling seismic sensors to a borehole wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2005-03-15

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  17. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  18. Degradation of Algal Cell Walls by Enzymes and Dyes - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Degradation of Algal Cell Walls by Enzymes and Dyes National Renewable Energy Laboratory ... for extracting the oils from the cells by first weakening the cell walls using enzymes. ...

  19. Modification of Lignin Content of Plant Cell Walls - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Return to Search Modification of Lignin Content of Plant Cell Walls Brookhaven National ... methyltransferases to reduce the lignin content and cross-linking in plant cell walls. ...

  20. Modifications of the cell wall of yeasts grown on hexadecane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modifications of the cell wall of yeasts grown on hexadecane and under starvation conditions Title Modifications of the cell wall of yeasts grown on hexadecane and under starvation...

  1. 2014 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs - Report | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives on SMRs - Report 2014 Wall Street Perspectives on SMRs - Report Summary of the results of a 2014 survey of Wall Street attitudes toward small modular reactors. PDF ...

  2. Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Location Wall Lake IA Coordinates 42.281965, -95.094098 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  3. CBEI: Packaged Masonry Wall Retrofit Solution for Small and Medium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaged Masonry Wall Retrofit Solution for Small and Medium Sized Commercial Buildings - 2015 Peer Review CBEI: Packaged Masonry Wall Retrofit Solution for Small and Medium Sized ...

  4. MHK Technologies/Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Water Wall Turbine.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Water Wall Turbine Technology Type Click...

  5. Lanzhou Great Wall Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wall Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lanzhou Great Wall Development Co., Ltd. Place: Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China Zip: 730000 Sector: Hydro Product:...

  6. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis This report considers a number of promising wall systems with improved thermal control to improve ...

  7. Building America Case Study: Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Case Study Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer Fans Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer Fans Location: Pittsburgh, ...

  8. YMGI Through-the-Wall Air Conditioner Determined Noncompliant...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    YMGI Through-the-Wall Air Conditioner Determined Noncompliant With Energy Efficiency Standard YMGI Through-the-Wall Air Conditioner Determined Noncompliant With Energy Efficiency ...

  9. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

  10. Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotubesilica composite materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotubesilica composite materials ...

  11. Enhanced magnetic hysteresis in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal and its influence on magnetic shape memory effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heczko, O. Drahokoupil, J.; Straka, L.

    2015-05-07

    Enhanced magnetic hysteresis due to boron doping in combination with magnetic shape memory effect in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal results in new interesting functionality of magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys such as mechanical demagnetization. In Ni{sub 50.0}Mn{sub 28.5}Ga{sub 21.5} single crystal, the boron doping increased magnetic coercivity from few Oe to 270?Oe while not affecting the transformation behavior and 10?M martensite structure. However, the magnetic field needed for MSM effect also increased in doped sample. The magnetic behavior is compared to undoped single crystal of similar composition. The evidence from the X-ray diffraction, magnetic domain structure, magnetization loops, and temperature evolution of the magnetic coercivity points out that the enhanced hysteresis is caused by stress-induced anisotropy.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures. In-situ TEM Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Xiaoqing

    2015-06-30

    The goal of this project was to explore the structure and dynamic behaviors of ferroelectric domains in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques in close collaboration with phase field modeling. The experimental techniques used include aberration-corrected sub-Å resolution TEM and in-situ TEM using a novel scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) - TEM holder that allows the direct observation of nucleation and dynamic evolution of ferroelectric domains under applied electric field. Specifically, this project was aimed to (1) to study the roles of static electrical boundary conditions and electrical charge in controlling the equilibrium domain structures of BiFeO3 thin films with controlled substrate constraints, (2) to explore the fundamental mechanisms of ferroelectric domain nucleation, growth, and switching under an applied electric field in both uniform thin films and nanostructures, and to understand the roles of crystal defects such as dislocations and interfaces in these processes, (3) to understand the physics of ferroelectric domain walls and the influence of defects on the electrical switching of ferroelectric domains.

  13. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  14. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references.

  15. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  16. Building a barrier wall through boulders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, D.R.; Mann, M.J. ); Tulett, R.C. )

    1994-10-01

    When the Occidental Chemical Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y., set out to remediate and contain wastes and ground water at its upstate New York site, they found that part of the proposed cutoff wall would be located in land reclaimed from the Niagara River. The fill was rock blasted out for a tunnel years ago, and the presence of boulders rule out conventional barrier-wall construction techniques. Occidental's first approach to containment had been a conventional soil-bentonite wall. Because of the area's geography and the location of the wastes, a portion of the wall had to be aligned along the riverbank. The company wanted to separate the plant area from the river, and decided to extend the barrier to the concrete headwall for intakes at the nearby Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant. This meant about 2,000 ft of the barrier wall would run through shot-rock fill placed during construction of the powerplant in the 1960s. Conduits for that plant were constructed by blasting rock to form open-cut tunnels several miles long. Some of the resulting shot rock was placed along the riverbank, extending the shoreline about 200 ft into the river near the now-contaminated site. The Rober Moses Parkway, a four-land highway, was constructed on the reclaimed land about 100 ft from the new shoreline.

  17. INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Arney, Ph.D.

    2002-12-31

    The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

  18. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  19. Wood Pulp Digetster Wall Corrosion Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, GE

    2003-09-18

    The modeling of the flow in a wood pulp digester is but one component of the investigation of the corrosion of digesters. This report describes the development of a Near-Wall-Model (NWM) that is intended to couple with a CFD model that determines the flow, heat, and chemical species transport and reaction within the bulk flow of a digester. Lubrication theory approximations were chosen from which to develop a model that could determine the flow conditions within a thin layer near the vessel wall using information from the interior conditions provided by a CFD calculation of the complete digester. The other conditions will be determined by coupled solutions of the wood chip, heat, and chemical species transport and chemical reactions. The NWM was to couple with a digester performance code in an iterative fashion to provide more detailed information about the conditions within the NW region. Process Simulations, Ltd (PSL) is developing the digester performance code. This more detailed (and perhaps more accurate) information from the NWM was to provide an estimate of the conditions that could aggravate the corrosion at the wall. It is intended that this combined tool (NWM-PSL) could be used to understand conditions at/near the wall in order to develop methods to reduce the corrosion. However, development and testing of the NWM flow model took longer than anticipated and the other developments (energy and species transport, chemical reactions and linking with the PSL code) were not completed. The development and testing of the NWM are described in this report. In addition, the investigation of the potential effects of a clear layer (layer reduced in concentration of wood chips) near the wall is reported in Appendix D. The existence of a clear layer was found to enhance the flow near the wall.

  20. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, Scott D.; Farrington, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  1. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  2. Cell Wall Recipe: A Lesson on Biofuels

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will investigate how changes in the DNA sequence that codes for cell wall formation can have a favorable outcome in producing plants that have higher levels of cellulose than the parent plant. The cellulose yield is most important in the production of ethanol: the greater the amount of cellulose within the cell wall, the greater the amount of ethanol that can be produced. To engage students, the first part of this lesson has students participating in a discovery activity where they will extract DNA from wheat germ.

  3. Using Non-Government Domain Names

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There may be occasion where it is necessary to utilize a non-government domain. The OMB Policies for Federal Agency Public Websites  states:

  4. A Geometric Rendezvous-Based Domain Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Wisconsin - Madison 1500 Engineering Dr. Madison, WI 53716 sslattery@wisc.edu March 20, 2013 1 A Geometric Rendezvous-Based Domain Model for Data Transfer...

  5. Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology Justin Coleman, P.E. Nuclear Science and Technology Idaho National Laboratory October 22, 2014

  6. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite ? and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for ??=?0 and the marginal stability values ?{sub rp,rw}?wall; resistive plasma, ideal wall; ideal plasma, resistive wall; and ideal plasma, ideal wall) are computed for both models. The main results are: (a) imaginary gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below ?{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above ?{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with ??>??{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below ?{sub rp,iw}.

  7. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Underlying the magnetocaloric effect is the idea that magnetism is the result of the ... with the magnetic field, the magnetic entropy (disorder) of the system decreases; if ...

  8. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures. Not Your Mother's Refrigerator Magnets Some day soon, magnets could do more than clutter up the front of your...

  9. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C.; Mahan, Archie H.; Alleman, Jeffrey L.

    2010-10-26

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  10. Ionic field effect and memristive phenomena in single-point ferroelectric domain switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ievlev, Anton; Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Electric field induced polarization switching underpins most functional applications of ferroelectric materials in information technology, materials science, and optoelectronics. In the last 20 years, much attention has been focused on the switching of individual domains using scanning probe microscopy, both as model of ferroelectric data storage and approach to explore fundamental physics of ferroelectric switching. The classical picture of tip induced switching includes formation of cylindrical domain oriented along the tip field, with the domain size is largely determined by the tip-induced field distribution and domain wall motion kinetics. The polarization screening is recognized as a necessary precondition to the stability of ferroelectric phase; however, screening processes are generally considered to be uniformly efficient and not leading to changes in switching behavior. Here, we demonstrate that single-point tip-induced polarization switching can give rise to a surprisingly broad range of domain morphologies, including radial and angular instabilities. These behaviors are traced to the surface screening charge dynamics, which in some cases can even give rise to anomalous switching against the electric field (ionic field effect). The implications of these behaviors for ferroelectric materials and devices are discussed.

  11. Solution structure of telomere binding domain of AtTRB2 derived from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won Kyung; Kim, Heeyoun; Kim, Eunhee; Cheong, Chaejoon; Cho, Myeon Haeng; Lee, Weontae

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • We have determined solution structure of Myb domain of AtTRB2. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 is located in the N-terminal region. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 binds to plant telomeric DNA without fourth helix. • Helix 2 and 3 of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 are involved in DNA recognition. • AtTRB2 is a novel protein distinguished from other known plant TBP. - Abstract: Telomere homeostasis is regulated by telomere-associated proteins, and the Myb domain is well conserved for telomere binding. AtTRB2 is a member of the SMH (Single-Myb-Histone)-like family in Arabidopsis thaliana, having an N-terminal Myb domain, which is responsible for DNA binding. The Myb domain of AtTRB2 contains three α-helices and loops for DNA binding, which is unusual given that other plant telomere-binding proteins have an additional fourth helix that is essential for DNA binding. To understand the structural role for telomeric DNA binding of AtTRB2, we determined the solution structure of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 (AtTRB2{sub 1–64}) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, the inter-molecular interaction between AtTRB2{sub 1–64} and telomeric DNA has been characterized by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and NMR titration analyses for both plant (TTTAGGG)n and human (TTAGGG)n telomere sequences. Data revealed that Trp28, Arg29, and Val47 residues located in Helix 2 and Helix 3 are crucial for DNA binding, which are well conserved among other plant telomere binding proteins. We concluded that although AtTRB2 is devoid of the additional fourth helix in the Myb-extension domain, it is able to bind to plant telomeric repeat sequences as well as human telomeric repeat sequences.

  12. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skladzien, S.B.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-08-18

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having walls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. Two magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180/sup 0/ apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  13. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domainsmore » on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.« less

  14. Permanent-magnet flowmeter having improved output-terminal means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    August, C.; Myers, H.J.

    1981-10-26

    Disclosed is an improved permanent magnet flowmeter capable of withstanding bending stresses in the direction of induced emf signals. The flowmeter includes a unique terminal arrangement integrally formed with the flowmeter by trepanning opposing wall sections of the flowmeter body. The terminal arrangement provides increased flowmeter sensitivity by increasing the strength of the induced emf signals.

  15. Permanent magnet flowmeter having improved output terminal means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    August, Charles; Myers, Harry J.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved permanent magnet flowmeter capable of withstanding bending stresses in the direction of induced emf signals. The flowmeter includes a unique terminal arrangement integrally formed with the flowmeter by trepanning opposing wall sections of the flowmeter body. The terminal arrangement provides increased flowmeter sensitivity by increasing the strength of the induced emf signals.

  16. Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  17. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Caporaso, George J.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    1998-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  18. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-09-22

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

  19. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0?57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  20. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowring, D.L.; DeMello, A.J.; Lambert, A.R.; Li, D.; Virostek,, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R.B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  1. Helium Pumping Wall for a Liquid Lithium Tokamak Richard Majeski...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wall for a Liquid Lithium Tokamak Richard Majeski This invention is designed to be a subsystem of a device, a tokamak with walls or plasma facing components of liquid lithium. ...

  2. 2014 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspective on SMRs 2014 Wall Street Perspective on SMRs Summary briefing on the results of a 2014 survey of Wall Street attitudes toward SMRs. PDF icon 2014 New Generation ...

  3. TBU-0061- In the Matter of Misti Wall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Misti Wall (the complainant or Wall), appeals the dismissal of her complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. As...

  4. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-R Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research on high-R-value walls showing the difference between rated and whole wall R values and the need for vented cladding to reduce condensation potential with some insulation types.

  5. City of Wall Lake, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Wall Lake, Iowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Wall Lake Place: Iowa Phone Number: (712) 664-2216 Website: walllake.com?pageid40 Outage...

  6. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D.

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  7. Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' DEC 5 1984 Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Mr. Wallo: The Divisfon of Remedial Action Projects staff has reviewed the authority review documents for Gardinler, Inc., Tampa, Florida; Conserv (formerly Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co.), Nichols, Florida; and Blockson Chemical co., Joliet, Illinois. Based on the content therein and in consultation with Mr. Steve Miller, Office of General Counsel

  8. new chemistry to break down cell walls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    new chemistry to break down cell walls - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  9. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  10. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howson, P.E.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-08-06

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  11. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howson, Paul E.; Mackenzie, Patricia D.; Horney, David P.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons.

  12. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we can understand the movement of the electronic domain structure. A typical image from a digital camera for x rays (CCD) showing a soft x-ray speckle pattern. The close-up...

  13. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the...

  14. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technique with photons of light that have wavelengths a billion times smaller than radio waves in order to study their domain motion. By using these soft x rays generated at...

  15. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print Wednesday, 25 June 2008 00:00 At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of

  16. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, Peter (East Brunswick, NJ)

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  17. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  18. Protective interior wall and attach8ing means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, Richard D.; Upham, Gerald A.; Anderson, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    An array of connected plates mounted on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel of a magnetic confinement reactor in order to provide a protective surface for energy deposition inside the vessel. All fasteners are concealed and protected beneath the plates, while the plates themselves share common mounting points. The entire array is installed with torqued nuts on threaded studs; provision also exists for thermal expansion by mounting each plate with two of its four mounts captured in an oversize grooved spool. A spool-washer mounting hardware allows one edge of a protective plate to be torqued while the other side remains loose, by simply inverting the spool-washer hardware.

  19. Cutting assembly including expanding wall segments of auger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treuhaft, Martin B.; Oser, Michael S.

    1983-01-01

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  20. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-04-20

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  1. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2011-03-29

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  2. Superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  3. Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fong, James T. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1996-01-01

    A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

  4. Try This: Household Magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Household Magnets Household Magnets Chances are very good that you have experimented with magnets. People have been fascinated with magnetism for thousands of years. As familiar to us as they may be, magnets still have some surprises for us. Here is a small collection of some of our favorite magnet experiments. What happens when we break a magnet in half? Radio Shack sells cheap ceramic magnets in several shapes. Get a ring shaped magnet and break it with pliers or a tap with a hammer. Try to

  5. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  6. Formation of a regular domain structure in TGS–TGS + Cr crystals with a profile impurity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belugina, N. V. Gainutdinov, R. V.; Tolstikhina, A. L.; Ivanova, E. S.; Kashevich, I. F.; Shut, V. N.; Mozzharov, S. E.

    2015-07-15

    A complex investigation of TGS–TGS + Cr crystals with a profile impurity distribution of chromium ions Cr{sup 3+} has been carried out at the macrolevel (measurement of dielectric properties by the method of nematic liquid crystals) and microlevel (domain structure according to atomic force microscopy data). It is established that periodic doped layers are formed only in individual growth pyramids in the regions where the polarization vector has a nonzero component along the normal to the growth faces rather than throughout the entire crystal volume. The domain configuration at the boundary of growth layers with different impurity compositions has been studied by piezoelectric force microscopy. The static unipolarity of layers with and without chromium impurity is approximately identical, whereas the domain-wall density in doped regions is higher than that in undoped ones by a factor of about 7.

  7. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Xu, Liming; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  8. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  9. On the predictability of the orientation of protein domains joined...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of protein domains joined by a spanning alpha-helical linker Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the predictability of the orientation of protein domains ...

  10. Molecular functions of the TLE tetramerization domain in Wnt...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular functions of the TLE tetramerization domain in Wnt target gene repression Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular functions of the TLE tetramerization domain ...

  11. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda...

  12. Category:Time-Domain Electromagnetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Time-Domain Electromagnetics page? For detailed...

  13. Jamming Behavior of Domains in a Spiral Antiferromagnetic System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jamming Behavior of Domains in a Spiral Antiferromagnetic System Jamming Behavior of Domains in a Spiral Antiferromagnetic System Print Tuesday, 04 June 2013 13:34 This schematic...

  14. Ferroelasticity and domain physics in two-dimensional transition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Ferroelasticity and domain physics in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers Prev Next Title: Ferroelasticity and domain physics in ...

  15. Statistical and Domain Analytics Applied to PV Module Lifetime...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statistical and Domain Analytics Applied to PV Module Lifetime and Degradation Science Statistical and Domain Analytics Applied to PV Module Lifetime and Degradation Science ...

  16. Ordered Mesoporous CMK-5 Carbon with Ultra-Thin Pore Walls and Highly Dispersed Nickel Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulvio, Pawquale F; Liang, Chengdu; Dai, Sheng; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2009-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous CMK-5 carbons with ultra-thin carbon pore walls and highly dispersed Ni nanoparticles have been successfully prepared by using two different SBA-15 silicas as hard templates and 2, 3-di-hydroxynaphtalene (DHN) as a carbon precursor. The nickel precursor was a concentrated nickel nitrate hexahydrate [Ni(NO3)2.6H2O] solution in isopropanol added to the carbon-silica nanocomposites prior to thermal treatments. The samples studied were analyzed by thermogravimetry (TG), nitrogen adsorption at -196 C, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and in situ electron diffraction X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). While TG revealed carbon contents lower than 30 wt%, nitrogen adsorption provided information about homogeneity of carbon thin film deposited onto mesopore walls of ordered silica templates, SBA-15. The templates, carbon-silica nanocomposites and carbon inverse replicas with nickel nanoparticles exhibited uniform pores, high surface areas and large pore volumes. Graphitic carbon was identified by the presence of a characteristic G band on Raman spectra, whereas the diffraction peak attributed to the stacking of graphene planes was not observed by powder XRD.The presence of ordered domains in the carbon materials studied was confirmed by small angle XRD and STEM imaging. In addition, the STEM images revealed that the nickel nanoparticles were uniform in size, ~3nm, and were homogeneously dispersed within ordered tubular carbon walls. A few larger clusters of nickel, ~60nm, present on the external surface, were identified by powder XRD as metallic Ni. The in situ EDX revealed that the small nanoparticles were largely composed of Ni with traces of NiO. Similar nanoparticles dispersions have been reported only for Ni-containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), whereas previously reported ordered mesoporous carbons possessed larger Ni/NiO nanoparticles within CMK-3 nanostructure.

  17. Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson

    2010-02-01

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

  18. Circular single domains in hemispherical Permalloy nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, Clodoaldo I. L de Fonseca, Jakson M.; Sinnecker, Joo P.; Delatorre, Rafael G.; Garcia, Nicolas; Pasa, Andr A.

    2014-11-14

    We have studied ferromagnetic Permalloy clusters obtained by electrodeposition on n-type silicon. Magnetization measurements reveal hysteresis loops almost independent on temperature and very similar in shape to those obtained in nanodisks with diameter bigger than 150?nm. The spin configuration for the ground state, obtained by micromagnetic simulation, shows topological vortices with random chirality and polarization. This behavior in the small diameter clusters (?80?nm) is attributed to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction that arises in its hemispherical geometries. This magnetization behavior can be utilized to explain the magnetoresistance measured with magnetic field in plane and out of sample plane.

  19. Magnetization of neutron matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigdeli, M.

    2011-09-21

    In this paper, we compute magnetization of neutron matter at strong magnetic field using the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) technique.

  20. Mechanism of Synthesis of Ultra-Long Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keidar, Michael

    2013-06-23

    In this project fundamental issues related to synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which is relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics were investigated. Given that among plasma-based techniques arc discharge stands out as very advantageous in several ways (fewer defects, high flexibility, longer lifetime) this techniques warrants attention from the plasma physics and plasma technology standpoint. Both experimental and theoretical investigations of the plasma and SWNTs synthesis were conducted. Experimental efforts focused on plasma diagnostics, measurements of nanostructures parameters, and nanoparticle characterization. Theoretical efforts focused to focus on multi-dimensional modeling of the arc discharge and single wall nanotube synthesis in arc plasmas. It was demonstrated in experiment and theoretically that controlling plasma parameters can affect nanostucture synthesis altering SWNT properties (length and diameter) and leading to synthesis of new structures such as a few-layer graphene. Among clearly identified parameters affecting synthesis are magnetic and electric fields. Knowledge of the plasma parameters and discharge characteristics is crucial for ability to control synthesis process by virtue of both magnetic and electric fields. New graduate course on plasma engineering was introduced into curriculum. 3 undergraduate students were attracted to the project and 3 graduate students (two are female) were involved in the project. Undergraduate student from Historically Black University was attracted and participated in the project during Summer 2010.

  1. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur 782 402 (India)] [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur 782 402 (India)

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 510{sup ?4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (?pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  2. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Wicks, George G.

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  3. TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Vörös, Zoltán; Narita, Yasuhito; Bruno, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic flux tubes in the solar wind can be twisted as they are transported from the solar surface, where the tubes are twisted due to photospheric motions. It is suggested that the twisted magnetic tubes can be detected as the variation of total (thermal+magnetic) pressure during their passage through the observing satellite. We show that the total pressure of several observed twisted tubes resembles the theoretically expected profile. The twist of the isolated magnetic tube may explain the observed abrupt changes of magnetic field direction at tube walls. We have also found some evidence that the flux tube walls can be associated with local heating of the plasma and elevated proton and electron temperatures. For the tubes aligned with the Parker spiral, the twist angle can be estimated from the change of magnetic field direction. Stability analysis of twisted tubes shows that the critical twist angle of the tube with a homogeneous twist is 70°, but the angle can further decrease due to the motion of the tube with respect to the solar wind stream. The tubes with a stronger twist are unstable to the kink instability, therefore they probably cannot reach 1 AU.

  4. DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on Successful LED Wall Washer Retrofit |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Successful LED Wall Washer Retrofit DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on Successful LED Wall Washer Retrofit August 5, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy has released a report on a GATEWAY demonstration, in which maintenance and energy costs were significantly reduced while retaining the quality of light when LED modules replaced 87 halogen lamps in existing wall washers at the University of Maryland's (UMD) Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. The project

  5. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity

  6. Monitoring of Double Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.

    2015-03-01

    Double-stud walls insulated with cellulose or low-density spray foam can have R-values of 40 or higher. However, double stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage, when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing.; Moisture conditions in double stud walls were monitored in Zone 5A (Massachusetts); three double stud assemblies were compared.

  7. MAGNETIC DENSITOMETER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCann, J.A.; Jones, R.H.

    1961-08-15

    A magnetic densitometer for locating defects and metallic inclusions in materials is described. The apparatus consists of two primary coils connected in series opposition and adapted te be placed in inductive relation to the material under test, a source of constant frequency alternating current coupled across the primary coil combination, a pick-up coil disposed in symmetrical inductive relationship with said primary coils, a phase-shifter coupled to the output of the energizing source. The output of the phase-shifter is coupled in series with the pick-up coil. An amplifier is provided selective to the third harmonic of the energizing source frequency. The series combination of the pick-up coil and the phase-shifter output are connected across the input of the amplifier, and an amplitude comparitor is coupled to the output of the amplifier and the energizing source for comparing the instantaneous amplitude of the amplifier output and the instantaneous output of the energizing source and producing an output proportional to the difference in amplitude. A recorder is coupled to the output of the amplitude comparison means to give an indication of the amplitude difference, thereby providing a permanent presentation of the character of the changes in characteristics exhibited by the material under test. (AEC)

  8. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  9. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Magnetic dipole interactions in crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnston, David

    2016-01-13

    The influence of magnetic dipole interactions (MDIs) on the magnetic properties of local-moment Heisenberg spin systems is investigated. A general formulation is presented for calculating the eigenvalues λ and eigenvectors μ ˆ of the MDI tensor of the magnetic dipoles in a line (one dimension, 1D), within a circle (2D) or a sphere (3D) of radius r surrounding a given moment μ → i for given magnetic propagation vectors k for collinear and coplanar noncollinear magnetic structures on both Bravais and non-Bravais spin lattices. Results are calculated for collinear ordering on 1D chains, 2D square and simple-hexagonal (triangular) Bravais lattices,more » 2D honeycomb and kagomé non-Bravais lattices, and 3D cubic Bravais lattices. The λ and μ ˆ values are compared with previously reported results. Calculations for collinear ordering on 3D simple tetragonal, body-centered tetragonal, and stacked triangular and honeycomb lattices are presented for c/a ratios from 0.5 to 3 in both graphical and tabular form to facilitate comparison of experimentally determined easy axes of ordering on these Bravais lattices with the predictions for MDIs. Comparisons with the easy axes measured for several illustrative collinear antiferromagnets (AFMs) are given. The calculations are extended to the cycloidal noncollinear 120 ° AFM ordering on the triangular lattice where λ is found to be the same as for collinear AFM ordering with the same k. The angular orientation of the ordered moments in the noncollinear coplanar AFM structure of GdB 4 with a distorted stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland spin-lattice geometry is calculated and found to be in disagreement with experimental observations, indicating the presence of another source of anisotropy. Similar calculations for the undistorted 2D and stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland lattices are reported. The thermodynamics of dipolar magnets are calculated using the Weiss molecular field theory for quantum spins, including the magnetic transition temperature T m and the ordered moment, magnetic heat capacity, and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ versus temperature T . The anisotropic Weiss temperature θ p in the Curie-Weiss law for T>T m is calculated. A quantitative study of the competition between FM and AFM ordering on cubic Bravais lattices versus the demagnetization factor in the absence of FM domain effects is presented. The contributions of Heisenberg exchange interactions and of the MDIs to T m and to θ p are found to be additive, which simplifies analysis of experimental data. Some properties in the magnetically-ordered state versus T are presented, including the ordered moment and magnetic heat capacity and, for AFMs, the dipolar anisotropy of the free energy and the perpendicular critical field. The anisotropic χ for dipolar AFMs is calculated both above and below the Néel temperature T N and the results are illustrated for a simple tetragonal lattice with c/a>1, c/a=1 (cubic), and c/a<1 , where a change in sign of the χ anisotropy is found at c/a=1 . Finally, following the early work of Keffer [Phys. Rev. 87, 608 (1952)], the dipolar anisotropy of χ above T N =69 K of the prototype collinear Heisenberg-exchange-coupled tetragonal compound MnF 2 is calculated and found to be in excellent agreement with experimental single-crystal literature data above 130 K, where the smoothly increasing deviation of the experimental data from the theory on cooling from 130 K to T N is deduced to arise from dynamic short-range collinear c -axis AFM ordering in this temperature range driven by the exchange interactions.« less

  11. SSL Demonstration: Wall Washers at the University of Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-31

    GATEWAY program report brief summarizing a demonstration of LED wall washers at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the University of Maryland.

  12. COLLOQUIUM: Assessing First Wall Materials at the Atomic Scale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wall Materials at the Atomic Scale and Energy Writ Large at Princeton Professor Emily Carter Princeton University Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory...

  13. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  14. Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  15. Concept for Reducing Hall Thruster Chamber Wall Erosion with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concept for Reducing Hall Thruster Chamber Wall Erosion with Lithium Vapor Shielding. Hall ... This invention addresses these concerns using a lightweight material (liquid lithium) in a ...

  16. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C.

    2009-03-15

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  17. Composites of Doped Semiconducting Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This would also allow for thermoelectrics to be used across more applications, at lower cost. Description In this case, the Seebeck coefficient for these single-walled...

  18. Thermal performance of concrete masonry unit wall systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.

    1995-12-31

    New materials, modern building wall technologies now available in the building marketplace, and unique, more accurate, methods of thermal analysis of wall systems create an opportunity to design and erect buildings where thermal envelopes that use masonry wall systems can be more efficient. Thermal performance of the six masonry wall systems is analyzed. Most existing masonry systems are modifications of technologies presented in this paper. Finite difference two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer modeling and unique methods of the clear wall and overall thermal analysis were used. In the design of thermally efficient masonry wall systems is t to know how effectively the insulation material is used and how the insulation shape and its location affect the wall thermal performance. Due to the incorrect shape of the insulation or structural components, hidden thermal shorts cause additional heat losses. In this study, the thermal analysis of the clear wall was enriched with the examination of the thermal properties of the wall details and the study of a quantity defined herein the Thermal Efficiency of the insulation material.

  19. Tag gas capsule with magnetic piercing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Ira V.

    1976-06-22

    An apparatus for introducing a tag (i.e., identifying) gas into a tubular nuclear fuel element. A sealed capsule containing the tag gas is placed in the plenum in the fuel tube between the fuel and the end cap. A ferromagnetic punch having a penetrating point is slidably mounted in the plenum. By external electro-magnets, the punch may be caused to penetrate a thin rupturable end wall of the capsule and release the tag gas into the fuel element. Preferably the punch is slidably mounted within the capsule, which is in turn loaded as a sealed unit into the fuel element.

  20. Magnetic Membrane System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElfresh, Michael W.; (Livermore, CA); Lucas, Matthew S.; (Pasadena, CA)

    2004-12-30

    The present invention provides a membrane with magnetic particles. In one embodiment the membrane is created by mixing particles in a non-magnetic base. The membrane may act as an actuator, a sensor, a pump, a valve, or other device. A magnet is operatively connected to the membrane. The magnet acts on and changes the shape of the membrane.

  1. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D. M.; Chen, S. S.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  2. Recycling Magnets | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recycling Magnets Recycling Magnets July 15, 2013 The cost of a nuclear or particle physics experiment can be enormous, several hundred million dollars for the Large Hadron Collider Experiments, ATLAS and CMS at CERN, several tens of millions of dollars for an experiment like our GlueX experiment in Hall D, being built as part of our upgrade project. Among the expensive components of many experiments is a large magnet or sometimes more than one magnet. Sometimes the magnets have interesting

  3. Magnetic properties on the surface of FeAl stripes induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiju, H. Kondo, K.; Ishibashi, A.; Yoshida, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yoshimi, K.

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrate the formation of magnetic nanostripes on the surface of Fe{sub 52}Al{sub 48} induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation and investigate their magnetic properties. The magnetic stripe consists of a disordered A2 phase of Fe-Al alloys with Al-oxide along the [110] direction on the (111)-oriented plane. According to the focused magneto-optical Kerr effect measurement, the coercive force of the magnetic stripe obeys the 1/cos?? law, where ? is the field rotation angle estimated from the stripe direction. Also, the jump field can be observed in the magnetic hysteresis loop. These results indicate that the magnetization reversal in the magnetic stripe originates from the domain pinning, showing that the magnetization rotates incoherently.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Moisture Management of High-Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    Moisture management of high-R walls is important to ensure optimal performance. This case study, developed by Building America team Building Science Corporation, focuses on how eight high-R walls handle the three main sources of moistureconstruction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leaks.

  5. Disruption of cell walls for enhanced lipid recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Donohoe, Bryon S; Gerken, Henri; Laurens, Lieve; Van Wychen, Stefanie Rose

    2015-03-24

    Presented herein are methods of using cell wall degrading enzymes for recovery of internal lipid bodies from biomass sources such as algae. Also provided are algal cells that express at least one exogenous gene encoding a cell wall degrading enzyme and methods for recovering lipids from the cells.

  6. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  7. Nanocomposite Magnets: Transformational Nanostructured Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GE is using nanomaterials technology to develop advanced magnets that contain fewer rare earth materials than their predecessors. Nanomaterials technology involves manipulating matter at the atomic or molecular scale, which can represent a stumbling block for magnets because it is difficult to create a finely grained magnet at that scale. GE is developing bulk magnets with finely tuned structures using iron-based mixtures that contain 80% less rare earth materials than traditional magnets, which will reduce their overall cost. These magnets will enable further commercialization of HEVs, EVs, and wind turbine generators while enhancing U.S. competitiveness in industries that heavily utilize these alternatives to rare earth minerals.

  8. Domain decomposition multigrid for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-01-01

    A two-level preconditioning method for the solution of elliptic boundary value problems using finite element schemes on possibly unstructured meshes is introduced. It is based on a domain decomposition and a Galerkin scheme for the coarse level vertex unknowns. For both the implementation and the analysis, it is not required that the curves of discontinuity in the coefficients of the PDE match the interfaces between subdomains. Generalizations to nonmatching or overlapping grids are made.

  9. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  10. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  11. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  12. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  13. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  14. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berka, Randy; Cherry, Joel

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  15. Side wall cooling for nozzle segments for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane segment includes outer and inner band portions with a vane extending therebetween and defining first and second cavities separated by an impingement plate for flowing cooling medium for impingement cooling of nozzle side walls. The side wall of each nozzle segment has an undercut region. The impingement plate has an inturned flange with a plurality of openings. Cooling inserts or receptacles having an open end are received in the openings and the base and side walls of the receptacles have apertures for receiving cooling medium from the first cavity and directing the cooling medium for impingement cooling of the side wall of the nozzle segment and a portion of the nozzle wall.

  16. Ion energy-angle distribution functions at the plasma-material interface in oblique magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaziev, Rinat; Curreli, Davide

    2015-04-15

    The ion energy-angle distribution (IEAD) at the wall of a magnetized plasma is of fundamental importance for the determination of the material processes occurring at the plasma-material interface, comprising secondary emissions and material sputtering. Here, we present a numerical characterization of the IEAD at the wall of a weakly collisional magnetized plasma with the magnetic field inclined at an arbitrary angle with respect to the wall. The analysis has been done using two different techniques: (1) a fluid-Monte Carlo method, and (2) particle-in-cell simulations, the former offering a fast but approximate method for the determination of the IEADs, the latter giving a computationally intensive but self-consistent treatment of the plasma behavior from the quasi-neutral region to the material boundary. The two models predict similar IEADs, whose similarities and differences are discussed. Data are presented for magnetic fields inclined at angles from normal to grazing incidence (0°–85°). We show the scaling factors of the average and peak ion energy and trends of the pitch angle at the wall as a function of the magnetic angle, for use in the correlation of fluid plasma models to material models.

  17. Pneumatic wall-locking geophone system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Harland L.; Cumerlato, Calvin L.; Tweeton, Daryl R.

    1991-01-01

    A seismic signal receiving system is provided for use in boreholes to receive seismic waves in carrying out geophysical investigations. The system includes three pairs of opposed plates, each of the pairs of plates including oppositely facing outer surfaces for engagement with opposite sides of a borehole. A seismic receiver is mounted on the inner surface of each of the plates for receiving seismic signals. A double-acting, fluid-operated actuator selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates away from each other to provide expansion thereof so as to enable the plates to engage the walls of a borehole and selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates toward each other to provide retraction thereof so as to enable the system to be removed from a borehole. The pairs of plates each comprise a relatively long plate and a relatively short plate. An expandable linkage interconnects the long plates at the distal ends thereof. The plates are mechanically biassed into the retracted state so that the plates return to this state in the event of a system failure.

  18. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Withers, Gregory J.; Meier, Stephen W.; Walter, Robert J.; Child, Michael D.; DeGraaf, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  19. Magnetic switch coupling to synchronize magnetic modulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Kim W.; Kiekel, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus for synchronizing the output pulses from a pair of magnetic switches. An electrically conductive loop is provided between the pair of switches with the loop having windlings about the core of each of the magnetic switches. The magnetic coupling created by the loop removes voltage and timing variations between the outputs of the two magnetic switches caused by any of a variety of factors. The only remaining variation is a very small fixed timing offset caused by the geometry and length of the loop itself.

  20. Magnetic switch coupling to synchronize magnetic modulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, K.W.; Kiekel, P.

    1999-04-27

    Apparatus for synchronizing the output pulses from a pair of magnetic switches is disclosed. An electrically conductive loop is provided between the pair of switches with the loop having windings about the core of each of the magnetic switches. The magnetic coupling created by the loop removes voltage and timing variations between the outputs of the two magnetic switches caused by any of a variety of factors. The only remaining variation is a very small fixed timing offset caused by the geometry and length of the loop itself. 13 figs.

  1. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. ALSNews Vol. 300

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications. Read more... ...

  3. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Electric Field Control of ... A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Proton Channel Orientation in ...

  4. Tamper resistant magnetic stripes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naylor, Richard Brian; Sharp, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    This invention relates to a magnetic stripe comprising a medium in which magnetized particles are suspended and in which the encoded information is recorded by actual physical rotation or alignment of the previously magnetized particles within the flux reversals of the stripe which are 180.degree. opposed in their magnetic polarity. The magnetized particles are suspended in a medium which is solid, or physically rigid, at ambient temperatures but which at moderately elevated temperatures, such as 40.degree. C., is thinable to a viscosity permissive of rotation of the particles therein under applications of moderate external magnetic field strengths within acceptable time limits.

  5. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging...

  6. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in...

  7. Comparative study of alkali-vapour cells with alkane-, alkeneand 1-nonadecylbenzene-based antirelaxation wall coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balabas, M V; Tretiak, O Yu

    2013-12-31

    The dependence of both longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of ground-state magnetic polarisation in alkali atoms on the coating temperature is experimentally studied for the first time in a rubidium-vapour cell with 1-nonadecylbenzene antirelaxation coating of inner walls. The comparison of these times with the relaxation times in a caesium-vapour cell with alkane wall coatings is presented. It is found that within the studied temperature range (294 340K) the transverse relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature of alkene and 1-nonadecylbenzene coatings. For the alkane coating such a dependence was not explicitly found. The longitudinal relaxation time begins to decrease in all cases when passing a certain critical temperature of the coating material. It is found that the unsaturated radical structure of the coating material molecules strongly affects its antirelaxation properties. (optical pumping)

  8. Wyo. Stat. 1-26 - Eminent Domain | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wyo. Stat. 1-26 - Eminent Domain Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Wyo. Stat. 1-26 - Eminent DomainLegal...

  9. Dynein Motor Domain Shows Ring-Shaped Motor, Buttress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynein Motor Domain Shows Ring-Shaped Motor, Buttress Dynein Motor Domain Shows Ring-Shaped Motor, Buttress Print Monday, 28 November 2011 14:52 Movement is fundamental to life. It...

  10. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, M J; Brantley, P S

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domains replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  11. Double wall vacuum tubing and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahl, Charles R.; Gibson, Michael A.; Knudsen, Christian W.

    1989-01-01

    An evacuated double wall tubing is shown together with a method for the manufacture of such tubing which includes providing a first pipe of predetermined larger diameter and a second pipe having an O.D. substantially smaller than the I.D. of the first pipe. An evacuation opening is then in the first pipe. The second pipe is inserted inside the first pipe with an annular space therebetween. The pipes are welded together at one end. A stretching tool is secured to the other end of the second pipe after welding. The second pipe is then prestressed mechanically with the stretching tool an amount sufficient to prevent substantial buckling of the second pipe under normal operating conditions of the double wall pipe. The other ends of the first pipe and the prestressed second pipe are welded together, preferably by explosion welding, without the introduction of mechanical spacers between the pipes. The annulus between the pipes is evacuated through the evacuation opening, and the evacuation opening is finally sealed. The first pipe is preferably of steel and the second pipe is preferably of titanium. The pipes may be of a size and wall thickness sufficient for the double wall pipe to be structurally load bearing or may be of a size and wall thickness insufficient for the double wall pipe to be structurally load bearing, and the double wall pipe positioned with a sliding fit inside a third pipe of a load-bearing size.

  12. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rote, Donald M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, Larry R.

    1994-01-01

    A propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of FIG. 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the FIG. 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  13. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rote, D.M.; He, J.; Johnson, L.R.

    1994-01-04

    A propulsion and stabilization system are described comprising a series of coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance, and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension. 8 figures.

  14. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rote, D.M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses a propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of figure 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the figure 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  15. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  16. SISGR -- Domain Microstructures and Mechanisms for Large, Reversible and Anhysteretic Strain Behaviors in Phase Transforming Ferroelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yu U.

    2013-12-06

    This four-year project (including one-year no-cost extension) aimed to advance fundamental understanding of field-induced strain behaviors of phase transforming ferroelectrics. We performed meso-scale phase field modeling and computer simulation to study domain evolutions, mechanisms and engineering techniques, and developed computational techniques for nanodomain diffraction analysis; to further support above originally planned tasks, we also carried out preliminary first-principles density functional theory calculations of point defects and domain walls to complement meso-scale computations as well as performed in-situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray single crystal diffraction experiments to guide theoretical development (both without extra cost to the project thanks to XSEDE supercomputers and DOE user facility Advanced Photon Source).

  17. Non-linear Conjugate Gradient Time-Domain Controlled Inversion Source

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-11-16

    Software that simulates and inverts time-domain electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a step-wise source signal from either galvanic (grounded wires) or inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code TEM3D ver. 2.0. The upgrade includes the following components: (1) Improved (faster)memory access during gradient computation. (2) Data parellelization scheme: Multiple transmitters (sources) can be distributed accross several banks of processors (daa-planes). Similarly, the receivers of each source are also distributed accross the corresponding data-plane. (3) Improved data-IO.« less

  18. Chest wall invasion by lung cancer: limitations of CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennes, D.R.; Glazer, G.M.; Wimbish, K.J.; Gross, B.H.; Long, R.W.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-03-01

    Thirty-three patients with peripheral pulmonary malignancies contiguous with a pleural surface were evaluated for chest wall invasion by computed tomography (CT). CT criteria included pleural thickening adjacent to the tumor, encroachment on or increased density of the extrapleural fat, asymmetry of the extrapleural soft tissues adjacent to the tumor, apparent mass invading the chest wall, and rib destruction. The CT scans were classified as positive, negative, or equivocal for invasion, and a decision matrix was constructed comparing CT results with pathologic data. CT scanning has low accuracy in assessing chest wall invasion in patients with peripheral lung cancers.

  19. Evaluation of Wall Boundary Condition Parameters for Gas-Solids

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evaluation of Wall Boundary Condition Parameters for Gas-Solids Fluidized-Bed Simulations Tingwen Li 1,2 , Sofiane Benyahia 1 1. National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507, U.S.A. 2. URS Corporation, Morgantown, WV 26505, U.S.A. Abstract Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the

  20. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    This report explains the moisture-related concerns for high R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. In this project, hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones. The modeling program assessed the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage; the report presents results of the study.

  1. Paducah Wall Display Unveiled at DOE Headquarters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paducah Wall Display Unveiled at DOE Headquarters Paducah Wall Display Unveiled at DOE Headquarters September 11, 2015 - 3:48pm Addthis Federal, state and local Kentucky officials joined Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz (third from left) and Senate Majority Mitch McConnell on September 10, 2015 as they cut the ribbon introducing the new Paducah Site wall display on the Fifth Floor of DOE’s Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C. Pictured (left-right) are: U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, Sen.

  2. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

    1998-07-28

    Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

  3. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Huang, Yin-Yan

    1998-01-01

    Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

  4. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  5. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost

  6. Magnetic nanohole superlattices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Feng

    2013-05-14

    A magnetic material is disclosed including a two-dimensional array of carbon atoms and a two-dimensional array of nanoholes patterned in the two-dimensional array of carbon atoms. The magnetic material has long-range magnetic ordering at a temperature below a critical temperature Tc.

  7. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  8. Advanced Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control Advanced Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control A new metal fiber wall-flow DPF with up to 99% efficiency and ...

  9. Cost-Effective Wall Retrofit Solution for the Interior Side of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Wall Retrofit Solution for the Interior Side of Building's Exterior Wall that Supports a Phased Retrofit Cost Model - 2014 BTO Peer Review Cost-Effective Wall ...

  10. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  11. Magnetorheological effect in the magnetic field oriented along the vorticity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzhir, P. Magnet, C.; Fezai, H.; Meunier, A.; Bossis, G.; Rodríguez-Arco, L.; López-López, M. T.; Zubarev, A.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we have studied the magnetorheological (MR) fluid rheology in the magnetic field parallel to the fluid vorticity. Experimentally, the MR fluid flow was realized in the Couette coaxial cylinder geometry with the magnetic field parallel to the symmetry axis. The rheological measurements were compared to those obtained in the cone-plate geometry with the magnetic field perpendicular to the lower rheometer plate. Experiments revealed a quasi-Bingham behavior in both geometries with the stress level being just a few dozens of percent smaller in the Couette cylindrical geometry at the same internal magnetic field. The unexpectedly high MR response in the magnetic field parallel to the fluid vorticity is explained by stochastic fluctuations of positions and orientations of the particle aggregates. These fluctuations are induced by magnetic interactions between them. Once misaligned from the vorticity direction, the aggregates generate a high stress independent of the shear rate, and thus assimilated to the suspension apparent (dynamic) yield stress. Quantitatively, the fluctuations of the aggregate orientation are modeled as a rotary diffusion process with a diffusion constant proportional to the mean square interaction torque. The model gives a satisfactory agreement with the experimental field dependency of the apparent yield stress and confirms the nearly quadratic concentration dependency σ{sub Y}∝Φ{sup 2.2}, revealed in experiments. The practical interest of this study lies in the development of MR smart devices with the magnetic field nonperpendicular to the channel walls.

  12. High-R Walls - Building America Top Innovation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R Walls - Building America Top Innovation High-R Walls - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows two framed walls. High-performance homes require walls that cost-effectively control both thermal and moisture flow. This Top Innovation profile describes Building America research from Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings and Building Science Corporation on high-R-value walls showing the difference between rated and whole wall R values and the need for vented cladding to reduce

  13. Method and apparatus for constructing an underground barrier wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Brian P.; Stewart, Willis E.; Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for constructing a underground barrier wall structure using a jet grout injector subassembly comprising a pair of primary nozzles and a plurality of secondary nozzles, the secondary nozzles having a smaller diameter than the primary nozzles, for injecting grout in directions other than the primary direction, which creates a barrier wall panel having a substantially uniform wall thickess. This invention addresses the problem of the weak "bow-tie" shape that is formed during conventional jet injection when using only a pair of primary nozzles. The improvement is accomplished by using at least four secondary nozzles, of smaller diameter, located on both sides of the primary nozzles. These additional secondary nozzles spray grout or permeable reactive materials in other directions optimized to fill in the thin regions of the bow-tie shape. The result is a panel with increased strength and substantially uniform wall thickness.

  14. Near wall cooling for a highly tapered turbine blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, George

    2011-03-08

    A turbine blade having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall connected at chordally spaced leading and trailing edges to define a cooling cavity. Pressure and suction side inner walls extend radially within the cooling cavity and define pressure and suction side near wall chambers. A plurality of mid-chord channels extend radially from a radially intermediate location on the blade to a tip passage at the blade tip for connecting the pressure side and suction side near wall chambers in fluid communication with the tip passage. In addition, radially extending leading edge and trailing edge flow channels are located adjacent to the leading and trailing edges, respectively, and cooling fluid flows in a triple-pass serpentine path as it flows through the leading edge flow channel, the near wall chambers and the trailing edge flow channel.

  15. Determining heat fluxes from temperature measurements made in massive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is described for determining heat fluxes at the surfaces of masonry walls or floors using temperature data measured at two points within the wall, usually near the surfaces. The process consists of solving the heat diffusion equation in one dimension using finite difference techniques given two measured temperatures as input. The method is fast and accurate and also allows for an in-situ measurement of wall thermal diffusivity if a third temperature is measured. The method is documented in sufficient detail so that it can be readily used by the reader. Examples are given for heat flow through walls. Annual results for two cases are presented. The method has also been used to determine heat flow into floors.

  16. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Kenneth V. (Clinton, TN); Cunningham, Jr., Robert A. (Powell, TN); Murrin, Horace T. (Alcoa, TN)

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  17. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Murrin, H.T.

    1981-05-29

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  18. Solar-Thermal Fluid-Wall Reaction Processing - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Solar-Thermal Fluid-Wall Reaction Processing University of Colorado National Renewable Energy ...

  19. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open ... 2012, 58, 2058-2068) is implemented in the open-source CFD code-MFIX. The variable ...

  20. Repairing Walls & Floors: How To's for the Handy Homeowner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-09

    This brochure provides handy homeowners with tips on how to properly repair walls and floors in their homes that sustained damage during a hurricane. This publications is a part of the How To's for the Handy Homeowner Series.

  1. "Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is intended for implementation in a tokamak. The design employs JxB forces to form a free-surface flow along a guide wall at the outer boundary of the plasma. The...

  2. Conserval aka SolarWall | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Conserval (aka SolarWall) Place: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Zip: M3J2N5 Sector: Solar Product: Makes solar passive heating and cooling products,...

  3. The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses in material bottles coated with deuterated polystryene Ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) from the LANSCE super-thermal ...

  4. EERE Web Domains and URLs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Process & Approvals » EERE Web Domains and URLs EERE Web Domains and URLs For domains and URLs, all Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) office and partnership websites must comply with the Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the EERE domain policies. Getting Approval All domains must be approved by the Web Governance Team (WGT). For new Web projects, you'll include it on the Project Information Form, which you'll complete

  5. Material migration studies with an ITER first wall panel proxy on EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, R.; Pitts, R. A.; Borodin, D.; Carpentier, S.; Ding, F.; Gong, X. Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Kirschner, A.; Kocan, M.; Li, J. G.; Luo, G. -N.; Mao, H. M.; Qian, J. P.; Stangeby, P. C.; Wampler, W. R.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, W. Z.; Chen, J. L.; Gan, K. F.

    2015-01-23

    The ITER beryllium (Be) first wall (FW) panels are shaped to protect leading edges between neighbouring panels arising from assembly tolerances. This departure from a perfectly cylindrical surface automatically leads to magnetically shadowed regions where eroded Be can be re-deposited, together with co-deposition of tritium fuel. To provide a benchmark for a series of erosion/re-deposition simulation studies performed for the ITER FW panels, dedicated experiments have been performed on the EAST tokamak using a specially designed, instrumented test limiter acting as a proxy for the FW panel geometry. Carbon coated molybdenum plates forming the limiter front surface were exposed to the outer midplane boundary plasma of helium discharges using the new Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES). Net erosion and deposition patterns are estimated using ion beam analysis to measure the carbon layer thickness variation across the surface after exposure. The highest erosion of about 0.8 µm is found near the midplane, where the surface is closest to the plasma separatrix. No net deposition above the measurement detection limit was found on the proxy wall element, even in shadowed regions. The measured 2D surface erosion distribution has been modelled with the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, using the local plasma parameter measurements together with a diffusive transport assumption. In conclusion, excellent agreement between the experimentally observed net erosion and the modelled erosion profile has been obtained.

  6. Material migration studies with an ITER first wall panel proxy on EAST

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ding, R.; Pitts, R. A.; Borodin, D.; Carpentier, S.; Ding, F.; Gong, X. Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Kirschner, A.; Kocan, M.; Li, J. G.; et al

    2015-01-23

    The ITER beryllium (Be) first wall (FW) panels are shaped to protect leading edges between neighbouring panels arising from assembly tolerances. This departure from a perfectly cylindrical surface automatically leads to magnetically shadowed regions where eroded Be can be re-deposited, together with co-deposition of tritium fuel. To provide a benchmark for a series of erosion/re-deposition simulation studies performed for the ITER FW panels, dedicated experiments have been performed on the EAST tokamak using a specially designed, instrumented test limiter acting as a proxy for the FW panel geometry. Carbon coated molybdenum plates forming the limiter front surface were exposed tomore » the outer midplane boundary plasma of helium discharges using the new Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES). Net erosion and deposition patterns are estimated using ion beam analysis to measure the carbon layer thickness variation across the surface after exposure. The highest erosion of about 0.8 µm is found near the midplane, where the surface is closest to the plasma separatrix. No net deposition above the measurement detection limit was found on the proxy wall element, even in shadowed regions. The measured 2D surface erosion distribution has been modelled with the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, using the local plasma parameter measurements together with a diffusive transport assumption. In conclusion, excellent agreement between the experimentally observed net erosion and the modelled erosion profile has been obtained.« less

  7. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  8. Fast Equilibrating 1st Wall -Majeski | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fast Equilibrating 1st Wall -Majeski The invention is primarily a composition of matter, which combines two pre-existing materials to produce new utility. Specifically, a "fast equilibrating" wall would consist of a 100-200 micron layer of plasma-facing material, backed with a hydrogen diffusion barrier. A candidate hydrogen barrier is a thin layer of densified ceramic. Densified ceramics have been shown to function as effective hydrogen diffusion barriers. By use of this construction,

  9. Metered Evaporator for Tokamak Wall Conditioning --- Inventor(s): Charles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. Skinner, Dennis Mansfield, Henry Kugel, Hans Schneider and Lane Roquemore | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Metered Evaporator for Tokamak Wall Conditioning --- Inventor(s): Charles H. Skinner, Dennis Mansfield, Henry Kugel, Hans Schneider and Lane Roquemore A novel lithium evaporator for the controlled introduction of lithium into tokamaks for wall conditioning is described. The concept uses a Li granule injector with a heated in-vessel yttrium crucible to evaporate a controlled amount of

  10. Template Directed Formation of Nanoparticle Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanotube Bundles with Uniform Diameter (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Template Directed Formation of Nanoparticle Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles with Uniform Diameter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Template Directed Formation of Nanoparticle Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles with Uniform Diameter Authors: Han, T Y ; Standermann, M ; Baumann, T F ; Murphy, K E ; Satcher, J H Publication Date: 2011-03-31 OSTI Identifier: 1183517 Report Number(s):

  11. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2015-03-25

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump tomore » avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet.« less

  12. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2015-03-25

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump to avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet.

  13. Potential formation in a collisionless plasma produced in an open magnetic field in presence of volume negative ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phukan, Ananya, E-mail: ananya.phukan26@gmail.com; Goswami, K. S.; Bhuyan, P. J. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research Sonapur, Kamrup (M), Assam 782402 (India)

    2014-08-15

    The electric potential near a wall for a multi-species plasma with volume produced negative ions in presence of axially varying magnetic field is studied following an analytical-numerical approach. A constant negative ion source is assumed throughout the plasma volume, along with finite temperature positive ions and Boltzmann electrons. The particles are assumed to be guided by an open magnetic field that has its maximum at the centre, and field strength decreasing towards the walls. The one dimensional (1D) Poisson equation is derived using an analytical approach, and then solved numerically to study the potential profiles. Effect of (a) negative ion production rate, (b) magnetic field profile, and (c) negative ion temperature on the potential profile has been investigated. A potential peak appears near the wall when the negative ion temperature and density are sufficiently high. Also, the presence of negative ions further decreases the potential in the plasma region for a finite Debye Length (?{sub D})

  14. LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

    2013-10-01

    The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

  15. Octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure generation during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-06-15

    The out-of-plane magnetic field, generated by fast magnetic reconnection, during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse, was studied with a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code, using both closed (flux conserving) and open boundary conditions on a square grid. It was discovered that the well known quadrupolar structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field gains four additional regions of opposite magnetic polarity, emerging near the corners of the simulation box, moving towards the X-point. The emerging, outer, magnetic field structure has opposite polarity to the inner quadrupolar structure, leading to an overall octupolar structure. Using Ampere's law and integrating electron and ion currents, defined at grid cells, over the simulation domain, contributions to the out-of-plane magnetic field from electron and ion currents were determined. The emerging regions of opposite magnetic polarity were shown to be the result of ion currents. Magnetic octupolar structure is found to be a signature of X-point collapse, rather than tearing mode, and factors relating to potential discoveries in experimental scenarios or space-craft observations are discussed.

  16. Conformational instability of the MARK3 UBA domain compromises ubiquitin recognition and promotes interaction with the adjacent kinase domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, James M.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Briant, Douglas J.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Sicheri, Frank; Kay, Lewis E.; Pawson, Tony (Mount Sinai Hospital); (Toronto)

    2012-10-23

    The Par-1/MARK protein kinases play a pivotal role in establishing cellular polarity. This family of kinases contains a unique domain architecture, in which a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain is located C-terminal to the kinase domain. We have used a combination of x-ray crystallography and NMR dynamics experiments to understand the interaction of the human (h) MARK3 UBA domain with the adjacent kinase domain as compared with ubiquitin. The x-ray crystal structure of the linked hMARK3 kinase and UBA domains establishes that the UBA domain forms a stable intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. However, solution-state NMR studies of the isolated UBA domain indicate that it is highly dynamic, undergoing conformational transitions that can be explained by a folding-unfolding equilibrium. NMR titration experiments indicated that the hMARK3 UBA domain has a detectable but extremely weak affinity for mono ubiquitin, which suggests that conformational instability of the isolated hMARK3 UBA domain attenuates binding to ubiquitin despite the presence of residues typically involved in ubiquitin recognition. Our data identify a molecular mechanism through which the hMARK3 UBA domain has evolved to bind the kinase domain, in a fashion that stabilizes an open conformation of the N- and C-terminal lobes, at the expense of its capacity to engage ubiquitin. These results may be relevant more generally to the 30% of UBA domains that lack significant ubiquitin-binding activity, and they suggest a unique mechanism by which interaction domains may evolve new binding properties.

  17. Birefringence insensitive optical coherence domain reflectometry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew J.; Davis, Joseph G.

    2002-01-01

    A birefringence insensitive fiber optic optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) system is provided containing non-polarization maintaining (non-PM) fiber in the sample arm and the reference arm without suffering from signal degradation caused by birefringence. The use of non-PM fiber significantly reduces the cost of the OCDR system and provides a disposable or multiplexed section of the sample arm. The dispersion in the reference arm and sample arm of the OCDR system are matched to achieve high resolution imaging. This system is useful in medical applications or for non-medical in situ probes. The disposable section of non-PM fiber in the sample arm can be conveniently replaced when contaminated by a sample or a patient.

  18. Spokane Wall Insulation Project: a field study of moisture damage in walls insulated without a vapor barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsongas, G.

    1985-09-01

    Considerable uncertainty has existed over whether or not the addition of wall insulation without a vapor barrier might increase the risk of moisture damage to the structure. Although it was concluded from a 1979 field study that there is no such risk in mild climates like that of Portland, Oregon (4792 degree-days), it was not clear if a problem might exist in colder climates. Thus, a second major field study was undertaken in Spokane, Washington (6835 degree-days) aimed at finding out if such a moisture problem really exists. This report describes that study and its results and conclusions. During the study the exterior walls of 103 homes were opened, of which 79 had retrofitted cellulose, rock wool, or fiberglass, and 24 were uninsulated as a control group. Field and laboratory test results are presented which, contrary to diffusion theory predictions, show the absence of moisture accumulation and consequent moisture damage caused by the addition of retrofitted wall insulation. Infrared thermography results giving the percentage of wall insulation void area for 30 of the test homes are also presented. The study strongly concludes that the addition of wall insulation without a vapor barrier does not cause moisture problems in existing homes in climates similar to that of Spokane. Future research needs are described, and the overall advisability of future retrofitting of wall insulation is discussed. 23 refs., 7 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. Approach to Fast Liquid Metal Flow Up a Magnetic Field Gradient | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab Approach to Fast Liquid Metal Flow Up a Magnetic Field Gradient Electrical and magnetic field (J x B) forces can be used to support flowing liquid metal against gravity. In a tokamak, the radial magnetic field gradient implies that JxB decreases inversely as the major radius, for constant current density in the liquid metal. This field gradient produces a pressure gradient along the support wall, which pushes the liquid metal towards the low field side. The invention

  20. Nanoscale, multidimensional artificial magnet created

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale, multidimensional artificial magnet created Nanoscale, multidimensional artificial magnet created Applications might range from general magnetism, such as developing sensors, to information encoding. October 26, 2015 Researchers have created a nanoscale, artificial magnet by arranging an array of magnetic nano-islands along a geometry that is not found in natural magnets. As temperature is reduced, magnetic nanoislands (in blue) reach a one-dimensional static, ordered state, while

  1. Passive magnetic bearing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  2. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. he effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. he coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5). he maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5 MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2 MGOe forx=1.5. he smallest domain size with a relatively short magnetic correlation length of 128 nm and largest root-mean-square phase shiftΦrmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. he optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  3. Magnetic probe response function calibrations for plasma equilibrium reconstructions of CDX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spaleta, J.; Zakharov, L.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Gray, T.

    2006-10-15

    A novel response function calibration technique has been developed to account for time-dependent nonaxisymmetric eddy currents near magnetic sensors in toroidal magnetic confinement devices. The response function technique provides a means to cross calibrate against all available external field coil systems to calculate the absolute sensitivity of each magnetic field sensor, even when induced eddy currents are present in the vacuum vessel wall. The response function information derived in the calibration process can be used in equilibrium reconstructions to separate plasma signals from signals due to externally produced eddy currents at magnetic field sensor locations, without invoking localized wall current distribution details. The response function technique was used for the first ever equilibrium reconstructions of spherical torus plasmas, when applied to the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device. In conjunction with the equilibrium and stability code (ESC), equilibria were obtained for recent CDX-U experiments with lithium plasma-facing components. A description of the CDX-U magnetic sensor configuration and the response function calibration technique will be presented along with examples of resulting plasma equilibrium for CDX-U lithium wall operations.

  4. Pulse magnetic welder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder is described for automated closure of fuel pins by a pulsed magnetic process in which the open end of a length of cladding is positioned within a complementary tube surrounded by a pulsed magnetic welder. Seals are provided at each end of the tube, which can be evacuated or can receive tag gas for direct introduction to the cladding interior. Loading of magnetic rings and end caps is accomplished automatically in conjunction with the welding steps carried out within the tube.

  5. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.; Albano, Richard K.; Morrison, Jr., John L.

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized.

  6. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.; Albano, R.K.; Morrison, J.L. Jr.

    1995-11-28

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized. 2 figs.

  7. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  8. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  9. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  10. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversely, introducing a magnetic field to certain materials will cause the material to heat up. This happens because, as the spins in such (paramagnetic) materials align with...

  11. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures. ... In molecular form, "nanomagnets" might just be the key to refrigeration that uses less ...

  12. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  13. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Gd). While some of this research is focused on materials that would operate near room temperature, Karotsis et al. here investigate the magnetic cooling properties of...

  14. Structural Basis for the Interaction between Pyk2-FAT Domain...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural Basis for the Interaction between Pyk2-FAT Domain and Leupaxin LD Repeats Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural Basis for the Interaction between ...

  15. Death Domain Assembly Mechanism Revealed by Crystal Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Core Complex Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Death Domain Assembly Mechanism Revealed by Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric PIDDosome Core Complex Authors: ...

  16. National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  17. Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling and Simulation of Surface and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Jose Abell, Kohei Watanabe, Chao Luo University of California, Davis Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley DOE NPH, October 2014 PDF icon Nonlinear Time Domain...

  18. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO, 1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain...

  19. Frequency-Domain Electromagnetics Survey At Kilauea East Rift...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Frequency-Domain Electromagnetics Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO,...

  20. Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of ferroelectric domains in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques in close collaboration with phase field...

  1. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration...

  2. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Skokan, 1974) Exploration...

  3. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Thomas, 1986)...

  4. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration...

  5. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration...

  6. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Exploration...

  7. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

  8. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration...

  9. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Dixie Hot Springs Area (Combs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Dixie Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity...

  10. Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of...

  11. Visualizing the Behavior of Polar Domains and Screening Charges...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visualizing the Behavior of Polar Domains and Screening Charges Under Electric and Mechanical Fields Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computing Science - LANS Seminar Start Date: Sep...

  12. Alignments in quasar polarizations: Pseudoscalar-photon mixing in the presence of correlated magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Nishant; Kamal, Archana; Jain, Pankaj

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the effects of pseudoscalar-photon mixing on electromagnetic radiation in the presence of correlated extragalactic magnetic fields. We model the Universe as a collection of magnetic domains and study the propagation of radiation through them. This leads to correlations between Stokes parameters over large scales and consistently explains the observed large-scale alignment of quasar polarizations at different redshifts within the framework of the big bang model.

  13. Self-contained instrument for measuring subterranean tunnel wall deflection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Donald Edgar (Kennewick, WA); Hof, Jr., Peter John (Richland, WA)

    1978-01-01

    The deflection of a subterranean tunnel is measured with a rod-like, self-contained instrument that is adapted to be inserted into a radially extending bore of the tunnel adjacent an end of the tunnel where the tunnel is being dug. One end of the instrument is anchored at the end of the bore remote from the tunnel wall, while the other end of the intrument is anchored adjacent the end of the wall in proximity to the tunnel wall. The two ends of the instrument are linearly displaceable relative to each other; the displacement is measured by a transducer means mounted on the instrument. Included in the instrument is a data storage means including a paper tape recorder periodically responsive to a parallel binary signal indicative of the measured displacement.

  14. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  15. Material options for a commercial fusion reactor first wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the potential of various materials for use as first walls in high-power-density commercial fusion reactors. Operating limits for each material were obtained based on a number of criteria, including maximum allowable structural temperatures, critical heat flux, ultimate tensile strength, and design-allowable stress. The results with water as a coolant indicate that a modified alloy similar to HT-9 may be a suitable candidate for low- and medium-power-density reactor first walls with neutron loads of up to 6 MW/m/sup 2/. A vanadium or copper alloy must be used for high-power-density reactors. The neutron wall load limit for vanadium alloys is about 14 MW/sup 2/, provided a suitable coating material is chosen. The extremely limited data base for radiation effects hinders any quantitative assessment of the limits for copper alloys.

  16. Dual-domain lateral shearing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2004-03-16

    The phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) was developed to address the problem of at-wavelength metrology of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems. Although extremely accurate, the fact that the PS/PDI is limited to use with coherent EUV sources, such as undulator radiation, is a drawback for its widespread use. An alternative to the PS/PDI, with relaxed coherence requirements, is lateral shearing interferometry (LSI). The use of a cross-grating, carrier-frequency configuration to characterize a large-field 4.times.-reduction EUV lithography optic is demonstrated. The results obtained are directly compared with PS/PDI measurements. A defocused implementation of the lateral shearing interferometer in which an image-plane filter allows both phase-shifting and Fourier wavefront recovery. The two wavefront recovery methods can be combined in a dual-domain technique providing suppression of noise added by self-interference of high-frequency components in the test-optic wavefront.

  17. Cost-Effective Wall Retrofit Solution for the Interior Side of Building's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exterior Wall that Supports a Phased Retrofit Cost Model - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy Cost-Effective Wall Retrofit Solution for the Interior Side of Building's Exterior Wall that Supports a Phased Retrofit Cost Model - 2014 BTO Peer Review Cost-Effective Wall Retrofit Solution for the Interior Side of Building's Exterior Wall that Supports a Phased Retrofit Cost Model - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Amy Wylie, Bayer MaterialScience/Penn State Consortium In order to achieve

  18. Unimpossible Missions: Making a wall listen | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is it possible to make a wall listen? Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Is it possible to make a wall listen? Sara Underwood 2016.02.11 This post is a behind-the-scenes look at one of the Unimpossible Missions experiments that a team of Global Research experts conducted in 2015. Click here to meet the

  19. Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials Authors: Dattelbaum, Andrew M [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2011-06-10 OSTI Identifier: 1072338 Report Number(s): LA-UR-11-03375; LA-UR-11-3375 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  20. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D.

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  1. Earth melter with rubble walls and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Chris C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement to the earth melter described and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,618. The improvement is the use of rubble for retaining walls. More specifically, the retaining walls rest on ground level and extend above ground level piling rubble around a melt zone. A portion of the melter may be below grade wherein sidewalls are formed by the relatively undisturbed native soil or rock, and the rubble may be used as a backfill liner for the below grade sidewalls.

  2. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  3. MAGNETIC RECORDING HEAD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, L.C.

    1958-06-17

    An electromagetic recording head is described for simultaneous recording of a plurality of signals within a small space on a magnetically semsitized medium. Basically the head structure comprises a non-magnetic centerpiece provided with only first and second groups of spaced cut-out slots respectively on opposite sides of the centerpiece. The two groups of slots are in parallel alignment and the slots of one group are staggered with respect to the slots of the other group so that one slot is not directly opposite another slot. Each slot has a magnet pole piece disposed therein and cooperating with a second pole and coil to provide a magnetic flux gap at the upper end of the slot. As a tape is drawn over the upper end of the centerpiece the individual magnetic circuits are disposed along its width to provide means for simultaneously recording information on separate portions, tracks. of the tape.

  4. Magnet pole tips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-11-19

    An improved magnet more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  5. Magnet pole tips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorn, Craig E. (Wading River, NY); Chasman, Chellis (Setauket, NY); Baltz, Anthony J. (Coram, NY)

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  6. Novel magnets and superconductors studied by high precision magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel magnets and superconductors studied by high precision magnetic susceptometer under pressure An Inductor-capacitor circuit (LC circuit) is a simple, text-book level electric...

  7. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Wednesday, 28 March 2012 00:00 Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the

  8. Expansion joint for guideway for magnetic levitation transportation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossing, T.D.

    1993-02-09

    An expansion joint that allows a guideway of a magnetic levitation transportation system to expand and contract while minimizing transients occurring in the magnetic lift and drag forces acting on a magnetic levitation vehicle traveling over the joint includes an upper cut or recess extending downwardly from the upper surface of the guideway and a non-intersecting lower cut or recess that extends upwardly from the lower surface of the guideway. The side walls of the cuts can be parallel to each other and the vertical axis of the guideway; the depth of the lower cut can be greater than the depth of the upper cut; and the overall combined lengths of the cuts can be greater than the thickness of the guideway from the upper to lower surface so that the cuts will overlap, but be spaced apart from each other. The distance between the cuts can be determined on the basis of the force transients and the mechanical behavior of the guideway. A second pair of similarly configured upper and lower cuts may be disposed in the guideway; the expansion joint may consist of two upper cuts and one lower cut; or the cuts may have non-parallel, diverging side walls so that the cuts have a substantially dove-tail shape.

  9. Domain evolution and polarization of continuously graded ferroelectric films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roytburd, A.; Roytburd, V.

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of graded ferroelectric films demonstrates that in the equilibrium state the films are subdivided into a single-domain band and a polydomain band which consists of wedge-shape domains. Polarization under an external electrostatic field proceeds through an inter-band boundary movement due to growth or shrinkage of the wedge domains. It is shown how the domain structure and evolution are determined by the principal characteristics of the film: the distribution of the spontaneous polarization and dielectric constant. Graded films exhibit a sharp increase of polarization with the field for weak fields, with a drop of the dielectric constant when the field is increasing. A general approach to finding the dependence of the displacement and the wedge-domain shape on the field as well as analytical solutions for the p{sup 4} Landau-Devonshire and parabolic potentials are presented.

  10. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

    1995-04-18

    An instrument is disclosed for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head. 4 figs.

  11. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straessle, R.; Ptremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140?C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  12. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Thacker, Louis H.; Fine, H. Alan

    1993-01-01

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head 18 to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum Within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A packet production line model is also described.

  13. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, Marc; Springer, David; Dakin, Bill; German, Alea

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of high performance wall systems. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, cost information, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into the 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project utilized information collected in the California project.

  14. Unified first wall-blanket structure for plasma device applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1987-01-01

    A plasma device for use in controlling nuclear reactions within the plasma including a first wall and blanket formed in a one-piece structure composed of a solid solution containing copper and lithium and melting above about 500.degree. C.

  15. Heat exchanger with leak detecting double wall tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieberbach, George; Bongaards, Donald J.; Lohmeier, Alfred; Duke, James M.

    1981-01-01

    A straight shell and tube heat exchanger utilizing double wall tubes and three tubesheets to ensure separation of the primary and secondary fluid and reliable leak detection of a leak in either the primary or the secondary fluids to further ensure that there is no mixing of the two fluids.

  16. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

    1993-10-05

    An instrument is described for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A packet production line model is also described. 3 figures.

  17. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  18. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, anmore » acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.« less

  19. Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

  20. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  1. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN); Fine, H. Alan (Lexington, KY)

    1995-01-01

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head.

  2. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavitytunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.60.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  3. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important...

  4. Magnetic nematicity: A debated origin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vaknin, David

    2016-01-22

    Different experimental studies based on nuclear magnetic resonance and inelastic neutron scattering reach opposing conclusions in regards to the origin of magnetic nematicity in iron chalcogenides.

  5. Magnetic Refrigeration | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Johnson, a materials scientist and project leader on GE's magnetic refrigeration project. ... materials would further improve the competitiveness of magnetic refrigeration technology. ...

  6. Speed Limit of Magnetic Recording

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the original magnetization direction can be distinguished as changes in the grey scale contrast. In our images the original magnetization direction corresponds to light...

  7. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying...

  8. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism,...

  9. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  10. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies....

  11. Method of controlling the side wall thickness of a turbine nozzle segment for improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane extending therebetween. Each band has a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band has an inturned flange defining with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The outer surface of the side wall is provided with a step prior to welding the cover to the side wall. A thermal barrier coating is applied in the step and, after the cover is welded to the side wall, the side wall is finally machined to a controlled thickness removing all, some or none of the coating.

  12. Magnetic field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krienin, Frank (Shoreham, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  13. Moment free toroidal magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, Peter

    1983-01-01

    A toroidal magnet for confining a high magnetic field for use in fusion reactor research and nuclear particle detection. The magnet includes a series of conductor elements arranged about and fixed at its small major radius portion to the outer surface of a central cylindrical support each conductor element having a geometry such as to maintain the conductor elements in pure tension when a high current flows therein, and a support assembly which redistributes all or part of the tension which would otherwise arise in the small major radius portion of each coil element to the large major radius portion thereof.

  14. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdikian, Alireza; Bagheri, Mehran

    2013-10-15

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  15. Permanent magnet energy conversion machine with magnet mounting arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.; Adams, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid permanent magnet dc motor includes three sets of permanent magnets supported by the rotor and three sets of corresponding stators fastened to the surrounding frame. One set of magnets operates across a radial gap with a surrounding radial gap stator, and the other two sets of magnets operate off the respective ends of the rotor across respective axial gaps.

  16. Magnetic gripper device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, R.E.

    1993-03-09

    A climbing apparatus is provided for climbing ferromagnetic surfaces, such as storage tanks and steel frame structures. A magnet assembly is rotatably mounted in a frame assembly. The frame assembly provides a pair of cam surfaces having different dimensions so that, when the frame is rotated, the cam surfaces contact the ferromagnetic surface to separate the magnet assembly from the surface. The different cam dimensions enable one side of the magnet at a time to be detached from the surface to reduce the effort needed to disengage the climbing apparatus. The cam surface also provides for smoothly attaching the apparatus. A hardened dowel pin is also attached to the frame and the pointed end of the dowel engages the surface when the magnet is attached to the surface to prevent downward sliding movement of the assembly under the weight of the user.

  17. Modular tokamak magnetic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Tien-Fang (Wayland, MA)

    1988-01-01

    A modular tokamak system comprised of a plurality of interlocking moldules. Each module is comprised of a vacuum vessel section, a toroidal field coil, moldular saddle coils which generate a poloidal magnetic field and ohmic heating coils.

  18. Magnetic Materials Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-ID-C: Soft X-ray Magnetic Spectroscopy This beamline operates in the soft x-ray energy spectrum (500 - 2700 eV) using an electromagnetic helical undulator to provide circularly...

  19. Magnetic separation of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  20. Magnetic gripper device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    A climbing apparatus is provided for climbing ferromagnetic surfaces, such as storage tanks and steel frame structures. A magnet assembly is rotatably mounted in a frame assembly. The frame assembly provides a pair of cam surfaces having different dimensions so that, when the frame is rotated, the cam surfaces contact the ferromagnetic surface to separate the magnet assembly from the surface. The different cam dimensions enable one side of the magnet at a time to be detached from the surface to reduce the effort needed to disengage the climbing apparatus. The cam surface also provides for smoothly attaching the apparatus. A hardened dowel pin is also attached to the frame and the pointed end of the dowel engages the surface when the magnet is attached to the surface to prevent downward sliding movement of the assembly under the weight of the user.