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1

Magnetic Confinement Fusion at the Crossroads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atoll: 15MT yield References - "Dark Sun" by Richard Rhodes, 1995 "History of Soviet Fusion", V = 12m 颅 Pfusion = 880 MW Ref: V.D. Shafranov, "History of Soviet Fusion" Physics-Uspekhi 4 835, culminating in TFTR (US), JET (EU), JT-60 (Japan) #12;MGB / UT / 070307 19 1973 Oil Embargo - Energy R

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

2

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Status and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by centrifugal force of particles moving along curved magnetic field plasma magnetic field Centrifugal force #12;Centrifugal force in a torus centrifugal force magnetic field #12;Stability theory is highly developed disruption to occur, Control its behavior by rapid injection of jet of neutral gas Causes energy

3

Open-ended magnetic confinement systems for fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic confinement systems that use externally generated magnetic fields can be divided topologically into two classes: ``closed`` and `open``. The tokamak, the stellarator, and the reversed-field-pinch approaches are representatives of the first category, while mirror-based systems and their variants are of the second category. While the recent thrust of magnetic fusion research, with its emphasis on the tokamak, has been concentrated on closed geometry, there are significant reasons for the continued pursuit of research into open-ended systems. The paper discusses these reasons, reviews the history and the present status of open-ended systems, and suggests some future directions for the research.

Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

B.C. Stratton, M. Bitter, K.W. Hill, D.L. Hillis, and J.T. Hogan

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. This observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the {nabla}n{sub e} Multiplication-Sign {nabla}T{sub e} term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang Xianzhu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Materials considerations for inertially-confined fusion reactors (ICFR)  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses some of the material considerations for inertially confined fusion reactors. A comparison of the material considerations for inertially confined reactors is made with those of magnetically confined reactors. The lithium fall reactor concept is used as an example of the freedom from constraints intrinsic to inertially-confined fusion reactors.

Hovingh, J.

1978-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

8

Inertial confinement fusion with direct electric generation by magnetic flux comparession  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-power-density laser-fusion-reactor concept in investigated in which directed kinetic enery imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium--in which the fusion target is centrally located--is maximized. In turn, this kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with, potentially, very high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the concept maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall can be many orders of magnitude less than is typical of D-T fusion reactor concepts.

Lasche, G.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

LDRD final report on confinement of cluster fusion plasmas with magnetic fields.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two versions of a current driver for single-turn, single-use 1-cm diameter magnetic field coils have been built and tested at the Sandia National Laboratories for use with cluster fusion experiments at the University of Texas in Austin. These coils are used to provide axial magnetic fields to slow radial loss of electrons from laser-produced deuterium plasmas. Typical peak field strength achievable for the two-capacitor system is 50 T, and 200 T for the ten-capacitor system. Current rise time for both systems is about 1.7 {mu}s, with peak current of 500 kA and 2 MA, respectively. Because the coil must be brought to the laser, the driver needs to be portable and drive currents in vacuum. The drivers are complete but laser-plasma experiments are still in progress. Therefore, in this report, we focus on system design, initial tests, and performance characteristics of the two-capacitor and ten-capacitors systems. The questions of whether a 200 T magnetic field can retard the breakup of a cluster-fusion plasma, and whether this field can enhance neutron production have not yet been answered. However, tools have been developed that will enable producing the magnetic fields needed to answer these questions. These are a two-capacitor, 400-kA system that was delivered to the University of Texas in 2010, and a 2-MA ten-capacitor system delivered this year. The first system allowed initial testing, and the second system will be able to produce the 200 T magnetic fields needed for cluster fusion experiments with a petawatt laser. The prototype 400-kA magnetic field driver system was designed and built to test the design concept for the system, and to verify that a portable driver system could be built that delivers current to a magnetic field coil in vacuum. This system was built copying a design from a fixed-facility, high-field machine at LANL, but made to be portable and to use a Z-machine-like vacuum insulator and vacuum transmission line. This system was sent to the University of Texas in Austin where magnetic fields up to 50 T have been produced in vacuum. Peak charge voltage and current for this system have been 100 kV and 490 kA. It was used this last year to verify injection of deuterium and surrogate clusters into these small, single-turn coils without shorting the coil. Initial test confirmed the need to insulate the inner surface of the coil, which requires that the clusters must be injected through small holes in an insulator. Tests with a low power laser confirmed that it is possible to inject clusters into the magnetic field coils through these holes without destroying the clusters. The university team also learned the necessity of maintaining good vacuum to avoid insulator, transmission line, and coil shorting. A 200-T, 2 MA system was also constructed using the experience from the first design to make the pulsed-power system more robust. This machine is a copy of the prototype design, but with ten 100-kV capacitors versus the two used in the prototype. It has additional inductance in the switch/capacitor unit to avoid breakdown seen in the prototype design. It also has slightly more inductance at the cable connection to the vacuum chamber. With this design we have been able to demonstrate 1 MA current into a 1 cm diameter coil with the vacuum chamber at air pressure. Circuit code simulations, including the additional inductance with the new design, agree well with the measured current at a charge voltage of 40 kV with a short circuit load, and at 50 kV with a coil. The code also predicts that with a charge voltage of 97 kV we will be able to get 2 MA into a 1 cm diameter coil, which will be sufficient for 200 T fields. Smaller diameter or multiple-turn coils will be able to achieve even higher fields, or be able to achieve 200-T fields with lower charge voltage. Work is now proceeding at the university under separate funding to verify operation at the 2-MA level, and to address issues of debris mitigation, measurement of the magnetic field, and operation in vacuum. We anticipate operation at full current with single

Argo, Jeffrey W.; Kellogg, Jeffrey W.; Headley, Daniel Ignacio; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Waugh, Caleb J.; Lewis, Sean M.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Wisher, Matthew; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Bengtson, Roger

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion conditions is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion.

Kirkpatrick, R. C. (Ronald C.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that will be co  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod A crucial challenge in magnetic fusion is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that is compatible with the engineering requirements of a fusion reactor. The triggering of edge transport barriers at the boundary of confined plasma is a common approach to obtaining high energy confinement, in a regime known as H-mode, which extrapolates to high performance in ITER and other burning plasma devices. However, barriers to energy transport can sometimes be self-defeating, since they also provide a strong barrier to particle transport. This can lead to enhanced confinement of impurities in the plasma core, excessive radiated power and deterioration of performance for a given

13

Inertial-confinement-fusion targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

Hendricks, C.D.

1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

Woolley, Robert D. (Belle Mead, NJ)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

Woolley, Robert D.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

Multishell inertial confinement fusion target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Multishell inertial confinement fusion target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Inertial confinement fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

inertial-confinement-fusion An inertial-confinement-fusion An experimental process that uses lasers to compress plasma to sufficiently high temperatures and densities for fusion to occur. Such experiments are carried out in places such as the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. en Fusion through the eyes of a veteran science journalist http://www.pppl.gov/news/2013/07/fusion-through-eyes-veteran-science-journalist-1

Author Daniel Clery recently published "A Piece of the Sun," a 320-page narrative of the history of fusion research and the

19

Inertial Confinement Fusion R&D and Nuclear Proliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R&D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

Robert J. Goldston

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Search for fusion power  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the basics of fusion power is given. Both inertial confinement and magnetic confinement fusion are discussed.

Post, R.F.

1978-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Commercial applications of inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the fundamentals of inertial-confinement fusion, some laser-fusion reactor (LFR) concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation. In addition, other commercial energy-related applications, such as the production of fissionable fuels, of synthetic hydrocarbon-based fuels, and of process heat for a variety of uses, as well as the environmental and safety aspects of fusion energy, are discussed. Finally, the requirements for commercialization of laser fusion technologies are described.

Booth, L.A.; Frank, T.G. (comps.)

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

Woolley, Robert D. (Hillsborough, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Inertial Confinement Fusion Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion

24

Multishell inertial-confinement-fusion target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure relates to fusion targets. It deals particularly with the production of multishell inertial confinement fusion targets. The fuel pellet within such targets is designed to compress isentropically under laser or particle irradiation. When a short pulse at extremely high power density strikes the target containing deuterium-tritium fuel, the resulting plasma is confined briefly by its own inertia. Thermonuclear energy can be released in less time than it takes the fuel pellet to blow apart. However, efficient thermonuclear burn requires that the plasma must remain intact at extremely high temperatures and densities for a time sufficient to allow a large fraction of the nuclei to react. Development of multishell targets has been directed at this problem.

Holland, J.R.; Del Vecchio, R.M.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Magnetic fusion reactor economics  

SciTech Connect

An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The VISTA spacecraft: Advantages of ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) for interplanetary fusion propulsion applications  

SciTech Connect

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an attractive engine power source for interplanetary manned spacecraft, especially for near-term missions requiring minimum flight duration, because ICF has inherent high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. We have developed a new vehicle concept called VISTA that uses ICF and is capable of round-trip manned missions to Mars in 100 days using A.D. 2020 technology. We describe VISTA's engine operation, discuss associated plasma issues, and describe the advantages of DT fuel for near-term applications. Although ICF is potentially superior to non-fusion technologies for near-term interplanetary transport, the performance capabilities of VISTA cannot be meaningfully compared with those of magnetic-fusion systems because of the lack of a comparable study of the magnetic-fusion systems. We urge that such a study be conducted.

Orth, C.D.; Klein, G.; Sercel, J.; Hoffman, N.; Murray, K.; Chang-Diaz, F.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels  

SciTech Connect

It is shown by means of multi-fluid particle-in-cell simulations that convergence of the spherical shock wave that propagates through the inner gas of inertial confinement fusion-relevant experiments is accompanied by a separation of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) ions across the shock front. Deuterons run ahead of the tritons due to their lower mass and higher charge-to-mass ratio and can reach the center several tens of picoseconds before the tritons. The rising edge of the DD and TT fusion rate is also temporally separated by the same amount, which should be an observable in experiments and would be a direct proof of the 'stratification conjecture' on the shock front [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056308 (2011)]. Moreover, dephasing of the D and T shock components in terms of density and temperature leads to a degradation of the DT fusion yield as the converging shock first rebounds from the fuel center (shock yield). For the parameters of this study, the second peak in the fusion yield (compression yield) is strongly dependent on the choice of the flux limiter.

Bellei, C.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Haines, M. G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientic, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion Office of Inertial...

29

Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

30

Comments on open-ended magnetic systems for fusion  

SciTech Connect

Differentiating characteristics of magnetic confinement systems having externally generated magnetic fields that are open'' are listed and discussed in the light of their several potential advantages for fusion power systems. It is pointed out that at this stage of fusion research high-Q'' (as deduced from long energy confinement times) is not necessarily the most relevant criterion by which to judge the potential of alternate fusion approaches for the economic generation of fusion power. An example is given of a hypothetical open-geometry fusion power system where low-Q operation is essential to meeting one of its main objectives (low neutron power flux).

Post, R.F.

1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

New Insight into Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternate Concepts & Magnets / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

G. L. Kulcinski et al.

32

Heat transfer in inertial confinement fusion reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

The transfer of energy produced by the interaction of the intense pulses of short-ranged fusion microexplosion products with materials is one of the most difficult problems in inertially-confined fusion (ICF) reactor design. The short time and deposition distance for the energy results in local peak power densities on the order of 10/sup 18/ watts/m/sup 3/. High local power densities may cause change of state or spall in the reactor materials. This will limit the structure lifetimes for ICF reactors of economic physical sizes, increasing operating costs including structure replacement and radioactive waste management. Four basic first wall protection methods have evolved: a dry-wall, a wet-wall, a magnetically shielded wall, and a fluid wall. These approaches are distinguished by the way the reactor wall interfaces with fusion debris as well as the way the ambient cavity conditions modify the fusion energy forms and spectra at the first wall. Each of these approaches requires different heat transfer considerations.

Hovingh, J.

1979-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

33

Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma and a toroidal field coil. A mechanism for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

Rawls, J.M.; Peuron, A.U.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors (30a, 30b, etc.) formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma (12) and a toroidal field coil (18). A mechanism (60) for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

Rawls, John M. (Del Mar, CA); Peuron, Unto A. (Solana Beach, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fueling of magnetic confinement devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general overview of the fueling of magnetic confinement devices is presented, with particular emphasis on recent experimental results. Various practical fueling mechanisms are considered, such as cold gas inlet (or plasma edge fueling), neutral beam injection, and injection of high speed cryogenic hydrogen pellets. The central role played by charged particle transport and recycle of plasma particles from material surfaces in contact with the plasma is discussed briefly. The various aspects of hydrogen pellet injection are treated in detail, including applications to the production of high purity start-up plasmas for stellarators and other devices, refueling of tokamak plasmas, pellet ablation theory, and the technology and performance characteristics of low and high speed pellet injectors.

Milora, S.L.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Shock convergence and mix dynamics in inertial confinement fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the phenomena of shock propagation and of turbulent mix induced by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth is of critical importance for ignition and high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Capsule ...

Rygg, James Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Design considerations in inertially-confined fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the effects of short time pulses of energetic particles and waves typical of inertially-confined thermonuclear reactions on the first wall, blanket and shield of conceptual reactors. Several reactor designs are presented which attempt to cope with the various problems from the microexplosion debris. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the first-wall problems of laser-initiated, inertially confined fusion reactors using the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle.

Hovingh, J.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

LANL | Physics | Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inertial confinement and high density Inertial confinement and high density plasma physics Using the world's most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The experimental research of the Physics Division's Inertial Confinement Fusion program is conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester, and the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos. Within inertial confinement fusion and the high energy density area, Los Alamos specializes in hohlraum energetics, symmetry tuning, warm dense matter physics, and hydrodynamics in ultra-extreme conditions. When complete, this research will enable the exploitation of fusion as an energy resource and will enable advanced research in stockpile stewardship

39

A review of Vlasov-Fokker-Planck numerical modeling of inertial confinement fusion plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of intense lasers with solid matter generates a hot plasma state that is well described by the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation. Accurate and efficient modeling of the physics in these scenarios is highly pertinent, because it relates to ... Keywords: Computational, Fast electron transport, Fokker-Planck, Inertial confinement fusion, Laser, Magnetic field, Plasma, Vlasov

A. G. R. Thomas; M. Tzoufras; A. P. L. Robinson; R. J. Kingham; C. P. Ridgers; M. Sherlock; A. R. Bell

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Inertial confinement fusion | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world抯 largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

Ross, P.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Method and Apparatus to Produce and Maintain a thick, flowing, Liquid Lithium first wall for Toroidal Magnetic Confinement DT Fusion Reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fission reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

Woolley, Robert D.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

Plasma confinement. [Physics for magnetic geometries  

SciTech Connect

The physics of plasma confinement by a magnetic field is developed from the basic properties of plasmas through the theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport in toroidal and open-ended configurations. The close relationship between the theory of plasma confinement and Hamiltonian mechanics is emphasized, and the modern view of macroscopic instabilities as three-dimensional equilibria is given.

Boozer, A.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Inertial confinement fusion: present status and future potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power from inertial confinement fusion holds much promise for society. This paper points out many of the benefits relative to combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and fission power. Potential problems are also identified and put in perspective. The progress toward achieving inertial fusion power is described and results of recent work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Key phenomenological uncertainties are described and experimental goals for the Nova laser system are given. Several ICF reactor designs are discussed.

Hogan, W.J.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today抯 magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today抯 computers and modern linear and non?linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

S.C. Jardin

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma.

Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Cambridge, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma.

Bers, Abraham (Arlington, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a reactor-scale FRC, and the FIREX program was intended to test the ideas behind this approach. We will describe in this report the technological development path and advances in physics understanding that allowed FIREX to reach a regime in which ion rings were reproducibly created with up to about half the current necessary to produce field reversal. Unfortunately, the experiments were limited to this level by a fundamental, unanticipated aspect of the physics of strong ion rings in plasma. The FIREX ring is a strongly anisotropic, current-carrying population of ions moving faster than the Alfven speed in the background plasma. The rapidly changing ring current excites very large-amplitude Alfven waves in the plasma, and these waves strongly affect the ring, causing rapid energy loss in a way that is not compatible with the success of the ring trapping scenario around which FIREX was designed. The result was that FIREX rings were always very short-lived. We will discuss the implication of these results for possible future use of large-orbit ions in FRCs. In short, it appears that a certain range of the parameters characterizing the ring Alfven mach number and distribution function must be avoided to allow the existence of a long-lived energetic ion component in an FRC. This report will explain why FIREX experimental results cannot be directly scaled to quantitatively predict this range for a particular FRC configuration. This will require accurate, three-dimensional simulations. FIREX results do constitute a very good dataset for validating such a code, and simulations already carried out during this program provide a guide to the important physics involved.

Greenly, John, B.

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Inertial Confinement Fusion Annual Report 1997  

SciTech Connect

The ICF Annual Report provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL ICF Program during the fiscal year by the use of two formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the fiscal year and (2) a compilation of the articles that previously appeared in the ICF Quarterly Report that year. Both the Overview and Quarterly Report are also on the Web at http://lasers.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1997, the fourth quarter issue of the ICF Quarterly was no longer printed as a separate document but rather included in the ICF Annual. This change provided a more efficient process of documenting our accomplishments with-out unnecessary duplication of printing. In addition we introduced a new document, the ICF Program Monthly Highlights. Starting with the September 1997 issue and each month following, the Monthly Highlights will provide a brief description of noteworthy activities of interest to our DOE sponsors and our stakeholders. The underlying theme for LLNL's ICF Program research continues to be defined within DOE's Defense Programs missions and goals. In support of these missions and goals, the ICF Program advances research and technology development in major interrelated areas that include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology. While in pursuit of its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application of inertial fusion energy for civilian power production. ICF technologies continue to have spin-off applications for additional government and industrial use. In addition to these topics, the ICF Annual Report covers non-ICF funded, but related, laser research and development and associated applications. We also provide a short summary of the quarterly activities within Nova laser operations, Beamlet laser operations, and National Ignition Facility laser design. LLNL's ICF Program falls within DOE's national ICF program, which includes the Nova and Beamlet (LLNL), OMEGA (University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics), Nike (Naval Research Laboratory), and Trident (Los Alamos National Laboratory) laser facilities. The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (Z) and Saturn pulsed-power facilities are at Sandia National Laboratories. General Atomics, Inc., develops and provides many of the targets for the above experimental facilities. Many of the ICF Annual Report articles are co-authored with our colleagues from these other ICF institutions.

Correll, D

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Bangerter, R.O. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Bock, R. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bangerter, R.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bock, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Diagnostic measurements related to laser driven inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

Scientists at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory have been conducting laser driven inertial confinement fusion experiments for over five years. The first proof of the thermonuclear burn came at the Janus target irradiation facility in the spring of 1975. Since that time three succeedingly higher energy facilities have been constructed at Livermore, Cyclops, Argus and Shiva, where increased fusion efficiency has been demonstrated. A new facility, called Nova, is now in the construction phase and we are hopeful that scientific break even (energy released compared to incident laser energy on target) will be demonstrated here in early 1980's. Projected progress of the Livermore program is shown.

Campbell, D.E.

1979-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion  

SciTech Connect

Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

Wurden, Glen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

Inertial confinement fusion method producing line source radiation fluence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inertial confinement fusion method in which target pellets are imploded in sequence by laser light beams or other energy beams at an implosion site which is variable between pellet implosions along a line. The effect of the variability in position of the implosion site along a line is to distribute the radiation fluence in surrounding reactor components as a line source of radiation would do, thereby permitting the utilization of cylindrical geometry in the design of the reactor and internal components.

Rose, Ronald P. (Peters Township, Washington County, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Progress in inertial confinement fusion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the Inertial Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are to study matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure and to produce fusion energy from inertially confined fusion fuel. With the conclusion of recent multi-kilojoule 0.53 ..mu..m experiments on Novette, we have demonstrated vastly improved plasma conditions compared to those previously obtained at LLNL with similar energies at 1.06 ..mu..m and elsewhere with 10 ..mu..m radiation. The lower preheat environment obtainable with short wavelength light has led to 3X improvements in the compression of targets on Novette compared to similar targets on Shiva with 1.06 ..mu..m. Subsequent experiments on Nova with short wavelength light will begin in 1985. They are expected to demonstrate the necessary compression conditions required for high gain fusion to occur when irradiated with a multi-megajoule driver. These recent results, together with improved calculations, and innovations in driver and reactor technology, indicate that high gain inertial fusion will occur and is a viable candidate for fusion power production in the future.

Holzrichter, J.F.

1984-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

56

Comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF (Inertial-Confinement-Fusion) driver  

SciTech Connect

This report compares two physics designs of the low energy end of an induction linac-ICF driver: one using electric quadrupole focusing of many parallel beams followed by transverse combining; the other using magnetic quadrupole focusing of fewer beams without beam combining. Because of larger head-to-tail velocity spread and a consequent rapid current amplification in a magnetic focusing channel, the overall accelerator size of the design using magnetic focusing is comparable to that using electric focusing.

Kim, C.H.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage ({approx}100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

Donovan, D. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boris, D. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, South West, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Piefer, G. R. [Phoenix Nuclear Labs, 2555 Industrial Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53713 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Magnetic fusion 1985: what next  

SciTech Connect

Recent budget reductions for magnetic fusion have led to a re-examination of program schedules and objectives. Faced with delays and postponement of major facilities as previously planned, some have called for a near-term focus on science, others have stressed technology. This talk will suggest a different focus as the keynote for this conference, namely, the applications of fusion. There is no doubt that plasma science is by now mature and fusion technology is at the forefront. This has and will continue to benefit many fields of endeavor, both in actual new discoveries and techniques and in attracting and training scientists and engineers who move on to make significant contributions in science, defense and industry. Nonetheless, however superb the science or how challenging the technology, these are means, not ends. To maintain its support, the magnetic fusion program must also offer the promise of power reactors that could be competitive in the future. At this conference, several new reactor designs will be described that claim to be smaller and economically competitive with fission reactors while retaining the environmental and safety characteristics that are the hallmark of fusion. The American Nuclear Society is an appropriate forum in which to examine these new designs critically, and to stimulate better ideas and improvements. As a preview, this talk will include brief discussions of new tokamak, tandem mirror and reversed field pinch reactor designs to be presented in later sessions. Finally, as a preview of the session on fusion breeders, the talk will explore once again the economic implications of a new nuclear age, beginning with improved fission reactors fueled by fusion breeders, then ultimately evolving to reactors based solely on fusion.

Fowler, T.K.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

Rostoker, Norman (Irvine, CA); Binderbauer, Michl (Irvine, CA); Qerushi, Artan (Irvine, CA); Tahsiri, Hooshang (Irvine, CA)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned Carbon Walls American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Next-generation laser for Inertial Confinement Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the progress in developing and building the Mercury laser system as the first in a series of a new generation of diode- pumped solid-state Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Mercury will be the first integrated demonstration of a scalable laser architecture compatible with advanced high energy density (HED) physics applications. Primary performance goals include 10% efficiencies at 10 Hz and a 1-10 ns pulse with 1 omega energies of 100 J and with 2 omega/3 omega frequency conversion.

Marshall, C.D.; Deach, R.J.; Bibeau, C. [and others

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

Consequences of intensity constraints on inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the conflicting requirements of high implosion efficiency (low corona temperature) and adequate energy transport (high corona temperature) can, together with other effects, limit useful infrared light intensities to values on the order of 100 Tw/cm/sup 2/. Increased interest in ultraviolet lasers, for which this intensity constraint is expected to be less severe, and the entry of charged-particle drivers in the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) competition are consequences of this limitation. Analytical results based on a simple model are presented which show how the gain of an ICF target is modified by the existence of an arbitrary intensity constraint.

Kidder, R.E.

1979-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies Prepared for The President's Committee May 16,1995 #12;Page 2 White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies 1. Introduction Dramatic present our vision for the future of fusion energy research. In this white paper, following a summary

64

System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

Moses, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

Hamilton, G.W.

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion) Understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through radiation- hydrodynamics. To minimize the drive energy for ignition, the imploding shell of DT- fuel needs to be kept as cold

Militzer, Burkhard

68

ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Brussels, Belgium,of the Heavy Ion Fusion Workshop held at Brookhaven NationalReport, Hearthfire Heavy Ion Fusion, October 1, 1979 - March

Faltens, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Spectral Line Shapes as a Diagnostic Tool in Magnetic Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spectral line shapes and intensities are used for obtaining information on the various regions of magnetic fusion devices. Emission from low principal quantum numbers of hydrogen isotopes is analyzed for understanding the complex recycling mechanism. Lines emitted from high principal quantum numbers of hydrogen and helium are dominated by Stark effect, allowing an electronic density diagnostic in the divertor. Intensities of lines emitted by impurities are fitted for a better knowledge of ion transport in the confined plasma.

Stamm, R; Capes, H; Demura, A; Godbert-Mouret, L; Koubiti, M; Marandet, Y; Mattioli, M; Rosato, J; Rosmej, F; Fournier, K B

2006-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

Electrons Confined with an Axially Symmetric Magnetic Mirror Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low energy non-neutral electron plasmas were confined with an axially symmetric magnetic mirror field and an electrostatic potential to investigate the basic confinement properties of a simple magnetic mirror trap. As expected the confinement time became longer as a function of the mirror ratio. The axial electrostatic oscillations of a confined electron plasma were also observed. Obtained results suggested an improved scheme to accumulate low energy charged particles with the use of a magnetic mirror field, which would enable the investigation of electron-positron plasmas.

Higaki, H.; Ito, K.; Kira, K.; Okamoto, H. [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

71

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related FieldsFusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fieldscalled, in the magnetic fusion energy community, a tandem

Kwan, J.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Prospects for developing attractive magnetic fusion concepts  

SciTech Connect

Comments are made pertaining to a generic magnetic fusion reactor study carried out at ORNL. A second study was made of the required reactor characteristics for attractive fusion reactors. The study concluded that both the physics and economics would be achievable with present magnetic configurations.

Sheffield, J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, January--March 1995. Volume 5, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included this quarter include: the role of the National Ignition Facility in the development of Inertial Confinement Fusion, laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums, evolution of solid-state induction modulators for a heavy-ion recirculator, the National Ignition Facility project, and terminal-level relaxation in Nd-doped laser material.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

L.E. Zakharov

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Computational and experimental investigation of magnetized target fusion  

SciTech Connect

In Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions. Because the magnetic field suppresses losses by electron thermal conduction in the fuel during the target implosion heating process, the compression may be over a much longer time scale than in traditional inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Bigger targets and much lower initial target densities than in ICF can be used, reducing radiative energy losses. Therefore, ``liner-on-plasma`` compressions, driven by relatively inexpensive electrical pulsed power, may be practical. Potential MTF target plasmas must meet minimum temperature, density, and magnetic field starting conditions, and must remain relatively free of high-Z radiation-cooling-enhancing contaminants. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, computational and experimental research is being pursued into MTF target plasmas, such as deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches, and the Russian-originated MAGO plasma. In addition, liner-on-plasma compressions of such target plasmas to fusion conditions are being computationally modeled, and experimental investigation of such heavy liner implosions has begun. The status of the research will be presented.

Sheehey, P.T.; Guzik, J.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Lithium pellet injection into high pressure magnetically confined plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ablation of solid pellets injected into high temperature magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by rapid oscillations in the ablation rate, and the formation of field aligned filaments in the ablatant. High ...

B鰏e, Brock (Brock Darrel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Requirements  

SciTech Connect

This Standard identifies safety requirements for magnetic fusion facilities. Safety functions are used to define outcomes that must be achieved to ensure that exposures to radiation, hazardous materials, or other hazards are maintained within acceptable limits. Requirements applicable to magnetic fusion facilities have been derived from Federal law, policy, and other documents. In addition to specific safety requirements, broad direction is given in the form of safety principles that are to be implemented and within which safety can be achieved.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Comment on 'Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels'[Phys. Plasmas 20, 012701 (2013)  

SciTech Connect

A recent paper presents numerical simulations of shock waves in a two-ion-component plasma, investigating how species separation occurring in the latter can affect the nuclear fusion yield of inertial confinement fusion targets. Here, it is shown that an important physical mechanism has obviously been omitted in those calculations, which thus lead to significantly overestimated results.

Larroche, O. [CEA DIF, Bruyeres le Chatel, 91297 Arpajon Cedex (France)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion John Lindl NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist (NIC) 路 Opportunities for the future on NIF #12;Fusion can be accomplished in three different ways density) 102 103 104 105 500 50 5 0.5 Capsule energy (KJ) NIF Relaxed pressure and stability requirements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, April--June 1995. Volume 5, No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ICF Quarterly Reports is published four times each fiscal year by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The journal reports selected current research within the ICF Program. Major areas of investigation presented here include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Equilibrium and stability studies of plasmas confined in a dipole magnetic field using magnetic measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is the first experiment of its kind to use a levitated current ring to confine a plasma in a dipole magnetic field. Unlike most other confinement devices, plasma compressibility ...

Karim, Ishtak

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a stationary plasma that is compatible with the engineering requirements of a fusion reactor. The triggering of edge transport barriers at the boundary of confined...

84

Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research  

SciTech Connect

The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main divertor heat flux (divertor strike point), the lithium is evaporated from the surface. The evaporated lithium is quickly ionized by the plasma and the ionized lithium ions can provide a strongly radiative layer of plasma ("radiative mantle"), thus could significantly reduce the heat flux to the divertor strike point surfaces, thus protecting the divertor surface. The protective effects of LL have been observed in many experiments and test stands. As a possible reactor divertor candidate, a closed LL divertor system is described. Finally, it is noted that the lithium applications as a PFC can be quite flexible and broad. The lithium application should be quite compatible with various divertor configurations, and it can be also applied to protecting the presently envisioned tungsten based solid PFC surfaces such as the ones for ITER. Lithium based PFCs therefore have the exciting prospect of providing a cost effective flexible means to improve the fusion reactor performance, while providing a practical solution to the highly challenging divertor heat handling issue confronting the steadystate magnetic fusion reactors.

Masayuki Ono

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main divertor heat flux (divertor strike point), the lithium is evaporated from the surface. The evaporated lithium is quickly ionized by the plasma and the ionized lithium ions can provide a strongly radiative layer of plasma ("radiative mantle"), thus could significantly reduce the heat flux to the divertor strike point surfaces, thus protecting the divertor surface. The protective effects of LL have been observed in many experiments and test stands. As a possible reactor divertor candidate, a closed LL divertor system is described. Finally, it is noted that the lithium applications as a PFC can be quite flexible and broad. The lithium application should be quite compatible with various divertor configurations, and it can be also applied to protecting the presently envisioned tungsten based solid PFC surfaces such as the ones for ITER. Lithium based PFCs therefore have the exciting prospect of providing a cost effective flexible means to improve the fusion reactor performance, while providing a practical solution to the highly challenging divertor heat handling issue confronting the steadystate magnetic fusion reactors.

Masayuki Ono

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Magnetic Confinement Fusion FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Fusion by Magnetic Confinement The image above is an artistic rendering of a tokamak, a donut-shaped magnetic vacuum chamber in which wispy vapors of fusion fuel are

88

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Heat transfer in inertial confinement fusion reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

The short time and deposition distance for the energy from inertial fusion products results in local peak power densities on the order of 10/sup 18/ watts/m/sup 3/. This paper presents an overview of the various inertial fusion reactor designs which attempt to reduce these peak power intensities and describes the heat transfer considerations for each design.

Hovingh, J.

1980-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Accelerated plan to develop magnetic fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

We have shown that, despite funding delays since the passage of the Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980, fusion development could still be carried to the point of a demonstration plant by the year 2000 as called for in the Act if funding, now about $365 million per year, were increased to the $1 billion range over the next few years (see Table I). We have also suggested that there may be an economic incentive for the private sector to become in accelerating fusion development on account of the greater stability of energy production costs from fusion. Namely, whereas fossil fuel prices will surely escalate in the course of time, fusion fuel will always be abundantly available at low cost; and fusion technology poses less future risk to the public and the investor compared to conventional nuclear power. In short, once a fusion plant is built, the cost of generating electricity mainly the amortization of the plant capital cost - would be relatively fixed for the life of the plant. In Sec. V, we found that the projected capital cost of fusion plants ($2000 to $4000 per KW/sub e/) would probably be acceptable if fusion plants were available today.

Fowler, T.K.

1986-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

The international magnetic fusion energy program  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1988, the long tradition of international cooperation in magnetic fusion energy research culminated in the initiation of design work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). If eventually constructed in the 1990s, ITER would be the world's first magnetic fusion reactor. This paper discusses the background events that led to ITER and the present status of the ITER activity. This paper presents a brief summary of the technical, political, and organizational activities that have led to the creation of the ITER design activity. The ITER activity is now the main focus of international cooperation in magnetic fusion research and one of the largest international cooperative efforts in all of science. 2 refs., 12 figs.

Fowler, T.K.

1988-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Overview of the VISTA Spacecraft Concept Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

VISTA was conceived through a detailed systems analysis as a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on advanced ICF technology but existing or near-term technology for other systems. It is a conical self-contained single-stage piloted spacecraft in which a magnetic thrust chamber directs the plasma emissions from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets into a rearward exhaust. VISTA's propulsion system is therefore unique because it is based on (1) a rather mature technology (ICF), which is known to work with sufficient driver input; (2) direct heating of all expellant by the fusion process, thus providing high mass flow rates without significant degradation of jet efficiency; and (3) a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. VISTA therefore has inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses. With advanced ICF technology, ultra-fast roundtrips (RTs) to objects within the solar system are possible (e.g., {ge}145 days RT to Mars, {ge}7 years RT to Pluto). Such short-duration missions are imperative to minimize the human physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity and the cosmic-radiation. In addition, VISTA offers on-board artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. In this paper, we give an overview of the various vehicle systems for this concept, estimate the general missions performance capabilities for interplanetary missions, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. Items requiring further research include a reduction of the wet mass from its baseline value of 6,000 metric tons, and the development of fast ignition or its equivalent to provide target gains in excess of several hundred. With target gains well above several hundred, there is no other known technology that can compete with VISTA's performance.

Orth, C D

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) MFE--Plasma Systems (UC-20a) MFE Temperature Response 4-7 4.6 Thermal Storage Requirements 4-16 4.6.1 Pressurized Water/Steam System 4-19 4

Harilal, S. S.

95

Road map for a modular magnetic fusion program  

SciTech Connect

During the past several decades magnetic fusion has made outstanding progress in understanding the science of fusion plasmas, the achievement of actual fusion plasmas and the development of key fusion technologies. Magnetic fusion is now technically ready to take the next step: the study of high gain fusion plasmas, the optimization of fusion plasmas and the continued development and integration of fusion technology. However, each of these objectives requires significant resources since the tests are now being done at the energy production scale. This paper describes a modular approach that addresses these objectives in specialized facilities that reduces the technical risk and lowers cost for near term facilities needed to address critical issues.

Dale M. Meade

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

96

Computational methods for kinetic models of magnetically confined plasmas  

SciTech Connect

In this book authors present various types of nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations which require solution for the realistic computer simulation of magnetically confined plasmas. They present detailed mathematical arguements leading to numerically tractable simplifications and provide examples and applications bearing directly on the most recent technology in plasma research.

Killeeen, J.; Kerbel, G.D.; Mc Coy, M.G.; Mirin, A.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NNSA Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF Project #12;2 Outline 路 National Nuclear Security Administration 路 ICF Campaign and Stewardship overview 路 NIF Use Plan 颅 Defense Science Board review (Ignition 2010) 路 Recent progress 颅 NIF, OMEGA, Z Confinement Fusion Acting Director Dr. Richard K. Thorpe NA-161 Office of the NIF Project Acting Director

98

Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, July--September 1994. Volume 4, Number 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ICF Quarterly continues with six articles in this issue describing recent developments in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The topics include plasma characterization, production of millimeter scale-length plasmas for studying laser-plasma instabilities, hohlraum physics, three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling, crystal growth, and laser-beam smoothing.

Honea, E. [ed.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Inertial Confinement Fusion: Quarterly report, April-June 1996  

SciTech Connect

The lead article, `Ion-beam propagation in a low-density reactor chamber for heavy-ion inertial fusion` (p. 89), explores the ability of heavy-ion beams to be adequately transported and focused in an IFE reactor. The next article, `Efficient production and applications of 2- to 10-keV x rays by laser-heated underdense radiators` (p. 96), explores the ability of the NIF to produce sufficient high-energy x rays for diagnostic backlighting, target preheating, or uniform irradiation of large test objects for Nuclear Weapons Effects Testing. For capsule implosion experiments, the increasing energies and distances involved in the NIF compared to Nova require the development of new diagnostics methods. The article `Fusion reaction-rate measurements--Nova and NIF` (p. 115) first reviews the use of time-resolved neutron measurements on Nova to monitor fusion burn histories and then explores the limitations of that technique, principally Doppler broadening, for the proposed NIF. It also explores the use of gamma rays on Nova, thereby providing a proof-of-principle for using gamma rays for monitoring fusion burn histories on the NIF. The articles `The energetics of gas-filled hohlraums` (p. 110) and `Measurements of laser- speckle-induced perturbations in laser-driven foils` (p. 123) report measurements on Nova of two important aspects of implosion experiments. The first characterizes the amount of energy lost from a hohlraum by stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering as a function of gas fill and laser-beam uniformity. The second of these articles shows that the growth of density nonuniformities implanted on smooth capsule surfaces by laser speckle can be correlated with the effects of physical surface roughness. The article `Laser-tissue interaction modeling with the LATIS computer program` (p. 103) explores the use of modeling to enhance the effectiveness--maximize desired effects and minimize collateral damage--of lasers for medical purposes.

Correll, D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Pre-Amplifier Module for Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion  

SciTech Connect

The Pre-Amplifier Modules (PAMs) are the heart of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), providing most of the energy gain for the most energetic laser in the world. Upon completion, NIF will be the only laboratory in which scientists can examine the fusion processes that occur inside stars, supernovae, and exploding nuclear weapons and that may someday serve as a virtually inexhaustible energy source for electricity. Consider that in a fusion power plant 50 cups of water could provide the energy comparable to 2 tons of coal. Of paramount importance for achieving laser-driven fusion ignition with the least energy input is the synchronous and symmetric compression of the target fuel--a condition known as laser power balance. NIF's 48 PAMs thus must provide energy gain in an exquisitely stable and consistent manner. While building one module that meets performance requirements is challenging enough, our design has already enabled the construction and fielding of 48 PAMs that are stable, uniform, and interchangeable. PAM systems are being tested at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and the Atomic Weapons Enterprise of Great Britain has purchased the PAM power system.

Heebner, J E; Bowers, M W

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the tokamak fusion test reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1--0.2 s for a line-average density range (n-bar/sub e/) of (1--2.5) x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o)approx.1.2--2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(0)approx.0.9--1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/approx.3. A comparison of Princeton large torus, poloidal divertor experiment, and tokamak fusion test reactor plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

102

Final report on the Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fusion has the potential to satisfy the prodigious power that the world will demand in the future, but it has yet to be harnessed as a practical energy source. The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. It is the contention here that a simpler path to fusion can be achieved by creating fusion conditions in a different regime at small scale (~ a few cm). One such program now under study, referred to as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), is directed at obtaining fusion in this high energy density regime by rapidly compressing a compact toroidal plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). To make fusion practical at this smaller scale, an efficient method for compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. In one variant of MTF a conducting metal shell is imploded electrically. This radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. The undertaking described in this report was to provide a suitable target FRC, as well as a simple and robust method for inserting and stopping the FRC within the imploding liner. The FRC must also survive during the time it takes for the metal liner to compress the FRC target. The initial work at the UW was focused on developing adequate preionization and flux trapping that were found to be essential in past experiments for obtaining the density, flux and most critically, FRC lifetime required for MTF. The timescale for testing and development of such a source can be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of a new facility funded by the Department of Energy. At this facility, two inductive plasma accelerators (IPA) were constructed and tested. Recent experiments with these IPAs have demonstrated the ability to rapidly form, accelerate and merge two hypervelocity FRCs into a compression chamber. The resultant FRC that was formed was hot (T{sub ion} ~ 400 eV), stationary, and stable with a configuration lifetime several times that necessary for the MTF liner experiments. The accelerator length was less than 1 meter, and the time from the initiation of formation to the establishment of the final equilibrium was less than 10 microseconds. With some modification, each accelerator can be made capable of producing FRCs suitable for the production of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment. Based on the initial FRC merging/compression results, the design and methodology for an experimental realization of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment can now be defined. The construction and testing of the key components for the formation of the target plasma at the Air force Research Laboratory (AFRL) will be performed on the IPA experiment, now at MSNW. A high density FRC plasmoid will be formed and accelerated out of each IPA into a merging/compression chamber similar to the imploding liner at AFRL. The properties of the resultant FRC plasma (size, temperature, density, flux, lifetime) will be obtained. The process will be optimized, and a final design for implementation at AFRL will be carried out. When implemented at AFRL it is anticipated that the colliding/merging FRCs will then be compressed by the liner. In this manner it is hoped that ultimately a plasma with ion temperatures reaching the 10 keV range and fusion gain near unity can be obtained.

John Slough

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Confinement and Stability of Alternate Fusion Concepts Varenna, Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

楼 Axisymmetric ideal MHD 楼 Accurate geometry 楼 Fit to experiment yields magnetic fields, currents, etc. NIMROD o Flux from injector coils Injector flux (private) Divertor Injector flux = 14 mWb Toroidal current The vacuum (bias) field allows operation at l(y) = j||/B ~ lFC (Flux conserver eigenmode). Vacuum Field

104

Magnetic mirror fusion systems: Characteristics and distinctive features  

SciTech Connect

A tutorial account is given of the main characteristics and distinctive features of conceptual magnetic fusion systems employing the magnetic mirror principle. These features are related to the potential advantages that mirror-based fusion systems may exhibit for the generation of economic fusion power.

Post, R.F.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

106

VISTA -- A Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Application Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an ideal technology to power self-contained single-stage piloted (manned) spacecraft within the solar system because of its inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses (i.e., high exhaust velocities). These technological advantages are retained when ICF is utilized with a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. We started with Rod Hyde's 1983 description of an ICF-powered engine concept using a magnetic thrust chamber, and conducted a more detailed systems study to develop a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on ICF technology projected to be available in the first half of the 21st century. The results include an entirely new conical spacecraft conceptual design utilizing near-existing radiator technology. We describe the various vehicle systems for this new concept, estimate the missions performance capabilities for general missions to the planets within the solar system, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. For this mission, we show that roundtrips totaling {ge}145 days are possible with advanced DT fusion technology and a total (wet) spacecraft mass of about 6000 metric tons. Such short-duration missions are advantageous to minimize the known cosmic-radiation hazards to astronauts, and are even more important to minimize the physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity. These ICF-powered missions are considerably faster than those available using chemical or nuclear-electric-propulsion technologies with minimum-mass vehicle configurations. VISTA also offers onboard artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the known hazards and physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. We emphasize, however, that the degree to which an ICF-powered vehicle can outperform a vehicle using any other realistic technology depends on the degree to which terrestrial-based ICF research can develop the necessary energy gain from ICF targets. With aggressive progress in such terrestrial research, VISTA will be able to make roundtrip missions to Pluto in {approx}7 years, and missions to points just beyond the solar system within a human lifetime.

Orth, C D

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

COLLIMATION AND CONFINEMENT OF MAGNETIC JETS BY EXTERNAL MEDIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the collimation of a highly magnetized jet by a surrounding cocoon that forms as a result of the interaction of the jet with the external medium. We show that in regions where the jet is well confined by the cocoon, current-driven instabilities should develop over timescales shorter than the expansion time of the jet's head. We speculate that these instabilities would give rise to complete magnetic field destruction, whereby the jet undergoes a transition from high to low sigma above the collimation zone. Using this assumption, we construct a self-consistent model for the evolution of the jet-cocoon system in an ambient medium of arbitrary density profile. We apply the model to jet breakout in long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and show that the jet is highly collimated inside the envelope of the progenitor star and is likely to remain confined well after breakout. We speculate that this strong confinement may provide a channel for magnetic field conversion in GRB outflows, whereby the hot, low-sigma jet section thereby produced is the source of the photospheric emission observed in many bursts.

Levinson, Amir [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: Levinson@wise.tau.ac.il, E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Primary heat transfer loop design for the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates a heat exchanger and balance of plant design to accompany the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber concept. The concept uses solid Li/sub 2/O or other lithium-ceramic granules, held to the wall of a rotating reaction chamber by centrifugal action, as a tritium breeding blanket and first wall protection. The Li/sub 2/O granules enter the chamber at 800 K and exit at 1200 K after absorbing the thermal energy produced by the fusion process.

Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development of backlighting sources for a Compton Radiography diagnostic of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion is time-resolved imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. Here we report on the source and diagnostic development of hard x-ray radiography and on the first radiographs of direct drive implosions obtained at photon energies up to about 100keV, where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the shell opacity. The radiographs of direct drive, plastic shell implosions obtained at the OMEGA laser facility have a spatial resolution of {approx}10um and a temporal resolution of {approx}10ps. This novel Compton Radiography is an invaluable diagnostic tool for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets, and will be integrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

Tommasini, R

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, October--December 1994. Volume 5, No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included in this issue include: system description and initial performance results for beamlet, design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers and optical switch, beamlet pulse-generation and wavefront-control system, large-aperture, high- damage-threshold optics for beamlet, beamlet pulsed power system, beamlet laser diagnostics, and beam propagation and frequency conversion modeling for the beamlet laser.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Improved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics via Massive Resistive Electromagnets  

SciTech Connect

Abandoning superconductors for magnetic fusion reactors and instead using resistive magnet designs based on cheap copper or aluminum conductor material operating at "room temperature" (300 K) can reduce the capital cost per unit fusion power and simplify plant operations. By increasing unit size well beyond that of present magnetic fusion energy conceptual designs using superconducting electromagnets, the recirculating power fraction needed to operate resistive electromagnets can be made as close to zero as needed for economy without requiring superconductors. Other advantages of larger fusion plant size, such as very long inductively driven pulses, may also help reduce the cost per unit fusion power.

Woolley, R.D.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Observation of nuclear fusion driven by a pyroelectric crystalQ1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a room temperature solid-state setting, including `cold' fusion5 and `bubble' fusion6 , have met.............................................................. Observation of nuclear fusion driven ............................................................................................................................................................................. While progress in fusion research continues with magnetic1 and inertial2 confinement, alternative

Gimzewski, James

113

Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1 to 0.2 s for a line-average density range (anti n/sub e/) of 1 to 2.5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o) approx. 1.2 to 2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(o) approx. 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. 3. A comparison of PLT, PDX, and TFTR plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed.

B.P. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; R. Majeski; S. Bernabei [and others

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Magnetized Target Fusion With Centimeter-Size Liner  

SciTech Connect

The author concentrates on the version of magnetized target fusion (MTF) that involves 3D implosions of a wall-confined plasma with the density in the compressed state {approx} 10{sup 21}-10{sup 22} cm{sup -3}. Possible plasma configurations suitable for this approach are identified. The main physics issues are outlined (equilibrium, stability, transport, plasma-liner interaction, etc). Specific parameters of the experiment reaching the plasma Q{approx}1 are presented (Q is the ratio of the fusion yield to the energy delivered to the plasma). It is emphasized that there exists a synergy between the physics and technology of MTF and dense Z-pinches (DZP). Specific areas include the particle and heat transport in a high-beta plasma, plasma-liner interaction, liner stability, stand-off problem for the power source, reaching a rep-rate regime in the energy-producing reactor, etc. Possible use of existing pulsed-power facilities for addressing these issues is discussed.

Ryutov, D

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

116

HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation  

SciTech Connect

Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R=1.0 to 3.0) requirements.

Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Component framework for coupled integrated fusion plasma simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, ... Keywords: components, coupled simulation, framework, fusion

Wael R. Elwasif; David E. Bernholdt; Lee A. Berry; Donald B. Batchelor

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fusion reactor design | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

used magnetic confinement device is the tokamak, followed by the stellarator. PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and...

119

MAGNETIC END CLOSURES FOR PLASMA CONFINING AND HEATING DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

More effective magnetic closure field regions for various open-ended containment magnetic fields used in fusion reactor devices are provided by several spaced, coaxially-aligned solenoids utilized to produce a series of nodal field regions of uniform or, preferably, of incrementally increasing intensity separated by lower intensity regions outwardly from the ends of said containment zone. Plasma sources may also be provided to inject plasma into said lower intensity areas to increase plasma density therein. Plasma may then be transported, by plasma diffusion mechanisms provided by the nodal fields, into the containment field. With correlated plasma densities and nodal field spacings approximating the mean free partl cle collision path length in the zones between the nodal fields, optimum closure effectiveness is obtained. (AEC)

Post, R.F.

1963-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

K-alpha conversion efficiency measurments for x-ray scattering in inertial confinement fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The conversion efficiency of ultra short-pulse laser radiation to K-{alpha} x-rays has been measured for various chlorine-containing targets to be used as x-ray scattering probes of dense plasmas. The spectral and temporal properties of these sources will allow spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering probing with picosecond temporal resolution required for measuring the plasma conditions in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Simulations of x-ray scattering spectra from these plasmas show that fuel capsule density, capsule ablator density, and shock timing information may be inferred.

Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Urry, M K; Robey, H; Niemann, C; Landen, O L; Morse, E; Glenzer, S H

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Driving high-gain shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets by green laser light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires UV light irradiation in order to achieve ignition at total laser energy of the order of 1 MJ. The shock-ignition approach opens up the possibility of igniting fusion targets using green light by reducing the implosion velocity and laser-driven ablation pressure. An analytical model is derived, allowing to rescale UV-driven targets to green light. Gain in the range 100-200 is obtained for total laser energy in the range 1.5-3 MJ. With respect to the original UV design, the rescaled targets are less sensitive to irradiation asymmetries and hydrodynamic instabilities, while operating in the same laser-plasma interaction regime.

Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, April--June 1994. Volume 4, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains six articles covering a wide range of activities within the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. It concentrates on target design; theoretical spectral analysis of ICF capsule surfaces; laser fusion experimental methods; and an alternative ICF design, based on ultrafast, ultrapowerful lasers. A key issue for the success of the ICF process is the hydrodynamic stability of the imploding capsule. There are two primary sources of instability growth in the ICF process: (1) asymmetries in the x-ray flux that drive the compression lead to asymmetric in the imploding surface; (2) imperfections on the capsule surface can grow into large perturbations, degrading the capsule performance. In recent years, a great deal of effort, both experimentally and theoretically, has been spent to enhance the Program`s ability to measure, model, and minimize instability growth during an implosion. Four the articles in this issue discuss this subject.

Shaw, M.J. [ed.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from a LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R = 1.0 to 3.0) requirements. These studies also indicate that masses on the order of 1.0 g at densities of rho greater than or equal to 500.0 g/cm/sup 3/ are required for a practical fusion-based fission product transmutation system.

Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Production and measurement of engineered surfaces for inertial confinement fusion research  

SciTech Connect

Inertial Confinement Fusion uses the optical energy from a very high power laser to implode spherical capsules that contain a fuel mixture of deuterium and tritium. The capsules are made of either Beryllium, plastic, or glass and range from 0.1 mm to 2 mm in diameter. As a capsule implodes, thereby compressing the fuel to reach nuclear fusion conditions, it achieves temperatures of millions of degrees Centigrade and very high pressures. In this state, the capsule materials act like fluids and often a low density fluidic material will push on a higher density material which can be a very unstable condition depending upon the smoothness of the interface between the two materials. This unstable condition is called a hydrodynamic instabillity which results in the mixing of the two materials. If the mixing occurs between the fuel and a non-fuel material, it can stop the fusion reaction just like adding significant amounts of water to gasoline can stop the operation of an automobile. Another region in the capsule where surface roughness can cause capsule performance degradation is at a joint. For instance, many capsules are made of hemispheres that are joined together. If the joint surfaces are too rough, then there will an effective reduction in density at the joint. This density reduction can cause a non-uniform implosion which will reduce the fusion energy coming out of the capsule.

Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Douglas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy spectra and spectrally resolved one-dimensional fluence images of self-emitted charged-fusion products (14.7 MeV D[superscript 3]He protons) are routinely measured from indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion ...

Li, C. K.

126

The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

Prager, Stewart (PPPL)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

127

Slow liner fusion  

SciTech Connect

{open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

Shaffer, M.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Magnetic fusion: planning for the future  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of international cooperation in the fusion program is given. The author shares his views on the technical prospects and future potential of fusion as a practical energy source. (MOW)

Fowler, T.K.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

R. W. Moir; N. N. Martovetsky; A. W. Molvik; D. D. Ryutov; T. C. Simonen

131

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

Lasche, G.P.

1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

Overview of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Devlopment and Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

This publication gives a comprehensive introduction to controlled fusion research. Topics covered in the discussion include the following: (1) fusion system engineering and advanced design, (2) plasma engineering, (3) magnetic systems, (4) materials, (5) environment and safety, and (6) alternate energy applications. (MOW)

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimizing and validating the magnetic confinement approach to fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities for "Exploratory Plasma Research" (EPR) in the U.S. #12;What is EPR? 路 "EPR" a recently

135

Universities and the UK Magnetic Confinement Fusion Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as for DTN, plus a choice of three other modules (eg High Performance Computing; Statistical Data Analysis

136

The restructured fusion program and the role of alternative fusion concepts  

SciTech Connect

This testimony to the subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the U.S. House of Representatives`s Committee on Science pushes for about 25% of the fusion budget to go to alternative fusion concepts. These concepts are: low density magnetic confinement, inertial confinement fusion, high density magnetic confinement, and non- thermonuclear and miscellaneous programs. Various aspects of each of these concepts are outlined.

Perkins, L.J.

1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

137

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29 The Fission-fusion Hybrid - iii - General DiscussionInteraction in Heavy Ion Fusion BIBLIOGRAPHY HEAVY IONReactor Designs . . . 27 Pure Fusion Power Reactor Tritium

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Inertial Confinement Fusion Quarterly Report: April--June 1993. Volume 3, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains six articles describing recent advances in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. The current emphasis of the ICF program is in support of DOE`s National Ignition Facility (NIF) initiative for demonstrating ignition and gain with a 1-2 MJ glass laser. The articles describe recent Nova experiments and investigations tailored towards enhancing understanding of the key physics and technological issues for the NIF. Titles of the articles are: development of large-aperture KDP crystals; inner-shell photo-ionized X-ray lasers; X-ray radiographic measurements of radiation-driven shock and interface motion in solid density materials; the role of nodule defects in laser-induced damage of multilayer optical coatings; techniques for Mbar to near-Gbar equation-of-state measurements with the Nova laser; parametric instabilities and laser-beam smoothing.

MacGowan, B.J.; Kotowski, M.; Schleich, D. [eds.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Interactive tools designed to study mix in inertial confinement fusion implosions  

SciTech Connect

Graphical user interface tools have been built in IDL to study mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion cores. FLAME (Fall-Line Analysis Mix Evaluator), a code which investigates yield degradation due to mix , was designed to post-process 1D hydrodynamic simulation output by implementing a variety of mix models. Three of these mix models are based on the physics of the fall-line. In addition, mixing data from other sources can be incorporated into the yield degradation analysis. Two independent tools called HAME (Haan Analysis Mix Evaluator) and YAME (Youngs Analysis Mix Evaluator) were developed to calculate the spatial extent of the mix region according to the Haan saturation model and Youngs' phenomenological model, respectively. FLAME facilitates a direct comparison to experimental data. The FLAME, HAME, and YAME interfaces are user-friendly, flexible, and platform-independent.

Welser-sherrill, Leslie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Doug C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Summary of research for the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The information presented in this report is a summary of the status of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as of February 1985. This report contains material on the existing high-power CO/sub 2/ laser driver (Antares), the program to determine the potential of KrF as an ICF driver, heavy-ion accelerators as drivers for ICF, target fabrication for ICF, and a summary of our understanding of laser-plasma interactions. A classified companion report contains material on our current understanding of capsule physics and lists the contributions to the Laboratory's weapons programs made by the ICF program. The information collected in these two volumes is meant to serve as a report on the status of some of the technological components of the Los Alamos ICF program rather than a detailed review of specific technical issues.

Cartwright, D.C. (comp.)

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Fusion Conditions Achieving Fusion Conditions CPEP: Online Fusion Course Main Topics Energy Sources and Conversions Two Key Fusion Reactions How Fusion Reactions Work Creating the Conditions for Fusion Plasmas - the 4th State of Matter Achieving Fusion Conditions More Info About CPEP Fusion Chart Images: English + 6 More Languages Main CPEP Web Site Printed Charts in 3 Sizes Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Achieving Fusion Conditions EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS IN FUSION RESEARCH Both inertial and magnetic confinement fusion research have focused on understanding plasma confinement and heating. This research has led to increases in plasma temperature, T, density, n, and energy confinement

142

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Volume 2, Guidance  

SciTech Connect

This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in Vol. 1 of this Standard. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While Vol. 1 is generally applicable in that requirements there apply to a wide range of fusion facilities, this volume is concerned mainly with large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This volume is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

KrF laser path to high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion) laboratory microfusion facility  

SciTech Connect

The krypton-fluoride laser has many desirable features for inertial confinement fusion. Because it is a gas laser capable of operation with high efficiency, it is the only known laser candidate capable of meeting the driver requirements for inertial fusion energy (IFE) production. Los Alamos National Laboratory has defined a program plan to develop KrF lasers for IFE production. This plan develops the KrF laser and demonstrates the target performance in single-pulse facilities. A 100-kJ Laser Target Test Facility (LTTF) is proposed as the next step, to be followed by a 3 to 10-MJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The LTTF will resolve many target physics issues and accurately define the driver energy required for the LMF. It is also proposed that the technology development for IFE, such as the high-efficiency, high-reliability, repetitively pulsed driver, the reactor, mass production of targets, and the mechanism of injecting targets be developed in parallel with the single-pulse facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs.

Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A.; Figueiro, J.F.; Cartwright, D.C.; McDonald, T.E.; Hauer, A.A.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Younger, S.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Magneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 1 LA-UR-11-01898 #12;Some Observations An economic for the DOE/NNSA 2 #12;Magneto-inertial fusion: Part of a plan B 路 May allow more efficient drivers, lower Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 3 #12;A Wide Range of Driver

145

Analysis of the requirements for economic magnetic fusion  

SciTech Connect

A generic reactor model is used to examine the economic viability of electricity generation by magnetic fusion. The simple model uses components which are representative of those used in previous reactor studies of deuterium-tritium burning tokamaks, stellarators, bumpy tori, reverse field pinches and tandem mirrors. Conservative costing assumptions are made. The generic reactor is not a tokamak but rather it is intended to emphasize what is common to all magnetic fusion reactors. The reactor uses a superconducting toroidal coil set to produce the dominant magnetic field. To this extent it is a less good approximation to systems, such as the reversed field pinch in which the main field is produced by a plasma current. The main output of the study is the cost of electricity as a function of the weight and size of the fusion core - blanket, shield, structure and coils. The model shows that a 1200 MW/sub e/ power plant with a fusion core weight of about 10,000 tonnes should be competitive in the future with fission and fossil plants. Sensitivity studies of varying the assumptions show that this result is not sensitively dependent on any given assumption. Of particular importance is the result that this scale of fusion reactor may be realized with only moderate advances in physics and technology capabilities. For a fusion-fission hybrid with a high support ratio for fission reactors, the fusion island is not such a critical driver as for electricity production. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Sheffield, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEAMS QF A P.ELLET FUSION REACTOR BY.fiUADRUPOLJ"DOUBLETS,prefer much smaller fusion reactors. In view of the evidencecertain that soie pure fusion reactor scenarios exist with

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Inertial confinement fusion. ICF quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993, Volume 4, Number 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report of its review of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, it was recommended that a high priority be placed on completing the Precision Nova Project and its associated experimental campaign. Since fiscal year 1990, the lab has therefore campaigned vigorously on Nova and in its supporting laboratories to develop the Precision Nova capabilities needed to perform the stressful target experiments recommended in the 1990 NAS report. The activities to enable these experiments have been directed at improvements in three areas - the Nova laser, target fabrication capabilities, and target diagnostics. As summarized in the five articles in this report, the Precision Nova improvements have been successfully completed. These improvements have had a positive impact on target performance and on the ability to diagnose the results, as evidenced by the HEP-1 experimental results. The five articles generally concentrate on improvements to the capabilities rather than on the associated target physics experiments. Separate abstracts are included for each paper.

Powell, H.T.; Schleich, D.P.; Murphy, P.W. [eds.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Pulsed power considerations for electron beam pumped krypton fluoride lasers for inertial confinement fusion applications  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program is developing the krypton-fluoride excimer laser for use as an ICF driver. The KrF laser has a number of inherent characteristics that make it a promising driver candidate, such as short wavelength (0.25 {mu}m), broad bandwidth to target (>100 cm{sup {minus}1}), pulse-shaping with high dynamic range, and the potential for high overall efficiency (>5%) and repetitive operation. The large KrF laser amplifiers needed for ICF drivers are electron-beam pumped. A key issue for all laser ICF drivers is cost, and a leading cost component of a KrF laser driver is associated with the pulsed power and electron diode. Therefore, the efficient generation of electron beams is a high priority. The Los Alamos ICF program is investigating pulsed-power and diode designs and technologies to further the development of affordable KrF laser ICF drivers. 12 refs., 8 figs.

Rose, E.A.; McDonald, T.E.; Rosocha, L.A.; Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Smith, I.D. (Pulse Sciences, Inc., San Leandro, CA (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Investigation of radial wire arrays for inertial confinement fusion and radiation effects science.  

SciTech Connect

Radial wire arrays provide an alternative x-ray source for Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. These arrays, where wires are positioned radially outwards from a central cathode to a concentric anode, have the potential to drive a more compact ICF hohlraum. A number of experiments were performed on the 7MA Saturn Generator. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1MA level, where they have been shown to provide similar x-ray outputs to larger diameter cylindrical arrays, to the higher current levels required for ICF. Data indicates that at 7MA radial arrays can obtain higher power densities than cylindrical wire arrays, so may be of use for x-ray driven ICF on future facilities. Even at the 7MA level, data using Saturn's short pulse mode indicates that a radial array should be able to drive a compact hohlraum to temperatures {approx}92eV, which may be of interest for opacity experiments. These arrays are also shown to have applications to jet production for laboratory astrophysics. MHD simulations require additional physics to match the observed behavior.

Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Bland, Simon Nicholas (Imperial College, London); McBride, Ryan D.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London); Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco Andres (Imperial College, London); Jennings, Christopher A.; Hall, Gareth Neville (Imperial College, London); Ampleford, David J.; Peyton, Bradley Philip; Lebedev, Sergey V. (Imperial College, London); Cleveland, Monica; Rogers, Thomas John; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Optical Comb Generation for Streak Camera Calibration for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is coming on-line to support physics experimentation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and Stockpile Stewardship (SS). Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation at NIF. To accurately reduce streak camera data a highly accurate temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for simultaneously generating a precise +/- 2 ps optical marker pulse (fiducial reference) and trains of precisely timed, short-duration optical pulses (so-called 揷omb pulse trains) that are suitable for the timing calibrations. These optical pulse generators are used with the LLNL optical streak cameras. They are small, portable light sources that, in the comb mode, produce a series of temporally short, uniformly spaced optical pulses, using a laser diode source. Comb generators have been produced with pulse-train repetition rates up to 10 GHz at 780 nm, and somewhat lower frequencies at 664 nm. Individual pulses can be as short as 25-ps FWHM. Signal output is via a fiber-optic connector on the front panel of the generator box. The optical signal is transported from comb generator to streak camera through multi-mode, graded-index optical fiber.

Ronald Justin, Terence Davies, Frans Janson, Bruce Marshall, Perry Bell, Daniel Kalantar, Joseph Kimbrough, Stephen Vernon, Oliver Sweningsen

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Precision Manufacturing of Inertial Confinement Fusion Double Shell Laser Targets for OMEGA  

SciTech Connect

Double shell targets have been built by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester and as a prelude to similar experiments on NIF. Of particular interest to ICF studies are high-precision double shell implosion targets for demonstrating thermonuclear ignition without the need for cryogenic preparation. Because the ignition tolerance to interface instabilities is rather low, the manufacturing requirements for smooth surface finishes and shell concentricity are particularly strict. This paper describes a deterministic approach to manufacturing and controlling error sources in each component. Included is the design philosophy of why certain manufacturing techniques were chosen to best reduce the errors within the target. The manufacturing plan developed for this effort created a deterministic process that, once proven, is repeatable. By taking this rigorous approach to controlling all error sources during the manufacture of each component and during assembly, we have achieved the overall 5 {micro}m dimensional requirement with sub-micron surface flaws. Strengths and weaknesses of the manufacturing process will be discussed.

Amendt, P A; Bono, M J; Hibbard, R L; Castro, C; Bennett, D W

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

On Lithium Wall and Performance of Magnetic Fusion Device S. I. Krasheninnikov1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Lithium Wall and Performance of Magnetic Fusion Device S. I. Krasheninnikov1 , L. E. Zakharov2 It is shown that lithium walls resulting in zero recycling conditions at the edge of magnetic fusion device strong impact of fully absorbing lithium walls on the performance of magnetic fusion devices have been

Krstic, Miroslav

153

Thermochemical hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conceptual design studies have been carried out on an integrated fusion/chemical plant system using a Tandem Mirror Reactor fusion energy source to drive the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Water-Splitting Cycle and produce hydrogen as a future feedstock for synthetic fuels. Blanket design studies for the Tandem Mirror Reactor show that several design alternatives are available for providing heat at sufficiently high temperatures to drive the General Atomic Cycle. The concept of a Joule-boosted decomposer is introduced in one of the systems investigated to provide heat electrically for the highest temperature step in the cycle (the SO/sub 3/ decomposition step), and thus lower blanket design requirements and costs. Flowsheeting and conceptual process designs have been developed for a complete fusion-driven hydrogen plant, and the information has been used to develop a plot plan for the plant and to estimate hydrogen production costs. Both public and private utility financing approaches have been used to obtain hydrogen production costs of $12-14/GJ based on July 1980 dollars.

Krikorian, O.H.; Brown, L.C.

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be required to embark on a serious R&D program for this application.

Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Real-time Fusion Power Monitor via Neutron Activation of Circulating Fluid.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Much effort has been devoted to the concept of fusion reactors, both magnetic and inertial confinement, in pursuit of an alternative source of energy. The (more)

Clark, Brandon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Improving particle confinement in inertial electrostatic fusion for spacecraft power and propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion energy is attractive for use in future spacecraft because of improved fuel energy density and reduced radioactivity compared with fission power. Unfortunately, the most promising means of generating fusion power on ...

Dietrich, Carl, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fusion-Fission Hybrid Using a D-D Cylindrical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Driver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

George H. Miley; Bradley Boyer

159

Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Personnel Safety for Future Magnetic Fusion Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safety of personnel at existing fusion experiments is an important concern that requires diligence. Looking to the future, fusion experiments will continue to increase in power and operating time until steady state power plants are achieved; this causes increased concern for personnel safety. This paper addresses four important aspects of personnel safety in the present and extrapolates these aspects to future power plants. The four aspects are personnel exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals, magnetic fields, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Ionizing radiation safety is treated well for present and near-term experiments by the use of proven techniques from other nuclear endeavors. There is documentation that suggests decreasing the annual ionizing radiation exposure limits that have remained constant for several decades. Many chemicals are used in fusion research, for parts cleaning, as use as coolants, cooling water cleanliness control, lubrication, and other needs. In present fusion experiments, a typical chemical laboratory safety program, such as those instituted in most industrialized countries, is effective in protecting personnel from chemical exposures. As fusion facilities grow in complexity, the chemical safety program must transition from a laboratory scale to an industrial scale program that addresses chemical use in larger quantity. It is also noted that allowable chemical exposure concentrations for workers have decreased over time and, in some cases, now pose more stringent exposure limits than those for ionizing radiation. Allowable chemical exposure concentrations have been the fastest changing occupational exposure values in the last thirty years. The trend of more restrictive chemical exposure regulations is expected to continue into the future. Other issues of safety importance are magnetic field exposure and RF energy exposure. Magnetic field exposure limits are consensus values adopted as best practices for worker safety; a typical exposure value is ~1000 times the Earth抯 magnetic field, but the Earth抯 field is a very low value. Allowable static magnetic field exposure limits have remained constant over the recent past and would appear to remain constant for the foreseeable future. Some existing fusion experiments have suffered from RF energy leakage from waveguides, the typical practice to protect personnel is establishing personnel exclusion areas when systems are operating. RF exposure limits have remained fairly constant for overall body exposures, but have become more specific in the exposure frequency values. This paper describes the occupational limits for those types of exposure, how these exposures are managed, and also discusses the likelihood of more restrictive regulations being promulgated that will affect the design of future fusion power plants and safety of their personnel.

Lee Cadwallader

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Laser fusion overview. [Forecasting of laser fusion feasibility  

SciTech Connect

Because of recent breakthroughs in the target area, and in the glass laser area, the scientific feasibility of laser fusion--and of inertial fusion--may be demonstrated in the early 1980's. Then the development in that time period of a suitable laser (or storage ring or other driving source) would make possible an operational inertial fusion reactor in this century. These are roughly the same time scales as projected by the Tokamak magnetic confinement approach. It thus appears that the 15-20 year earlier start by magnetic confinement fusion may be overcome. Because inertial confinement has been demonstrated, and inertial fusion reactors may operate on smaller scales than Tokamaks, laser fusion may have important technical and economic advantages.

Nuckolls, J.

1976-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ion source operation with different magnetic confinement geometries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparison has been made between the longitudinal line cusp and the ''continuous'' checkerboard magnet geometries. We find that the checkerboard arrangement can provide a larger uniform density profile with approximately 20% less plasma density than the longitudinal line cusp. Results seem to indicate that the reduction in plasma density is closely related to the containment of primary ionizing electrons by the permanent magnets. A new magneto-electrostatic containment scheme was generated by using an internal magnetic cage system. The overall efficiency of this ion source was increased when it was operated with a xenon or argon plasma.

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Non-Electric Applications of the Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Concept  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternate Concepts/Applications / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Gerald L. Kulcinski; John F. Santarius

164

A Magnetic Diagnostic Code for 3D Fusion Equilibria  

SciTech Connect

A synthetic magnetic diagnostics code for fusion equilibria is presented. This code calculates the response of various magnetic diagnostics to the equilibria produced by the VMEC and PIES codes. This allows for treatment of equilibria with both good nested flux surfaces and those with stochastic regions. DIAGNO v2.0 builds upon previous codes through the implementation of a virtual casing principle. The code is validated against a vacuum shot on the Large Helical Device (LHD) where the vertical field was ramped. As an exercise of the code, the diagnostic response for various equilibria are calculated on the LHD.

Samuel A. Lazerson, S. Sakakibara and Y. Suzuki

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

Magnetic Geometry and the Confinement of Electrically Conducting Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an effective field theory approach to inspect the electromagnetic interactions in an electrically neutral plasma, with an equal number of negative and positive charge carriers. We argue that the static equilibrium configurations within the plasma are topologically stable solitons, that describe knotted and linked fluxtubes of helical magnetic fields.

Ludvig Faddeev; Antti J. Niemi

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Improving Particle Confinement in Inertial Electrostatic Fusion for Spacecraft Power and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................... 10 Figure 2: IEC "Fusor" built by high-school student Brian McDermott (photo credit: Brian Mc as being conceived of by Philo T. Farnsworth, the inventor of television [20]. In IEC devices, fusion ions the idea of having a fusion reactor in their garage. Figure 2: IEC "Fusor" built by high-school student

167

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Fusion Research An updated, searchable Fusion FAQ is being prepared. In the meantime, the incomplete public-domain Fusion FAQ from 1994-1995 is still available

168

Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

Armijo, Julien

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given voltage. Particle fluxes ranging from a few tens of particle per second up to thousands of particles per second have been achieved using this simple device. To achieve higher dust injection speed, another key consideration is how to accelerate dust at controlled amount. In addition to gravity, other possible acceleration mechanisms include electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration. Features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. We will also describe laboratory experiments on dust acceleration.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yangfang [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

170

Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

Kevin J. Kramer; Jeffery F. Latkowski; Ryan P. Abbott; John K. Boyd; Jeffrey J. Powers; Jeffrey E. Seifried

171

Seiberg-Witten and 'Polyakov-like' Magnetic Bion Confinements are Continuously Connected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study four-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric pure-gauge (Seiberg-Witten) theory and its N = 1 mass perturbation by using compactification on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}. It is well known that on R{sup 4} (or at large S{sup 1} size L) the perturbed theory realizes confinement through monopole or dyon condensation. At small S{sup 1}, we demonstrate that confinement is induced by a generalization of Polyakov's three-dimensional instanton mechanism to a locally four-dimensional theory - the magnetic bion mechanism - which also applies to a large class of nonsupersymmetric theories. Using a large- vs. small-L Poisson duality, we show that the two mechanisms of confinement, previously thought to be distinct, are in fact continuously connected.

Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Sun Our Sun FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement The Sun Runs on Fusion Energy How the sun looks through x-ray eyes! Like all stars, the sun is a huge fusion reactor, pumping out 100 million times as much energy in a single second as the entire population of Earth

173

Magnetic fusion energy. [Lectures on status of tokamak and magnetic mirror research  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of fusion research during the last 20 years is given. Some highlights of theoretical plasma physics are presented. The role that computational plasma physics is playing in analyzing and understanding the experiments of today is discussed. The magnetic mirror program is reviewed. (MOW)

McNamara, B.

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

APPARATUS FOR MINIMIZING ENERGY LOSSES FROM MAGNETICALLY CONFINED VOLUMES OF HOT PLASMA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for controlling electron temperature in plasma confined in a Pyrotron magnetic containment field. Basically the device comprises means for directing low temperature electrons to the plasma in controlled quantities to maintain a predetermined optimum equilibrium electron temperature whereat minimum losses of plasma ions due to ambipolar effects and energy damping of the ions due to dynamical friction with the electrons occur. (AEC)

Post, R.F.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Magnetic and inertial CTR: present status and outlook  

SciTech Connect

Some of the successes of controlled fusion research in both inertial confinement and magnetic confinement are described. The possibilities of scaled- up experiments are also discussed with respect to cost and economics. (MOW)

Wood, L.

1975-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development report. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities which took place under this contract during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. During this period, GA was assigned 18 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included ``Capabilities Activation`` and ``Capabilities Demonstration`` to enable us to begin production of glass and composite polymer capsules. Capsule delivery tasks included ``Small Glass Shell Deliveries`` and ``Composite Polymer Capsules`` for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We also were asked to provide direct ``Onsite Support`` at LLNL and LANL. We continued planning for the transfer of ``Micromachining Equipment from Rocky Flats`` and established ``Target Component Micromachining and Electroplating Facilities`` at GA. We fabricated over 1100 films and filters of 11 types for Sandia National Laboratory and provided full-time onsite engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to make targets for the Naval Research Laboratory. We investigated spherical interferometry, built an automated capsule sorter, and developed an apparatus for calorimetric measurement of fuel fill for LLNL. We assisted LANL in the ``Characterization of Opaque b-Layered Targets.`` We developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process.

Steinman, D. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. During the period, GA was assigned 17 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. This year they achieved full production capabilities for the micromachining, dimensional characterization and gold plating of hohlraums. They fabricated and delivered 726 gold-plated mandrels of 27 different types to LLNL and 48 gold-plated mandrels of two different types to LANL. They achieved full production capabilities in composite capsule production ad delivered in excess of 240 composite capsules. They continuously work to improve performance and capabilities. They were also directed to dismantle, remove, and disposition all equipment at the previous contractor (KMSF) that had radioactive contamination levels low enough that they could be exposed to the general public without radiological constraints. GA was also directed to receive and store the tritium fill equipment. They assisted LANL in the development of techniques for characterization of opaque targets. They developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at NIF and the Omega Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or D-T fuel. They continued engineering and assembly of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments.

Hoppe, M. [ed.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Confinement Of Pure Ion Plasma In A Cylindrical Current Sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

j ?B force. An equilibrium calculation using a relativistic, 1-D, cold-fluid model shows: the confine- ment of non-neutral ion plasmas that are adequately dense for controlled thermonu- clear fusion limit? Conventional magnetic fusion devices contain quasi-neutral plasmas in a toroidal or linear

179

Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment study  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment (HIFSA) study was conducted with the specific objective of evaluating the prospects of using induction linac drivers to generate economical electrical power from inertial confinement fusion. The study used algorithmic models of representative components of a fusion system to identify favored areas in the multidimensional parameter space. The resulting cost-of-electricity (COE) projections are comparable to those from other (magnetic) fusion scenarios, at a plant size of 100 MWe.

Dudziak, D.J.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement The Glossary of Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Research Browse | Search | Submit an Entry Introduction, Sources and Contributors This Glossary seeks to provide plain-language definitions of over 3600

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home> Student and Teacher Resources > For Introductory Students Home> Student and Teacher Resources > For Introductory Students FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Guide to Fusion Education Resources for Introductory Physics Students This is a compilation of online and offline education resources for

182

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us About Us FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Webby Honoree graphic graphic Key Resource Snap editors choice new scientist DrMatrix Webby Awards Honoree, April 10, 2007 The Alchemist - WebPick, January 29, 1999 Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 October 19, 1998 - October 19, 1999 Site of the Day, September 24, 1998. Hot spot. Student Science Resource, April 16, 1997

183

Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF Using novel neutron spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel neutron spectrometer, called the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), was designed, built, and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the neutron spectra from ...

Casey, Daniel Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ICF target comprising a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a concentric shell; and a process for manufacturing the same which includes the steps of forming hemispheric shells of a silicon or other substrate material, adhering the shell segments to each other with a fuel pellet contained concentrically therein, then separating the individual targets from the parent substrate. Formation of hemispheric cavities by deposition or coating of a mold substrate is also described. Coatings or membranes may also be applied to the interior of the hemispheric segments prior to joining.

Masnari, Nino A. (Ann Arbor, MI); Rensel, Walter B. (Ann Arbor, MI); Robinson, Merrill G. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wise, Kensall D. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wuttke, Gilbert H. (Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw County, MI)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information 禄 October 2012 A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion Plasmas Recent experiments have confirmed the great potential of a novel plasma-material interface concept. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

186

Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unique advantages of fusion rocket propulsion systems for distant missions are explored using the magnetic dipole configurations as an example. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in a year, and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 years. This is about 10 times better specific power performance than nuclear electric fission systems. Possibilities to further increase the specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as is an approach to implementing the concept through proof-testing on the moon. 20 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Teller, E.; Glass, A.J.; Fowler, T.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Hasegawa, A. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)); Santarius, J.F. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Fusion Technology Inst.)

1991-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design is discussed for a fusion rocket propulsion system based on the magnetic dipole configuration. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Example parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of 1 kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in a year, and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 years. This is about 10 times better specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as in an approach to implementing the concept through proof-testing on the moon. 21 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Teller, E.; Glass, A.J.; Fowler, T.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hasegawa, A. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (USA)); Santarius, J.F. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Fusion Technology Inst.)

1991-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Magneized target fusion: An overview of the concept  

SciTech Connect

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) seeks to take advantage of the reduction of thermal conductivity through the application of a strong magneticfield and thereby ease the requirements for reaching fusion conditions in a thermonuclear (TN) fusion fuel. A potentially important benefit of the strong field in the partial trapping of energetic charged particles to enhance energy deposition by the TN fusion reaction products. The essential physics is described. MTF appears to lead to fusion targets that require orders of magnitude less power and intensity for fusion ignition than currently proposed (unmagnetized) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets do, making some very energetic pulsed power drivers attractive for realizing controlled fusion.

Kirkpatrick, R.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, January-March 1998, volume 8, number 2  

SciTech Connect

The coupling of laser light with plasmas is one of the key physics issues for the use of high-power lasers for inertial fusion, high-energy-density physics, and scientific stockpile stewardship. The coupling physics is extremely rich and challenging, particularly in the large plasmas to be accessed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The coupling mechanisms span the gamut from classical inverse bremsstrahlung absorption to a variety of nonlinear optical processes. These include stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from electron plasma waves, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) from ion sound waves, resonant decay into electron plasma and ion sound waves, and laser beam filamentation. These processes depend on laser intensity and produce effects such as changes in the efficiency and location of the energy deposition or generation of a component of very energetic electrons, which can preheat capsules. Coupling physics issues have an extremely high leverage. The coupling models are clearly very important ingredients for detailed calculations of laser-irradiated target behavior. Improved understanding and models enable a more efficient use of laser facilities, which becomes even more important as these facilities become larger and more expensive. Advances in the understanding also allow a more timely and cost-effective identification of new applications of high-power lasers, such as for generation of high-temperature hohlraums and compact x-ray sources, or for discovery of advanced fusion schemes. Finally, the interaction of intense electromagnetic waves with ionized media is a fundamental topic of interest to numerous areas of applied science and is an excellent test bed for advancing plasma science and computational modeling of complex phenomena. This issue of the ICF Quarterly Report is dedicated to laser--plasma interactions. The eight articles present a cross section of the broad progress in understanding the key interaction issues, such as laser beam bending, spraying, and scattering, as well as scaling the Nova results to NIF.

Kruer, W

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method of controlling fusion reaction rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Valeo, Ernest J. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Goldhaber, Maurice (Bayport, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A 1. 5--4 Kelvin detachable cold-sample transfer system: Application to inertially confined fusion with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compact cold-transfer apparatus for engaging and retrieving samples at liquid helium temperatures (1.5--4K), maintaining the samples at such temperatures for periods of hours, and subsequently inserting them in diverse apparatuses followed by disengagement, is described. The properties of several thermal radiation-insulating shrouds, necessary for very low sample temperatures, are presented. The immediate intended application is transportable target-shells containing highly spin-polarized deuterons in solid HD or D{sub 2} for inertially confined fusion (ICF) experiments. The system is also valuable for unpolarized high-density fusion fuels, as well as for other applications which are discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.

Alexander, N.; Barden, J.; Fan, Q.; Honig, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Kinetic simulations of stimulated Raman backscattering and related processes for the shock-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed description of stimulated Raman backscattering and related processes for the purpose of inertial confinement fusion requires multi-dimensional kinetic simulations of a full speckle in a high-temperature, large-scale, inhomogeneous plasma. In particular for the shock-ignition scheme operating at high laser intensities, kinetic aspects are predominant. High- (I{lambda}{sub o}{sup 2}{approx}5x10{sup 15}W{mu}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}) as well as low-intensity (I{lambda}{sub o}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 15}W{mu}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}) cases show the predominance of collisionless, collective processes for the interaction. While the two-plasmon decay instability and the cavitation scenario are hardly affected by intensity variation, inflationary Raman backscattering proves to be very sensitive. Brillouin backscattering evolves on longer time scales and dominates the reflectivities, although it is sensitive to the intensity. Filamentation and self-focusing do occur for all cases but on time scales too long to affect Raman backscattering.

Riconda, C.; Weber, S. [LULI, Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique - CNRS - CEA, 75252 Paris (France); Tikhonchuk, V. T. [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS - CEA, 33405 Talence (France); Heron, A. [CPHT, Ecole Polytechnique - CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Creating the Conditions for Fusion PLASMA CONFINEMENT AND HEATING Fusion requires high...

194

A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion A Snowflake-Shaped Magnetic Field Holds Promise for Taming Harsh Fusion Plasmas Recent experiments have confirmed the great potential of a novel plasma-material interface concept. By U.S Department of Energy Office of Science October 31, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One National Spherical Torus Experiment (Photo by Elle Starkman, Office of Communications, PPPL) National Spherical Torus Experiment The Science Heat escaping from the core of a twelve-million degree nuclear fusion plasma device was successfully contained by a snowflake-shaped magnetic field to mitigate its impact on device walls. The Impact One of the grand challenges of the magnetic fusion research is to "tame the plasma-material interface"-to develop an interface between the hot

195

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Research Needed Now for Magnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Year ProjectedOntario(OPG)TritiumInventory(kg) CANDU Supply w/o Fusion ITER-FEAT (2004 start) 1000 MW

196

Magnetic Fusion Energy Research: A Summary of Accomplishments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Some of the more important contributions of the research program needed to establish the scientific and technical base for fusion power production are discussed. (MOW)

1986-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

197

Scientists discuss progress toward magnetic fusion energy at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

world's most populous nation is pushing ahead with plans for a device called China's Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) that would develop the technology for a...

198

COMMUNICATIONS SUMMIT for U.S. Magnetic Fusion | Princeton Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

199

Magnetic fusion energy research: A summary of accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

Some of the more important contributions of the research program needed to establish the scientific and technical base for fusion power production are discussed. (MOW)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Arturo Dominguez: a passion for teaching about magnetic fusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

content emergency.pppl.gov Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Status of Research Regarding Magnetic Mirrors as a Fusion Neutron Source or Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results, theory and innovative ideas now point with increased confidence to the possibility of a Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) neutron source which would be on the path to an attractively simple Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror (ATM) power plant. Although magnetic mirror research was terminated in the US 20 years ago, experiments continued in Japan (Gamma 10) and Russia (GDT), with a very small US effort. This research has now yielded data, increased understanding, and generated ideas resulting in the new concepts described here. Early mirror research was carried out with circular axisymmetric magnets. These plasmas were MHD unstable due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature near the mid-plane. Then the minimum-B concept emerged in which the field line curvature was everywhere favorable and the plasma was situated in a MHD stable magnetic well (70% average beta in 2XII-B). The Ioffe-bar or baseball-coil became the standard for over 40 years. In the 1980's, driven by success with minimum-B stabilization and the control of ion cyclotron instabilities in PR6 and 2XII-B, mirrors were viewed as a potentially attractive concept with near-term advantages as a lower Q neutron source for applications such as a hybrid fission fuel factory or toxic waste burner. However there are down sides to the minimum-B geometry: coil construction is complex; restraining magnetic forces limit field strength and mirror ratios. Furthermore, the magnetic field lines have geodesic curvature which introduces resonant and neoclassical radial transport as observed in early tandem mirror experiments. So what now leads us to think that simple axisymmetric mirror plasmas can be stable? The Russian GDT experiment achieves on-axis 60% beta by peaking of the kinetic plasma pressure near the mirror throat (where the curvature is favorable) to counter-balance the average unfavorable mid-plane curvature. Then a modest augmentation of plasma pressure in the expander results in stability. The GDT experiments have confirmed the physics of effluent plasma stabilization predicted by theory. The plasma had a mean ion energy of 10 keV and a density of 5e19m-3. If successful, the axisymmetric tandem mirror extension of the GDT idea could lead to a Q {approx} 10 power plant of modest size and would yield important applications at lower Q. In addition to the GDT method, there are four other ways to augment stability that have been demonstrated; including: plasma rotation (MCX), diverter coils (Tara), pondermotive (Phaedrus & Tara), and end wall funnel shape (Nizhni Novgorod). There are also 5 stabilization techniques predicted, but not yet demonstrated: expander kinetic pressure (KSTM-Post), Pulsed ECH Dynamic Stabilization (Post), wall stabilization (Berk), non-paraxial end mirrors (Ryutov), and cusp ends (Kesner). While these options should be examined further together with conceptual engineering designs. Physics issues that need further analysis include: electron confinement, MHD and trapped particle modes, analysis of micro stability, radial transport, evaluation and optimization of Q, and the plasma density needed to bridge to the expansion-region. While promising all should be examined through increased theory effort, university-scale experiments, and through increased international collaboration with the substantial facilities in Russia and Japan The conventional wisdom of magnetic mirrors was that they would never work as a fusion concept for a number of reasons. This conventional wisdom is most probably all wrong or not applicable, especially for applications such as low Q (DT Neutron Source) aimed at materials testing or for a Q {approx} 3-5 fusion neutron source applied to destroying actinides in fission waste and breeding of fissile fuel.

Simonen, T

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

Issues in the commercialization of magnetic fusion power  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies and outlines the issues that must be considered if fusion is to be put into commercial practice. The issues are put into perspective around a consistent framework and a program of study and research is recommended to anticipate and handle the issues for a successful fusion commercialization program. (MOW)

Rockwood, A.D.; Willke, T.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J. A. Delettrez, V. N. Goncharov, F. J. Marshall, J. M. Soures, V. A. Smalyuk, P. B. Radha, B. Yaakobi,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J 87545, USA J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Se麓guin Plasma Science and Fusion Center May 2004) The mixing of cold, high-density shell plasma with the low-density, hot spot plasma

204

Thick Liquid-Walled Spheromak Magnetic Fusion Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We assume a spheromak configuration can be made and sustained by a steady gun current, which injects particles, current and magnetic field, i.e., helicity injection. The equilibrium is calculated with an MHD equilibrium code, where an average beta of 10% is found. The toroidal current of 40 MA is sustained by an injection current of 100 kA (125 MW of gun power). The flux linking the gun is 1/1000th that of the flux in the spheromak. The geometry allows a flow of liquid, either molten salt, (flibe-Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} or flinabe-LiNaBeF{sub 4}) or liquid metal such as SnLi which protects most of the walls and structures from neutron damage. The free surface between the liquid and the burning plasma is heated by bremsstrahlung and optical radiation and neutrons from the plasma. The temperature of the free surface of the liquid is calculated and then the evaporation rate is estimated. The impurity concentration in the burning plasma is estimated and limited to a 20% reduction in the fusion power. For a high radiating edge plasma, the divertor power density of 460 MW/m{sup 2} is handled by high-speed (20 m/s), liquid jets. For low radiating edge plasmas, the divertor-power density of 1860 MW/m{sup 2} is too high to handle for flibe but possibly acceptable for SnLi with jets of 100 m/s flow speed. Calculations show the tritium breeding is adequate with enriched Li and appropriate design of the walls not covered by flowing liquid 15% of the total. We have come up with a number of problem areas needing further study to make the design self consistent and workable.

Moir, R W; Bulmer, R H; Fowler, T K; Youssef, M Z

2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor which will be completedDrivers and Reactors for Inertial Confinement Fusion, K.A.

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Plan for the Development of Magnetic Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seen fusion budgets rise and fall -- usually in sync with the price of oil. Expensive oil tends cards. "Nobody in the history of Texas Hold 'Em poker has ever won without some hole cards," he says

208

QCD string tension curve, the ferromagnetic magnetization, and the quark-antiquark confining potential at finite temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the string tension as a function of temperature, fitting the SU(3) lattice QCD finite temperature free energy potentials computed by the Bielefeld group. We compare the string tension points with order parameter curves of ferromagnets, superconductors, or string models, all related to confinement. We also compare the SU(3) string tension with the one of SU(2) lattice QCD. With the curve providing the best fit to the finite temperature string tensions, the spontaneous magnetization curve, we then show how to include finite temperature, in the state of the art confining and chiral invariant quark models.

Bicudo, P. [CFTP, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The QCD string tension curve, the ferromagnetic magnetization, and the quark-antiquark confining potential at finite Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the string tension as a function of temperature, fitting the SU(3) lattice QCD finite temperature free energy potentials computed by the Bielefeld group. We compare the string tension points with order parameter curves of ferromagnets, superconductors or string models, all related to confinement. We also compare the SU(3) string tension with the one of SU(2) Lattice QCD. With the curve providing the best fit to the finite temperature string tensions, the spontaneous magnetization curve, we then show how to include finite temperature, in the state of the art confining and chiral invariant quark models.

P. Bicudo

2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Rotation studies in fusion plasmas via imaging X-ray crystal spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increase in plasma performance associated with turbulence suppression via flow shear in magnetically confined fusion plasmas has been well documented. Currently, the standard methods for both generating and measuring ...

Ince-Cushman, Alexander Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Controlled production of energy by fusion of light nuclei has been the goal of a large portion of the physics community since the 1950's. In order for a fusion reaction to take place, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. At this temperature, matter can exist only in the form of an almost fully ionized plasma. In order for the reaction to produce net power, the product of the density and energy confinement time must exceed a minimum value of 10/sup 20/ sec m/sup -3/, the so-called Lawson criterion. Basically, two approaches are being taken to meet this criterion: inertial confinement and magnetic confinement. Inertial confinement is the basis of the laser fusion approach; a fuel pellet is imploded by intense laser beams from all sides and ignites. Magnetic confinement devices, which exist in a variety of geometries, rely upon electromagnetic forces on the charged particles of the plasma to keep the hot plasma from expanding. Of these devices, the most encouraging results have been achieved with a class of devices known as tokamaks. Recent successes with these devices have given plasma physicists confidence that scientific feasibility will be demonstrated in the next generation of tokamaks; however, an even larger effort will be required to make fusion power commercially feasible. As a result, emphasis in the controlled thermonuclear research program is beginning to shift from plasma physics to a new branch of nuclear engineering which can be called fusion engineering, in which instrumentation and control engineers will play a major role. Among the new problem areas they will deal with are plasma diagnostics and superconducting coil instrumentation.

Walstrom, P.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Bold Step by the World to Fusion Energy: ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HISTORY OF INT'L COLLABORATION 路 1958: WORLD-WIDE DECLASSIFICATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED FUSIONV TEMPERATURES [20 MILLION DEGREES F] 路 1970'S: OIL CRISIS PROPELS MAJOR INVESTMENT IN FUSION RESEARCH FACILITIES HISTORY AND KEY FUSION SCIENCE ADVANCES 85 90 95 00 05 85 90 95 00 05 CDA EDA EDA -ext US out AT

213

Photo of the Week: The Mirror Fusion Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Mirror Fusion Test Facility The Mirror Fusion Test Facility Photo of the Week: The Mirror Fusion Test Facility July 19, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis This 1981 photo shows the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an experimental magnetic confinement fusion device built using a magnetic mirror at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The MFTF functioned as the primary research center for mirror fusion devices. The design consisted of a 64-meter-long vacuum vessel fitted with 26 coil magnets bonding the center of the vessel and two 400-ton yin-yang magnet mirrors at either end. The first magnet produced a magnetic field force equal to the weight of 30 jumbo jets hanging from the magnet coil. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This 1981 photo shows the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an

214

FED-R: a fusion engineering device utilizing resistive magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal purpose of the FED-R tokamak facility is to provide a substantial quasi-steady flux of fusion neutrons irradiating a large test area in order to carry out thermal, neutronic, and radiation effects testing of experimental blanket assemblies having a variety of configurations, compositions, and purposes. The design of the FED-R device also suggests potential for an upgrade that could be employed as a full-scale demonstration reactor for some specific fusion-neutron application when required.

Jassby, D.L.; Kalsi, S.S. (eds.)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion  

SciTech Connect

A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

Martens, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Scott C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

SciTech Connect

A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

Lasche, G.P.

1987-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

External proton beam analysis of plasma facing materials for magnetic confinement fusion applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 1.7MV tandem accelerator was reconstructed and refurbished for this thesis and for surface science applications at the Cambridge laboratory for accelerator study of surfaces (CLASS). At CLASS, an external proton beam ...

Barnard, Harold Salvadore

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

First-wall, blanket, and shield engineering test program for magnetically confined fusion power reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key engineering areas identified for early study relate to FW/B/S system thermal-hydraulics, thermomechnics, nucleonics, electromagnetics, assembly, maintenance, and repair. Programmatic guidance derived frm planning exercises involving over thirty organizations (laboratories, industries, and universities) has indicated (1) that meaningful near term engineering testing should be feasible within the bounds of a modest funding base, (2) that there are existing facilities and expertise which can be profitably utilized in this testing, and (3) that near term efforts should focus on the measurement of engineering data and the verification/calibration of predictive methods for anticipated normal operational and transient FW/B/S conditions. The remainder of this paper discusses in more detail the planning strategies, proposed approach to near term testing, and longer range needs for integrated FW/B/S test facilities.

Maroni, V.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Heavy-ion accelerator research for inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

Thermonuclear fusion offers a most attractive long-term solution to the problem of future energy supplies: The fuel is virtually inexhaustible and the fusion reaction is notably free of long-lived radioactive by-products. Also, because the fuel is in the form of a plasma, there is no solid fuel core that could melt down. The DOE supports two major fusion research programs to exploit these virtues, one based on magnetic confinement and a second on inertial confinement. One part of the program aimed at inertial fusion is known as Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, or HIFAR. In this booklet, the aim is to place this effort in the context of fusion research generally, to review the brief history of heavy-ion fusion, and to describe the current status of the HIFAR program.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Density profiles of plasmas confined by the field of a Levitating Dipole Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 4-channel microwave interferometer (center frequency: 60 GHz) has been constructed to measure the density profiles of plasmas confined within the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). LDX is the first and only experiment ...

Boxer, Alexander C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES ??Grid? (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid??s resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

Schissel, David P.

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

Saturation of the Two-Plasmon Decay Instability in Long-Scale-Length Plasmas Relevant to Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the hot-electron generation by the two-plasmon-decay instability are made in plasmas relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Density-scale lengths of 400 {micro}m at n{sub cr}/4 in planar CH targets allowed the two-plasmon-decay instability to be driven to saturation for vacuum intensities above ~3.5 x 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. In the saturated regime, ~1% of the laser energy is converted to hot electrons. The hot-electron temperature is measured to increase rapidly from 25 to 90 keV as the laser beam intensity is increased from 2 to 7 x 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. This increase in the hot-electron temperature is compared with predictions from nonlinear Zakharov models.

Yaakobi, B; Hu, S X; Chang, P -Y; Craxton, R S; Edgell, D H; Follett, R; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Seka, W; Short, R W; Solodov, A A

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)  

SciTech Connect

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been applied to the on-axis nTOF detectors located in the basement of the Z-Facility. It will be shown that this method can identify sources of neutron scattering, and is useful for predicting detector responses in future experimental configurations, and for identifying potential sources of neutron scattering when experimental set-ups change. This method can also provide insight on how much broadening neutron scattering contributes to the primary signals, which is then subtracted from them. Detector time responses are deconvolved from the signals, allowing a transformation from dN/dt to dN/dE, extracting neutron spectra at each detector location; these spectra are proportional to the absolute yield.

Nelson, A. J.; Cooper, G. W. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; Smelser, R.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nuclear processes in magnetic fusion reactors with polarized fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the processes $d +d \\to n +{^3He}$, $d +{^3He} \\to p +{^4He}$, $d +{^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$, ${^3He} +{^3He}\\to p+p +{^4He}$, ${^3H} +{^3He}\\to d +{^4He}$, with particular attention for applications in fusion reactors. After a model independent parametrization of the spin structure of the matrix elements for these processes at thermal colliding energies, in terms of partial amplitudes, we study polarization phenomena in the framework of a formalism of helicity amplitudes. The strong angular dependence of the final nuclei and of the polarization observables on the polarizations of the fuel components can be helpful in the design of the reactor shielding, blanket arrangement etc..We analyze also the angular dependence of the neutron polarization for the processes $\\vec d +\\vec d \\to n +{^3He}$ and $\\vec d +\\vec {^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$.

Rekalo, M P; Rekalo, Michail P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Nuclear processes in magnetic fusion reactors with polarized fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the processes $d +d \\to n +{^3He}$, $d +{^3He} \\to p +{^4He}$, $d +{^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$, ${^3He} +{^3He}\\to p+p +{^4He}$, ${^3H} +{^3He}\\to d +{^4He}$, with particular attention for applications in fusion reactors. After a model independent parametrization of the spin structure of the matrix elements for these processes at thermal colliding energies, in terms of partial amplitudes, we study polarization phenomena in the framework of a formalism of helicity amplitudes. The strong angular dependence of the final nuclei and of the polarization observables on the polarizations of the fuel components can be helpful in the design of the reactor shielding, blanket arrangement etc..We analyze also the angular dependence of the neutron polarization for the processes $\\vec d +\\vec d \\to n +{^3He}$ and $\\vec d +\\vec {^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$.

Michail P. Rekalo; Egle Tomasi-Gustafsson

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create visualizations and perform analysis of their simulation data from either the MDSplus data storage environment or from locally stored HDF5 files. More advanced tools for visualization and analysis also were created in collaboration with the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling. Versions of SCIRun with the FusionViewer have been made available to fusion scientists on the Mac OS X, Linux, and other Unix based platforms and have been downloaded 1163 times. SCIRun has been used with NIMROD, M3D, BOUT fusion simulation data as well as simulation data from other SciDAC application areas (e.g., Astrophysics). The subsequent visualization results - including animations - have been incorporated into invited talks at multiple APS/DPP meetings as well as peer reviewed journal articles. As an example, SCIRun was used for the visualization and analysis of a NIMROD simulation of a disruption that occurred in a DIII-D experiment. The resulting animations and stills were presented as part of invited talks at APS/DPP meetings and the SC04 conference in addition to being highlighted in the NIH/NSF Visualization Research Challenges Report. By achieving its technical goals, the University of Utah played a key role in the successful development of a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. Many of the visualization tools developed as part of the NFC continue to be used by Fusion and other SciDAC application scientists and are currently being supported and expanded through follow-on up on SciDAC projects (Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technology, and the Visualization and Analysis in Support of Fusion SAP).

Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Technological implications of fusion power: requirements and status  

SciTech Connect

The major technological requirements for fusion power, as implied by current conceptual designs of fusion power plants, are identified and assessed relative to the goals of existing technology programs. The focus of the discussion is on the tokamak magnetic confinement concept; however, key technological requirements of mirror magnetic confinement systems and of inertial confinement concepts will also be addressed. The required technology is examined on the basis of three general areas of concern: (a) the power balance, that is, the unique power handling requirements associated with the production of electrical power by fusion; (b) reactor design, focusing primarily on the requirements imposed by a tritium-based fuel cycle, thermal hydraulic considerations, and magnet systems; and (c) materials considerations, including radiation damage effects, neutron-induced activation, and resource limitations.

Steiner, D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Core transport studies in fusion devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas has important and non-trivial effects on the quality of the energy confinement. These effects are hard to make a quantitative assessment of analytically. The problem investigated in this article is the transport of energy and particles, in particular impurities, in a Tokamak plasma. Impurities from the walls of the plasma vessel cause energy losses if they reach the plasma core. It is therefore important to understand the transport mechanisms to prevent impurity accumulation and minimize losses. This is an area of research where turbulence plays a major role and is intimately associated with the performance of future fusion reactors, such as ITER.

Strand, P鋜; Nordman, Hans

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic-Fusion Devices with Lithium-Conditioned Carbon Walls  

SciTech Connect

Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen.

Krstic, Predrag S. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Allain, J. P. [Purdue University; Taylor, C. N. [Purdue University; Dadras, J. [UTK/Univ. California, Los Angeles; Maeda, S. [Kyoto University, Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Japan; Morokuma, K. [Kyoto University, Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Japan; Jakowski, J. [National Inst. Computational Sciences, UTK; Allouche, A. [PIM/CNRS/Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Design and testing of the magnetic quadrupole for the Heavy Ion Fusion Program  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Fusion Program at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is conducting experiments in the transport and acceleration of ``driverlike`` beams. The single beam coming from the four-to-one beam combiner will be transported in a lattice of pulsed magnetic quadrupoles. The present beam transport consists of high field, short aspect ratio magnetic quadrupoles to maximize the transportable current. This design could also be converted to be superconducting for future uses in a driver. The pulsed quadrupole will develop a maximum field of two Tesla and will be housed within the induction accelerator cells at the appropriate lattice period. Hardware implementation of the physics requirements and full parameter testing is described.

Benjegerdes, R.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Stuart, M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 2, Designs, assessments, and comparisons, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was to provide the Office of Fusion Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The term reactor studies is somewhat of a misnomer since these studies included the conceptual design and analysis of all aspects of the IFE power plants: the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, other balance of plant facilities, target systems (including the target production, injection, and tracking systems), and the two drivers. The scope of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was quite ambitious. The majority of our effort was spent on the conceptual design of two IFE electric power plants, one using an induction linac heavy ion beam (HIB) driver and the other using a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser driver. After the two point designs were developed, they were assessed in terms of their (1) environmental and safety aspects; (2) reliability, availability, and maintainability; (3) technical issues and technology development requirements; and (4) economics. Finally, we compared the design features and the results of the assessments for the two designs.

Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of Fusion Energy Options for Commercial Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion energy options were reviewed to assess technical readiness levels for commercial electricity production for the power industry. Magnetic and inertial confinement systems, in addition to nontraditional fusion concepts, were reviewed by a technical panel of experts, based on workshop presentations by the proponents of each technology. The results are summarized in this ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fusion research: the past is prologue  

SciTech Connect

At this juncture fusion research can be viewed as being at a turning point, a time to review its past and to imagine its future. Today, almost 50 years since the first serious attempts to address the daunting problem of achieving controlled fusion, we have both an opportunity and a challenge. Some predictions place fusion research today at a point midway between its first inception and its eventual maturation - in the middle of the 21st century - when fusion would become a major source of energy. Our opportunity therefore is to assess what we have learned from 50 years of hard work and use that knowledge as a starting point for new and better approaches to solving the fusion problem. Our challenge is to prove the "50 more years" prophesy wrong, by finding ways to shorten the time when fusion power becomes a reality. The thesis will be advanced that in the magnetic confinement approach to fusion open-ended magnetic confinement geometries offer much in responding to the challenge. A major advantage of open systems is that, owing to their theoretically and experimentally demonstrated ability to suppress plasma instabilities of both the MHD and the high-frequency wave-particle variety, the confinement becomes predictable from "classical," i.e., Fokker-Planck-type analysis. In a time of straitened budgetary circumstances for magnetic fusion research now being faced in the United States, the theoretical tractability of mirror-based systems is a substantial asset. In pursuing this avenue it is also necessary to keep an open mind as to the forms that mirror-based fusion power plants might take. For example, one can look to the high-energy physics community for a possible model: This community has shown the feasibility of constructing large and complex particle accelerators using superconducting magnets, vacuum chambers and complicated particle-handling technology, housed in underground tunnels that are 20 or more kilometers long. In the paper examples of mirror-based fusion power systems resembling long "linear colliders" will be discussed. It is not the intent of this paper to present detailed proposals for next-generation experiments in magnetic fusion research, but rather to encourage a return to the ambiance of an earlier era of fusion research, when innovative thinking and a spirit of scientific adventure prevailed. In that way we can realistically build a new era of fusion research, an era that would be firmly undergirded by the scientific and technological foundation that was laid in fusion's first half-century.

Post, R F

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

Inertial Fusion Energy Studies on an Earth Simulator-Class Computer  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. is developing fusion energy based on inertial confinement of the burning fusion fuel, as a complement to the magnetic confinement approach. DOE's Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program within the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) is coordinated with, and gains leverage from, the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Advanced plasma and particle beam simulations play a major role in the IFE effort, and the program is well poised to benefit from an Earth Simulator-class resource. Progress in all key physics areas of IFE, including heavy-ion ''drivers'' which impart the energy to the fusion fuel, the targets for both ion- and laser-driven approaches, and an advanced concept known as fast ignition, would be dramatically accelerated by an Earth Simulator-class resource.

Friedman, A; Stephens, R

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advanced fission and fossil plant economics-implications for fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order for fusion energy to be a viable option for electric power generation, it must either directly compete with future alternatives or serve as a reasonable backup if the alternatives become unacceptable. This paper discusses projected costs for the most likely competitors with fusion power for baseload electric capacity and what these costs imply for fusion economics. The competitors examined include advanced nuclear fission and advanced fossil-fired plants. The projected costs and their basis are discussed. The estimates for these technologies are compared with cost estimates for magnetic and inertial confinement fusion plants. The conclusion of the analysis is that fusion faces formidable economic competition. Although the cost level for fusion appears greater than that for fission or fossil, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion`s potential competitiveness.

Delene, J.G.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fudge: a high-bandwidth fusion diagnostic of the NIF  

SciTech Connect

Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)/Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program must include good characterization of the fusion source. Ideally, diagnostics would measure the spatially-resolved history of the fusion reaction rate and temperature. Existing diagnostics can satisfy this goal only partially. One class of new techniques that could play a major role in high-yield diagnostics is measurements based on fusion {gamma} rays. The Fusion Diagnostic Gamma Experiment (FUDGE) can be used to perform energy-resolved measurements of (D,T) fusion reaction rates This diagnostic is based on the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays that are produced by (D,T) fusion. The {gamma} rays are free of spectral dispersion and can be detected with a high bandwidth Cherenkov detector. A simple magnetic monochromator selects signals from the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays and reduces background signals from non-fusion {gamma} rays.

Moran, M. J., LLNL

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

243

Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement American Fusion News Category: General Atomics (GA) Link: General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New...

245

Knudsen Layer Reduction of Fusion Reactivity Kim Molvig and Nelson...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fusion cross section determine Gamow peak in the fusion reactivity. 2 Inertially confined fusion systems typically have plasma fuel enveloped by a cold non-reacting region or...

246

Praise and suggestions for fusion research from a utility industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select and View High Resolution Images to Download Learn More Engineering Fusion energy Fusion reactor design Inertial confinement fusion Nuclear energy Plasma physics Tokamaks...

247

Laser-Driven Magnetic-Flux Compression in High-Energy-Density Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demonstration of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement fusion targets is reported for the first time. The OMEGA laser [T.?R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. ...

Gotchev, O. V.

248

Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

Motley, Robert W. (Princeton, NJ); Glanz, James (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear fusion advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade has seen advances in the shaping and confinement of plasmas, and in approaches to noninductive current drive. Here, the author presents an overview of nuclear fusion advances between 1983-93 examining: fusion milestones; plasma shaping; ...

W. Sweet

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The solar tachocline: a self-consistent model of magnetic confinement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be efficiently communicated throughout the entire Sun. 1.4 Solar spin-down 13 Charbonneau & MacGregor (1993) constructed a simple axisymmetric, time- dependent computational model of spin-down in the solar interior in the presence of a global-scale magnetic field... of the solar atmosphere, and assumed local thermal equilibrium (LTE) (e.g. Holweger & Mu╨ler, 1974). In such models, the broadening and displacement of spectral lines by convective turbulence must be parametrised, usually in terms of 搈icroturbulence...

Wood, Toby

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Magnetic mirror fusion-fission early history and applicability to other systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the mid 1970s to mid 1980s the mirror program was stuck with a concept, the Standard Mirror that was Q {approx} 1 where Q=P{sub fusion}/P{sub injection}. Heroic efforts were put into hybridizing thinking added energy and fuel sales would make a commercial product. At the same time the tokamak was thought to allow ignition and ultrahigh Q values of 20 or even higher. There was an effort to use neutral beams to drive the tokamak just like the mirror machines were driven in which case the Q value plunged to a few, however this was thought to be achievable decades earlier than the high Q versions. Meanwhile current drive and other features of the tokamak have seen the projected Q values come down to the range of 10. Meanwhile the mirror program got Q enhancement into high gear and various tandem mirrors projected Q values up towards 10 and with advanced features over 10 with axi-symmetric magnets (See R. F. Post papers), however the experimental program is all but non-existent. Meanwhile, the gas dynamic trap mirror system which is present day state-of-the-art can with low risk produce Q of {approx}0.1 useful for a low risk, low cost neutron source for materials development useful for the development of materials for all fusion concepts (see Simonen white paper: 'A Physics-Based Strategy to Develop a Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid' and D.D. Ryutov, 'Axisymmetric MHD-stable mirror as a neutron source and a driver for a fusion-fission hybrid'). Many early hybrid designs with multi-disciplinary teams were carried out in great detail for the mirror system with its axi-symmetric blanket modules. It is recognized that most of these designs are adaptable to tokamak or inertial fusion geometry. When Q is low (1 to 2) economics gives a large economic penalty for high recirculating power. These early studies covered the three design types: Power production, fuel production and waste burning. All three had their place but power production fell away because every study showed fusion machines that were extensively studied by multidisciplinary teams came up with power costs much higher than for existing fission plants except in very large sizes (3 GWe). There was lots of work on waste burning - Ted Parrish - comes to mind. However, fuel production along with power production became nearly everyone's goals. First, fast-fission blankets were favored but later to enhance safety, fission-suppressed blankets came into vogue. Both fuel producing and waste burning hybrid studies were terminated with the advent of accidents, high interest rates, rising 'green like' movement and cheap natural gas for power production. For waste burning and fast-fission fuel producing designs, the blanket energy multiplication was about 10 and economics was OK relative to recirculating power for Q over 2. For fission-suppressed fuel producers, where the blanket multiplication is under 2, the Q needed was over 5. In the mirror program we came at this problem by trying to find a product for mirror fusion technology. We hoped we had a product and studied and promoted it. There was no market pull and when the mirror program collapsed in the US, so did both hybrid programs for mirrors and tokamaks and IFE by the mid 1980s. Today, the problem of what to do with wastes that were supposed to be accepted by the government appears to be a high value market pull. It remains to be shown if fusion neutrons can be generated at low enough cost so that economics will not be a showstopper. For burning only the minor actinides, the economics will be the most favorable. Burning the Pu as well will lower the number of fission reactors supported by each burner fusion machine and hurt economics of the system. The fuel-producing role of fusion to fuel fission reactors remains an important possible use of fusion especially in the early stages of fusion development. It is not clear that burning fission wastes in a fusion machine is more appropriate than burning these wastes in specially designed fission machines. Fusion can produce U-233 along with over 2.4%U-232 making the material large

Moir, R

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Causality detection and turbulence in fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work explores the potential of an information-theoretical causality detection method for unraveling the relation between fluctuating variables in complex nonlinear systems. The method is tested on some simple though nonlinear models, and guidelines for the choice of analysis parameters are established. Then, measurements from magnetically confined fusion plasmas are analyzed. The selected data bear relevance to the all-important spontaneous confinement transitions often observed in fusion plasmas, fundamental for the design of an economically attractive fusion reactor. It is shown how the present method is capable of clarifying the interaction between fluctuating quantities such as the turbulence amplitude, turbulent flux, and Zonal Flow amplitude, and uncovers several interactions that were missed by traditional methods.

van Milligen, B Ph; Ramisch, M; Estrada, T; Hidalgo, C; Alonso, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

'Optical' soft x-ray arrays for fluctuation diagnostics in magnetic fusion energy experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are developing large pixel count, fast ({>=}100 kHz) and continuously sampling soft x-ray (SXR) array for the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and turbulent fluctuations in magnetic fusion energy plasmas. The arrays are based on efficient scintillators, high thoughput multiclad fiber optics, and multichannel light amplification and integration. Compared to conventional x-ray diode arrays, such systems can provide vastly increased spatial coverage, and access to difficult locations with small neutron noise and damage. An eight-channel array has been built using columnar CsI:Tl as an SXR converter and a multianode photomultiplier tube as photoamplifier. The overall system efficiency is measured using laboratory SXR sources, while the time response and signal-to-noise performance have been evaluated by recording MHD activity from the spherical tori (ST) Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade and National Spherical Torus Experiment, both at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.; Johnson, D.; Majeski, R. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Plasma Spectroscopy Group, Bloomberg Center 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

DOE-STD-6002-96; DOE Standard Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6002-96 6002-96 May 1996 DOE STANDARD SAFETY OF MAGNETIC FUSION FACILITIES: REQUIREMENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE96009495 DOE-STD-6002-96 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page FOREWORD....................................................................................................................... v

257

SOLVING THE STAND-OFF PROBLEM FOR MAGNETIZED TARGET FUSION: PLASMA STREAMS AS DISPOSABLE ELECTRODES, PLUS A LOCAL SPHERICAL BLANKET  

SciTech Connect

In a fusion reactor based on the Magnetized Target Fusion approach, the permanent power supply has to deliver currents up to a few mega-amperes to the target dropped into the reaction chamber. All the structures situated around the target will be destroyed after every pulse and have to be replaced at a frequency of 1 to 10 Hz. In this paper, an approach based on the use of spherical blanket surrounding the target, and pulsed plasma electrodes connecting the target to the power supply, is discussed. A brief physic analysis of the processes associated with creation of plasma electrodes is discussed.

Ryutov, D D; Thio, Y F

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

Structural analysis of magnetic fusion energy systems in a combined interactive/batch computer environment  

SciTech Connect

A system of computer programs has been developed to aid in the preparation of input data for and the evaluation of output data from finite element structural analyses of magnetic fusion energy devices. The system utilizes the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program and a special set of interactive pre- and post-processor computer programs, and has been designed for use in an environment wherein a time-share computer system is linked to a batch computer system. In such an environment, the analyst must only enter, review and/or manipulate data through interactive terminals linked to the time-share computer system. The primary pre-processor programs include NASDAT, NASERR and TORMAC. NASDAT and TORMAC are used to generate NASTRAN input data. NASERR performs routine error checks on this data. The NASTRAN program is run on a batch computer system using data generated by NASDAT and TORMAC. The primary post-processing programs include NASCMP and NASPOP. NASCMP is used to compress the data initially stored on magnetic tape by NASTRAN so as to facilitate interactive use of the data. NASPOP reads the data stored by NASCMP and reproduces NASTRAN output for selected grid points, elements and/or data types.

Johnson, N.E.; Singhal, M.K.; Walls, J.C.; Gray, W.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses.

Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fusion power and the environment  

SciTech Connect

Environmental characteristics of conceptual fusion-reactor systems based on magnetic confinement are examined quantitatively, and some comparisons with fission systems are made. Fusion, like all other energy sources, will not be completely free of environmental liabilities, but the most obvious of these-- tritium leakage and activation of structural materials by neutron bombardment-- are susceptible to significant reduction by ingenuity in choice of materials and design. Large fusion reactors can probably be designed so that worst-case releases of radioactivity owing to accident or sabotage would produce no prompt fatalities in the public. A world energy economy relying heavily on fusion could make heavy demands on scarce nonfuel materials, a topic deserving further attention. Fusion's potential environmental advantages are not entirely ''automatic'', converting them into practical reality will require emphasis on environmental characteristics throughout the process of reactor design and engineering. The central role of environmental impact in the long-term energy dilemma of civilization justifies the highest priority on this aspect of fusion. (auth)

Holdren, J.P.; Fowler, T.K.; Post, R.F.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included. (RME)

Fowler, T.K.

1977-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

265

NUCLEAR FUSION doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/1/014004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion energy research began in the early 1950s as scientists worked to harness the awesome power of the atom for peaceful purposes. There was early optimism for a quick solution for fusion energy as there had been for fission. However, this was soon tempered by reality as the difficulty of producing and confining fusion fuel at temperatures of 100 million ? C in the laboratory was appreciated. Fusion research has followed two main paths inertial confinement fusion and magnetic confinement fusion. Over the past 50 years, there has been remarkable progress with both approaches, and now each has a solid technical foundation that has led to the construction of major facilities that are aimed at demonstrating fusion energy producing plasmas. PACS numbers: 52.55.?s, 52.57.?z, 28.52.?s, 89.30.Jj (Some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introductionfusion energy prior to 1958 The 1950s were a period of rapid progress and high expectations in science and technology. Nuclear weapons were advanced with the first fusion assisted nuclear weapons being tested in 1952. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy in

Dale Meade

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Controlled thermonuclear fusion research in Europe -- Competence in advanced physics and technologies  

SciTech Connect

Development of Fusion power is being pursued in all major industrial countries. The European Union, together with countries associated to the EURATOM-Framework Program undertakes an integrated RTD program for the development of magnetic fusion. The Key Action Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion has the objectives to develop the capacity to construct and operated a Next Step device for which the design is being pursued in international collaboration (ITER EDA, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Engineering Design Activities); to undertake structured activities for concept improvements for a fusion power station; to develop technologies needed in the longer term for a prototype fusion reactor. Work on the socio-economic aspects of fusion and a keep in touch activity coordinating national civil research activities in inertial confinement fusion complement the program.

Bruhns, H.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

TWO IMPORTANT FUSION PROCESSES CREATING THE CONDITIONS FOR FUSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPORTANT FUSION PROCESSES CREATING THE CONDITIONS FOR FUSION F u s i o n Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source C o n f i n e m e n t Q u a l i t y , n 蟿 ( m - 3 s ) 1970-75 1990s 1975-80 1980s Ion Temperature (K) 10 21 10 20 10 19 10 18 10 17 10 6 10 7 10 8 10 9 Inertial Magnetic Expected reactor regime Expected reactor regime Useful Nuclear Masses (The electron's mass is 0.000549 u.) Label Species Mass (u*) n ( 1 n) neutron 1.008665 p ( 1 H) proton 1.007276 D ( 2 H) deuteron 2.013553 T ( 3 H) triton 3.015500 3 He helium-3 3.014932 伪 ( 4 He) helium-4 4.001505 * 1 u = 1.66054 x 10 -27 kg = 931.466 MeV/c 2 Nuclear Mass (u) B i n d i n g E n e r g y P e r N u c l e o n ( M e V ) 1 200 150 100 50 10 0 5 62 Ni Fusion Reactions Release Energy Fission Reactions Release Energy EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS IN FUSION RESEARCH Fusion requires high tempera- ture plasmas confined long enough at high density

268

Fusion reactor design studies: standard unit costs and cost scaling rules  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes standard unit costs and scaling rules for estimating costs of material, equipment, land, and labor components used in magnetic confinement fusion reactor plant construction and operation. Use of the standard unit costs and scaling rules will add uniformity to cost estimates, and thus allow valid comparison of the economic characteristics of various reactor concepts.

Schulte, S.C.; Bickford, W.E.; Willingham, C.E.; Ghose, S.K.; Walker, M.G.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low- to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work.

Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface  

SciTech Connect

The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Negative Halogen Ions for Fusion Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past quarter century, advances in hydrogen negative ion sources have extended the usable range of hydrogen isotope neutral beams to energies suitable for large magnetically confined fusion devices. Recently, drawing upon this experience, negative halogen ions have been proposed as an alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers in inertial confinement fusion, because electron accumulation would be prevented in negative ion beams, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. This paper reports the results of an experiment comparing the current density and beam emittance of Cl+ and Cl- extracted from substantially ion-ion plasmas with that of Ar+ extracted from an ordinary electron-ion plasma, all using the same source, extractor, and emittance scanner. At similar discharge conditions, the Cl- current was typically 85 90% of the positive chlorine current, with an e-/ Cl- ratio as low as seven without grid magnets. The Cl- was as much as 76% of the Ar+ current from a discharge with the same RF drive. The minimum normalized beam emittance and inferred ion temperatures of Cl+, Cl-, and Ar+ were all similar, so the current density and optical quality of Cl- appear as suitable for heavy ion fusion driver applications as a positive noble gas ion of similar mass. Since F, I, and Br should all behave similarly in an ion source, they should also be suitable as driver beams.

Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Leung, K.N.; Westenskow, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Mirror fusion--fission hybrids  

SciTech Connect

The fusion-fission concept and the mirror fusion-fission hybrid program are outlined. Magnetic mirror fusion drivers and blankets for hybrid reactors are discussed. Results of system analyses are presented and a reference design is described.

Lee, J.D.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Plasma Facing Material Selection - A Critical Issue for Magnetic Fusion Power Development (A26873)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings Of 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, October 11-16, 2010, Daejeon, Republic Of Korea, Http://www-pub.iaea.org/mtcd/meetings/cn180_papers.asp, Paper FTP/P1-3123rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference Daejeon, KP, 2010999617635

Wong, C.P.C.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

COLLABORATIVE: FUSION SIMULATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, participated in the ???垄????????Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) Planning Activities???垄???????聺 [http://www.pppl.gov/fsp], with C.S. Chang as the institutional PI. FSP???垄????????s mission was to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. Specific institutional goal of the New York University was to participate in the planning of the edge integrated simulation, with emphasis on the usage of large scale HPCs, in connection with the SciDAC CPES project which the PI was leading. New York University successfully completed its mission by participating in the various planning activities, including the edge physics integration, the edge science drivers, and the mathematical verification. The activity resulted in the combined report that can be found in http://www.pppl.gov/fsp/Overview.html. Participation and presentations as part of this project are listed in a separation file.

Chang, Choong Seock

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

Moment free toroidal magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A toroidal magnet for confining a high magnetic field for use in fusion reactor research and nuclear particle detection. The magnet includes a series of conductor elements arranged about and fixed at its small major radius portion to the outer surface of a central cylindrical support each conductor element having a geometry such as to maintain the conductor elements in pure tension when a high current flows therein, and a support assembly which redistributes all or part of the tension which would otherwise arise in the small major radius portion of each coil element to the large major radius portion thereof.

Bonanos, Peter (East Brunswick, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

None

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mirror Confinement Systems: project summaries  

SciTech Connect

This report contains descriptions of the projects supported by the Mirror Confinement Systems (MCS) Division of the Office of Fusion Energy. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators, in collaboration with MCS staff office, and include objectives and milestones for each project. In addition to project summaries, statements of Division objectives and budget summaries are also provided.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

Koenig, H.R.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1]could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

Owen, L.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32] E. Greenspan. Fusion reactors blanket nucleonics. Intemperature windows for fusion reactor structural materials.steels for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF. Journal of

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF. Journal of NuclearFusion reactors blanket nucleonics. In Progress in NuclearFusion-Fission hybrid reactors. In Advances in Nuclear

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reviewers Comments on the 5th Symposium and the Status of Fusion Research 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Better to understand the status of fusion research in the year 2003 we will first put the research in its historical context. Fusion power research, now beginning its sixth decade of continuous effort, is unique in the field of scientific research. Unique in its mixture of pure and applied research, unique in its long-term goal and its promise for the future, and unique in the degree that it has been guided and constrained by national and international governmental policy. Though fusion research's goal has from the start been precisely defined, namely, to obtain a net release of energy from controlled nuclear fusion reactions between light isotopes (in particular those of hydrogen and helium) the difficulty of the problem has spawned in the past a very wide variety of approaches to the problem. Some of these approaches have had massive international support for decades, some have been pursued only at a ''shoestring'' level by dedicated groups in small research laboratories or universities. In discussing the historical and present status of fusion research the implications of there being two distinctly different approaches to achieving net fusion power should be pointed out. The first, and oldest, approach is the use of strong magnetic fields to confine the heated fuel, in the form of a plasma and at a density typically four or five orders of magnitude smaller than the density of the atmosphere. In steady state this fusion fuel density is still sufficient to release fusion energy at the rate of many megawatts per cubic meter. The plasma confinement times required for net energy release in this regime are long--typically a second or more, representing an extremely difficult scientific challenge --witness the five decades of research in magnetic fusion, still without having reaching that goal. The second, more recently initiated approach, is of course the ''inertial'' approach. As its name implies, the ''confinement'' problem is solved ''inertially,'' that is by compressing and heating a tiny pellet of frozen fusion fuel in nanoseconds, such that before disassembly the pellet fuses and releases its energy as a micro-explosion. The first, and most thoroughly investigated means to create this compression and heating is to use multiple laser beams, with total energies of megajoules, focused down to impinge uniformly on the pellet target. To illustrate the extreme difference between the usual magnetic confinement regime at that of inertial fusion, there are twenty orders of magnitude in fusion power density (ten orders of magnitude in plasma density) between the two regimes. In principle fusion power systems could operate at any density between these extremes, if means were to be found to exploit this possibility.

Post, R F

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fusion Communication Summit cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMUNICATIONS SUMMIT for U.S. Magnetic Fusion September 12-13, 2012 Princeton University - Frist Campus Center Princeton, New Jersey, USA Mission Statement Announcements...

287

Development of tritium technology for the United States magnetic fusion energy program  

SciTech Connect

Tritium technology development for the DOE fusion program is taking place principally at three laboratories, Mound Facility, Argonne National Laboratory and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This paper will review the major aspects of each of the three programs and look at aspects of the tritium technology being developed at other laboratories within the United States. Facilities and experiments to be discussed include the Tritium Effluent Control Laboratory and the Tritium Storage and Delivery System for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Mound Facility; the Lithium Processing Test Loop and the solid breeder blanket studies at Argonne; and the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos.

Anderson, J.L.; Wilkes, W.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Effect of superbanana diffusion on fusion reactivity in stellarators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion reactivity is usually obtained using a Maxwellian distribution. However, energy-dependent radial diffusion can modify the energy distribution. Superbanana diffusion is energy-dependent and occurs in nonaxisymmetric magnetic confinement devices, such as stellarators, because of ripple-trapped particles which can take large steps between collisions. In this paper, the D-T fusion reactivity is calculated using a non-Maxwellian energy distribution obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically, including radial superbanana diffusion as well as energy scattering. The ions in the tail of the distribution, with energies larger than thermal, which are most needed for fusion, are depleted by superbanana diffusion. In this paper, it is shown that the D-T fusion reactivity is reduced by tail ion depletion due to superbanana diffusion, by roughly a factor of 0.5 for the parameters used in the calculation.

Hinton, Fred L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling. Progress report, August 16, 1991--September 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Measurements of electromagnetic properties of LCT (Large Coil Task) coils in IFSMTF (International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Participants in the international Large Coil Task (LCT) have designed, built, and tested six different toroidal field coils. Each coil has a 2.5- by 3.5-m, D-shaped bore and a current between 10 and 18 kA and is designed to demonstrate stable operation at 8 T, with a superimposed averaged pulsed field of 0.14 T in 1.0 s and simulated nuclear heating. Testing of the full six-coil toroidal array began early in 1986 and was successfully completed on September 3, 1987, in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper summarizes electromagnetic properties of LCT coils measured in different modes of energization and fast dump. Effects of mutual coupling and induced eddy currents are analyzed and discussed. Measurements of the ac loss caused by the superimposed pulsed fields are summarized. Finally, the interpretation of the test results and their relevance to practical fusion are presented. 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tab.

Shen, S.S.; Baylor, L.R.; Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Wilson, C.T.; Wintenberg, R.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The solar wind confines the magnetic field of Earth and governs phenomena such as geomagnetic storms and aurorae. The solar wind confines the magnetic fields of other planets as...

292

Commercial application of thermionic conversion using a fusion reactor energy source. A preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of using thermionic conversion as a topping cycle for fusion reactors is presented. Because of the absence of restrictive temperature limitations for fusion-reactor blankets, fusion reactors may offer significant advantages, compared to fission reactors and fossil-fuel energy sources, for utilizing thermionic topping cycles. A system with a thermionic topping cycle and a conventional steam-turbine generator that utilizes the heat rejected by the thermionic converters is presented for illustration. This system consists of conceptual laser-fusion reactors with high-temperature radiating reactor blankets serving as heat sources for the thermionic topping cycle. The design concept appears to be equally adaptable to magnetically confined fusion reactors. For the example analyzed, net conversion efficiencies of combined thermionic and steam-turbine cycles are high, exceeding 50 percent for some values of the operating parameters, and the cost of producing low-voltage direct current for electrochemical processing is low.

Frank, T.G.; Kern, E.A.; Booth, L.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will present a uniform technical assessment of the benefits of the three approaches. The draft report will be presented and extensively discussed during the July meeting, leading to a final report. This report will provide critical fusion community input to the decision process of FESAC and DOE in 2002-2003, and to the review of burning plasma science by the National Academy of Sciences called for by FESAC and Energy Legislation which was passed by the House of Representatives [H.R. 4]. Members of the fusion community are encouraged to participate in the Snowmass working groups.

N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 80 - SEPT. 81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were derived from a MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY STAFF W, Kunkel (H. 1. F. Staff, Heavy Ion Fusion Half-year Report October 1,LBL-12594 (1981). Heavy Ion Fusion Staff, Heavy Ion Fusion

Johnson Ed, R.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fusion neutron generation computations in a stellarator-mirror hybrid with neutral beam injection  

SciTech Connect

In the paper [Moiseenko V.E., Noack K., Agren O. 'Stellarator-mirror based fusion driven fission reactor' J Fusion Energy 29 (2010) 65.], a version of a fusion driven system (FDS), i.e. a sub-critical fast fission assembly with a fusion plasma neutron source, is proposed. The plasma part of the reactor is based on a stellarator with a small mirror part. Hot ions with high perpendicular energy are assumed to be trapped in the magnetic mirror part. The stellarator part which connects to the mirror part and provides confinement for the bulk (deuterium) plasma. In the magnetic well of the mirror part, fusion reactions occur from collisions between a of hot ion component (tritium) with cold background plasma ions. RF heating is one option to heat the tritium. A more conventional method to sustain the hot ions is neutral beam injection (NBI), which is here studied numerically for the above-mentioned hybrid scheme. For these studies, a new kinetic code, KNBIM, has been developed. The code takes into account Coulomb collisions between the hot ions and the background plasma. The geometry of the confining magnetic field is arbitrary for the code. It is accounted for via a numerical bounce averaging procedure. Along with the kinetic calculations the neutron generation intensity and its spatial distribution are computed.

Moiseenko, V. E.; Agren, O. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Division of Electricity, Box 534, SE-7512 Uppsala (Sweden)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

STUDY OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD OF ACTIVE REGION 11117 AROUND THE TIME OF A CONFINED FLARE USING A DATA-DRIVEN CESE-MHD MODEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We apply a data-driven magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare that occurred on 2010 October 25. The MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma {beta}. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photosphere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria based on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory around the time of the flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most cases. The magnetic configuration changes very little during the studied time interval of 2 hr. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photosphere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the computed magnetic free energy drops during the flare by {approx}10{sup 30} erg, which seems to be adequate in providing the energy budget of a minor C-class confined flare.

Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, S. T.; Hu Qiang, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: wus@uah.edu, E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

NEUTRONICS ANALYSIS OF A SELF-COOLED BLANKET FOR A LASER FUSION PLANT WITH MAGNETIC DIVERSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as armor and structural materials, respectively. This results in a large chamber (~10.5 m radius) to ensure armor survival.1 A parallel effort is underway to explore the option of using magnetic diversion for a toroidal ring cusp dump. The apex of each cone has a polar cusp armored dump, which is exposed to some

Raffray, A. Ren茅

298

Accelerators for heavy ion fusion  

SciTech Connect

Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

Bangerter, R.O.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Energy and particle confinement in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)  

SciTech Connect

ITER will require a level of energy ({tau}{sub E}) and particle ({tau}{sub p}) confinement sufficient for reaching ignition and extended burn of DT plasmas, with steady-state, high-Q (Q = P{sub fusion}/P{sub aux} = 5P{sub {alpha}}/P{sub aux}) operation as an ultimate goal. This translates into a required confinement capability of T{sub i}(0)n{sub DT}(0){tau}{sub E} {approximately}4--8 {times} 10{sup 21} keV{center dot}s/m{sup 3} for Q {approximately}5--{infinity} (where T{sub i}(0) is the central ion temperature, n{sub DT}(0) is the central DT fuel ion density, {tau}{sub E} is the global energy confinement time). In addition, {tau}{sub p} {sup He}/{tau}{sub E} < 10 is required to ensure that the thermal {alpha}-particle (He) accumulation (n{sub He}/n{sub e}) is less than 10% (where {tau}{sub p}{sup He} is the global thermal alpha particle containment time). Furthermore, the tritium fuel burnup fraction under nominal burn conditions must be greater than 1.5%. While the ITER Tn{tau}{sub E} requirement is about ten times the highest value achieved in JET (3), the extrapolation in plasma physics parameters is less. If {beta} (ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure), {nu}* (collisionality), and {rho}/a (ratio of the ion gyroradius to the plasma minor radius) are taken as the relevant dimensionless parameters to characterize the plasma, the extrapolation from present JET performance to ITER is a factor {le}2. The ITER concept is based on the expectation that H-mode confinement can be achieved for long pulse. This paper covers the energy and particle confinement issues for ITER. 15 refs.

Uckan, N.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Yushmanov, P.N.; Mukhovatov, V.S.; Parail, V.V.; Putvinskii, S. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii); Takizuka, T.; Tsunematsu, T.; Yoshino, R. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)); Borrass, K.; Engelmann, F.; Kardaun, O.; Lackner, K. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik,

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Panel discussion: Progress and plans for magnetic fusion: Summary of comments on recent progress in fusion research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in fusion research is marked not so much by a few giant steps as by a continual number of small steps, which yield a steady advance toward the goal of producing a fusion reactor. During the past year, there have been two such steps in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) program: the experimental demonstration of access to the second stable region of beta in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF); and the acceleration of a frozen hydrogen pellet by an intense electron beam. This paper discusses these steps.

Sheffield, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 Congressional Budget Campaign and a major goal for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The ICF Campaign supports the NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF provides NNSA extraordinary opportunities for scientific progress and discovery in the areas

302

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) responsive infrastructure, supports NNSA an important component of the scientific and technical understanding required to assess the safety, security, and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability

303

Exploring Plasma Science Advances from Fusion Findings to Astrophysica...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was shown for inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Speakers noted that producing...

304

Final report of the Ad Hoc Experts Group on Fusion  

SciTech Connect

The objectives and strategy of the fusion program are reviewed. In particular, tokamaks, mirrors, alternate concepts, plasma physics, and inertial confinement options are reviewed. (MOW)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Handling and archiving of magnetic fusion data at DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

Recent modifications to the computer network at DIII-D enhance the collection and distribution of newly acquired and archived experimental data. Linked clients and servers route new data from diagnostic computers to centralized mass storage and distribute data on demand to local and remote workstations and computers. Capacity for data handling exceeds the upper limit of DIII-D Tokamak data production of about 4 GBytes per day. Network users have fast access to new data stored on line. An interactive program handles requests for restoration of data archived off line. Disk management procedures retain selected data on line in preference to other data. Redundancy of all components on the archiving path from the network to magnetic media has prevented loss of data. Older data are rearchived as dictated by limited media life.

VanderLaan, J.F.; Miller, S.; McHarg, B.B. Jr.; Henline, P.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

VISUALIZATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED PLASMAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. As an example, in 1990, the per capita consumption of energy in India and China were 1/6 and 1/3 of the world. Hence, there is a great need to develop viable renewable energy sources and increase the efforts

307

VISUALIZATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED PLASMAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in India and China were 1/6 and 1/3 of the world average respectively. Over the next decades it is likely on the global environment is simply staggering. Hence, there is a great need to develop viable renewable energy

308

High-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, 6.151 keV x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion and complex hydrodynamics experiments on Sandia's Z accelerator (invited)  

SciTech Connect

When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' 20 MA, 100 ns rise-time Z accelerator [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)], the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57 nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151 keV, Mn-He{sub {alpha}} curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for various high-energy-density physics experiments. Enhancements to this imaging system during 2005 have led to the capture of inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion and complex hydrodynamics images of significantly higher quality. The three main improvements, all leading effectively to enhanced image plane brightness, were bringing the source inside the Rowland circle to approximately double the collection solid angle, replacing direct exposure film with Fuji BAS-TR2025 image plate (read with a Fuji BAS-5000 scanner), and generating a 0.3-0.6 ns, {approx}200 J prepulse 2 ns before the 1.0 ns, {approx}1 kJ main pulse to more than double the 6.151 keV flux produced compared with a single 1 kJ pulse. It appears that the 20{+-}5 {mu}m imaging resolution is limited by the 25 {mu}m scanning resolution of the BAS-5000 unit, and to this end, a higher resolution scanner will replace it. ZBL is presently undergoing modifications to provide two temporally separated images ('two-frame') per Z shot for this system before the accelerator closes down in summer 2006 for the Z-refurbished (ZR) upgrade. In 2008, after ZR, it is anticipated that the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) addition to ZBL will be completed, possibly allowing high-energy 11.2224 and 15.7751 keV K{alpha}{sub 1} curved-crystal imaging to be performed. With an ongoing several-year project to develop a highly sensitive multiframe ultrafast digital x-ray camera (MUDXC), it is expected that two-frame HEPW 11 and 16 keV imaging and four-frame ZBL 6.151 keV curved-crystal imaging will be possible. MUDXC will be based on the technology of highly cooled silicon and germanium photodiode arrays and ultrafast, radiation-hardened integrated circuitry.

Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Wenger, D. F.; Cuneo, M. E.; Adams, R. G.; Barnard, W. J.; Beutler, D. E.; Burr, R. A.; Campbell, D. V.; Claus, L. D.; Foresi, J. S.; Johnson, D. W.; Keller, K. L.; Lackey, C.; Leifeste, G. T.; McPherson, L. A.; Mulville, T. D.; Neely, K. A.; Rambo, P. K.; Rovang, D. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1106 (United States)] (and others)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hot electron confinement in a microwave heated spindle cusp  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Research Laboratory at the University of Missouri-Columbia was established with awards from the McDonnel Douglas Foundation, ARMCO, Union Electric, Black and Vetch, Kansas City Power and Light, the National Science Foundation, and DOE. The Plasma Research Lab's major effort is the Missouri Magnetic Mirror (MMM or M{sup 3}) Project. The technical goals of MMM have been (1) Diagnostic Development, (2) Plasma Physics in the Cusp geometry, (3) plasma-wall interactions, (4) impurity effects in a steady-state plasma, and (5) Development of Diagnostics for use in harsh plasma processing environments. The other major goal of MMM has remained providing a facility for hands-on training in experimental plasma physics. The major experimental facility of MMM is the MMM Modified Experiment (M4X). Other research efforts in the Plasma Research Laboratory include small efforts in cold fusion, toroidal magnetic confinement, and inertial confinement and a potentially major effort in direct conversion of nuclear energy.

Prelas, M.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Small, Clean, Stable Fusion Power Plant ---- Inventor Samuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small, Clean, Stable Fusion Power Plant ---- Inventor Samuel A. Cohen This invention discloses improvements in magnetic fusion reactor design and operational modes that reduce...

311

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion power production requires energy storage and transfer on short time scales to create confining magnetic fields and for heating plasmas. The theta-pinch Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) requires 480 MJ of energy to drive the 5-T compression field with a 0.7-ms rise time. Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR) require 1 to 2 GJ of energy with a 1 to 2-s rise time for plasma ohmic heating. The design, development, and testing of four 300-kJ energy storage coils to satisfy the SFTR needs are described. Potential rotating machinery and homopolar energy systems for both the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) and tokamak ohmic-heating are presented.

Rogers, J.D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national program efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. Substantial efforts to develop integrated plasma modeling codes are also underway in the U.S., Europe and Japan. As a result of the highly collaborative nature of FES research, the community is facing new and unique challenges. While FES has a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of available tools. The NFC Project was initiated to address these challenges by creating and deploying collaborative software tools. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

SCHISSEL, D.P.; ABLA, G.; BURRUSS, J.R.; FEIBUSH, E.; FREDIAN, T.W.; GOODE, M.M.; GREENWALD, M.J.; KEAHEY, K.; LEGGETT, T.; LI, K.; McCUNE, D.C.; PAPKA, M.E.; RANDERSON, L.; SANDERSON, A.; STILLERMAN, J.; THOMPSON, M.R.; URAM, T.; WALLACE, G.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national program efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. Substantial efforts to develop integrated plasma modeling codes are also underway in the U.S., Europe and Japan. As a result of the highly collaborative nature of FES research, the community is facing new and unique challenges. While FES has a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of available tools. The NFC Project was initiated to address these challenges by creating and deploying collaborative software tools. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

SCHISSEL, D.P.; ABLA, G.; BURRUSS, J.R.; FEIBUSH, E.; FREDIAN, T.W.; GOODE, M.M.; GREENWALD, M.J.; KEAHEY, K.; LEGGETT, T.; LI, K.; McCUNE, D.C.; PAPKA, M.E.; RANDERSON, L.; SANDERSON, A.; STILLERMAN, J.; THOMPSON, M.R.; URAM, T.; WALLACE, G.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11, 1980, p. 725. MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY Staff W. Kunkel andsupport) Accelerator and Fusion Research Division N.Abt Y.Wong J. Zatver HEAVY ION FUSION Work continued during FY80

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tritium can be bred in a fusion reactor by capturing fusionchamber. Whereas magnetic-fusion reactors typically combineProjected MFE reactors have a toroidal fusion-power core

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Magnetic fusion energy, 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics in plasma research: Ion Sources; Accelerators for Negative Ions; and Plasma Theory.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Moment-free toroidal magnet background of the invention  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A toroidal magnet is described for confining a high magnetic field for use in fusion reactor research and nuclear particle detection. The magnet includes a series of conductor elements arranged about and fixed at its small major radius portion to the outer surface of a central cylindrical support each conductor element having a geometry such as to maintain the conductor elements in pure tension when a high current flows therein, and a support assembly which redistributes all or part of the tension which would otherwise arise in the small major radius portion of each coil element to the large major radius portion thereof.

Not Available

1981-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fusion power production in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

Up to 9.3 MW of fusion power has been produced from deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reactions in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The total fusion yield from a single plasma pulse has reached 6.5 MJ. The experiments in TFTR with deuterium-tritium plasmas fueled and heated by neutral beam injection span wide ranges in plasma and operating conditions. Through the use of lithium pellet conditioning to control the edge recycling, the plasma confinement in TFTR has been improved to the point where the stability of the plasma to pressure driven modes is limiting the fusion power for plasma currents up to 2.5 MA. The central energy and fusion power densities in these plasmas are comparable to those expected in a thermalized DT reactor, such as ITER.

Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Fusion Simulation Project. Workshop sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Rockville, MD, May 16-18, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved forty-six physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from twenty-one institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a three-day workshop in May 2007.

None

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fusion Simulation Project. Workshop Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Rockville, MD, May 16-18, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved forty-six physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from twenty-one institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a three-day workshop in May 2007.

Kritz, A.; Keyes, D.

2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Role of atomic collisions in fusion  

SciTech Connect

Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

Post, D.E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOE Handbook: Supplementary guidance and design experience for the fusion safety standards DOE-STD-6002-96 and DOE-STD-6003-96  

SciTech Connect

Two standards have been developed that pertain to the safety of fusion facilities. These are DOE- STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements, and DOE-STD-6003-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Guidance. The first of these standards identifies requirements that subscribers to that standard must meet to achieve safety in fusion facilities. The second standard contains guidance to assist in meeting the requirements identified inthefirst This handbook provides additional documentation on good operations and design practices as well as lessons learned from the experiences of designers and operators of previous fusion facilities and related systems. It is intended to capture the experience gained in the various fields and pass it on to designers of future fusion facilities as a means of enhancing success and safeiy. The sections of this document are presented according to the physical location of the major systems of a t%sion facility, beginning with the vacuum vessel and proceeding to those systems and components outside the vacuum vessel (the "Ex-vessel Systems"). The last section describes administrative procedures that cannot be localized to specific components. It has been tacitly assumed that the general structure of the fusion facilities addressed is that of a tokamak though the same principles would apply to other magnetic confinement options.

None

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics Research Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links earl marmar head of alcator reviewing data Dr. Earl Marmar, leader of the Alcator Project, studies C-Mod data. Today, we are closer than ever to realizing the dream of harnessing the nuclear process that powers our sun. This stellar process, called fusion, produces minimal waste and offers the hope of an almost limitless supply of safe, dependable energy. Among fusion research groups, MIT's Alcator C-Mod project is unique in its dedication to compact size and high performance. It is the world's highest magnetic field tokamak plasma confinement experiment. As a result, Alcator experiments have performed at levels rivaling the largest fusion experiments in the world.

324

Progress on the conceptual design of a mirror hybrid fusion--fission reactor  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design study was made of a fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of producing fissile material and electricity. The fusion component is a D-T plasma confined by a pair of magnetic mirror coils in a Yin-Yang configuration and is sustained by neutral beam injection. The neutrons from the fusion plasma drive the fission assembly which is composed of natural uranium carbide fuel rods clad with stainless steel and helium cooled. It was shown conceptually how the reactor might be built using essentially present-day technology and how the uranium-bearing blanket modules can be routinely changed to allow separation of the bred fissile fuel. (MOW)

Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Burleigh, R.J.

1975-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

325

Particle beam fusion progress report for 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress on the pulsed power approach to inertial confinement fusion. In 1989, the authors achieved a proton focal intensity of 5 TW/cm{sup 2} on PBFA-II in a 15-cm-radius applied magnetic-field (applied-B) ion diode. This is an improvement by a factor of 4 compared to previous PBFA-II experiments. They completed development of the three-dimensional (3-D), electromagnetic, particle-in-cell code QUICKSILVER and obtained the first 3-D simulations of an applied-B ion diode. The simulations, together with analytic theory, suggest that control of electromagnetic instabilities could reduce ion divergence. In experiments using a lithium fluoride source, they delivered 26 kJ of lithium energy to the diode axis. Rutherford-scattered ion diagnostics have been developed and tested using a conical foil located inside the diode. They can now obtain energy density profiles by using range filters and recording ion images on nuclear track recording film. Timing uncertainties in power flow experiments on PBFA-II have been reduced by a factor of 5. They are investigating three plasma opening switches that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. These new switches provide better power flow than the standard plasma erosion switch. Advanced pulsed-power fusion drivers will require extraction-geometry applied-B ion diodes. During this reporting period, progress was made in evaluating the generation, transport, and focus of multiple ion beams in an extraction geometry and in assessing the probable damage to a target chamber first wall.

Sweeney, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Pulsed Power Sciences Center

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Commercial application of laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

The fundamentals of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described.

Booth, L.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Reviewers Comments on the 5th Symposium and the Status of Fusion Research 2003  

SciTech Connect

Better to understand the status of fusion research in the year 2003 we will first put the research in its historical context. Fusion power research, now beginning its sixth decade of continuous effort, is unique in the field of scientific research. Unique in its mixture of pure and applied research, unique in its long-term goal and its promise for the future, and unique in the degree that it has been guided and constrained by national and international governmental policy. Though fusion research's goal has from the start been precisely defined, namely, to obtain a net release of energy from controlled nuclear fusion reactions between light isotopes (in particular those of hydrogen and helium) the difficulty of the problem has spawned in the past a very wide variety of approaches to the problem. Some of these approaches have had massive international support for decades, some have been pursued only at a ''shoestring'' level by dedicated groups in small research laboratories or universities. In discussing the historical and present status of fusion research the implications of there being two distinctly different approaches to achieving net fusion power should be pointed out. The first, and oldest, approach is the use of strong magnetic fields to confine the heated fuel, in the form of a plasma and at a density typically four or five orders of magnitude smaller than the density of the atmosphere. In steady state this fusion fuel density is still sufficient to release fusion energy at the rate of many megawatts per cubic meter. The plasma confinement times required for net energy release in this regime are long--typically a second or more, representing an extremely difficult scientific challenge --witness the five decades of research in magnetic fusion, still without having reaching that goal. The second, more recently initiated approach, is of course the ''inertial'' approach. As its name implies, the ''confinement'' problem is solved ''inertially,'' that is by compressing and heating a tiny pellet of frozen fusion fuel in nanoseconds, such that before disassembly the pellet fuses and releases its energy as a micro-explosion. The first, and most thoroughly investigated means to create this compression and heating is to use multiple laser beams, with total energies of megajoules, focused down to impinge uniformly on the pellet target. To illustrate the extreme difference between the usual magnetic confinement regime at that of inertial fusion, there are twenty orders of magnitude in fusion power density (ten orders of magnitude in plasma density) between the two regimes. In principle fusion power systems could operate at any density between these extremes, if means were to be found to exploit this possibility.

Post, R F

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

329

Final Report DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-01ER54617 Computer Modeling of Microturbulence and Macrostability Properties of Magnetically Confined Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 We have made significant progress during the past grant period in several key areas of the UCLA and national Fusion Theory Program. This impressive body of work includes both fundamental and applied contributions to MHD and turbulence in DIII-D and Electric Tokamak plasmas, and also to Z-pinches, particularly with respect to the effect of flows on these phenomena. We have successfully carried out interpretive and predictive global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell calculations of DIII-D discharges. We have cemented our participation in the gyrokinetic PIC effort of the SciDAC Plasma Microturbulence Project through working membership in the Summit Gyrokinetic PIC Team. We have continued to teach advanced courses at UCLA pertaining to computational plasma physics and to foster interaction with students and junior researchers. We have in fact graduated 2 Ph. D. students during the past grant period. The research carried out during that time has resulted in many publications in the premier plasma physics and fusion energy sciences journals and in several invited oral communications at major conferences such as Sherwood, Transport Task Force (TTF), the annual meetings of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society, of the European Physical Society, and the 2002 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, FEC 2002. Many of these have been authored and co-authored with experimentalists at DIII-D.

Jean-Noel Leboeuf

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

Fowler, T. Kenneth (Walnut Creek, CA); Condit, William C. (Livermore, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications & news,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1st Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Atlanta, 2009 1st Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Atlanta, 2009 Invited Orals I. Cziegler Structures and Velocities of the Edge Turbulence in Alcator C-Mod M. Greenwald Verification and Validation for Magnetic Fusion: Moving Toward Predictive Capability J. Hughes Edge Pedestal and Confinement Regulation on Alcator C-Mod L. Lin Comparison of Experimental Measurements and Gyrokinetic Turbulent Electron Transport Models in Alcator C-Mod Plasmas M. Porkolab Taming Magnetically Confined Plasmas with RF Waves: a Historical Perspective S. Shiraiwa Plasma Wave Simulation Based on a Versatile FEM Solver on Alcator C-Mod D. Whyte Runaway Electron Transport & Disruption Mitigation Optimization on Alcator C-Mod Contributed Orals B. Bose Studies of Filament Formation during Lithium Pellet Injection in Alcator C-Mod

332

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs  

SciTech Connect

A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics of Magnetic Fusion Reactors, Rev. of Modern Physicsheavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study, Technical Reporta toroidally shaped fusion reactor (tokamak) such as shown

Prost, Lionel Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Scientific and Computational Challenges of the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper highlights the scientific and computational challenges facing the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) a major national initiative in the United States with the primary objective being to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. It is expected to provide a suite of advanced modeling tools for reliably predicting fusion device behavior with comprehensive and targeted science-based simulations of nonlinearly-coupled phenomena in the core plasma, edge plasma, and wall region on time and space scales required for fusion energy production. As such, it will strive to embody the most current theoretical and experimental understanding of magnetic fusion plasmas and to provide a living framework for the simulation of such plasmas as the associated physics understanding continues to advance over the next several decades. Substantive progress on answering the outstanding scientific questions in the field will drive the FSP toward its ultimate goal of developing the ability to predict the behavior of plasma discharges in toroidal magnetic fusion devices with high physics fidelity on all relevant time and space scales. From a computational perspective, this will demand computing resources in the petascale range and beyond together with the associated multi-core algorithmic formulation needed to address burning plasma issues relevant to ITER - a multibillion dollar collaborative experiment involving seven international partners representing over half the world's population. Even more powerful exascale platforms will be needed to meet the future challenges of designing a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO). Analogous to other major applied physics modeling projects (e.g., Climate Modeling), the FSP will need to develop software in close collaboration with computers scientists and applied mathematicians and validated against experimental data from tokamaks around the world. Specific examples of expected advances needed to enable such a comprehensive integrated modeling capability and possible "co-design" approaches will be discussed. __________________________________________________

William M. Tang

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fusion Simulation Project Workshop Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for tokamak operation, disruptions, energetic particle stability and confinement, turbulent transport to performance projections and operational limits. The Fusion Simulation Project, which will focus on tokamak and transient heat loads on the divertor . . . . . 17 2.1.3 Tritium migration and impurity transport

Gropp, Bill

336

Review of deuterium--tritium results from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. At present the maximum fusion power of 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-{beta}{sub {ital p}} discharge following a current rampdown. The fusion power density in a core of the plasma is {approx}2.8 MW m{sup {minus}3}, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) at 1500 MW total fusion power. The energy confinement time, {tau}{sub {ital E}}, is observed to increase in D--T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the {ital n}{sub {ital i}}(0) {ital T}{sub {ital i}}(0) {tau}{sub {ital E}} product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-{beta}{sub {ital p}} discharges. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating of a D--T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP simulations. Initial measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from He gas puffing experiments. The loss of alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed. D--T experiments on TFTR will continue to explore the assumptions of the ITER design and to examine some of the physics issues associated with an advanced tokamak reactor.

McGuire, K.M.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Chang, C.S.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dendy, R.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M.J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Marmar, E.S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Mauel, M.; McCarthy, M.P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O`Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S.F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated Strings of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall.

Hartman, C W; Reisman, D B; McLean, H S; Thomas, J

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tomamak Fusion Test reactor has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled with nominally equal densities of deuterium and tritium. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by [similar to]20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by [alpha] particles created by the D-T fusion reactions.

Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Darrow, D.S.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Gentile, C.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kugel, H.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Loughlin, M.J.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levinton, F.M.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Martin, A.; Mazzucato, E.; Majeski, R.; Marmar, E.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Muelle

1994-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Large Geomagnetic Storms in Relation to CME Related Shocks and Magnetic Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied large geomagnetic stormsstorms (93%) are associated with CME related shocks and the related shocks are forward shocks. The geomagnetic storms, which are associated with CME related shocks, are also related to strong X-ray solar flares of category X or M class and most of them are associated with magnetic clouds (60%) also. We have further determined that the magnitude of geomagnetic storms depends upon strength of the shocks, duration of magnetic clouds and speed of the CMEs, which are associated with geomagnetic storms. We have found medium positive correlation between magnitude of geomagnetic storms and speed of associated CMEs with correlation coefficient.49and large negative correlation between magnitude of geomagnetic storms and duration of associated magnetic clouds.We have concluded that coronal mass ejections which are associated with interplanetary shocks, magnetic clouds or combination of both are very much effective in producing geomagnetic storms of higher magnitude.

P. L. Verma; R. S. Gupta; P. K. Chamadia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hot-electron plasma formation and confinement in the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the first experiment to investigate the thermal-barrier tandem-mirror concept. One attractive feature of the tandem magnetic mirror as a commercial power reactor is that the fusion reactions occur in an easily accessible center-cell. On the other hand, complicated end-cells are necessary to provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and improved particle confinement of the center-cell plasma. In these end-cells, enhanced confinement is achieved with a particular axial potential profile that is formed with electron-cyclotron range-of-frequency heating (ECRF heating, ECRH). By modifying the loss rates of electrons at spatially distinct locations within the end-cells, the ECRH can tailor the plasma potential profile in the desired fashion. Specifically, the thermal-barrier concept requires generation of a population of energetic electrons near the midplane of each end-cell. To be effective, the transverse (to the magnetic field) spatial structure of the hot-electron plasma must be fairly uniform. In this dissertation we characterize the spatial structure of the ECRH-generated plasma, and determine how the structure builds up in time. Furthermore, the plasma should efficiently absorb the ECRF power, and a large fraction of the electrons must be well confined near the end-cell midplane. Therefore, we also examine in detail the ECRH power balance, determining how the ECRF power is absorbed by the plasma, and the processes through which that power is confined and lost. 43 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

Ress, D.B.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Electromagnetic confinement and movement of thin sheets of molten metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus capable of producing a combination of magnetic fields that can retain a metal in liquid form in a region having a smooth vertical boundary including a levitation magnet that produces low frequency magnetic field traveling waves to retain the metal and a stabilization magnet that produces a high frequency magnetic field to produce a smooth vertical boundary. As particularly adapted to the casting of solid metal sheets, a metal in liquid form can be continuously fed into one end of the confinement region produced by the levitation and stabilization magnets and removed in solid form from the other end of confinement region. An additional magnet may be included for support at the edges of the confinement region where eddy currents loop.

Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) will be the first experiment able to study high-beta plasma confined by a magnetic dipole with near classi-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-coil. In addition, we summarize our plan to test the operation of the superconducting magnets and our procedure/Science Technology Center (St. Petersburg, Russia), and manufacturing of its cyrostat has begun. Finally, the HTc! #12;LDX Superconducting Coil Manufacturing Status: Floating Coil (714 turns, Nb3Sn, 5T, 1.3 MA turns

343

MFE Burning Plasmas Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFE Burning Plasmas and Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs) Bick Hooper LLNL Presentation power requires: 路 A burning plasma experiment 路 An advancing portfolio of ICCs 路 Plasma physics unified Improved Configurations Magnetic Configurations Knowledge Base Burning Plasma Phys. & Tech. Knowledge Base

344

The importance of the toroidal magnetic field for the feasibility of a tokamak burning plasma experiment  

SciTech Connect

The next step in the demonstration of the scientific feasibility of a tokamak fusion reactor is a DT burning plasma experiment for the study and control of self-heated plasmas. In this paper, the authors examine the role of the toroidal magnetic field on the confinement of a tokamak plasma in the ELMy H-mode regime--the operational regime foreseen for ITER.

Mazzucato, E.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

American Fusion News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Fusion News American Fusion News General Atomics (GA) December 4, 2012 The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" December 4, 2012 Frozen Bullets Tame Unruly Edge Plasmas in Fusion Experiment February 15, 2012 General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement See All Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) April 5, 2013 Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science February 22, 2013 A Tour of Plasma Physics in Downtown Cambridge December 4, 2012 Placing Fusion Power on a Pedestal September 21, 2012 MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTUE OF TECHNOLOGY See All National Ignition Facility February 22, 2013 Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy February 16, 2012 National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes

346

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regarding Confinement Resonances Regarding Confinement Resonances Regarding Confinement Resonances Print Wednesday, 27 July 2011 00:00 When an atom is encapsulated inside a hollow spherical carbon buckyball, the complex is called an "endofullerene." Theoretically, if the atom is an unreactive noble gas like xenon, it should be centered within the cage. If one or more of the atom's electrons are boosted out of the cage by an x-ray photon, the electron waves may be transmitted through or reflected off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but have never been observed. In the first experimental test of this theory, members of an international team led by Ronald Phaneuf, University of Nevada, and working at ALS Beamline 10.0.1 produced and isolated xenon endofullerenes and observed confinement resonances.

347

Stockpile tritium production from fusion  

SciTech Connect

A fusion breeder holds the promise of a new capability - ''dialable'' reserve capacity at little additional cost - that offers stockpile planners a new way to deal with today's uncertainties in forecasting long range needs. Though still in the research stage, fusion can be developed in time to meet future military requirements. Much of the necessary technology will be developed by the ongoing magnetic fusion energy program. However, a specific program to develop the nuclear technology required for materials production is needed if fusion is to become a viable option for a new production complex around the turn of the century.

Lokke, W.A.; Fowler, T.K.

1986-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regarding Confinement Resonances Print Regarding Confinement Resonances Print When an atom is encapsulated inside a hollow spherical carbon buckyball, the complex is called an "endofullerene." Theoretically, if the atom is an unreactive noble gas like xenon, it should be centered within the cage. If one or more of the atom's electrons are boosted out of the cage by an x-ray photon, the electron waves may be transmitted through or reflected off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but have never been observed. In the first experimental test of this theory, members of an international team led by Ronald Phaneuf, University of Nevada, and working at ALS Beamline 10.0.1 produced and isolated xenon endofullerenes and observed confinement resonances.

350

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regarding Confinement Resonances Print Regarding Confinement Resonances Print When an atom is encapsulated inside a hollow spherical carbon buckyball, the complex is called an "endofullerene." Theoretically, if the atom is an unreactive noble gas like xenon, it should be centered within the cage. If one or more of the atom's electrons are boosted out of the cage by an x-ray photon, the electron waves may be transmitted through or reflected off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but have never been observed. In the first experimental test of this theory, members of an international team led by Ronald Phaneuf, University of Nevada, and working at ALS Beamline 10.0.1 produced and isolated xenon endofullerenes and observed confinement resonances.

351

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but...

352

Regarding Confinement Resonances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regarding Confinement Resonances Print Regarding Confinement Resonances Print When an atom is encapsulated inside a hollow spherical carbon buckyball, the complex is called an "endofullerene." Theoretically, if the atom is an unreactive noble gas like xenon, it should be centered within the cage. If one or more of the atom's electrons are boosted out of the cage by an x-ray photon, the electron waves may be transmitted through or reflected off the carbon cage, giving rise to an interference effect similar to waves in a water tank. These so-called "confinement resonances" were predicted theoretically a decade ago but have never been observed. In the first experimental test of this theory, members of an international team led by Ronald Phaneuf, University of Nevada, and working at ALS Beamline 10.0.1 produced and isolated xenon endofullerenes and observed confinement resonances.

353

23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

Richard J. Hawryluk

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

354

Macron Formed Liner Compression as a Practical Method for Enabling Magneto-Inertial Fusion  

SciTech Connect

The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. The main impediment for current nuclear fusion concepts is the complexity and large mass associated with the confinement systems. To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of magnetic fusion, an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. The very compact, high energy density plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) provides for an ideal target for this purpose. To make fusion with the FRC practical, an efficient method for repetitively compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. A novel approach to be explored in this endeavor is to remotely launch a converging array of small macro-particles (macrons) that merge and form a more massive liner inside the reactor which then radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target FRC plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining liner significantly lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. With the momentum flux being delivered by an assemblage of low mass, but high velocity macrons, many of the difficulties encountered with the liner implosion power technology are eliminated. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to evaluate the feasibility achieving fusion conditions from this simple and low cost approach to fusion. During phase I the design and testing of the key components for the creation of the macron formed liner have been successfully carried out. Detailed numerical calculations of the merging, formation and radial implosion of the Macron Formed Liner (MFL) were also performed. The phase II effort will focus on an experimental demonstration of the macron launcher at full power, and the demonstration of megagauss magnetic field compression by a small array of full scale macrons. In addition the physics of the compression of an FRC to fusion conditions will be undertaken with a smaller scale MFL. The timescale for testing will be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of other facilities at MSNW where the target FRC will be created and translated inside the MFL just prior to implosion of the MFL. Experimental success would establish the concept at the 芒??proof of principle芒?聺 level and the following phase III effort would focus on the full development of the concept into a fusion gain device. Successful operation would lead to several benefits in various fields. It would have application to high energy density physics, as well as nuclear waste transmutation and alternate fission fuel cycles. The smaller scale device could find immediate application as an intense source of neutrons for diagnostic imaging and non-invasive object interrogation.

Slough, John

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Linear electric field frequency shift (important for next generation electric dipole moment searches) induced in confined gases by a magnetic field gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The search for particle electric dipole moments (edm) represents a most promising way to search for physics beyond the standard model. A number of groups are planning a new generation of experiments using stored gases of various kinds. In order to achieve the target sensitivities it will be necessary to deal with the systematic error resulting from the interaction of the well-known $\\overrightarrow{v}\\times \\overrightarrow{E}$ field with magnetic field gradients (often referred to as the geometric phase effect (Commins, ED; Am. J. Phys. \\QTR{bf}{59}, 1077 (1991), Pendlebury, JM \\QTR{em}{et al;} Phys. Rev. \\QTR{bf}{A70}, 032102 (2004)). This interaction produces a frequency shift linear in the electric field, mimicking an edm. In this work we introduce an analytic form for the velocity auto-correlation function which determines the velocity-position correlation function which in turn determines the behavior of the frequency shift (Lamoreaux, SK and Golub, R; Phys. Rev \\QTR{bf}{A71}, 032104 (2005)) and show how it depends on the operating conditions of the experiment. We also discuss some additional issues.

Authors A. L. Barabanov; R. Golub; S. K. Lamoreaux

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

356

Some applications of mirror-generated electric potentials to alternative fusion concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient electrical potentials can be generated in plasmas by utilizing impulsive mirror-generated forces acting on the plasma electrons together with ion inertia to cause momentary charge imbalance. In the Mirrortron such potentials are generated by applying a rapidly rising (tens of nanoseconds) localized mirror field to the central region of a hot-electron plasma confined between static mirrors. Because of the loss-cone nature of the electron distribution the sudden appearance of the pulsed mirror tends to expel electrons, whereas the ion density remains nearly constant. The quasi-neutrality condition then operates to create an electrical potential the equipotential surfaces of which can be shown theoretically to be congruent with surfaces of constant B. An alternative way of generating transient potentials is to apply a pulse of high-power microwaves to a plasma residing on a magnetic field with a longitudinal gradient. This technique resembles one employed in the Pleiade experiments. At gigawatt power levels, such as those produced by a Free Electron Laser, the production of very high transient potentials is predicted. Fusion-relevant applications of these ideas include heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion, and the possibility of employing these techniques to enhance the longitudinal confinement of fusion plasmas in multiple-mirror systems. 23 refs., 3 figs.

Post, R.F.

1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fusion Website  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Basics Fusion Intro Fusion Education Research DIII-D Internal Site Opportunities Virtual DIII-D Collaborators Countries Physics Eng Physics Operations Diagnostics Computing IFT IFT Site ITER ITER Site FDF Theory Collaborators Conferences GA-Hosted Room Reservations Fusion Meetings Plasma Publications Presentations Images Brochures Posters Movies Corporate General Atomics Products Visitor GA Fusion Hotels Internal Users GA Internal Site DIII-D General Experimental Science Experimental Science Home 2013 Experimental Campaign Burning Plasma Physics Dynamics & Control Boundary and Pedestal ELM Control Operations Diagnostics Computing Support Visitors DIII-D Web Access Help IFT ITER-GA Theory Research Highlights Personnel Links Policies Safety Comp Support Trouble Ticket Eng/Design Fusion Webmail Phone Book

358

Fusion breeder  

SciTech Connect

The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

Moir, R.W.

1982-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fusion breeder  

SciTech Connect

The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

Moir, R.W.

1982-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

2011 Confined Space Program Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Confined Space Entry Program Update Confined Space Entry Program Update IMPORTANT: After reading this document, click the "Get Course Credit" link at the bottom of the page. You will then log in to the EHS training system using your LDAP to get course credit. LBNL's confined space entry program was substantially improved this year. Several new features have been included which improve overall safety for Confined Space Entrants and better align the confined space entry program with the OSHA requirements. As an Activity Lead, Confined Space Entrant or Entry Supervisor, you should be aware of the following: We improved the procedures for safely working in confined spaces. Please review the new Chapter 34 in Publication 3000. Additionally, we have a new planning tool known as the confined space inventory which is a registry of LBNL's confined spaces, their potential hazards and safe work procedures unique to a particular confined space.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Peaceful uses of fusion  

SciTech Connect

Applications a thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and when once brought under control are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low--specific-yield formations are also suggested.

Teller, E.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Ceramics for fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors.

Clinard, F.W. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Scientific problems of fusion, solved and to be solved  

SciTech Connect

A good comprehensive review of research progress and the present status of research on inertial confinement, tokamak device, and magnetic mirror technology is given. (MOW)

Post, R.F.

1977-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fusion Implementation  

SciTech Connect

If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

J.A. Schmidt

2002-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Aspects of stellarator confinement scaling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive discussion has been made concerning stellarator experimental confinement scaling and the extrapolation to reactor systems. Two features are discussed here: (1) The role of hydrogen-impurity interactions. (2) The neoclassical (bootstrap) current has been invoked as an argument against the possibility of optimizing the stellarator magnetic configuration to reach high ..beta... It is felt that significant bootstrap current production under conditions of high ..beta.. will dominate the vacuum fields. In this regard, a brief summary is presented of a comparison made between ISX-B high-..beta.. data and the neoclassical predictions. The non-neoclassical rates of electron pitch-angle scattering serve to destroy this current, and are evidently responsible for a lack of evidence for the bootstrap current under conditions in tokamaks where a large effect is expected.

Hogan, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Economic potential of inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents.

Nuckolls, J.H.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

2XIIB plasma confinement experiments  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports results of 2XIIB neutral-beam injection experiments with plasma-stream stabilization. The plasma stream is provided either by a pulsed plasma generator located on the field lines outside the plasma region or by ionization of neutral gas introduced at the mirror throat. In the latter case, the gas is ionized by the normal particle flux through the magnetic mirror. A method of plasma startup and sustenance in a steady-state magnetic field is reported in which the plasma stream from the pulsed plasma generator serves as the initial target for the neutral beams. After an energetic plasma of sufficient density is established, the plasma generator stream is replaced by the gas-fed stream. Lifetimes of the stabilized plasma increase with plasma temperature in agreement with the plasma stabilization of the drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode. The following plasma parameters are attained using the pulsed plasma generator for stabilization: n approximately 5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, anti W/sub i/ approximately 13 keV, T/sub e/ = 140 eV, and ntau/sub p/ approximately 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s. With the gas feed, the mean deuterium ion energy is 9 keV and the peak density n approximately 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. In the latter case, the energy confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub E/ = 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s, and the particle confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub p/ = 1 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/.s.

Coensgen, F.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Correll, D.L.

1976-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

Assisted fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of nuclear fusion consisting of a wave packet impinging into a well located between square one dimensional barriers is treated analytically. The wave function inside the well is calculated exactly for the assisted tunneling induced by a perturbation mimicking a constant electric field with arbitrary time dependence. Conditions are found for the enhancement of fusion.

German K鋖bermann

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Thermal aspects of a superconducting coil for fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Computer models are used to simulate both localized and extensive thermal excursions in a large superconducting magnet for fusion reactor. Conditions for the failure of fusion magnet due to thermal excursion are delineated. Designs to protect the magnet against such thermal excursion are evaluated. (auth)

Yeh, H.T.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy.

Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Automated laser fusion target production concept  

SciTech Connect

A target production concept is described for the production of multilayered cryogenic spherical inertial confinement fusion targets. The facility is to deliver targets to the reactor chamber at rates up to 10 per second and at costs consistent with economic production of power.

Hendricks, C.D.

1977-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

Purdue Contribution of Fusion Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect

The overall science goal of the FSP is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in research related to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical areas: 1) the plasma edge and 2) whole device modeling including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model (WDM) will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP. The FSP plan targets the needed modeling capabilities by developing Integrated Science Applications (ISAs) specific to their needs. The Pedestal-Boundary model will include boundary magnetic topology, cross-field transport of multi-species plasmas, parallel plasma transport, neutral transport, atomic physics and interactions with the plasma wall. It will address the origins and structure of the plasma electric field, rotation, the L-H transition, and the wide variety of pedestal relaxation mechanisms. The Whole Device Model will predict the entire discharge evolution given external actuators (i.e., magnets, power supplies, heating, current drive and fueling systems) and control strategies. Based on components operating over a range of physics fidelity, the WDM will model the plasma equilibrium, plasma sources, profile evolution, linear stability and nonlinear evolution toward a disruption (but not the full disruption dynamics). The plan assumes that, as the FSP matures and demonstrates success, the program will evolve and grow, enabling additional science problems to be addressed. The next set of integration opportunities could include: 1) Simulation of disruption dynamics and their effects; 2) Prediction of core profile including 3D effects, mesoscale dynamics and integration with the edge plasma; 3) Computation of non-thermal particle distributions, self-consistent with fusion, radio frequency (RF) and neutral beam injection (NBI) sources, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and short-wavelength turbulence.

Jeffrey Brooks

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fusion energy applied to synthetic fuel production: a report to the DOE Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy based on a preliminary study by an ad-hoc advisory group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general conclusion is that the potential for utilization of fusion energy for synthetic fuel production is favorable. Three basic methods of hydrogen production are identified: high-temperature electrolysis, thermochemical cycles, and direct radiolysis. Combinations of these and their use as in combined cycles for electric power generation are considered.

Booth, L.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Control of Hamiltonian chaos as a possible tool to control anomalous transport in fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that a relevant control of Hamiltonian chaos is possible through suitable small perturbations whose form can be explicitly computed. In particular, it is possible to control (reduce) the chaotic diffusion in the phase space of a Hamiltonian system with 1.5 degrees of freedom which models the diffusion of charged test particles in a turbulent electric field across the confining magnetic field in controlled thermonuclear fusion devices. Though still far from practical applications, this result suggests that some strategy to control turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas, in particular tokamaks, is conceivable. The robustness of the control is investigated in terms of a departure from the optimum magnitude, of a varying cut-off at large wave vectors, and of random errors on the phases of the modes. In all three cases, there is a significant region of maximum efficiency in the vicinity of the optimum control term.

G. Ciraolo; F. Briolle; C. Chandre; E. Floriani; R. Lima; M. Vittot; M. Pettini; C. Figarella; P. Ghendrih

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Data security on the national fusion grid  

SciTech Connect

The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Security on the US Fusion Grid  

SciTech Connect

The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Status of inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

The technology advancement to high-power beams has also given birth to new technologies. That class of Free Electron Lasers that employs rf linacs, synchrotrons, and storage rings - although the use the tools of High Energy Physics (HEP) - was developed well behind the kinetic energy frontier. The induction linac, however, is something of an exception; it was born directly from the needs of the magnetic fusion program, and was not motivated by a high-energy physics application. The heavy-ion approach to inertial fusion starts with picking from the rich menu of accelerator technologies those that have, ab initio, the essential ingredients needed for a power plant driver: multigap acceleration - which leads to reliability/lifetime; electrical efficiency; repetition rate; and beams that can be reliably focused over a suitably long distance. The report describes the programs underway in Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research as well as listing expected advances in driver, target, and beam quality areas in the inertial fusion power program.

Keefe, D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Heavy-Ion Fusion Science (HIFS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gain of energy. Instead of using enormous lasers (as in laser fusion) or magnets (as in ITER) to cause the fuel pellet to compress, the idea is to use a very high-current particle...

379

Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Dynamic Instruction Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC INSTRUCTION FUSION A thesis submitted in4 2.2 Instruction Fusion & Complex10 3.1 Fusion Selection

Lee, Ian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Minimal fusion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We define minimal fusion systems in a way that every non-solvable fusion system has a section which is minimal. Minimal fusion systems can also be (more)

Henke, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

"50" Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

路 Steady-state operation is a highly desirable characteristic for a magnetic fusion power plant with toroidal multipole at GA 1966 #12;Four New Superconducting Tokamaks will Address Steady- State Advanced by Sakharov in the early 50s). 颅 Wave propagation became basis for RF heating 路 Experimental Progress (some

384

Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breeding ratio from the separate zone blanket option with different neutron multipliers (internally cooled. Liquid Metal a. liquid metal as breeder and coolant b. liquid metal as breeder and a separate coolant 2. Solid Breeder (with separate coolant). The candidate liquid metals are lithium, Li,yPbg., and Li

Abdou, Mohamed

385

Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: S. Baron, Burns & Roe, Inc., Oradell, N.J. H. K. Forsen, Exxon Nuclear Co., Inc., Bellevue, Wash. M

Harilal, S. S.

386

Magnetic Divertor for Low Plasma Recycling in Tokamaks Ernesto Mazzucato |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Divertor for Low Plasma Recycling in Tokamaks Ernesto Mazzucato Magnetic Divertor for Low Plasma Recycling in Tokamaks Ernesto Mazzucato Existing experiments indicate that low recycling of exhausted particles can improve the energy confinement in tokamaks, very likely by preventing the cooling of the plasma edge and thereby causing a reduction in the level of plasma turbulence. This can reduce the size of a tokamak fusion reactor, making the latter a more viable source of energy. The necessary conditions for low recycling can be achieved with the use of a new magnetic divertor, where the exhausted particles are injected through a narrow aperture into a large chamber. Exhausting the particles into a large chamber prevents their return to the plasma, resulting in a reduction in plasma recycling to a level where existing experiments have shown a large enhancement in plasma

387

Fusion pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Pappas, D.S.

1987-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 21, 2003 #12;2 Statements to FESAC IFE panel 10/28/03 路 Ignition is a major goal for NNSA supports OFES's mission and OFES use of NNSA's ICF facilities is accepted 路 Defense Programs reserves right: Provide mission need report for the proposed OMEGA Extended Performance project. 路 October 2002: NNSA

389

Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature Radius Massdensity Hot spot Burn wave Ablator DT ice #12;A-beam smoothing is critical to ICF ignition I1771 EO phase modulator Grating Amplifiers Grating Focusing optics Angular dispersion f Oscillator Phase Plates1 Measured far field of an OMEGA indirect-drive phase plate

390

Double-shell inertial confinement fusion target fabrication  

SciTech Connect

First generation hemishells, from which spherical shells are constructed, were fabricated by micromachining coated mandrels and by molding. The remachining of coated mandrels are described in detail. Techniques were developed for coating the microsized mandrels with polymeric and metallic materials by methods including conformal coating, vapor deposition, plasma polymerization and thermoforming. Micropositioning equipment and bonding techniques have also been developed to assemble the hemishells about a fuel pellet maintaining a spherical concentricity of better than 2 ..mu..m and voids in the hemishell bonding line of a few hundred angstroms or less.

Hatcher, C.W.; Lorensen, L.E.; Weinstein, B.W.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

391

Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

required to support the nuclear weapon stockpile. ICF's experimental capabilities are an essential component of the overall NNSA plan to manage the assessment of nuclear...

392

ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Humphries, Jr. , Sandia Laboratories Report SANO 80-0402effort in this area is at Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerquebeing developed at Sandia Laboratories, Alburquerque,'

Faltens, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ITER is a type of fusion reactor that use toroidal magneticreactor core. Simulations of magnetically confined fusion

Garth, Christoph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on fusion devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For fusion, obtaining reliable measurements of basic plasma parameters like ion and electron densities and temperatures is a primary goal. For theory, measurements are needed as a function of time and space to understand plasma transport and confinement with the ultimate goal of achieving economic nuclear fusion power. Electron profile measurements and plasma spectroscopy for the plasma ions are introduced. With the advent of Neutral Beam auxiliary plasma heating, Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy provides accurate and time resolved measurements of the ions in large volume fusion devices. In acknowledgement of Nicol Peacock's role in the development of these techniques, still at the forefront of plasma fusion research, this paper describes the evolution of this diagnostic method.

Duval, B. P. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Status of 2XIIB plasma confinement experiments  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status of 2XIIB neutral beam injection experiments with stabilizing plasma. The stream suppresses ion-cyclotron fluctuations and permits density to 5 x 10$sup 13$ cm$sup -3$. The ion energy is 13 keV, and electron temperature reaches 140 eV. Plasma confinement increases with ion energy and n tau reaches 7 x 10$sup 10$ cm$sup -3$.s at 13 keV. The n tau energy scaling is consistent with electron drag and ion-ion scattering losses. Buildup on a streaming plasma in a steady-state magnetic field is described. (auth)

Coensgen, F. J.; Clauser, J. F.; Correll, D. L.

1976-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... imaging, tomographic reconstruction, magnetohydrodynamics, transport and turbulence studies in magnetically confined fusion plasma research. ...

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream  

SciTech Connect

In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

Clayton, E.D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Heating, Confinement and Extrapolation to Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status of Fusion / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

J. Ongena; A. M. Messiaen

400

magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I I Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Midterm Summary of Japan-US Fusion Cooperation Program TITAN  

SciTech Connect

Japan-US cooperation program TITAN (Tritium, Irradiation and Thermofluid for America and Nippon) started in April 2007 as 6-year project. This is the summary report at the midterm of the project. Historical overview of the Japan-US cooperation programs and direction of the TITAN project in its second half are presented in addition to the technical highlights. Blankets are component systems whose principal functions are extraction of heat and tritium. Thus it is crucial to clarify the potentiality for controlling heat and tritium flow throughout the first wall, blanket and out-of-vessel recovery systems. The TITAN project continues the JUPITER-II activity but extends its scope including the first wall and the recovery systems with the title of 'Tritium and thermofluid control for magnetic and inertial confinement systems'. The objective of the program is to clarify the mechanisms of tritium and heat transfer throughout the first-wall, the blanket and the heat/tritium recovery systems under specific conditions to fusion such as irradiation, high heat flux, circulation and high magnetic fields. Based on integrated models, the breeding, transfer, inventory of tritium and heat extraction properties will be evaluated for some representative liquid breeder blankets and the necessary database will be obtained for focused research in the future.

Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sze, Dai-Kai [University of California, San Diego; Sokolov, Mikhail [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Atomic data for beam-stimulated plasma spectroscopy in fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Injection of high energy atoms into a confined plasma volume is an established diagnostic technique in fusion research. This method strongly depends on the quality of atomic data for charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS), motional Stark effect (MSE) and beam-emission spectroscopy (BES). We present some examples of atomic data for CXRS and review the current status of collisional data for parabolic states of hydrogen atoms that are used for accurate MSE modeling. It is shown that the collisional data require knowledge of the excitation density matrix including the off-diagonal matrix elements. The new datasets for transitions between parabolic states are used in an extended collisional-radiative model. The ratios between the {sigma}- and {pi}-components and the beam-emission rate coefficients are calculated in a quasi-steady state approximation. Good agreement with the experimental data from JET is found which points out to strong deviations from the statistical distribution for magnetic sublevels.

Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Schlummer, T. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ralchenko, Yu. [Quantum Measurement Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8422 (United States); Schultz, D. R. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Collaboration: TEXTOR Team

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Inertial fusion: strategy and economic potential  

SciTech Connect

Inertial fusion must demonstrate that the high target gains required for practical fusion energy can be achieved with driver energies not larger than a few megajoules. Before a multi-megajoule scale driver is constructed, inertial fusion must provide convincing experimental evidence that the required high target gains are feasible. This will be the principal objective of the NOVA laser experiments. Implosions will be conducted with scaled targets which are nearly hydrodynamically equivalent to the high gain target implosions. Experiments which demonstrate high target gains will be conducted in the early nineties when multi-megajoule drivers become available. Efficient drivers will also be demonstrated by this time period. Magnetic fusion may demonstrate high Q at about the same time as inertial fusion demonstrates high gain. Beyond demonstration of high performance fusion, economic considerations will predominate. Fusion energy will achieve full commercial success when it becomes cheaper than fission and coal. Analysis of the ultimate economic potential of inertial fusion suggests its costs may be reduced to half those of fission and coal. Relative cost escalation would increase this advantage. Fusions potential economic advantage derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy (which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity).

Nuckolls, J.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

EBT electron energy confinement experiments  

SciTech Connect

Plasma parameters as measured in the EBT-S device are presented together with a description of ECH power modulation techniques applied to investigate the confinement properties of the EBT plasma.

Wilgen, J.B.; Richards, R.K.; Hillis, D.L.; Swain, D.W.; White, T.L.; Peterson, B.G.; Baity, F.W.; Berry, L.A.; Casson, W.H.; Cobble, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

Fowler, T. Kenneth (Walnut Creek, CA)

1978-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

MIT Plasma Fusion Sciences Center IAP Seminar! Jan 10th, 2012!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIT Plasma Fusion Sciences Center IAP Seminar! Jan 10th, 2012! ! ! ! ! ! Otto Landen! Associate-07NA27344 Inertial Confinement Fusion Physics and Challenges*! #12;The NIF ignition experiments-degenerate fuel Spherical collapse of the shell produces a central hot spot surrounded by cold, dense main fuel

407

THE CONCEPT OF ISOCHORIC CENTRAL SPARK IGNITION AND ITS FUEL GAIN IN INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE CONCEPT OF ISOCHORIC CENTRAL SPARK IGNITION AND ITS FUEL GAIN IN INERTIAL FUSION of the best methods in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is the concept of central spark ignition, consisting of two distinct regions named as hot and cold regions and formed by hydro-dynamical implosion of fuel

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

408

University of California, San Diego UCSD-ENG-090 Fusion Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: A Stationary Inertial-Confinement Fusion Reactor with Non- vaporizing Walls," 13th IEEE Symposium on Fusion) compressible response to impulsive loading on wavy free surfaces, and (3) energy deposition, phase change energy density 200 kJ/m3 Laser propagation limits laser intensity compression beam 1014~1015 W/cm2

Krstic, Miroslav

409

Failure rate data for fusion safety and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducts safety research in materials, chemical reactions, safety analysis, risk assessment, and in component research and development to support existing magnetic fusion experiments and also to promote safety in the design of future experiments. One of the areas of safety research is applying probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods to fusion experiments. To apply PRA, we need a fusion-relevant radiological dose code and a component failure rate data base. This paper describes the FSP effort to develop a failure rate data base for fusion-specific components.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Failure rate data for fusion safety and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducts safety research in materials, chemical reactions, safety analysis, risk assessment, and in component research and development to support existing magnetic fusion experiments and also to promote safety in the design of future experiments. One of the areas of safety research is applying probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods to fusion experiments. To apply PRA, we need a fusion-relevant radiological dose code and a component failure rate data base. This paper describes the FSP effort to develop a failure rate data base for fusion-specific components.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Latent Matcher Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Latent Matcher Fusion -- Lessons Learned IAI ... 14 Page 15. The Fusion was in Two Steps Step 1 a reduced working candidate list was ...

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

International information exchange in fusion research  

SciTech Connect

Formal and informal agreements exist between the US and several other countries, assuring the unrestricted exchange of magnetic fusion information. The Fusion Energy Library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory uses the US Department of Energy standard distribution system and exchange agreements to ensure the receipt of current reports. Selective dissemination of information, computer networks, and exchange programs are additional means for information gathering. The importance of these means as they relate to the fusion program in the US and specifically at ORNL is discussed.

Strickler, C.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Model Comparison in Plasma Energy Confinement Scaling revisited  

SciTech Connect

Already in 1998 we presented on a MaxEnt conference a Bayesian model comparison for the confinement scaling of fusion devices. The reason to visit this field again is an over the years enlarged data basis facilitating new physical insights. We compare up to ten physical models on the basis of the old (low-{beta}) data of the 1998 approach and newly acquired high-{beta} data. This work serves as an example where the prior odds cannot be set constant (as would be the normal procedure) but has to be furnished with physics information.

Preuss, R.; Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

414

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated simulation of a fusion reactor Accurately detectin magnetic -confinement-fusion reactor simulation for whichsimulation of a fusion reactor is beyond the capability of

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 (2004) 121 PII: S0741-3335(04)82842-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion.1088/0741-3335/46/1/. . . Abstract Hydrogenic fast-ion populations are common in toroidal magnetic fusion AQ1 devices, especially compared with the signals from the injected neutrals, the warm (halo) neutrals and the cold edge neutrals

Heidbrink, William W.

416

Inertial fusion: an energy-production option for the future  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the inertial-confinement approach to fusion energy. After explaining the fundamentals of fusion, they describe the state of the art of fusion experiments, emphasizing the results achieved through the use of neodymium-doped glass lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at other laboratories. They highlight recent experimental results confirming theoretical predictions that short-wavelength lasers have excellent energy absorption on fuel pellets. Compressions of deuterium-tritium fuel of over 100 times liquid density have been measured, only a factor of 10 away from the compression required for a commercial reactor. Finally, it is shown how to exploit the unique characteristics of inertial fusion to design reactor chambers that have a very high power density and a long life, features that the authors believe will eventually lead to fusion power at a competitive cost.

Hovingh, J.; Pitts, J.H.; Monsler, M.J.; Grow, G.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fusion pumped laser  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Taylor/FESAC Priorities/July 18, 2012 Fusion Energy Science Program Priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/FESAC Priorities/July 18, 2012 Burning Plasma Research In ITER Is the Top Priority On the Path to Magnetic Fusion

419

CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

DUFTY J W

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

Not Available

1987-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnetic confinement fusion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A probabilistic model for the identification of confinement regimes and edge localized mode behavior, with implications to scaling laws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pattern recognition is becoming an important tool in fusion data analysis. However, fusion diagnostic measurements are often affected by considerable statistical uncertainties, rendering the extraction of useful patterns a significant challenge. Therefore, we assume a probabilistic model for the data and perform pattern recognition in the space of probability distributions. We show the considerable advantage of our method for identifying confinement regimes and edge localized mode behavior, and we discuss the potential for scaling laws.

Verdoolaege, Geert; Van Oost, Guido [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fusion energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

1973-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Review Whyte, D. The Role of the Boundary in Defining the Viability of Magnetic Fusion Energy Invited Orals Cziegler, I. Fluctuating Zonal Flows in I-Mode in Alcator...

425

The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study  

SciTech Connect

This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010) 014003 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/1/014003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creation. References [1] Tamm I.E. 1959 Theory of the magnetic thermonuclear reactor, part I Plasma Physics.D. Theory of magnetic thermonuclear reactor, part 2 Plasma Physics and the Problem of ControlledIOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010) 014003

427

Quark confinement and hadronic interactions  

SciTech Connect

A study of quark models for many-hadron systems is presented. The starting point in the construction of these nonrelativistic models is a proper formal definition of the concept of color singlet and nonsinglet clusters in a multiquark system which respects the exchange symmetry of the quarks. This definition provides a natural way to impose saturation of the confining forces.

Lenz, F.; Londergan, J.T.; Moniz, E.J.; Rosenfelder, R.; Stingl, M.; Yazaki, K.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

Rainer W. Kuehne

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

Kuehne, R W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Pinch-based thermonuclear D{sup 3}He fusion driven by a femtosecond laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new thermonuclear-fusion concept involving inertial-magnetic confinement on the basis of a high-current Z pinch and employing a powerful femtosecond laser is proposed. The possibility of implementing this scheme for the production of energy in a compressed liner consisting of a D{sup 3}He fuel contained inside a {sup 9}Be shell is considered. It is shown that the concerted effect of the electric discharge along the liner and an ultrashort laser shot at one of the liner endfaces provides preconditions for an ultrafast ignition of a small portion of the fuel and for the onset of the propagation of a burn wave along a plasma filament. Under favorable conditions, this system provides an energy gain of about 50, the contribution of the neutron component here being only a few percent. Basic mechanisms of the heating and confinement of the D{sup 3}He fuel are discussed along with the problem of convenient gamma-ray plasma diagnostics.

Kukulin, V. I.; Voronchev, V. T. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Code MFE Magnetic Fusion Energy MOX Mixed Oxide NES Nuclearreprocessing mixed oxide (MOX) fuels, as will be discussedbegun using Mixed ox- ide or MOX fuel as a means of both

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Review of fusion synfuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

Fillo, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed. (auth)

Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop 2000 (Book of Abstracts)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion VehicleTorus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle

Celata, Christine; Accelerator and Fusion Research Staff

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents  

SciTech Connect

Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fusion Forum 1981  

SciTech Connect

This review covers the basics of the fusion process. Some research programs and their present status are mentioned. (MOW)

Fowler, T.K.

1981-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Despite the cold war, which raged for another 30 years, controlled fusion research became a modelFusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, John Webster - editor, published by John Wiley & Sons, New York (1999) #12;Controlled Fusion For half a century

Greenwald, Martin

439

How much laser power can propagate through fusion plasma?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propagation of intense laser beams is crucial for inertial confinement fusion, which requires precise beam control to achieve the compression and heating necessary to ignite the fusion reaction. The National Ignition Facility (NIF), where fusion will be attempted, is now under construction. Control of intense beam propagation may be ruined by laser beam self-focusing. We have identified the maximum laser beam power that can propagate through fusion plasma without significant self-focusing and have found excellent agreement with recent experimental data, and suggest a way to increase that maximum by appropriate choice of plasma composition with implication for NIF designs. Our theory also leads to the prediction of anti-correlation between beam spray and backscatter and suggests the indirect control of backscatter through manipulation of plasma ionization state or acoustic damping.

Pavel M. Lushnikov; Harvey A. Rose

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions, can be used to separate radioactive fission products from nuclear waste or from spent nuclear fuel in a nonproliferative manner....