National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for magnetic confinement fusion

  1. Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Status and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Status and Challenges S. Prager University of Wisconsin February, 2005 #12;Two approaches to fusion Inertial confinement extremely dense, short-lived Magnetic by centrifugal force of particles moving along curved magnetic field plasma magnetic field Centrifugal force #12

  2. Magnetic Confinement Fusion at the Crossroads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Matterhorn initiated at Princeton 1950s Classified US Project Sherwood on controlled thermonuclear fusionMagnetic Confinement Fusion at the Crossroads Michael Bell Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;MGB / UT / 070307 2 The Beginnings of Fusion Energy Research 1928 Concept of fusion reactions

  3. The Requirements for Collision Data on the Species Helium, Beryllium and Boron in Magnetic Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Requirements for Collision Data on the Species Helium, Beryllium and Boron in Magnetic Confinement Fusion

  4. Latest Developments in Image Processing Methods and Technologies for Magnetic Confinement Nuclear Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latest Developments in Image Processing Methods and Technologies for Magnetic Confinement Nuclear Fusion

  5. Inertial confinement fusion implosions with imposed magnetic field compression using the OMEGA Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inertial confinement fusion implosions with imposed magnetic field compression using the OMEGA of solid and gaseous samples to diagnose inertial confinement fusion implosions Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83://pop.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Inertial confinement fusion implosions with imposed magnetic field compression using the OMEGA

  6. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

  7. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  8. Thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion and comparison with magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betti, R.; Chang, P. Y.; Anderson, K. S.; Nora, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Spears, B. K.; Edwards, J.; Lindl, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fatenejad, M. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Shvarts, D. [NRCN, Negev and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84015 (Israel)

    2010-05-15

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA[T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptauapprox1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptauapprox1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (Tapprox2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chiapprox0.02-0.03 is approx5x lower than in JET (chiapprox0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  9. Intermittency and turbulence in a magnetically confined fusion plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Carbone; L. Sorriso-Valvo; E. Martines; V. Antoni; P. Veltri

    2001-01-30

    We investigate the intermittency of magnetic turbulence as measured in Reversed Field Pinch plasmas. We show that the Probability Distribution Functions of magnetic field differences are not scale invariant, that is the wings of these functions are more important at the smallest scales, a classical signature of intermittency. We show that scaling laws appear also in a region very close to the external wall of the confinement device, and we present evidences that the observed intermittency increases moving towards the wall.

  10. Multiscale methods for analyzing and computing fluid and plasma turbulence: Applications to magnetically confined plasmas in fusion devices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Kai

    to magnetically confined plasmas in fusion devices. The optimization of many industrial processes requires in the case of magnetically confined plasmas encountered in tokamaks. The understanding of confinement of the confinement determines the performance of the device. Plasma turbulence shares numerous properties with fluid

  11. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. This observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  12. The roadmap to magnetic confinement fusion Cutaway of the ITER tokamak. ( ITER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    The roadmap to magnetic confinement fusion Cutaway of the ITER tokamak. (© ITER) There are two ways "tokamak" configuration invented by Tamm and Sakharov in 1950 and declassified in 1957 [1] . Over 198 tokamaks have been built [2] . Four large tokamak projects were built in the 1980s. Two of these

  13. Fusion in a magnetically-shielded-grid inertial electrostatic confinement device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedditch, John; Khachan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented that shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively-biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  14. Issues and Paths to Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roadmap in a nutshell MST = Mid-scale tokamak IC = Interna-onal Collabora Roadmap in a nutshell MST = Mid-scale tokamak IC = Interna-onal Collabora (CN) FNS (US) Europe's new fusion roadmap: · Eight strategic missions

  15. On anomalous plasma transport in the edge of magnetic confinement devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angus, Justin Ray

    2012-01-01

    promising magnetic confinement devices for a fusion reactorthermonuclear fusion in magnetic confinement devices.what is fusion energy, how do magnetic confinement devices

  16. Evidence for a New Path to the Self-Sustainment of the Thermonuclear Fusion Reactions in Magnetically Confined Burning Plasma Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evidence for a New Path to the Self-Sustainment of the Thermonuclear Fusion Reactions in Magnetically Confined Burning Plasma Experiments

  17. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang Xianzhu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the {nabla}n{sub e} Multiplication-Sign {nabla}T{sub e} term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  18. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2?10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  19. Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments & Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments & Modeling Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Thin Does Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Work? A spherical capsule filled with fuel (deuterium Laboratory) #12;Outline I. What is Fusion? II. How does Inertial Fusion work? The physics of indirect

  20. Studies of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF and magnetic reconnection using laser-produced plasmas at OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ion kinetic effects during the shock-convergence phase of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven, laser-produced plasmas have been facilitated by the use of ...

  1. Status of inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schriever, R.L. (Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (USA))

    1987-12-01

    Technical, institutional, and financial assessments are made of inertial confinement fusion programs in the United States. Among the programs discussed are the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator at Sandia, the AURORA facility at Los Alamos, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the OMEGA glass laser system and facility, and the fusion research program at the University of Rochester. Target, diagnostic, heating, and other areas of research are discussed. Prospects for the future of fusion research within the context of the current energy scenario in the country are evaluated.

  2. Elliptical magnetic mirror generated via resistivity gradients for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    The elliptical magnetic mirror scheme for guiding fast electrons for Fast Ignition proposed by Schmitz et al. (Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085016 (2012)) is studied for conditions on the multi-kJ scale which are much closer to full-scale Fast Ignition. When scaled up, the elliptical mirror scheme is still highly beneficial to Fast Ignition. An increase in the coupling efficiency by a factor of 3–4 is found over a wide range of fast electron divergence half-angles.

  3. Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, R. C. (Ronald C.)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion conditions is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion.

  4. Field-reversed Configuration Plasma for Magnetized Target Fusion Manuscript received September 8, 2005. Revised January 16, 2006. This work was supported by the Department of Energy--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . INTRODUCTION Approaches to plasma fusion research are usually categorized as either Magnetic confinement Fusion

  5. ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION Andris Faltens,ENERGY PRODUCTION VIA INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSIONFor inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to lead to net energy

  6. Interplay between confinement, turbulence and magnetic topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    Alcator C-Mod Interplay between confinement, turbulence and magnetic topology Nils P. Basse, S. Zoletnik1, W. L. Rowan2 et al. MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center 1KFKI-RMKI, Euratom Association, Budapest, Hungary 2Fusion Research Center, University of Texas at Austin This idea originates from density

  7. Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woolley, Robert D. (Belle Mead, NJ)

    1999-01-01

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  8. Abstract--The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is a new, innovative magnetic confinement fusion experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Darren T.

    pressure helium vessel. The pressure vessel is surrounded by a large thermal mass radiation shield and the shield are equipped with a tube heat exchanger for initial nitrogen magnet cooling and daily helium re -4 - 10 -8 torr during normal operation. The cryostat is able to operate with its outside pressure

  9. Superconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V. Minervini and Miklos Porkolab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    enabling technology for magnetic confinement fusion devices. Powerful magnetsSuperconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V are required for plasma confinement, and, depending on the magnetic configuration

  10. Superconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaithersburg Marriott Washingtonian Center #12;Magnet Technology Enables Magnetic Confinement Fusion · MagnetsSuperconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V. Minervini, Leslie are an essential component for magnetic fusion energy. · Advances in magnet technology are needed to fulfill

  11. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  12. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  13. Superconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V. Minervini1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are the ultimate enabling technology for magnetic confinement fusion devices. PowerfulSuperconducting Magnets Research for a Viable US Fusion Program Joseph V. Minervini1 , Leslie magnetic fields are required for confinement of the plasma, and, depending

  14. Inertial Confinement Fusion R&D and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28

    In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R&D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

  15. The Dipole Fusion Confinement Concept: A White Paper for the Fusion Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that accompanied strong magnetic and electric fluctuations in planetary magnetospheres represented a fundamental and neutron stars. The use of a dipole magnetic field generated by a levitated ring to confine a hot plasma for fusion power generation was first considered by Akira Hasegawa after participating in the Voyager 2

  16. An experiment to test centrifugal confinement for fusion* R. F. Ellis, A. B. Hassam,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassam, Adil

    An experiment to test centrifugal confinement for fusion* R. F. Ellis, A. B. Hassam, S. Messer forces from supersonic rotation to augment conventional magnetic confinement. Optimizing this ``knob confine plasmas to desired regions of shaped magnetic fields; second, the accompanying large velocity

  17. PLASMA CONFINEMENT IN A MAGNETIC DIPOLE* J. KESNER AND L. BROMBERG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    requires 10 times the confinement required for DT ignition). Since the magnetic field of a dipole1 PLASMA CONFINEMENT IN A MAGNETIC DIPOLE* J. KESNER AND L. BROMBERG Plasma Science and Fusion the magnetic pressure, > 1. A dipole fusion confinement device takes advantage of these properties

  18. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-fusion have opposite strategies for meeting this criterion. Magnetic confinement

  19. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  20. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woolley, Robert D. (Hillsborough, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  1. Cadwallader, L.C. 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; MAGNETIC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Selected component failure rate values from fusion safety assessment tasks Cadwallader, L.C. 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT; THERMONUCLEAR DEVICES;...

  2. Development of the B-Stark motional Stark effect diagnostic for measurements of the internal magnetic field in the DIII-D tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablant, Novimir Antoniuk

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Magnetic confinement fusion . . . . . . . . . . 1.2Stokes vector magnetic confinement fusion, 1 magnetic fieldare discussed. Magnetic confinement fusion The goal of

  3. Nuclear diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1997-11-01

    This abstract contains viewgraphs on nuclear diagnostic techniques for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The viewgraphs contain information on: reactions of interest in ICF; advantages and disadvantages of these methods; the properties nuclear techniques can measure; and some specifics on the detectors used.

  4. Lasers and Inertial Confinement Fusion in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermonuclear device began the Inertial Confinement Fusion Era I1860 · StanislawUlamandEdward Teller developedLasers and Inertial Confinement Fusion in the United States R. L. McCrory Director and Vice Provost confinement fusion (ICF) has grown as successively larger lasers have been built I1859 · The

  5. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

  6. Turbulence and Transport The Secrets of Magnetic Confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwald, Martin

    better analogy for fusion energy: Heating a building E Total stored energy Joules Heating rate WattsTurbulence and Transport The Secrets of Magnetic Confinement Martin Greenwald - MIT Plasma Science: (sec) ( ) ( / sec) Volume of water gallons Source rate gallons #12;ENERGY CONFINEMENT A slightly

  7. MFE Concept Integration and Performance Measures Magnetic Fusion Concept Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFE Concept Integration and Performance Measures Magnetic Fusion Concept Working Group Contributors. Simonen, T. Thorson INTRODUCTION This subgroup of the Magnetic Fusion Concepts Working Group discussed the plans for developing the major magnetic confinement concepts: standard pulsed tokamak, advanced tokamak

  8. Magnetically Catalyzed Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy S. Heyl; Lars Hernquist

    1996-08-25

    We calculate the reaction cross-sections for the fusion of hydrogen and deuterium in strong magnetic fields as are believed to exist in the atmospheres of neutron stars. We find that in the presence of a strong magnetic field ($B \\gsim 10^{12}$G), the reaction rates are many orders of magnitude higher than in the unmagnetized case. The fusion of both protons and deuterons are important over a neutron star's lifetime for ultrastrong magnetic fields ($B \\sim 10^{16}$G). The enhancement may have dramatic effects on thermonuclear runaways and bursts on the surfaces of neutron stars.

  9. Comments on the Status of and Future Possibilities for the U. S. Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the plasma interacts with a wall that is closely located to the body of the plasma. This area may also, it is dominated by research on the tokamak approach. That particular approach has now been studied for nearly that the cross-field diffusion constants in the best tokamak confinement studies are four to five orders larger

  10. STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION BY A SINGLE WAVE IN A MAGNETIZED PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    augmented magnetic-mirror confinement," Nucl. Fusion B. V.to thermonuclear fusion by means of magnetic confinement

  11. High Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaeyoung; Sieck, Paul E; Offermann, Dustin T; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when beta (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is order of unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high beta a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. The current experiment validates this theoretical conjecture for the first time and represents critical progress toward the Polywell fusion concept which combines a high beta cusp configuration with an electrostatic fusion for a compact, economical, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  12. Stability of a plasma confined in a dipole field Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For a magnetic fusion confinement configuration, end losses can be eliminated by levitating the current loop confined in a magnetic dipole field is stabilized by the expansion of the magnetic flux. The stability of low beta electrostatic modes in a magnetic dipole field is examined when the distribution function

  13. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joglekar, A S; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields.We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfv\\`enic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high $\\beta$ plasma. However, the Hall parameter $\\omega_c \\tau_{ei}$ can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  14. Driven reconnection in magnetic fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1995-11-01

    Error fields (i.e. small non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field due to coil misalignments, etc.) are a fact of life in magnetic fusion experiments. What effects do error fields have on plasma confinement? How can any detrimental effects be alleviated? These, and other, questions are explored in detail in this lecture using simple resistive magnetohydrodynamic (resistance MHD) arguments. Although the lecture concentrates on one particular type of magnetic fusion device, namely, the tokamak, the analysis is fairly general and could also be used to examine the effects of error fields on other types of device (e.g. Reversed Field Pinches, Stellerators, etc.).

  15. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF): Principles, Status, and International Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-11-16

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion that is intermediate between the two extremes of inertial and magnetic confinement. Target plasma preparation is followed by compression to fusion conditions. The use of a magnetic field to reduce electron thermal conduction and potentially enhance DT alpha energy deposition allows the compression rate to be drastically reduced relative to that for inertial confinement fusion. This leads to compact systems with target driver power and intensity requirements that are orders of magnitude lower than for ICF. A liner on plasma experiment has been proposed to provide a firm proof of principle for MTF.

  16. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.

  17. Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellei, C.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Haines, M. G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientic, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    It is shown by means of multi-fluid particle-in-cell simulations that convergence of the spherical shock wave that propagates through the inner gas of inertial confinement fusion-relevant experiments is accompanied by a separation of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) ions across the shock front. Deuterons run ahead of the tritons due to their lower mass and higher charge-to-mass ratio and can reach the center several tens of picoseconds before the tritons. The rising edge of the DD and TT fusion rate is also temporally separated by the same amount, which should be an observable in experiments and would be a direct proof of the 'stratification conjecture' on the shock front [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056308 (2011)]. Moreover, dephasing of the D and T shock components in terms of density and temperature leads to a degradation of the DT fusion yield as the converging shock first rebounds from the fuel center (shock yield). For the parameters of this study, the second peak in the fusion yield (compression yield) is strongly dependent on the choice of the flux limiter.

  18. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  19. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2006-10-31

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  20. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  1. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J.

    2013-07-15

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ?50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

  2. An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    control of edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod A crucial challenge in magnetic fusion is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that is compatible with...

  3. Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments S. Cremera) and C. P energetic up to 31 MeV tertiary protons produced during the final stage of inertial confinement fusion the elastic scattering of 14.1 MeV neutrons, is a source of very energetic protons capable of escaping from

  4. ACCELERATION SYSTEMS FOR HEAVY-ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION A. Fa1tens, D. L.ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION A. Faltens, D.L.generation through inertial confinement fusion have been set

  5. Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rawls, John M. (Del Mar, CA); Peuron, Unto A. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors (30a, 30b, etc.) formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma (12) and a toroidal field coil (18). A mechanism (60) for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

  6. Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rawls, J.M.; Peuron, A.U.

    1980-07-01

    Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma and a toroidal field coil. A mechanism for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

  7. Course: FUSION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Universit degli Studi di Padova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesare, Bernardo

    the subject of controlled thermonuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas. Both fusion science of Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, b) Engineering of a Magnetically Confined Fusion Reactor, c) ExperimentalCourse: FUSION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Università degli Studi di Padova in agreement

  8. Shock convergence and mix dynamics in inertial confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rygg, James Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the phenomena of shock propagation and of turbulent mix induced by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth is of critical importance for ignition and high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Capsule ...

  9. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A. [and others

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that {approx}10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit {approx}1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm{sup 3}), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described.

  10. Magneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LA-UR-11-01898 #12;Magneto-inertial fusion: A hybrid approach to fusion....ICF with a twistMagneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g ) or "why should we bother with another ICF boost performance (LLE, Omega) ·Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) demonstration, FRCHX at AFRL

  11. On anomalous plasma transport in the edge of magnetic confinement devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angus, Justin Ray

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic confinement devices use strong magnetic fields tomagnetic fields. This is known as magnetic confinement. One

  12. Confining quantum particles with a purely magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves Colin De Verdière; Francoise Truc

    2009-10-15

    We consider an open domain with a compact boundary in an Euclidean space and a Schroedinger operator with magnetic field on this domain. We give sufficient conditions on the rate of growth of the magnetic field near the boundary which guarantees essential self-adjointness of this operator. From the physical point of view, it means that the quantum particle is confined in the domain by the magnetic field. We construct examples on polytopes and domains with smooth boundaries; these examples of "magnetic bottles" are highly simplified models of what is done for nuclear fusion in tokamacs.

  13. Fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    Results of studies on fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are reviewed. The aspects of the fast ignition concept, which consists in the separation of the processes of target ignition and compression due to the synchronized action of different energy drivers, are considered. Criteria for the compression ratio and heating rate of a fast ignition target, the energy balance, and the thermonuclear gain are discussed. The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the heating of a compressed target by various types of igniting drivers, namely, beams of fast electrons and light ions produced under the action of a petawatt laser pulse on the target, a heavy-ion beam generated in the accelerator, an X-ray pulse, and a hydrodynamic flow of laser-accelerated matter, are analyzed. Requirements to the igniting-driver parameters that depend on the fast ignition criteria under the conditions of specific target heating mechanisms, as well as possibilities of practical implementation of these requirements, are discussed. The experimental programs of various laboratories and the prospects of practical implementation of fast ignition of ICF targets are reviewed. To date, fast ignition is the most promising method for decreasing the ignition energy and increasing the thermonuclear gain of an ICF plasma. A large number of publications have been devoted to investigations of this method and adjacent problems of the physics of igniting drivers and their interaction with plasma. This review presents results of only some of these studies that, in the author's opinion, allow one to discuss in detail the main physical aspects of the fast ignition concept and understand the current state and prospects of studies in this direction.

  14. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF): A Low-Cost Fusion Development Path

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Siemon, R.E.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1998-10-19

    Simple transport-based scaling laws are derived to show that a density and time regime intermediate between conventional magnetic confinement and conventional inertial confinement offers attractive reductions in system size and energy when compared to magnetic confinement and attractive reductions in heating power and intensity when compared to inertial confinement. This intermediate parameter space appears to be readily accessible by existing and near term pulsed power technologies. Hence, the technology of the Megagauss conference opens up an attractive path to controlled thermonuclear fusion.

  15. Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, P.

    2012-08-29

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

  16. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a reactor-scale FRC, and the FIREX program was intended to test the ideas behind this approach. We will describe in this report the technological development path and advances in physics understanding that allowed FIREX to reach a regime in which ion rings were reproducibly created with up to about half the current necessary to produce field reversal. Unfortunately, the experiments were limited to this level by a fundamental, unanticipated aspect of the physics of strong ion rings in plasma. The FIREX ring is a strongly anisotropic, current-carrying population of ions moving faster than the Alfven speed in the background plasma. The rapidly changing ring current excites very large-amplitude Alfven waves in the plasma, and these waves strongly affect the ring, causing rapid energy loss in a way that is not compatible with the success of the ring trapping scenario around which FIREX was designed. The result was that FIREX rings were always very short-lived. We will discuss the implication of these results for possible future use of large-orbit ions in FRCs. In short, it appears that a certain range of the parameters characterizing the ring Alfven mach number and distribution function must be avoided to allow the existence of a long-lived energetic ion component in an FRC. This report will explain why FIREX experimental results cannot be directly scaled to quantitatively predict this range for a particular FRC configuration. This will require accurate, three-dimensional simulations. FIREX results do constitute a very good dataset for validating such a code, and simulations already carried out during this program provide a guide to the important physics involved.

  17. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    critical issues in magnetic confinement fusion research. TheMHD) equations in magnetic fusion confinement geometries 8 .Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) mission will be to provide predictive capability for the behavior of magnetic confinement

  18. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using on the ignition and burn of inertial confinement fusion targets: A multi-scale approach Phys. Plasmas 21, 122709 (2014); 10.1063/1.4904212 Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosionsa

  19. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.C. Jardin

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non?linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  20. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Cambridge, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma.

  1. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bers, Abraham (Arlington, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma.

  2. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurden, Glen A.

    2012-08-24

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  3. Atomic scale mixing for inertial confinement fusion associated hydro instabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    Atomic scale mixing for inertial confinement fusion associated hydro instabilities J. Melvina, , P Alamos, NM 87545, USA Abstract Hydro instabilities have been identified as a potential cause- able. We find numerical convergence for this important quantity, in a purely hydro study, with only

  4. www.postersession.com Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion for Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and inertial confinement fusion. Both of these approaches show promise for future sources of energy low in the foreseeable future. Consequently, we are investigating a very low-mass alternative type and useful source of energy for both Earth-based and space-based power systems. This hypothetical

  5. Generic magnetic fusion reactor cost assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.

    1984-01-01

    A generic D-T burning magnetic fusion reactor model shows that within the constraints set by generic limitations it is possible for magnetic fusion to be a competitive source of electricity in the 21st century.

  6. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA, 063502 (2014) A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)a) Rev. Sci. Instrum

  7. MULTI-OBJECTIVE SPECTROSCOPIC DATA ANALYSIS OF INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION IMPLOSION CORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    MULTI-OBJECTIVE SPECTROSCOPIC DATA ANALYSIS OF INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION IMPLOSION CORES: PLASMA the implosion of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) deuterium-filled plastic-microballoon can provide critical confinement fusion implosion cores based on the self-consistent analysis of simultaneous narrow-band X

  8. The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion. Related Articles Investigating inertial confinement fusion target fuel conditions through x://pop.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion

  9. Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion John Lindl NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist - Boston #12;#12;Outline · The challenge of Inertial Confinement Fusion · Development of the science basis to compression in Inertial Confinement Fusion Direct Drive DT gas 2.5 mm 0.1 mm 10 mm #12;The scale of ICF

  10. VISUALIZATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED PLASMAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hence, there is a great need to develop viable renewable energy sources and increase the efforts a great promise for the future. Widespread in- troduction of fusion energy power plants could in experimental and theoretical fu- sion energy research towards more geometric details, visualization plays

  11. VISUALIZATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED PLASMAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the global environment is simply staggering. Hence, there is a great need to develop viable renewable energy developments in experimental and theoretical fu- sion energy research towards more geometric details can be used to compare and contrast some di#11;erent con#12;gurations for future fusion reactors

  12. Transmission Line MTF: Magnetized Target Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transmission Line MTF: Magnetized Target Fusion Initial target: preheated & magnetized Subsequent for the FRC. Abstract Block Diagram theta coil transmission line Bias cap. bank maincapacitor inductor PI cap

  13. Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) ANL/FPP/TM-175 ANL/FPP/TM--175 DE83 015751 THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND STRESS ANALYSIS 15 7.0 LIFETIME ANALYSIS 19 8 . 0 StttMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS-1 Vaporization thickness as a function of energy density for a 1 us disruption 8 4-2 Melt layer thickness

  14. Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) D383 005P43 ANL/FPP/TM-165 ARGONNE NATIONAL of Nuclear Data for Science and Technology, September 6-10, 1982, Antwerp, Belgium. #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS References 49 iii #12;LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE NO. TITLE PAGE 1 17Li-83Pb liquid alloy breeder first wall

  15. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    ion drivers for inertial confinement fusion, was achieved.ion driver beams for inertial confinement fusion, they weredriver beams for inertial confinement fusion were successful

  16. Turbulence and Transport The Secrets of Magnetic Confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwald, Martin

    Magnetic Confinement · Takes advantage of the motion of charged particles in a magnetic field. HOW DO WE DO. · In Toroidal devices, plasma is confined by Poloidal magnetic fields #12;\\COLLISIONAL TRANSPORT ITurbulence and Transport The Secrets of Magnetic Confinement Presented by Martin Greenwald MIT

  17. Linear relaxation to planar Travelling Waves in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monsaingeon, Léonard

    2012-01-01

    We study linear stability of planar travelling waves for a scalar reaction-diffusion equation with non-linear anisotropic diffusion. The mathematical model is derived from the full thermo-hydrodynamical model describing the process of Inertial Confinement Fusion. We show that solutions of the Cauchy problem with physically relevant initial data become planar exponentially fast with rate $s(\\eps',k)>0$, where $\\eps'=\\frac{T_{min}}{T_{max}}\\ll 1$ is a small temperature ratio and $k\\gg 1$ the transversal wrinkling wavenumber of perturbations. We rigorously recover in some particular limit $(\\eps',k)\\rightarrow (0,+\\infty)$ a dispersion relation $s(\\eps',k)\\sim \\gamma_0 k^{\\alpha}$ previously computed heuristically and numerically in some physical models of Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  18. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bock, R.; Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  19. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Bangerter, R.O. ); Bock, R. ); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. )

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  20. Inertial confinement fusion method producing line source radiation fluence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Ronald P. (Peters Township, Washington County, PA)

    1984-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion method in which target pellets are imploded in sequence by laser light beams or other energy beams at an implosion site which is variable between pellet implosions along a line. The effect of the variability in position of the implosion site along a line is to distribute the radiation fluence in surrounding reactor components as a line source of radiation would do, thereby permitting the utilization of cylindrical geometry in the design of the reactor and internal components.

  1. Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, D. C.; Boris, D. R.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.; Piefer, G. R.

    2013-03-15

    A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage ({approx}100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

  2. Research Needs Workshop for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ReNeW Research Needs Workshop for Magnetic Fusion Energy June 7-13, 2009 Richard Hazeltine, ReNeW for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland ­ June 8-12, 2009 OFFICE OF FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES Wednesday, November 25, 2009 #12;Acknowledgements ReNeW

  3. Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Slough

    2012-04-18

    Nuclear fusion has the potential to satisfy the prodigious power that the world will demand in the future, but it has yet to be harnessed as a practical energy source. The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. It is the contention here that a simpler path to fusion can be achieved by creating fusion conditions in a different regime at small scale (~ a few cm). One such program now under study, referred to as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), is directed at obtaining fusion in this high energy density regime by rapidly compressing a compact toroidal plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). To make fusion practical at this smaller scale, an efficient method for compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. In one variant of MTF a conducting metal shell is imploded electrically. This radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. The undertaking described in this report was to provide a suitable target FRC, as well as a simple and robust method for inserting and stopping the FRC within the imploding liner. The FRC must also survive during the time it takes for the metal liner to compress the FRC target. The initial work at the UW was focused on developing adequate preionization and flux trapping that were found to be essential in past experiments for obtaining the density, flux and most critically, FRC lifetime required for MTF. The timescale for testing and development of such a source can be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of a new facility funded by the Department of Energy. At this facility, two inductive plasma accelerators (IPA) were constructed and tested. Recent experiments with these IPAs have demonstrated the ability to rapidly form, accelerate and merge two hypervelocity FRCs into a compression chamber. The resultant FRC that was formed was hot (T{sub ion} ~ 400 eV), stationary, and stable with a configuration lifetime several times that necessary for the MTF liner experiments. The accelerator length was less than 1 meter, and the time from the initiation of formation to the establishment of the final equilibrium was less than 10 microseconds. With some modification, each accelerator can be made capable of producing FRCs suitable for the production of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment. Based on the initial FRC merging/compression results, the design and methodology for an experimental realization of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment can now be defined. The construction and testing of the key components for the formation of the target plasma at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) will be performed on the IPA experiment, now at MSNW. A high density FRC plasmoid will be formed and accelerated out of each IPA into a merging/compression chamber similar to the imploding liner at AFRL. The properties of the resultant FRC plasma (size, temperature, density, flux, lifetime) will be obtained. The process will be optimized, and a final design for implementation at AFRL will be carried out. When implemented at AFRL it is anticipated that the colliding/merging FRCs will then be compressed by the liner. In this manner it is hoped that ultimately a plasma with ion temperatures reaching the 10 keV range and fusion gain near unity can be obtained.

  4. Comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF (Inertial-Confinement-Fusion) driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C.H.

    1987-04-01

    This report compares two physics designs of the low energy end of an induction linac-ICF driver: one using electric quadrupole focusing of many parallel beams followed by transverse combining; the other using magnetic quadrupole focusing of fewer beams without beam combining. Because of larger head-to-tail velocity spread and a consequent rapid current amplification in a magnetic focusing channel, the overall accelerator size of the design using magnetic focusing is comparable to that using electric focusing.

  5. Study of internal magnetic field via polarimetry in fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    process that powers the stars: the fusion of atomic nuclei2011]. In a star the confinement of the fusion plasma is

  6. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-10-10

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  7. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-12-16

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  8. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2007-02-20

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  9. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-02-07

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  10. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman (Irvine, CA); Binderbauer, Michl (Irvine, CA); Qerushi, Artan (Irvine, CA); Tahsiri, Hooshang (Irvine, CA)

    2008-10-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  11. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-03-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  12. Self-consistent analysis of the hot spot dynamics for inertial confinement fusion capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Self-consistent analysis of the hot spot dynamics for inertial confinement fusion capsules J. Sanz Hydrodynamic stability of inertial confinement fusion ICF capsules during the deceleration stage has been re October 2005; published online 11 November 2005 In the context of the French Laser-Mégajoule fusion

  13. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    fusion plasma confinement are known: gravita- tional, magnetic andConfinement Fusion IFE Inertial Fusion Energy IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change MCNP Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code MFE Magnetic

  14. Introduction to nuclear fusion Modelling Finite volume scheme Formal asymptotics Summary Magnetized Target Fusion: Insights from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    Introduction to nuclear fusion Modelling Finite volume scheme Formal asymptotics Summary Magnetized, Committee Member November 28, 2014 Michael Lindstrom Magnetized Target Fusion #12;Introduction to nuclear Target Fusion #12;Introduction to nuclear fusion Modelling Finite volume scheme Formal asymptotics

  15. Tachocline Confinement by an Oscillatory Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Forgacs-Dajka; K. Petrovay

    2006-06-02

    Helioseismic measurements indicate that the solar tachocline is very thin, its full thickness not exceeding 4% of the solar radius. The mechanism that inhibits differential rotation to propagate from the convective zone to deeper into the radiative zone is not known, though several propositions have been made. In this paper we demonstrate by numerical models and analytic estimates that the tachocline can be confined to its observed thickness by a poloidal magnetic field B_p of about one kilogauss, penetrating below the convective zone and oscillating with a period of 22 years, if the tachocline region is turbulent with a diffusivity of eta 10^10 cm^2/s (for a turbulent magnetic Prandtl number of unity). We also show that a similar confinement may be produced for other pairs of the parameter values (B_p, eta). The assumption of the dynamo field penetrating into the tachocline is consistent whenever eta>10^9 cm^2/s.

  16. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; Schmitt, A. J.; Sethian, J. D.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Kruer, W. L.; Tanaka, K.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-11-25

    In this study, the direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. The problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 um—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 um (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for mainline direct-drive target concepts. Filamentation is largely suppressed by beam smoothing. Thermal transport modeling, important to the interpretation of experiments and to target design, has been found to be non-local in nature. Advances in shock timing and equation-of-state measurements relevant to direct-drive ICF are reported. Room-temperature implosions have provided an increased understanding of the importance of stability and uniformity. The evolution of cryogenic implosion capabilities, leading to an extensive series carried out on the 60-beam OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], is reviewed together with major advances in cryogenic target formation. A polar-drive concept has been developed that will enable direct-drive–ignition experiments to be performed on the National Ignition Facility [C. A. Haynam et al., Appl. Opt. 46 (16), 3276 (2007)]. The advantages offered by the alternative approaches of fast ignition and shock ignition and the issues associated with these concepts are described. The lessons learned from target-physics and implosion experiments are taken into account in ignition and high-gain target designs for laser wavelengths of 1/3 um and 1/4 um. Substantial advances in direct-drive inertial fusion reactor concepts are reviewed. Overall, the progress in scientific understanding over the past five decades has been enormous, to the point that inertial fusion energy using direct drive shows significant promise as a future environmentally attractive energy source.

  17. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; et al

    2015-11-25

    In this study, the direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. Themore »problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 um—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 um (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for mainline direct-drive target concepts. Filamentation is largely suppressed by beam smoothing. Thermal transport modeling, important to the interpretation of experiments and to target design, has been found to be non-local in nature. Advances in shock timing and equation-of-state measurements relevant to direct-drive ICF are reported. Room-temperature implosions have provided an increased understanding of the importance of stability and uniformity. The evolution of cryogenic implosion capabilities, leading to an extensive series carried out on the 60-beam OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], is reviewed together with major advances in cryogenic target formation. A polar-drive concept has been developed that will enable direct-drive–ignition experiments to be performed on the National Ignition Facility [C. A. Haynam et al., Appl. Opt. 46 (16), 3276 (2007)]. The advantages offered by the alternative approaches of fast ignition and shock ignition and the issues associated with these concepts are described. The lessons learned from target-physics and implosion experiments are taken into account in ignition and high-gain target designs for laser wavelengths of 1/3 um and 1/4 um. Substantial advances in direct-drive inertial fusion reactor concepts are reviewed. Overall, the progress in scientific understanding over the past five decades has been enormous, to the point that inertial fusion energy using direct drive shows significant promise as a future environmentally attractive energy source.« less

  18. Introduction to Magnetic Thermonuclear Fusion and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Introduction to Magnetic Thermonuclear Fusion and Related Research Projects Ghassan Antar Fusion 2. Research on Turbulence (Theory and Experiment) 3. Research on Disruptions 4. Research on Plasma Facing Components #12;Ghassan Y. ANTAR 3 Fusion Occurs when Two Nuclei Unite to Form One The Energy

  19. Observation of the Dynamical Structure of Turbulence in Plasma Confined by a Dipole Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    improvements that allow observation of quasi-coherent structures and measurement of multipoint statistics-off-layers of toroidal fusion confinement devices[14­16], in the solar wind[17], in magnetized columns of electrons[18 the large-scale structure of turbulence consists of rotating, long-wavelength convective cells with ampli

  20. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  1. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  2. The Vlasov-Maxwell system with strong initial magnetic field. Guiding-center approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bostan, Mihai

    @univ-fcomte.fr 1 #12;duction through the thermonuclear fusion process. Two ways are currently explored for this: the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). The magnetic confinement

  3. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  4. FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion) Understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through radiation- hydrodynamics. To minimize the drive energy for ignition, the imploding shell of DT- fuel needs to be kept as cold

  5. Ways towards pure deuterium inertial confinement fusion through the attainment of gigavolt potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    The attainment of ultrahigh electric potentials by suppressing the stepped leader breakdown of a highly charged conductor levitated in a spiraling Taylor flow opens up the possibility of order of magnitude larger driver energies for the ignition of thermonuclear reactions by inertial confinement. In reaching gigavolt potentials, intense 1016 Watt, GeV ion beams become possible. Together with their large self-magnetic field, these beams should be powerful enough to launch a thermonuclear micro-detonation into pure deuterium, compressed and ignited by such beams. In high gain laser fusion the proton flash from the micro-explosion is likely to destroy the optical laser ignition apparatus, and it is not explained how to avoid this danger. The possible attainment of gigavolt potentials could make laser fusion obsolete.

  6. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  7. ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Brussels, Belgium,of the Heavy Ion Fusion Workshop held at Brookhaven NationalReport, Hearthfire Heavy Ion Fusion, October 1, 1979 - March

  8. An Assessment of Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics A Panel on Fusion Target Physics ("the Panel") will serve as a technical resource to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Assessment of Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics A Panel on Fusion Target Physics ("the ON INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION TARGET PHYSICS John Ahearne, Chair Sigma Xi Robert Dynes University Panel") will serve as a technical resource to the Committee on Inertial Confinement Energy Systems ("the

  9. Integrated diagnostic analysis of inertial confinement fusion capsule performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerjan, Charles; Springer, Paul T.; Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    A conceptual model is developed for typical inertial confinement fusion implosion conditions that integrates available diagnostic information to determine the stagnation properties of the interior fill and surrounding shell. Assuming pressure equilibrium at peak compression and invoking radiative and equation-of-state relations, the pressure, density, and electron temperature are obtained by optimized fitting of the experimental output to smooth, global functional forms. Typical observational data that may be used includes x-ray self-emission, directional neutron time-of-flight signals, neutron yield, high-resolution x-ray spectra, and radiographic images. This approach has been validated by comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, producing semi-quantitative agreement. Model results implicate poor kinetic energy coupling to the hot core as the primary cause of the observed low thermonuclear burn yields.

  10. KULL: LLNL's ASCI Inertial Confinement Fusion Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathkopf, J. A.; Miller, D. S.; Owen, J. M.; Zike, M. R.; Eltgroth, P. G.; Madsen, N. K.; McCandless, K. P.; Nowak, P. F.; Nemanic, M. K.; Gentile, N. A.; Stuart, L. M.; Keen, N. D.; Palmer, T. S.

    2000-01-10

    KULL is a three dimensional, time dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulation code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), KULL's purpose is to simulate the physical processes in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets. The National Ignition Facility, where ICF experiments will be conducted, and ASCI are part of the experimental and computational components of DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. This paper provides an overview of ASCI and describes KULL, its hydrodynamic simulation capability and its three methods of simulating radiative transfer. Particular emphasis is given to the parallelization techniques essential to obtain the performance required of the Stockpile Stewardship Program and to exploit the massively parallel processor machines that ASCI is procuring.

  11. Development of KrF lasers for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J.A.; Harris, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Recent reviews of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program have resulted in recommendations that promise to focus the research effort on the examination of the feasibility of pellet ignition at 1 MJ of energy on target. If successful, the next major step in the program has been defined to be the construction of an Ignition Facility. Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a plan to reach single-pulse multimegajoule ICF facilities using the electron-beam-pumped KrF laser. The Los Alamos plan, its relation to the development of ICF for energy production, and the major features and design issues associated with ICF drivers will be covered in this presentation. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  13. Machine Learning Methods for Data Driven Theory in the Physical Sciences with Applications to Confinement Regime Identification in Nuclear Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machine Learning Methods for Data Driven Theory in the Physical Sciences with Applications to Confinement Regime Identification in Nuclear Fusion

  14. Improving Particle Confinement in Inertial Electrostatic Fusion for Spacecraft Power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving Particle Confinement in Inertial Electrostatic Fusion for Spacecraft Power and Propulsion;2 (This page intentionally left blank) #12;3 Abstract Improving Particle Confinement in Inertial reactors like ITER and inertial confinement reactors like NIF) require very large and heavy structures

  15. Tutorial on the Physics of Inertial Confinement Fusion for energy applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutorial on the Physics of Inertial Confinement Fusion for energy applications R. Betti University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 3rd Meeting of the NAS panel on Inertial Fusion Energy · The implications of ignition to fusion ENERGY production Does the NIF address all the plasma-target PHYSICS issues

  16. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fieldsof Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

  17. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari, S. Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  18. Innovative approaches to inertial confinement fusion reactors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourque, R.F.; Schultz, K.R.

    1986-11-01

    Three areas of innovative approaches to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor design are given. First, issues pertaining to the Cascade reactor concept are discussed. Then, several innovative concepts are presented which attempt to directly recover the blast energy from a fusion target. Finally, the Turbostar concept for direct recovery of that energy is evaluated. The Cascade issues discussed are combustion of the carbon granules in the event of air ingress, the use of alternate granule materials, and the effect of changes in carbon flow on details of the heat exchanger. Carbon combustion turns out to be a minor problem. Four ICF innovative concepts were considered: a turbine with ablating surfaces, a liquid piston system, a wave generator, and a resonating pump. In the final analysis, none show any real promise. The Turbostar concept of direct recovery is a very interesting idea and appeared technically viable. However, it shows no efficiency gain or any decrease in capital cost compared to reactors with conventional thermal conversion systems. Attempts to improve it by placing a close-in lithium sphere around the target to increase gas generation increased efficiency only slightly. It is concluded that these direct conversion techniques require thermalization of the x-ray and debris energy, and are Carnot limited. They therefore offer no advantage over existing and proposed methods of thermal energy conversion or direct electrical conversion.

  19. Extraction of coherent bursts from turbulent edge plasma in magnetic fusion devices using orthogonal wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    École Normale Supérieure

    Extraction of coherent bursts from turbulent edge plasma in magnetic fusion devices using, as they determine the confinement properties of the overall plasma in the bulk region and the energy density to be handled by the limiter or divertor components in the shadowed region of the plasma, where the magnetic

  20. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  1. An accelerator based fusion-product source for development of inertial confinement fusion nuclear diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A National Instruments NI FieldPoint system has been in- stalled and programed to control and monitor-particle spectrometry program F. H. Seguin et al., Rev. Sci Instrum. 75, 3520 2004 and the magnetic recoil neutron. as a neutron generator,1 it was converted for use as a fusion- product source, as described in Ref. 2. Since

  2. Computational and experimental investigation of magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehey, P.T.; Guzik, J.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions. Because the magnetic field suppresses losses by electron thermal conduction in the fuel during the target implosion heating process, the compression may be over a much longer time scale than in traditional inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Bigger targets and much lower initial target densities than in ICF can be used, reducing radiative energy losses. Therefore, `liner-on-plasma` compressions, driven by relatively inexpensive electrical pulsed power, may be practical. Potential MTF target plasmas must meet minimum temperature, density, and magnetic field starting conditions, and must remain relatively free of high-Z radiation-cooling-enhancing contaminants. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, computational and experimental research is being pursued into MTF target plasmas, such as deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches, and the Russian-originated `MAGO` plasma. In addition, liner-on-plasma compressions of such target plasmas to fusion conditions are being computationally modeled, and experimental investigation of such heavy liner implosions has begun. The status of the research will be presented. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Tritium Gas Processing for Magnetic Fusion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gas Processing for Magnetic Fusion SRNL-STI-2014-00168 Bernice Rogers Clean Energy - Savannah River National Laboratory April 24, 2014 The views and opinions expressed herein do...

  4. SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutman, Dan

    2014-09-10

    The present report summarizes the results obtained during a one-year extension of DoE grant “SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas”, at Johns Hopkins University, aimed at completing the development of a new type of magnetic fusion plasma diagnostic, the XUV Transmission Grating Imaging Radiometer (TGIR). The TGIR enables simultaneous spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of the XUV/VUV radiated power from impurities in fusion plasmas, with high speed. The instrument was successfully developed and qualified in the laboratory and in experiments on a tokamak. Its future applications will be diagnostic of the impurity content and transport in the divertor and edge of advanced magnetic fusion experiments, such as NSTX Upgrade.

  5. MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS B. Fornberg,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fornberg, Bengt

    MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS N. Flyer,1 B, plasma density and magnetic field. We present a hydromag- netic study of the self-confinement of magnetic Axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields external to a unit sphere are studied as solutions to boundary value

  6. Magnetized Target Fusion: Input to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetized Target Fusion: Input to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan G. A. Wurden Fusion to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan · Imagine a fusion concept where: · The plasma beta ranges from to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan · MTF offers a uniquely different pathway to achieving

  7. NON-PROLIFERATION CHALLENGES IN CONNECTION WITH MAGNETIC FUSION POWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF MAGNETIC FUSION · The nuclear weapons proliferation risks associated with magnetic fusion power plantsNON-PROLIFERATION CHALLENGES IN CONNECTION WITH MAGNETIC FUSION POWER RICHARD KAMENDJE FPA Annual increasingly focused on the production of fusion energy on an industrial, power plant scale · Many countries

  8. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-15

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  9. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main divertor heat flux (divertor strike point), the lithium is evaporated from the surface. The evaporated lithium is quickly ionized by the plasma and the ionized lithium ions can provide a strongly radiative layer of plasma ("radiative mantle"), thus could significantly reduce the heat flux to the divertor strike point surfaces, thus protecting the divertor surface. The protective effects of LL have been observed in many experiments and test stands. As a possible reactor divertor candidate, a closed LL divertor system is described. Finally, it is noted that the lithium applications as a PFC can be quite flexible and broad. The lithium application should be quite compatible with various divertor configurations, and it can be also applied to protecting the presently envisioned tungsten based solid PFC surfaces such as the ones for ITER. Lithium based PFCs therefore have the exciting prospect of providing a cost effective flexible means to improve the fusion reactor performance, while providing a practical solution to the highly challenging divertor heat handling issue confronting the steadystate magnetic fusion reactors.

  10. Discovery Research in Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Plasma Physics Research at Columbia University · CNT Stellarator · HBT-EP Tokamak · CTX/LDX Dipole #12;Columbia University Collaborator Dr. Otto Octavius Stabilize Fusion in NYC... (2004) #12;Magnetized Plasma Physics Research at Columbia University · CNT Stellarator · HBT-EP Tokamak · CTX/LDX Dipole #12;Magnetized

  11. Progress in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    Significant progress in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research has been made since the completion of the 60-beam, 30-kJ{sub UV} OMEGA Laser System [Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] in 1995. A theory of ignition requirements, applicable to any ICF concept, has been developed. Detailed understanding of laser-plasma coupling, electron thermal transport, and hot-electron preheating has lead to the measurement of neutron-averaged areal densities of {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2} in cryogenic target implosions. These correspond to an estimated peak fuel density in excess of 100 g/cm{sup 3} and are in good agreement with hydrodynamic simulations. The implosions were performed using an 18-kJ drive pulse designed to put the converging fuel on an adiabat of two. The polar-drive concept will allow direct-drive-ignition research on the National Ignition Facility while it is configured for indirect drive. Advanced ICF ignition concepts - fast ignition [Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994)] and shock ignition [Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007)] - have the potential to significantly reduce ignition driver energies and/or provide higher target gain.

  12. Turbulence, Transport and the Density Limit in Magnetic Fusion Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwald, Martin

    Program) 3 Magnetic Confinement Takes advantage of the motion of charged particles in a magnetic field) · In toroidal devices, plasma is confined by Poloidal magnetic fields #12;DESPITE THE CHALLENGES, PROGRESS HAS AND MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT· · · · THE DENSITY LIMIT PROBLEM INTERLUDE ON TRANSPORT AND TURBULENCE TOWARDS

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 4, APRIL 2011 1007 Inertial Confinement Fusion Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 4, APRIL 2011 1007 Inertial Confinement Fusion in this paper are available online at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org. Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/TPS.2011

  14. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, T.

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165???m in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal ...

  15. Self-Similar Structure and Experimental Signatures of Suprathermal Ion Distribution in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Grigory

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydrodynamic instabilities ...

  16. Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) ?-to-neutron branching ratio [[superscript 3]H(d,?)[superscript 5]He/[superscript 3]H(d,n)[superscript 4]He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the ...

  17. Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

    2005-01-01

    A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

  18. The role of Z-pinches and related configurations in magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1997-07-10

    The use of a magnetic field within a fusion target is now known as Magnetized Target Fusion in the US and as MAGO (Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) in Russia. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (e.g., ICF), MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm, magnetized, wall-confined plasma of intermediate density within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression and heating of the plasma by imploding the confining wall, or pusher. In many ways, MTF can be considered a marriage between the more mature MFE and ICF approaches, and this marriage potentially eliminates some of the hurdles encountered in the other approaches. When compared to ICF, MTF requires lower implosion velocity, lower initial density, significantly lower radial convergence, and larger targets, all of which lead to substantially reduced driver intensity, power, and symmetry requirements. When compared to MFE, MTF does not require a vacuum separating the plasma from the wall, and, in fact, complete magnetic confinement, even if possible, may not be desirable. The higher density of MTF and much shorter confinement times should make magnetized plasma formation a much less difficult step than in MFE. The substantially lower driver requirements and implosion velocity of MTF make z-pinch magnetically driven liners, magnetically imploded by existing modern pulsed power electrical current sources, a leading candidate for the target pusher of an MTF system.

  19. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities.

  20. National Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. usage, it makes the DoD the single largest energy user in the country." Energy Sources · Laser FusionNational Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems Tour.S. Naval Research Laboratory Research supported by the Department of Energy, NNSA Presented by Steve

  1. Proton core imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton core imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion implosions J. L. De; published online 7 April 2006 A proton emission imaging system has been developed and used extensively the penetrating 14.7 MeV protons produced from D 3 He fusion reactions to produce emission images of the nuclear

  2. Comment on 'Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels'[Phys. Plasmas 20, 012701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larroche, O. [CEA DIF, Bruyeres le Chatel, 91297 Arpajon Cedex (France)

    2013-04-15

    A recent paper presents numerical simulations of shock waves in a two-ion-component plasma, investigating how species separation occurring in the latter can affect the nuclear fusion yield of inertial confinement fusion targets. Here, it is shown that an important physical mechanism has obviously been omitted in those calculations, which thus lead to significantly overestimated results.

  3. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, April--June 1995. Volume 5, No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The ICF Quarterly Reports is published four times each fiscal year by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The journal reports selected current research within the ICF Program. Major areas of investigation presented here include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology.

  4. Nuclear Fusion: ITER Project Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetic Fusion Research is a World-wide Endeavor... #12;U.S. ITER / Sauthoff Slide 3 Roadmap · Overview Slide 13 Roadmap · Overview of fusion and magnetic confinement systems · Demonstrating the scientific

  5. Lithium pellet injection into high pressure magnetically confined plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Böse, Brock (Brock Darrel)

    2010-01-01

    The ablation of solid pellets injected into high temperature magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by rapid oscillations in the ablation rate, and the formation of field aligned filaments in the ablatant. High ...

  6. Equilibrium and stability studies of plasmas confined in a dipole magnetic field using magnetic measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karim, Ishtak

    2007-01-01

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is the first experiment of its kind to use a levitated current ring to confine a plasma in a dipole magnetic field. Unlike most other confinement devices, plasma compressibility ...

  7. Heat transfer in inertial confinement fusion reactor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovingh, J.

    1980-04-23

    The short time and deposition distance for the energy from inertial fusion products results in local peak power densities on the order of 10/sup 18/ watts/m/sup 3/. This paper presents an overview of the various inertial fusion reactor designs which attempt to reduce these peak power intensities and describes the heat transfer considerations for each design.

  8. Analysis of Recurrent Patterns in Toroidal Magnetic Fields Allen R. Sanderson, Member, IEEE, Guoning Chen, Member, IEEE, Xavier Tricoche, Member, IEEE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guoning

    Abstract--In the development of magnetic confinement fusion which will potentially be a future source of magnetically confined burning plasmas. Index Terms--Confined magnetic fusion, magnetic field visualization of magnetic confinement fusion which will poten- tially be a future source for low cost power is an important

  9. Taming turbulence in magnetized plasmas: from fusion energy to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is not perfect, our magnetic bottle can leak heat at a significant rate · In TFTR, it took ~40MW of heating power magnetic bottle can leak heat at a significant rate · In TFTR, it took ~40MW of heating power to maintain) B - Magnetic Confinement (tokamak) Current #12;Heating a magnetically confined plasma · Initial

  10. THE NATIONAL FUSION COLLABORATORY PROJECT: APPLYING GRID TECHNOLOGY FOR MAGNETIC FUSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mary R.

    THE NATIONAL FUSION COLLABORATORY PROJECT: APPLYING GRID TECHNOLOGY FOR MAGNETIC FUSION RESEARCH D Diego, California 92186-5608 email: schissel@fusion.gat.com, Phone: (858) 455-3387, Fax: (858) 455- 4156, Berkeley, California 04720 The overall goal of the DOE SciDAC funded U.S. National Fusion Collaboratory

  11. Velocity-ion temperature gradient driven modes and angular momentum transport in magnetically confined plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, John Chandler

    2007-01-01

    Plasma confinement experiments continue to uncover fascinating phenomena that motivate theoretical discussion and exploration. In this thesis, we consider the phenomenon of angular momentum transport in magnetically confined ...

  12. Final report on the Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Slough

    2009-09-08

    Nuclear fusion has the potential to satisfy the prodigious power that the world will demand in the future, but it has yet to be harnessed as a practical energy source. The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. It is the contention here that a simpler path to fusion can be achieved by creating fusion conditions in a different regime at small scale (~ a few cm). One such program now under study, referred to as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), is directed at obtaining fusion in this high energy density regime by rapidly compressing a compact toroidal plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). To make fusion practical at this smaller scale, an efficient method for compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. In one variant of MTF a conducting metal shell is imploded electrically. This radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to provide a suitable target FRC, as well as a simple and robust method for inserting and stopping the FRC within the imploding liner. The timescale for testing and development can be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of a new facility funded by the Department of Energy. At this facility, two inductive plasma accelerators (IPA) were constructed and tested. Recent experiments with these IPAs have demonstrated the ability to rapidly form, accelerate and merge two hypervelocity FRCs into a compression chamber. The resultant FRC that was formed was hot (T&ion ~ 400 eV), stationary, and stable with a configuration lifetime several times that necessary for the MTF liner experiments. The accelerator length was less than 1 meter, and the time from the initiation of formation to the establishment of the final equilibrium was less than 10 microseconds. With some modification, each accelerator was made capable of producing FRCs suitable for the production of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment. Based on the initial FRC merging/compression results, the design and methodology for an experimental realization of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment can now be defined. A high density FRC plasmoid is to be formed and accelerated out of each IPA into a merging/compression chamber similar to the imploding liner at AFRL. The properties of the resultant FRC plasma (size, temperature, density, flux, lifetime) are obtained in the reevant regime of interest. The process still needs to be optimized, and a final design for implementation at AFRL must now be carried out. When implemented at AFRL it is anticipated that the colliding/merging FRCs will then be compressed by the liner. In this manner it is hoped that ultimately a plasma with ion temperatures reaching the 10 keV range and fusion gain near unity can be obtained.

  13. Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) MFE--Plasma Systems (UC-20a) MFE for Chapter 3 3-38 4. THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM ANALYSIS 4-1 4.1 Introduction 4-1 4 CYCLE EFFECTS 6-1 6.1 Burn Cycle and Energy Transfer System 6-1 6.2 Conventional Cycle 6-2 6

  14. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  15. The role of fast electrons for the confinement of plasma by magnetic cusps This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    The role of fast electrons for the confinement of plasma by magnetic cusps This article has been. THE ROLE OF FAST ELECTRONS FOR THE CONFINEMENT OF PLASMA BY MAGNETIC CUSPS 6.KI\\;ORRand R. L. MERLINO Dept. Fusion 26 433 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/26/2/004) Download details: IP Address: 128

  16. Seminar -1. letnik bolonjske magistrske stopnje Inertial confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    ................................................................................................................................12 #12;Introduction Mankind has always dreamed about producing energy in a way the sun does. For over 100 years we have known how ­ how the sun produces energy, but it has always been too difficult how manage to achieve and sustain energy fusion for energy production. In this seminar I will discuss what

  17. Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks in X-rays - a Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ud-Doula, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A subset (~ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modelling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  18. Magnetic confinement of a high-density cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahedo, Eduardo [E. T. S. Ingenieros Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The stationary structure of a weakly collisional plasma column, confined by an axial magnetic field and a cylindrical vessel, is studied for the high-density case, when the diamagnetic azimuthal current is large enough to demagnetize partially the plasma. The plasma response is characterized mainly by two dimensionless parameters: the ratios of the electron gyroradius and the electron skin-depth to the plasma radius, and each of them measures the independent influence of the applied magnetic field and the plasma density on the plasma response. The strong magnetic confinement regime, characterized by very small wall losses, is limited to the small gyroradius and large skin-depth ranges. In the high-density case, when the electron skin-depth is smaller than the electron gyroradius, the skin-depth turns out to be the magnetic screening length, so that the bulk of the plasma behaves as unmagnetized.

  19. He-proton emission imaging for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments (invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D3 He-proton emission imaging for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments (invited) F. H. Séguin, Livermore, California 94550 (Presented on 19 April 2004; published 5 October 2004) Proton emission imaging cameras, in combination with proton spectrometers and a proton temporal diagnostic, provide a great deal

  20. D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas Y. Kim, J. M. Mack, H. W. Herrmann, C. S. Young, G. M. Hale et al. Citation: Phys. Plasmas 19, 056313 (2012 in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF Phys. Plasmas 19, 056307 (2012) Experimental and theoretical

  1. Implosion Experiments using Glass Ablators for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smalyuk, V. A.

    Direct-drive implosions with 20-?m-thick glass shells were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of high-Z glass ablators for direct-drive, inertial confinement fusion. The x-ray signal caused by ...

  2. Inertial Confinement Fusion, High Energy Density Plasmas and an Energy Source on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inertial Confinement Fusion, High Energy Density Plasmas and an Energy Source on Earth Max Tabak ignition robust burn Supernova core MFE ICF ignition requires large energy and power densities Log10 Achieving the necessary multiplication of power,energy and mass densities requires a well controlled

  3. The role of nuclear reactions and -particle transport in the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    The role of nuclear reactions and -particle transport in the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion capsules Josselin Garnier1,a and Catherine Cherfils-Clérouin2 1 Laboratoire de Probabilités et the energy released by nuclear reactions, a nonlocal model for the -particle energy deposition process

  4. Spectral confinement and current for atoms in strong magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Fournais

    2006-08-28

    We study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. The results obtained allow us to calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region $B \\ll Z^3$.

  5. Dynamic response of materials on subnanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Damian C.; Tierney, Thomas E.; Luo Shengnian; Paisley, Dennis L.; Kyrala, George A.; Hauer, Allan; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Lorenzana, Hector E.; Kalantar, Daniel; Remington, Bruce A.; Peralta, Pedro; Loomis, Eric

    2005-05-15

    During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. These relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser-induced ablation can be particularly convenient: this technique has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from {approx}1 to 200 GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including line imaging surface velocimetry, surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response from the polycrystalline microstructure. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1 TPa.

  6. Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles.1088/0741-3335/52/12/124027 Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles C K Li1 , F H S are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introduction Achieving inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF

  7. Inertial Confinement Fusion: Quarterly report, April-June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correll, D.

    1996-06-01

    The lead article, `Ion-beam propagation in a low-density reactor chamber for heavy-ion inertial fusion` (p. 89), explores the ability of heavy-ion beams to be adequately transported and focused in an IFE reactor. The next article, `Efficient production and applications of 2- to 10-keV x rays by laser-heated underdense radiators` (p. 96), explores the ability of the NIF to produce sufficient high-energy x rays for diagnostic backlighting, target preheating, or uniform irradiation of large test objects for Nuclear Weapons Effects Testing. For capsule implosion experiments, the increasing energies and distances involved in the NIF compared to Nova require the development of new diagnostics methods. The article `Fusion reaction-rate measurements--Nova and NIF` (p. 115) first reviews the use of time-resolved neutron measurements on Nova to monitor fusion burn histories and then explores the limitations of that technique, principally Doppler broadening, for the proposed NIF. It also explores the use of gamma rays on Nova, thereby providing a proof-of-principle for using gamma rays for monitoring fusion burn histories on the NIF. The articles `The energetics of gas-filled hohlraums` (p. 110) and `Measurements of laser- speckle-induced perturbations in laser-driven foils` (p. 123) report measurements on Nova of two important aspects of implosion experiments. The first characterizes the amount of energy lost from a hohlraum by stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering as a function of gas fill and laser-beam uniformity. The second of these articles shows that the growth of density nonuniformities implanted on smooth capsule surfaces by laser speckle can be correlated with the effects of physical surface roughness. The article `Laser-tissue interaction modeling with the LATIS computer program` (p. 103) explores the use of modeling to enhance the effectiveness--maximize desired effects and minimize collateral damage--of lasers for medical purposes.

  8. Pre-Amplifier Module for Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heebner, J E; Bowers, M W

    2008-02-06

    The Pre-Amplifier Modules (PAMs) are the heart of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), providing most of the energy gain for the most energetic laser in the world. Upon completion, NIF will be the only laboratory in which scientists can examine the fusion processes that occur inside stars, supernovae, and exploding nuclear weapons and that may someday serve as a virtually inexhaustible energy source for electricity. Consider that in a fusion power plant 50 cups of water could provide the energy comparable to 2 tons of coal. Of paramount importance for achieving laser-driven fusion ignition with the least energy input is the synchronous and symmetric compression of the target fuel--a condition known as laser power balance. NIF's 48 PAMs thus must provide energy gain in an exquisitely stable and consistent manner. While building one module that meets performance requirements is challenging enough, our design has already enabled the construction and fielding of 48 PAMs that are stable, uniform, and interchangeable. PAM systems are being tested at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and the Atomic Weapons Enterprise of Great Britain has purchased the PAM power system.

  9. Scientists discuss progress toward magnetic fusion energy at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists discuss progress toward magnetic fusion energy at 2013 AAAS annual meeting February 21, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Scientists participating in...

  10. AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; MFTF DEVICES; DESIGN; DEUTERIUM; MAGNET...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MFTF-. cap alpha. + T progress report Nelson, W.D. (ed.) 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; MFTF DEVICES; DESIGN; DEUTERIUM; MAGNET COILS; MAINTENANCE; REACTOR FUELING;...

  11. Role of hydrodynamic instability growth in hot-spot mass gain and fusion performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2014-10-15

    In an inertial confinement fusion target, energy loss due to thermal conduction from the hot-spot will inevitably ablate fuel ice into the hot-spot, resulting in a more massive but cooler hot-spot, which negatively impacts fusion yield. Hydrodynamic mix due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the gas-ice interface can aggravate the problem via an increased gas-ice interfacial area across which energy transfer from the hot-spot and ice can be enhanced. Here, this mix-enhanced transport effect on hot-spot fusion-performance degradation is quantified using contrasting 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations, and its dependence on effective acceleration, Atwood number, and ablation speed is identified.

  12. Centrifugal Breakout of Magnetically Confined Line-Driven Stellar Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. ud-Doula; R. H. D. Townsend; S. P. Owocki

    2006-02-15

    We present 2D MHD simulations of the radiatively driven outflow from a rotating hot star with a dipole magnetic field aligned with the star's rotation axis. We focus primarily on a model with moderately rapid rotation (half the critical value), and also a large magnetic confinement parameter, $\\eta_{\\ast} \\equiv B_{\\ast}^2 R_{\\ast}^{2} / \\dot{M} V_{\\infty} = 600$. The magnetic field channels and torques the wind outflow into an equatorial, rigidly rotating disk extending from near the Kepler corotation radius outwards. Even with fine-tuning at lower magnetic confinement, none of the MHD models produce a stable Keplerian disk. Instead, material below the Kepler radius falls back on to the stellar surface, while the strong centrifugal force on material beyond the corotation escape radius stretches the magnetic loops outwards, leading to episodic breakout of mass when the field reconnects. The associated dissipation of magnetic energy heats material to temperatures of nearly $10^{8}$K, high enough to emit hard (several keV) X-rays. Such \\emph{centrifugal mass ejection} represents a novel mechanism for driving magnetic reconnection, and seems a very promising basis for modeling X-ray flares recently observed in rotating magnetic Bp stars like $\\sigma$ Ori E.

  13. Confinement and $?_s$ in a strong magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Simonov; M. A. Trusov

    2015-04-01

    Hadron decay widths are shown to increase in strong magnetic fields as $\\Gamma (eB) \\sim \\frac{eB}{\\kappa} \\Gamma(0)$. The same mechanism is shown to be present in the production of the sea quark pair inside the confining string, which decreases the string tension with the growing $eB$ parallel to the string . On the other hand, the average energy of the $q\\bar q$ holes in the string world sheet increases, when the direction of $\\mathbf{B}$ is perpendicular to the sheet. These two effects stipulate the spectacular picture of the $\\mathbf{B}$ dependent confinement and $\\alpha_s$, discovered on the lattice.

  14. Fuel Target Implosion in Ion beam Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    The numerical results for the fuel target implosion are presented in order to clarify the target physics in ion beam inertial fusion. The numerical analyses are performed for a direct-driven ion beam target. In the paper the following issues are studied: the beam obliquely incidence on the target surface, the plasma effect on the beam-stopping power, the beam particle energy, the beam time duration, the target radius, the beam input energy and the non-uniformity effect on the fuel target performance. In this paper the beam ions are protons.

  15. T-shaped quantum wires in magnetic fields: Weakly confined magnetoexcitons beyond the diamagnetic limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Band, Yehuda B.

    T-shaped quantum wires in magnetic fields: Weakly confined magnetoexcitons beyond the diamagnetic at vanishing magnetic field26 to B 0. Exciton states for interacting electron-hole pairs confined to a T-particle states confined to the T intersection in a magnetic field and then using these single- particle states

  16. Innovations and New Ideas in Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Fusion in NYC... (2004) #12;Magnetized Plasma Physics Research at Columbia University · CNT Stellarator · HBT-EP Tokamak · CTX/LDX Dipoles #12;Magnetized Plasma Physics Research at Columbia University · CNT

  17. MgB? Coil Options for Fusion Poloidal Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giunchi, Giovanni

    A hybrid solution is proposed for the IGNITOR research fusion machine by using of superconducting coils for some poloidal magnets, in association with high field copper magnets for the central solenoid and for the toroidal ...

  18. Magneto-inertial fusion with laser compression of a magnetized spherical target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu., E-mail: kost@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation); Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The paper is devoted to the principles of magneto-inertial fusion and laser-plasma methods of generation of a Megagauss field during spherical implosion of a magnetized target. A model based on a magnetic confinement system, namely, a cusp configuration with inertial compression of the target by a laser driver, is developed. The dynamics of plasma in a cusp compressed under the effect of laser beams is precalculated. Analytical and numerical estimates of the particle number and magnetic field intensity during magneto-inertial plasma compression are obtained. The problems of irradiation of a spherically closed volume by a high-energy laser pulse are discussed.

  19. Self-similar structure and experimental signatures of suprathermal ion distribution in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Grigory; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Huang, C -K

    2015-01-01

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot-spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydro-instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. The ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT at National Ignition Facility.

  20. Self-similar structure and experimental signatures of suprathermal ion distribution in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kagan, Grigory; Svyatskiy, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Huang, C. -K.; McDevitt, C. J.

    2015-09-03

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydrodynamic instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. Thus, the ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT atmore »the National Ignition Facility.« less

  1. Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.a.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-06-28

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is expected to demonstrate high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next decade and is a leading candidate for inertial fusion energy production. The NIF will initially be configured for x-ray drive and with no beams placed at the target equator to provide a symmetric irradiation of a direct-drive capsule. LLE is developing the “polar-direct-drive” (PDD) approach that repoints beams toward the target equator. Initial 2-D simulations have shown ignition. A unique “Saturn-like” plastic ring around the equator refracts the laser light incident near the equator toward the target, improving the drive uniformity.

  2. Advances in Understanding Turbulence & Confinement in Fusion Energy Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    complicated (incl. sources & sinks, atomic physics, plasma- wall interactions) Edge region very important Energy Research I. Simple physical pictures of tokamak plasma turbu- lence and how to reduce it. II) and squeezing magnetic fields at high plasma pressure: "Second stabil- ity" Advanced Tokamak or Spherical Torus

  3. LA-UR-98-5674 Magnetized Target Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LA-UR-98-5674 Magnetized Target Fusion: A burning FRC plasma in an imploded metal can G. A. Wurden Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) experiments, using theta using the MOQUI FRC code shows that the required plasma can be formed using conical theta pinch coils

  4. A 20-year Vision for the UK Contribution to Fusion as an Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    following ITER. The role for the UK in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) over the next 20 years is strongly fusion (MCF) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) - the full list of which is given in Annex B programme over the next 20 years is given below. In magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) the continued

  5. Index of light ion inertial confinement fusion publications and presentations January 1989 through December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report lists publications and presentations that are related to inertial confinement fusion and were authored or coauthored by Sandians in the Pulsed Power Sciences Center from 1989 through 1993. The 661 publications and presentations are categorized into the following general topics: (1) reviews, (2) ion sources, (3) ion diodes, (4) plasma opening switches, (5) ion beam transport, (6) targets and deposition physics, (7) advanced driver and pulsed power technology development, (8) diagnostics, and (9) code development. Research in these areas is arranged by topic in chronological order, with the early efforts under each topic presented first. The work is also categorized alphabetically by first author. A list of acronyms, abbreviations, and definitions of use in understanding light ion inertial confinement fusion research is also included.

  6. Development of backlighting sources for a Compton Radiography diagnostic of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tommasini, R

    2010-04-23

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion is time-resolved imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. Here we report on the source and diagnostic development of hard x-ray radiography and on the first radiographs of direct drive implosions obtained at photon energies up to about 100keV, where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the shell opacity. The radiographs of direct drive, plastic shell implosions obtained at the OMEGA laser facility have a spatial resolution of {approx}10um and a temporal resolution of {approx}10ps. This novel Compton Radiography is an invaluable diagnostic tool for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets, and will be integrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  7. COLLIMATION AND CONFINEMENT OF MAGNETIC JETS BY EXTERNAL MEDIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Amir; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-02-20

    We study the collimation of a highly magnetized jet by a surrounding cocoon that forms as a result of the interaction of the jet with the external medium. We show that in regions where the jet is well confined by the cocoon, current-driven instabilities should develop over timescales shorter than the expansion time of the jet's head. We speculate that these instabilities would give rise to complete magnetic field destruction, whereby the jet undergoes a transition from high to low sigma above the collimation zone. Using this assumption, we construct a self-consistent model for the evolution of the jet-cocoon system in an ambient medium of arbitrary density profile. We apply the model to jet breakout in long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and show that the jet is highly collimated inside the envelope of the progenitor star and is likely to remain confined well after breakout. We speculate that this strong confinement may provide a channel for magnetic field conversion in GRB outflows, whereby the hot, low-sigma jet section thereby produced is the source of the photospheric emission observed in many bursts.

  8. Massive photons and Dirac monopoles: electric condensate and magnetic confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Guimaraes; R. Rougemont; C. Wotzasek; C. A. D. Zarro

    2013-05-13

    We use the generalized Julia-Toulouse approach (GJTA) for condensation of topological currents (charges or defects) to argue that massive photons can coexist consistently with Dirac monopoles. The Proca theory is obtained here via GJTA as a low energy effective theory describing an electric condensate and the mass of the vector boson is responsible for generating a Meissner effect which confines the magnetic defects in monopole-antimonopole pairs connected by physical open magnetic vortices described by Dirac brane invariants, instead of Dirac strings.

  9. Investigating inertial confinement fusion target fuel conditions through x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are designed to produce hot, dense fuel in a neutron-producing core that is surrounded by a shell of compressing material. The x-rays emitted from ICF plasmas can be analyzed to reveal details of the temperatures, densities, gradients, velocities, and mix characteristics of ICF targets. Such diagnostics are critical to understand the target performance and to improve the predictive power of simulation codes.

  10. Confined Dirac Particles in Constant and Tilted Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulaziz D. Alhaidari; Hocine Bahlouli; Ahmed Jellal

    2012-02-23

    We study the confinement of charged Dirac particles in 3+1 space-time due to the presence of a constant and tilted magnetic field. We focus on the nature of the solutions of the Dirac equation and on how they depend on the choice of vector potential that gives rise to the magnetic field. In particular, we select a "Landau gauge" such that the momentum is conserved along the direction of the vector potential yielding spinor wavefunctions, which are localized in the plane containing the magnetic field and normal to the vector potential. These wave functions are expressed in terms of the Hermite polynomials. We point out the relevance of these findings to the relativistic quantum Hall effect and compare with the results obtained for a constant magnetic field normal to the plane in 2+1 dimensions.

  11. ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    and D. Keefe, "Inertial Confinement Fusion Systems Usingpresented at the Inertial Confinement Fusion Conf. , Sanapplication to inertial confinement fusion. Betatrons

  12. Species separation and modification of neutron diagnostics in inertial-confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inglebert, Aurelie; Larroche, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The different behaviours of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) in the hot spot of marginally-igniting cryogenic DT inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) targets are investigated with an ion Fokker-Planck model. With respect to an equivalent single-species model, a higher density and a higher temperature are found for T in the stagnation phase of the target implosion. In addition, the stagnating hot spot is found to be less dense but hotter than in the single-species case. As a result, the fusion reaction yield in the hot spot is significantly increased. Fusion neutron diagnostics of the implosion find a larger ion temperature as deduced from DT reactions than from DD reactions, in good agreement with NIF experimental results. ICF target designs should thus definitely take ion-kinetic effects into account.

  13. The magnetic field and wind confinement of b Cephei: new clues for interpreting the Be phenomenon?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donati, Jean-François

    The magnetic field and wind confinement of b Cephei: new clues for interpreting the Be phenomenon of the weakest detected to date, this magnetic field is strong enough to magnetically confine the wind of b Cep collected by Henrichs et al. and propose for this star a consistent model of the large-scale magnetic field

  14. Direct-Drive Inerital Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Charting the Path to Thermonuclear Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R.L.; Regan, S.P.; Loucks, S.J.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2005-10-07

    Significant theoretical and experimental progress continues to be made at the University of Rocheter's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), charting the path to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition. Direct drive offers the potential for higher-gain implosions than x-ray drive and is a leading candidate for an inertial fusion enery power plant.

  15. Threshold bubble chamber for measurement of knock-on DT neutron tails from magnetic and inertial confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.K. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Zaveryaev, V.S. [Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Institute; Trusillo, S.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre, Arzamas (Russian Federation). Experimental Physics Institute

    1996-07-01

    We propose a new {open_quotes}threshold{close_quotes} bubble chamber detector for measurement of knock-on neutron tails. These energetic neutrons result from fusion reactions involving energetic fuel ions created by alpha knock-on collisions in tokamak and other magnetic confinement experiments, and by both alpha and neutron knock-on collisions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The energy spectrum of these neutrons will yield information on the alpha population and energy distribution in tokamaks, and on alpha target physics and {rho}R measurements in ICF experiments. The bubble chamber should only detect neutrons with energies above a selectable threshold energy controlled by the bubble chamber pressure. The bubble chamber threshold mechanism, detection efficiency, and proposed applications to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will be discussed.

  16. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasche, G.P.

    1988-04-05

    A method for recovering energy in an inertial confinement fusion reactor having a reactor chamber and a sphere forming means positioned above an opening in the reactor chamber is described, comprising: embedding a fusion target fuel capsule having a predetermined yield in the center of a hollow solid lithium tube and subsequently embedding the hollow solid lithium tube in a liquid lithium medium; using the sphere forming means for forming the liquid lithium into a spherical shaped liquid lithium mass having a diameter smaller than the length of the hollow solid lithium tube with the hollow solid lithium tube being positioned along a diameter of the spherical shaped mass, providing the spherical shaped liquid lithium mass with the fusion fuel target capsule and hollow solid lithium tube therein as a freestanding liquid lithium shaped spherical shaped mass without any external means for maintaining the spherical shape by dropping the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass from the sphere forming means into the reactor chamber; producing a magnetic field in the reactor chamber; imploding the target capsule in the reactor chamber to produce fusion energy; absorbing fusion energy in the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass to convert substantially all the fusion energy to shock induced kinetic energy of the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass which expands the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass; and compressing the magnetic field by expansion of the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass and recovering useful energy.

  17. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    from present practice. Inertial Confinement Fusion While forReactors for Inertial Confinement Fusion, K.A. Brueckner (

  18. NATURE | NEWS Laser fusion nears crucial milestone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of `inertial confinement' fusion -- faces an uncertain future. Would success mean that the US Department National Laboratory in New Mexico, agrees, saying that scientists working on inertial confinement should to the troubles that have plagued a competing approach to fusion -- magnetic confinement -- and its flagship

  19. Numerical simulation of the equilibrium and transport of a centrifugally confined plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassam, Adil

    of plasmas along the magnetic field.1,2 Configurations that could be used for thermonuclear fusion plasmas centrifugal forces from supersonic plasma rotation to augment the conventional magnetic confinement of fusion confinement as applied to fusion devices. The centrifugal force constitutes an additional ``knob'' and is used

  20. Confined System with Rashba Coupling in Constant Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed El Bouziani; Rachid Houca; Ahmed Jellal

    2012-04-30

    We study a two dimensional system of electrons with Rashba coupling in the constant magnetic field $B$ and confining potential. We algebraically diagonalize the corresponding Hamiltonian to end up with the solutions of the energy spectrum. In terms of two kinds of operator we construct two symmetries and discuss the filling of the shells with electrons for strong and weak $B$. Subsequently, we show that our system is sharing some common features with quantum optics where the exact operator solutions for the basics Jaynes-Cummings variables are derived from our results. An interesting limit is studied and the corresponding quantum dynamics is recovered.

  1. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  2. COMMENTARIES ON CRITICISMS OF MAGNETIC FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    issue of Science. p14 VII. Commentary on "Complexity and Availability for Fusion Power Plants", J of Technology Review. p5 1V. Commentary on "Insurmountable Engineering Problems Seen as Ruling Out `Fusion Power is probably greater than the energy content of fossil or uranium fuels, and the fusion fuel is virtually

  3. Stable High Beta Plasmas Confined by a Dipole Magnetic Field D. T. Garnier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Stable High Beta Plasmas Confined by a Dipole Magnetic Field D. T. Garnier, A. Hansen, M. E. Mauel and confined by the magnetic field of a superconducting coil that is suspended within a large vacuum chamber with the magnetic drifts of fast electrons and causes rapid radial transport. Higher gas fueling stabilizes

  4. MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. II. FIELD-PLASMA INTERACTION B. Fornberg,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fornberg, Bengt

    MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. II. FIELD-PLASMA INTERACTION N. Flyer,1 B. Fornberg In the first paper of this series, we treated the self-confinement of nonlinear force-free magnetic fields study of axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields in the unbounded space outside a unit sphere, presented

  5. Magnetic confinement of a high-density cylindrical plasma Eduardo Ahedoa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad

    collisional plasma column, confined by an axial magnetic field and a cylindrical vessel, is studiedMagnetic confinement of a high-density cylindrical plasma Eduardo Ahedoa) E. T. S. Ingenieros the independent influence of the applied magnetic field and the plasma density on the plasma response. The strong

  6. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore »of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  7. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore »of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  8. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Séguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma (Italy); Rinderknecht, H. G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hoffman, N. M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)] (ORCID:000000030178767X); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sio, H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017274236X); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Delettrez, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672); Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pino, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kagan, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  9. Magnetic Nanorods Confined in a Lamellar Lyotropic Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keevin Béneut; Doru Constantin; Patrick Davidson; Arnaud Dessombz; Corinne Chanéac

    2015-04-11

    The dilute lamellar phase of the nonionic surfactant C$_{12}$EO$_5$ was doped with goethite (iron oxide) nanorods up to a fraction of 5 vol. %. The interaction between the inclusions and the host phase was studied by polarized optical microscopy (with or without an applied magnetic field) and by small-angle X-ray scattering. We find that, when the orientation of the nanorods is modified using the magnetic field, the texture of the lamellar phase changes accordingly; one can thus induce a homeotropic-planar reorientation transition. On the other hand, the lamellar phase induces an attractive interaction between the nanorods. In more concentrated lamellar phases (under stronger confinement) the particles form aggregates. This behavior is not encountered for a similar system doped with spherical particles, emphasizing the role of particle shape in the interaction between doping particles and the host phase.

  10. Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-14

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  11. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, D. A., E-mail: shaughnessy2@llnl.gov; Moody, K. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Grant, P. M.; Gostic, J. M.; Torretto, P. C.; Wooddy, P. T.; Bandong, B. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Hagmann, C. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Despotopulos, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Radiochemistry Program, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,?) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of {sup 198m+g}Au and {sup 196g}Au is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF.

  12. Research and Development of Compact Neutron Sources based on Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Kai; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Nagasaki, Kazunobu [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Takamatsu, Teruhisa; Fujimoto, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Tomoya; Kajiwara, Taiju [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiroya, Seiji; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2009-03-10

    Recent progress is described in the research and development of an inertial-electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) device. Use of a water-cooling jacket with non-uniform thickness shows promising success for landmine detection application, such as effective channeling of neutron flux toward the target and a very stable dc yield in excess of 10{sup 7} D-D neutrons/sec. Addition of an ion source to the conventional glow-discharge-driven IECF enhances the converging deuterium ion energy distribution by allowing a lower operating gas pressure. Improvement in normalized neutron yield, which corresponds to the fusion cross-section averaged over the device radius, by a factor often has been observed.

  13. Driving high-gain shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets by green laser light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Standard direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires UV light irradiation in order to achieve ignition at total laser energy of the order of 1 MJ. The shock-ignition approach opens up the possibility of igniting fusion targets using green light by reducing the implosion velocity and laser-driven ablation pressure. An analytical model is derived, allowing to rescale UV-driven targets to green light. Gain in the range 100-200 is obtained for total laser energy in the range 1.5-3 MJ. With respect to the original UV design, the rescaled targets are less sensitive to irradiation asymmetries and hydrodynamic instabilities, while operating in the same laser-plasma interaction regime.

  14. Manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional Euler equations with relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, J., E-mail: jwaltz@lanl.gov [Computational Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Canfield, T.R. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, N.R. [Computational Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Risinger, L.D.; Wohlbier, J.G. [Computational and Computer Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We present a set of manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional (3D) Euler equations. The purpose of these solutions is to allow for code verification against true 3D flows with physical relevance, as opposed to 3D simulations of lower-dimensional problems or manufactured solutions that lack physical relevance. Of particular interest are solutions with relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules. While ICF capsules are designed for spherical symmetry, they are hypothesized to become highly 3D at late time due to phenomena such as Rayleigh–Taylor instability, drive asymmetry, and vortex decay. ICF capsules also involve highly nonlinear coupling between the fluid dynamics and other physics, such as radiation transport and thermonuclear fusion. The manufactured solutions we present are specifically designed to test the terms and couplings in the Euler equations that are relevant to these phenomena. Example numerical results generated with a 3D Finite Element hydrodynamics code are presented, including mesh convergence studies.

  15. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, April--June 1994. Volume 4, Number 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, M.J. [ed.

    1994-06-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains six articles covering a wide range of activities within the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. It concentrates on target design; theoretical spectral analysis of ICF capsule surfaces; laser fusion experimental methods; and an alternative ICF design, based on ultrafast, ultrapowerful lasers. A key issue for the success of the ICF process is the hydrodynamic stability of the imploding capsule. There are two primary sources of instability growth in the ICF process: (1) asymmetries in the x-ray flux that drive the compression lead to asymmetric in the imploding surface; (2) imperfections on the capsule surface can grow into large perturbations, degrading the capsule performance. In recent years, a great deal of effort, both experimentally and theoretically, has been spent to enhance the Program`s ability to measure, model, and minimize instability growth during an implosion. Four the articles in this issue discuss this subject.

  16. Multiple-beam laser–plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myatt, J. F. Zhang, J.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Edgell, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Froula, D. H.; Hinkel, D. E.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.

    2014-05-15

    The experimental evidence for multiple-beam laser-plasma instabilities of relevance to laser driven inertial confinement fusion at the ignition scale is reviewed, in both the indirect and direct-drive approaches. The instabilities described are cross-beam energy transfer (in both indirectly driven targets on the NIF and in direct-drive targets), multiple-beam stimulated Raman scattering (for indirect-drive), and multiple-beam two-plasmon decay instability (in direct drive). Advances in theoretical understanding and in the numerical modeling of these multiple beam instabilities are presented.

  17. An improved version of the view factor method for simulating inertial confinement fusion hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basko, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    A modified version of the view factor equations is proposed which improves the accuracy of the description of temporal effects in energy redistribution by thermal radiation in cavities driven by power pulses typical for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The method is applied to analyze the process of radiative symmetrization in the simplest type of closed cylindrical hohlraums heated by two x-ray rings on the sidewall of the hohlraum case. Such hohlraums may be used in certain types of ICF targets driven by ion beams. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, C. K.

    Energy spectra and spectrally resolved one-dimensional fluence images of self-emitted charged-fusion products (14.7 MeV D[superscript 3]He protons) are routinely measured from indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion ...

  19. Production and measurement of engineered surfaces for inertial confinement fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Douglas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19

    Inertial Confinement Fusion uses the optical energy from a very high power laser to implode spherical capsules that contain a fuel mixture of deuterium and tritium. The capsules are made of either Beryllium, plastic, or glass and range from 0.1 mm to 2 mm in diameter. As a capsule implodes, thereby compressing the fuel to reach nuclear fusion conditions, it achieves temperatures of millions of degrees Centigrade and very high pressures. In this state, the capsule materials act like fluids and often a low density fluidic material will push on a higher density material which can be a very unstable condition depending upon the smoothness of the interface between the two materials. This unstable condition is called a hydrodynamic instabillity which results in the mixing of the two materials. If the mixing occurs between the fuel and a non-fuel material, it can stop the fusion reaction just like adding significant amounts of water to gasoline can stop the operation of an automobile. Another region in the capsule where surface roughness can cause capsule performance degradation is at a joint. For instance, many capsules are made of hemispheres that are joined together. If the joint surfaces are too rough, then there will an effective reduction in density at the joint. This density reduction can cause a non-uniform implosion which will reduce the fusion energy coming out of the capsule.

  20. Mathematical models for strongly magnetized plasmas with mass disparate particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negulescu, Claudia

    , thermonuclear fusion (and thus energy) is produced in a tokamak, which is a toroidal plasma confining device , Claudia Negulescu (3rd September 2010) Abstract The controlled fusion is achieved by magnetic confinement

  1. Mathematical models for strongly magnetized plasmas with mass disparate particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bostan, Mihai

    , thermonuclear fusion (and thus energy) is produced in a tokamak, which is a toroidal plasma confining device , Claudia Negulescu (August 22, 2010) Abstract The controlled fusion is achieved by magnetic confinement

  2. White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is uncertain. There are predictions of future energy shortages and of severe environmental impacts from present our vision for the future of fusion energy research. In this white paper, following a summary Institute of Technology Michael J. Saltmarsh Director, Fusion Energy Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  3. Pressure profiles of plasmas confined in the field of a magnetic dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Matthew S

    Equilibrium pressure profiles of plasmas confined in the field of a dipole magnet are reconstructed using magnetic and x-ray measurements on the levitated dipole experiment (LDX). LDX operates in two distinct modes: with ...

  4. Magnetic Field Confinement in the Corona: The Role of Magnetic Helicity Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mei Zhang; Natasha Flyer; Boon Chye Low

    2006-03-01

    A loss of magnetic field confinement is believed to be the cause of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a major form of solar activity in the corona. The mechanisms for magnetic energy storage are crucial in understanding how a field may possess enough free energy to overcome the Aly limit and open up. Previously, we have pointed out that the accumulation of magnetic helicity in the corona plays a significant role in storing magnetic energy. In this paper, we investigate another hydromagnetic consequence of magnetic-helicity accumulation. We propose a conjecture that there is an upper bound on the total magnetic helicity that a force-free field can contain. This is directly related to the hydromagnetic property that force-free fields in unbounded space have to be self-confining. Although a mathematical proof of this conjecture for any field configuration is formidable, its plausibility can be demonstrated with the properties of several families of power-law, axisymmetric force-free fields. We put forth mathematical evidence, as well as numerical, indicating that an upper bound on the magnetic helicity may exist for such fields. Thus, the accumulation of magnetic helicity in excess of this upper bound would initiate a non-equilibrium situation, resulting in a CME expulsion as a natural product of coronal evolution.

  5. Path Integral Confined Dirac Fermions in a Constant Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdeldjalil Merdaci; Ahmed Jellal; Lyazid Chetouani

    2014-04-17

    We consider Dirac fermion confined in harmonic potential and submitted to a constant magnetic field. The corresponding solutions of the energy spectrum are obtained by using the path integral techniques. For this, we begin by establishing a symmetric global projection, which provides a symmetric form for the Green function. Based on this, we show that it is possible to end up with the propagator of the harmonic oscillator for one charged particle. After some transformations, we derive the normalized wave functions and the eigenvalues in terms of different physical parameters and quantum numbers. By interchanging quantum numbers, we show that our solutions possed interesting properties. The density of current and the non-relativistic limit are analyzed where different conclusions are obtained.

  6. Magnetic field confinement by meridional flow and the solar tachocline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. L. Kitchatinov; G. Ruediger

    2006-03-16

    We show that the MHD theory that explains the solar tachocline by an effect of the magnetic field can work with the decay modes of a fossil field in the solar interior if the meridional flow of the convection zone penetrates slightly the radiative zone beneath. An equatorward flow of about 10 m/s penetrating to a maximum depth of 1000 km below the convection zone is able to generate almost horizontal field lines in the tachocline region so that the internal field is almost totally confined to the radiative zone. The theory of differential solar rotation indeed provides meridional flows of about 10 m/s and a penetration depth of < 1000 km for viscosity values that are characteristic of a stable tachocline.

  7. Confined Dirac Fermions in a Constant Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Jellal; Abdulaziz D. Alhaidari; Hocine Bahlouli

    2009-04-03

    We obtain an exact solution of the Dirac equation in (2+1)-dimensions in the presence of a constant magnetic field normal to the plane together with a two-dimensional Dirac-oscillator potential coupling. The solution space consists of a positive and negative energy solution, each of which splits into two disconnected subspaces depending on the sign of an azimuthal quantum number, k = 0, \\pm 1, \\pm 2,... and whether the cyclotron frequency is larger or smaller than the oscillator frequency. The spinor wavefunction is written in terms of the associated Laguerre polynomials. For negative k, the relativistic energy spectrum is infinitely degenerate due to the fact that it is independent of k. We compare our results with already published work and point out the relevance of these findings to a systematic formulation of the relativistic quantum Hall effect in a confining potential.

  8. Role of the mean curvature in the geometry of magnetic confinement configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skovoroda, A. A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Taimanov, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-15

    Examples are presented of how the geometric notion of the mean curvature is applied to the vector of a general magnetic field and to magnetic surfaces. It is shown that the mean curvature is related to the variation of the absolute value of the magnetic field along its lines. Magnetic surfaces of constant mean curvature are optimum for plasma confinement in multimirror open confinement systems and rippled tori.

  9. Fatigue cracking of a bare steel first wall in an inertial confinement fusion chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, R. M.; Abbott, R. P.; Havstad, M. A.; Dunne, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Inertial confinement fusion power plants will deposit high energy X-rays onto the outer surfaces of the first wall many times a second for the lifetime of the plant. These X-rays create brief temperature spikes in the first few microns of the wall, which cause an associated highly compressive stress response on the surface of the material. The periodicity of this stress pulse is a concern due to the possibility of fatigue cracking of the wall. We have used finite element analyses to simulate the conditions present on the first wall in order to evaluate the driving force of crack propagation on fusion-facing surface cracks. Analysis results indicate that the X-ray induced plastic compressive stress creates a region of residual tension on the surface between pulses. This tension film will likely result in surface cracking upon repeated cycling. Additionally, the compressive pulse may induce plasticity ahead of the crack tip, leaving residual tension in its wake. However, the stress amplitude decreases dramatically for depths greater than 80–100 ?m into the fusion-facing surface. Crack propagation models as well as stress-life estimates agree that even though small cracks may form on the surface of the wall, they are unlikely to propagate further than 100 ?m without assistance from creep or grain erosion phenomena.

  10. Inertial confinement fusion. 1995 ICF annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is a Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program research and advanced technology development program focused on the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. During FY 1995, the ICF Program continued to conduct ignition target physics optimization studies and weapons physics experiments in support of the Defense Program`s stockpile stewardship goals. It also continued to develop technologies in support of the performance, cost, and schedule goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The NIF is a key element of the DOE`s Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition to its primary Defense Program goals, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application to inertial fusion energy (IFE). Also, ICF technologies have had spin-off applications for industrial and governmental use. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Observation of Centrifugally Driven Interchange Instabilities in a Plasma Confined by a Magnetic Dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Observation of Centrifugally Driven Interchange Instabilities in a Plasma Confined by a Magnetic) Centrifugally driven interchange instabilities are observed in a laboratory plasma confined by a dipole magnetic electrostatic dipole vortex [3] that transports mass, energy, and charge [4]. The centrifugally driven

  12. Magnetic confinement and the sharp tachopause MICHAEL E. McINTYRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    8 Magnetic confinement and the sharp tachopause MICHAEL E. McINTYRE Centre for Atmospheric Science thermomagnetic boundary layer at the tachopause, essential for the confinement of the interior field Bi by high, in turn, point toward the inevitable existence of a global-scale magnetic field Bi in the radiative

  13. Understanding Quasi-Periodic Fieldlines and Their Topology in Toroidal Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guoning

    Introduction In magnetic confinement fusion devices such as a tokamak, magnetic fields are used to confine Sanderson, Guoning Chen, Xavier Tricoche, and Elaine Cohen Abstract In the study of a magnetic confinement fusion device such as a tokamak, physicists need to understand the topology of the flux (or magnetic

  14. Analysis of Recurrent Patterns in Toroidal Magnetic Fields Allen R. Sanderson, Member, IEEE Guoning Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Breslau ¶ Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Abstract-- In the development of magnetic confinement fusion patterns 1 INTRODUCTION The development of magnetic confinement fusion which will poten- tially be a future the magnetic field that confines the burning plasma. While the magnetic field can be described as a vector

  15. (Experimental development, testing and research work in support of the inertial confinement fusion program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; Luckhardt, R.; Terry, N.; Drake, D.; Gaines, J. (eds.)

    1990-04-27

    This KMS Fusion Semi-Annual Technical Report covers the period October 1989 through March 1990. It contains a review of work performed by KMS Fusion, Inc. (KMSF), in support of the national program to achieve inertially confined fusion (ICF). A major section of the report is devoted to target technology, a field which is expected to play an increasingly important role in the overall KMSF fusion effort. Among the highlights of our efforts in this area covered in this report are: improvements and new developments in target fabrication techniques, including a discussion of techniques for introducing gaussian bumps and bands on target surfaces. Development of a single automated system for the interferometric characterization of transparent shells. Residual gas analysis of the blowing gases contained in glass shells made from xerogels. These usually include CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, and are objectionable because they dilute the fuel. Efforts to observe the ice layers formed in the {beta}-layering process in cryogenic targets, and to simulate the formation of these layers. In addition to our work on target technology, we conducted experiments with the Chroma laser and supported the ICF effort at other labs with theoretical and computational support as well as diagnostic development. Included in the work covered in this report are: experiments on Chroma to study interpenetration of and ionization balance in laser generated plasmas. Diagnostic development, including an optical probe for the Aurora laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a high energy x-ray continuum spectrograph for Aurora. Investigation of the radiation cooling instability as a possible mechanism for the generation of relatively cold, dense jets observed in ICF experiments.

  16. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerators for Inertial Confinement Fusion,” Proc. IAEAbriefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the

  17. Summary talk to 21st IAEA FEC, Chendu, 2006 Inertial fusion advance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scheme V. heavy ion fusion scheme VI. Other miscellanies VII. Brief remarks #12;Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) parallel to magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) is an alternative approach to gain inertialSummary talk to 21st IAEA FEC, Chendu, 2006 Inertial fusion advance towards ignition and gain X. T

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

    2010-01-01

    29 The Fission-fusion Hybrid - iii - General DiscussionInteraction in Heavy Ion Fusion BIBLIOGRAPHY HEAVY IONReactor Designs . . . 27 Pure Fusion Power Reactor Tritium

  19. Prediction of inertial confinement fusion chamber gas evolution using multi-species computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Robert Scott

    2007-01-01

    to the pro- duction of fusion energy for power generation.injection in an inertial fusion energy chamber, Fusionas Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (Laser IFE), the ability to

  20. A new class of magnetic confinement device in the shape of a knot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, S. R., E-mail: shudson@pppl.gov; Startsev, E.; Feibush, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    We describe a new class of magnetic confinement device, with the magnetic axis in the shape of a knot. We call such devices “knotatrons.” An example is given that has a large volume filled with magnetic surfaces, with significant rotational-transform, and with the magnetic field produced entirely by external circular coils.

  1. Advances in compact proton spectrometers for inertial-confinement fusion and plasma nuclear science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Sangster, T. C.; Roberts, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Compact wedge-range-filter proton spectrometers cover proton energies {approx}3-20 MeV. They have been used at the OMEGA laser facility for more than a decade for measuring spectra of primary D{sup 3}He protons in D{sup 3}He implosions, secondary D{sup 3}He protons in DD implosions, and ablator protons in DT implosions; they are now being used also at the National Ignition Facility. The spectra are used to determine proton yields, shell areal density at shock-bang time and compression-bang time, fuel areal density, and implosion symmetry. There have been changes in fabrication and in analysis algorithms, resulting in a wider energy range, better accuracy and precision, and better robustness for survivability with indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments.

  2. Development of a Bayesian method for the analysis of inertial confinement fusion experiments on the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffney, Jim A; Sonnad, Vijay; Libby, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    The complex nature of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments results in a very large number of experimental parameters that are only known with limited reliability. These parameters, combined with the myriad physical models that govern target evolution, make the reliable extraction of physics from experimental campaigns very difficult. We develop an inference method that allows all important experimental parameters, and previous knowledge, to be taken into account when investigating underlying microphysics models. The result is framed as a modified $\\chi^{2}$ analysis which is easy to implement in existing analyses, and quite portable. We present a first application to a recent convergent ablator experiment performed at the NIF, and investigate the effect of variations in all physical dimensions of the target (very difficult to do using other methods). We show that for well characterised targets in which dimensions vary at the 0.5% level there is little effect, but 3% variations change the results of i...

  3. A new ignition scheme using hybrid indirect-direct drive for inertial confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Dai, Zhensheng; Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping; Zhang, W Y; He, X T

    2013-01-01

    A new hybrid indirect-direct-drive ignition scheme is proposed for inertial confinement fusion: a cryogenic capsule encased in a hohlraum is first compressed symmetrically by indirect-drive x-rays, and then accelerated and ignited by both direct-drive lasers and x-rays. A steady high-density plateau newly formed between the radiation and electron ablation fronts suppresses the rarefaction at the radiation ablation front and greatly enhances the drive pressure. Meanwhile, multiple shock reflections at the fuel/hot-spot interface are prevented during capsule deceleration. Thus rapid ignition and burn are realized. In comparison with the conventional indirect drive, the hybrid drive implodes the capsule with a higher velocity ($\\sim4.3\\times10^7$ cm/s) and a much lower convergence ratio ($\\sim$25), and the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities is significantly reduced, especially at the fuel/hot-spot interface.

  4. Effect of experimentally observed hydrogenic fractionation on inertial confinement fusion ignition target performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenty, P. W.; Wittman, M. D.; Harding, D. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The need of cryogenic hydrogenic fuels in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition targets has been long been established. Efficient implosion of such targets has mandated keeping the adiabat of the main fuel layer at low levels to ensure drive energies are kept at reasonable minima. The use of cryogenic fuels helps meet this requirement and has therefore become the standard in most ICF ignition designs. To date most theoretical ICF ignition target designs have assumed a homogeneous layer of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel kept slightly below the triple point. However, recent work has indicated that, as cryogenic fuel layers are formed inside an ICF capsule, isotopic dissociation of the tritium (T), deuterium (D), and DT takes place leading to a 'fractionation' of the final ice layer. This paper will numerically investigate the effects that various scenarios of fractionation have on hot-spot formation, ignition, and burn in ICF ignition target designs.

  5. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  6. A review of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), ICF reactors, and the HYLIFE-II concept using liquid FLiBe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moir, R.W.

    1989-09-25

    This paper reviews Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) reactor designs and discusses their safety, environmental impact, and economic prospects. The emphasis is on designs carried out at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) because of the author's familiarity with them; the omission of other designs should not necessarily be taken as disparaging towards those designs. 18 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thio, Francis Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

  8. Computational problems in magnetic fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killeen, J.

    1981-08-31

    Numerical calculations have had an important role in fusion research since its beginning, but the application of computers to plasma physics has advanced rapidly in the last few years. One reason for this is the increasing sophistication of the mathematical models of plasma behavior, and another is the increased speed and memory of the computers which made it reasonable to consider numerical simulation of fusion devices. The behavior of a plasma is simulated by a variety of numerical models. Some models used for short times give detailed knowledge of the plasma on a microscopic scale, while other models used for much longer times compute macroscopic properties of the plasma dynamics. The computer models used in fusion research are surveyed. One of the most active areas of research is in time-dependent, three-dimensional, resistive magnetohydrodynamic models. These codes are reviewed briefly.

  9. Dynamic response of materials on sub-nanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, D C; Tierney, T E; Luo, S N; Paisley, D L; Kyrala, G A; Hauer, A; Greenfield, S R; Koskelo, A C; McClellan, K J; Lorenzana, H E; Knudson, M D; Peralta, P P; Loomis, E

    2004-12-09

    During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. these relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser ablation can be particularly convenient. The TRIDENT laser has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from {approx}1 to 200GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including surface velocimetry (line-imaging VISAR), surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically-driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1TPa.

  10. Mode 1 drive asymmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spears, Brian K. Edwards, M. J.; Hatchett, S.; Kritcher, A.; Lindl, J.; Munro, D.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Kilkenny, J.; Knauer, J.

    2014-04-15

    Mode 1 radiation drive asymmetry (pole-to-pole imbalance) at significant levels can have a large impact on inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This asymmetry distorts the cold confining shell and drives a high-speed jet through the hot spot. The perturbed hot spot shows increased residual kinetic energy and reduced internal energy, and it achieves reduced pressure and neutron yield. The altered implosion physics manifests itself in observable diagnostic signatures, especially the neutron spectrum which can be used to measure the neutron-weighted flow velocity, apparent ion temperature, and neutron downscattering. Numerical simulations of implosions with mode 1 asymmetry show that the resultant simulated diagnostic signatures are moved toward the values observed in many NIF experiments. The diagnostic output can also be used to build a set of integrated implosion performance metrics. The metrics indicate that P{sub 1} has a significant impact on implosion performance and must be carefully controlled in NIF implosions.

  11. Production and Metrology of Cylindrical Inertial Confinement Fusion Targets with Sinusoidal Perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balkey, M.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Day, R.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Batha, S.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Elliot, N.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Pierce, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Sandoval, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Garrard, K.P. [North Carolina State University (United States); Sohn, A. [North Carolina State University (United States)

    2004-03-15

    Shock waves generated during inertial confinement fusion implosions propagate toward the center of the capsule encountering interfaces between materials with different densities, such as between the ablator and the DT fuel. These interactions are hydrodynamically unstable and the resulting instability causes mixing of the materials at the interface, which is predicted to have detrimental effects on fusion burn. In this experiment, the growth of a single-mode perturbation machined into a radiographically opaque marker layer, driven by a strong shock, is measured during a cylindrically symmetric implosion. These measurements are used to validate simulations and theories of the complex hydrodynamics. Since any perturbation on the marker layer surface will lead to instability growth, precise knowledge of the initial conditions is critical. The targets used in this experiment have up to a 3.0-{mu}m-amplitude, mode 28 ({lambda} = 98 {mu}m) sinusoidal perturbation machined into a 438-{mu}m-outerradius aluminum band with a nominal thickness of 8 {mu}m. The perturbations were machined using a fast-tool servo [B. JARED and T. A. DOW, Precision Engineering Center Annual Report, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC, p. 123 (1996)] and were metrologized using a linear variable differential transformer [FRANK J. OLIVER, Practical Instrumentation Tranducers, p. 42-45, Hayden Book Company (1971)]. In this paper, the importance of metrology is discussed and is shown to be critical to the interpretation of experimental results.

  12. Study of fusion regimes in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using the new eclipse disk diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murali, S. Krupakar; Cipiti, B.B.; Santarius, J.F.; Kulcinski, G.L. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    New diagnostics are required to understand the physics operation of an inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device. In an attempt to understand the fusion source regimes within the IEC device, a new diagnostic called the eclipse disk has been introduced. This diagnostic was used to exploit the byproduct protons' energy difference between the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium--an isotope of helium with two protons and one neutron (D-{sup 3}He) reactions to study the contributions of the protons generated from various source regimes. These source regimes are divided into five categories namely: converged core, embedded, beam background, volume, and wall-surface sources. The eclipse disk diagnostic has provided the first confirmed evidence that D-{sup 3}He reactions are predominantly embedded reactions. It has been observed that at the present operating power levels (6-10 kW) most of the D-D reactions occur in the volume of the chamber caused by the charge exchanged neutrals, and the converged core contribution is significant only for D-D reactions. Since the branching ratio for the proton and neutron generation in a D-D fusion reaction is {approx}50%, it is inferred that the proton to neutron count ratio is a better parameter to monitor than either proton or neutron counts measured alone while studying the source regimes. This parameter may also be used for studying the potential wells within the cathode grid.

  13. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule Nelson M. Hoffman, George B. Zimmerman, Kim Molvig, Hans G. Rinderknecht, Michael J. Rosenberg, B. J.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions on the ignition and burn of inertial confinement fusion targets: A multi-scale approach Phys. Plasmas 21, 122709 (2014); 10.1063/1.4904212 Metrics for long wavelength asymmetries in inertial confinement fusion

  14. Electric field and ionization-gradient effects on inertial-confinement-fusion implosions This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric field and ionization-gradient effects on inertial-confinement-fusion implosions.1088/0741-3335/51/12/124048 Electric field and ionization-gradient effects on inertial-confinement-fusion implosions P A Amendt1 , J L-generated electric fields (108 ­109 V m-1 ) in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion capsules has been reported

  15. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosionsa) H. G. Rinderknecht, H. Sio, C. K. Li, N. Hoffman, A. B. Zylstra, M. J. Rosenberg, J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosionsa) H. G. Rinderknecht (2013); 10.1063/1.4805081 On the transport coefficients of hydrogen in the inertial confinement fusion in inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGAa) Phys. Plasmas 14, 056306 (2007); 10.1063/1.2671761 Laser

  16. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-15

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  17. Use of internal current rings in long closed magnetic confinement systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsventoukh, M. M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University) (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-15

    A closed magnetic confinement system is considered in the shape a corrugated torus into one or several mirror cells of which current rings are introduced that reverse the magnetic field on the axis. An internal current ring surrounded by plasma creates a magnetic configuration with an average magnetic well on the axis. The axial plasma region of such a configuration is stabilized by cusps, whereas the outer region can be stabilized by a divertor, provided that the plasma pressure gradually decreases toward the periphery. The use of internal current rings may be profitable in stellarators in which the confinement region can be divided into several regions by magnetic mirrors.

  18. Report of the Technical' Panel on Magnetic Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOE/S-O035 Report of the Technical' Panel on Magnetic Fusion of the Energy Research Advisory Board November 1986 A Report of the Energy Research Advisory Board to the United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 #12;#12;Febnmry 12, 1987 Energy Research Advisory Board to the United States Department

  19. The Magnetic Fusion Program in China ----Roadmap and Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Magnetic Fusion Program in China ----Roadmap and Progress Presented by Yuanxi Wan1, 2 1 Significant progress of MF research has been achieved since China join ITER project Roadmap of MFE development on the conceptual design and some R&D of CFETR has been achieved A special group for drafting the MF roadmap

  20. AN ACOUSTICALLY DRIVEN MAGNETIZED TARGET FUSION REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laberge, Michel [General Fusion Inc., Vancouver (Canada)

    2009-07-26

    We propose a new acoustic compression scheme for a MTF power plant. A strong acoustic wave is produced by piston impacts. The wave focuses in liquid PbLi to compress a pre-formed FRC plasma. Simulations indicate the possibility of building an economical 60 MWe power plant. A proof-of-principle experiment produces a small D-D fusion yield of 2000 neutrons per shot.

  1. THE MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT OF ELECTRON AND PHOTON DOSE PROFILES AND THE POSSIBLE EFFECT OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becchetti, Fred

    THE MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT OF ELECTRON AND PHOTON DOSE PROFILES AND THE POSSIBLE EFFECT OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD ON RELATIVE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS by Yu Chen A dissertation submitted in partial magnetic field can significantly improve electron beam dose profiles. This could permit improved targeting

  2. Limits on weak magnetic confinement of neutral atoms C. A. Sackett*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackett, Cass

    Limits on weak magnetic confinement of neutral atoms C. A. Sackett* Physics Department, University It is shown that when a magnetic field is used to support neutral atoms against the gravitational force mg, the total curvature of the field magnitude B must be larger than m2 g2 / 2 2 B , where is the magnetic

  3. Plasma generation and confinement in a toroidal magnetic cusp J. Egedal, A. Fasoli,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    Plasma generation and confinement in a toroidal magnetic cusp J. Egedal, A. Fasoli,a) M. Porkolab0034-6748 00 01209-0 I. INTRODUCTION The interaction between plasmas and magnetic fields leading by microscopic mecha- nisms, the rearrangement of the magnetic field lines in the presence of the plasma

  4. Pulsed High Density Fusion John Slough#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    configuration allowing for much longer energy confinement lifetimes. For this reason, the FRC plasma need. Essentially, the more massive the system required to confine and heat the fusion plasma, the larger the cost required for fusion gain with low steady state reactors ( being the ratio of the plasma to magnetic energy

  5. Improvement of collisionless particle confinement in a non-quasi-symmetric stellarator vacuum magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasilov, S. V.; Kernbichler, W.; Mikhailov, M. I.; Nemov, V. V.; Nuehrenberg, J. Zille, R.

    2013-04-15

    A non-quasi-symmetric stellarator vacuum magnetic field with an aspect ratio of about 11 is found in which collisionless particles are confined up to about 2/5 of the minor radius.

  6. Efficient evaluation of beam ion confinement in spherical tokamaks Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    of the beam confinement. Losses due to nonadiabatic changes in the magnetic moment are also evaluated. Due: 10.1063/1.1569490# I. INTRODUCTION One of the important methods for heating magnetically confinedEfficient evaluation of beam ion confinement in spherical tokamaks J. Egedal Massachusetts

  7. Efficient evaluation of beam ion confinement in spherical tokamaks Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    of the beam confinement. Losses due to nonadiabatic changes in the magnetic moment are also evaluated. Due: 10.1063/1.1569490 I. INTRODUCTION One of the important methods for heating magnetically confinedEfficient evaluation of beam ion confinement in spherical tokamaks J. Egedal Massachusetts

  8. MMMMaaaaggggnnnneeeettttiiiicccc FFFFuuuussssiiiioooonnnn EEEEnnnneeeerrrrggggyyyy MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MINUTES OF FUEL IN PLASMA · LOW RISK OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS PROLIFERATION · CONCENTRATED RELATIVE TO SOLAR FFFFuuuussssiiiioooonnnn EEEEnnnneeeerrrrggggyyyy Schematic of MFE Power Plant Raw Fuel WasteFuel p First Wall Magnet

  9. A new class of magnetic confinement device in the shape of a knot S. R. Hudson,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Stuart

    A new class of magnetic confinement device in the shape of a knot S. R. Hudson,a) E. Startsev class of magnetic confinement device, with the magnetic axis in the shape of a knot. We call, with significant rotational-transform, and with the magnetic field produced entirely by external circular coils. VC

  10. Dynamic symmetry of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion capsules on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Town, R. P. J., E-mail: town2@llnl.gov; Bradley, D. K.; Kritcher, A.; Jones, O. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Tommasini, R.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Döppner, T.; Dewald, E. L.; Eder, D. C.; Field, J. E.; Glenn, S. M.; Izumi, N.; Haan, S. W.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    In order to achieve ignition using inertial confinement fusion it is important to control the growth of low-mode asymmetries as the capsule is compressed. Understanding the time-dependent evolution of the shape of the hot spot and surrounding fuel layer is crucial to optimizing implosion performance. A design and experimental campaign to examine sources of asymmetry and to quantify symmetry throughout the implosion has been developed and executed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We have constructed a large simulation database of asymmetries applied during different time intervals. Analysis of the database has shown the need to measure and control the hot-spot shape, areal density distribution, and symmetry swings during the implosion. The shape of the hot spot during final stagnation is measured using time-resolved imaging of the self-emission, and information on the shape of the fuel at stagnation can be obtained from Compton radiography [R. Tommasini et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309 (2011)]. For the first time on NIF, two-dimensional inflight radiographs of gas-filled and cryogenic fuel layered capsules have been measured to infer the symmetry of the radiation drive on the capsule. These results have been used to modify the hohlraum geometry and the wavelength tuning to improve the inflight implosion symmetry. We have also expanded our shock timing capabilities by the addition of extra mirrors inside the re-entrant cone to allow the simultaneous measurement of shock symmetry in three locations on a single shot, providing asymmetry information up to Legendre mode 4. By diagnosing the shape at nearly every step of the implosion, we estimate that shape has typically reduced fusion yield by about 50% in ignition experiments.

  11. Confinement and dynamics of laser-produced plasma expanding across a transverse magnetic field S. S. Harilal, M. S. Tillack, B. O'Shay, C. V. Bindhu, and F. Najmabadi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    in the boundary of the jet. Even though the magnetic pressure PB B2 /8 exceeded both the plasma ram pressure Pr nm evolution, astrophysical jets, etc. 1,2 . In the field of inertial fusion, confinement of an expanding of the plasma jet in the plane perpendicular to the B field as due to curvature of the polarization fields

  12. Inertial confinement fusion. ICF quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993, Volume 4, Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, H.T.; Schleich, D.P.; Murphy, P.W. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    In the 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report of its review of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, it was recommended that a high priority be placed on completing the Precision Nova Project and its associated experimental campaign. Since fiscal year 1990, the lab has therefore campaigned vigorously on Nova and in its supporting laboratories to develop the Precision Nova capabilities needed to perform the stressful target experiments recommended in the 1990 NAS report. The activities to enable these experiments have been directed at improvements in three areas - the Nova laser, target fabrication capabilities, and target diagnostics. As summarized in the five articles in this report, the Precision Nova improvements have been successfully completed. These improvements have had a positive impact on target performance and on the ability to diagnose the results, as evidenced by the HEP-1 experimental results. The five articles generally concentrate on improvements to the capabilities rather than on the associated target physics experiments. Separate abstracts are included for each paper.

  13. Investigation of radial wire arrays for inertial confinement fusion and radiation effects science.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Bland, Simon Nicholas (Imperial College, London); McBride, Ryan D.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London); Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco Andres (Imperial College, London); Jennings, Christopher A.; Hall, Gareth Neville (Imperial College, London); Ampleford, David J.; Peyton, Bradley Philip; Lebedev, Sergey V. (Imperial College, London); Cleveland, Monica; Rogers, Thomas John; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-02-01

    Radial wire arrays provide an alternative x-ray source for Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. These arrays, where wires are positioned radially outwards from a central cathode to a concentric anode, have the potential to drive a more compact ICF hohlraum. A number of experiments were performed on the 7MA Saturn Generator. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1MA level, where they have been shown to provide similar x-ray outputs to larger diameter cylindrical arrays, to the higher current levels required for ICF. Data indicates that at 7MA radial arrays can obtain higher power densities than cylindrical wire arrays, so may be of use for x-ray driven ICF on future facilities. Even at the 7MA level, data using Saturn's short pulse mode indicates that a radial array should be able to drive a compact hohlraum to temperatures {approx}92eV, which may be of interest for opacity experiments. These arrays are also shown to have applications to jet production for laboratory astrophysics. MHD simulations require additional physics to match the observed behavior.

  14. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium–tritium micro-implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R. J., E-mail: rodmason01@msn.com; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J. [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ?40??m diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 10{sup 2} or 10{sup 3}?g/cm{sup 3} densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20?keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200?g/cm{sup 3}), while the elliptical shells evidence p?=?2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  15. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  16. Metrics for long wavelength asymmetries in inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A. L.; Town, R.; Bradley, D.; Clark, D.; Spears, B.; Jones, O.; Haan, S.; Springer, P. T.; Lindl, J.; Callahan, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Scott, R. H. H. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)] [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    We investigate yield degradation due to applied low mode P2 and P4 asymmetries in layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. This study has been performed with a large database of >600 2D simulations. We show that low mode radiation induced drive asymmetries can result in significant deviation between the core hot spot shape and the fuel ?R shape at peak compression. In addition, we show that significant residual kinetic energy at peak compression can be induced by these low mode asymmetries. We have developed a metric, which is a function of the hot spot shape, fuel ?R shape, and residual kinetic energy at peak compression, that is well correlated to yield degradation due to low mode shape perturbations. It is shown that the ?R shape and residual kinetic energy cannot, in general, be recovered by inducing counter asymmetries to make the hot core emission symmetric. In addition, we show that the yield degradation due to low mode asymmetries is well correlated to measurements of time dependent shape throughout the entire implosion, including early time shock symmetry and inflight fuel symmetry.

  17. Indirect-direct hybrid-drive work-dominated hotspot ignition for inertial confinement fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, X T; Li, J W; Liu, J; Lan, K; Wu, J F; Wang, L F; Ye, W H

    2015-01-01

    An indirect-direct hybrid-drive work-dominated hotspot ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion is proposed: a layered fuel capsule inside a spherical hohlraum with an octahedral symmetry is compressed first by indirect-drive soft-x rays (radiation) and then by direct-drive lasers in last pulse duration. In this scheme, an enhanced shock and a follow-up compression wave for ignition with pressure far greater than the radiation ablation pressure are driven by the direct-drive lasers, and provide large pdV work to the hotspot to perform the work-dominated ignition. The numerical simulations show that the enhanced shock stops the reflections of indirect-drive shock at the main fuel-hotspot interface, and therefore significantly suppresses the hydrodynamic instabilities and asymmetry. Based on the indirect-drive implosion dynamics the hotspot is further compressed and heated by the enhanced shock and follow-up compression wave, resulting in the work-dominated hotspot ignition and burn with a maximal implos...

  18. X-ray ablation rates in inertial confinement fusion capsule materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    X-ray ablation rates have been measured in beryllium, copper-doped beryllium, germanium-doped plastic (Ge-doped CH), and diamondlike high density carbon (HDC) for radiation temperatures T in the range of 160-260 eV. In beryllium, the measured ablation rates range from 3 to 12 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns; in Ge-doped CH, the ablation rates range from 2 to 6 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns; and for HDC, the rates range from 2 to 9 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns. The ablation rates follow an approximate T{sup 3} dependence and, for T below 230 eV, the beryllium ablation rates are significantly higher than HDC and Ge-doped CH. The corresponding implied ablation pressures are in the range of 20-160 Mbar, scaling as T{sup 3.5}. The results are found to be well predicted by computational simulations using the physics packages and computational techniques employed in the design of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion capsules. An iterative rocket model has been developed and used to compare the ablation rate data set to spherical indirect-drive capsule implosion experiments and to confirm the validity of some aspects of proposed full-scale National Ignition Facility ignition capsule designs.

  19. On the transport coefficients of hydrogen in the inertial confinement fusion regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Flavien; Recoules, Vanina; Decoster, Alain; Clerouin, Jean [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Desjarlais, Michael [Pulsed Power Sciences Center, Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Ab initio molecular dynamics is used to compute the thermal and electrical conductivities of hydrogen from 10 to 160 g cm{sup -3} and temperatures up to 800 eV, i.e., thermodynamical conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ionic structure is obtained using molecular dynamics simulations based on an orbital-free treatment for the electrons. The transport properties were computed using ab initio simulations in the DFT/LDA approximation. The thermal and electrical conductivities are evaluated using Kubo-Greenwood formulation. Particular attention is paid to the convergence of electronic transport properties with respect to the number of bands and atoms. These calculations are then used to check various analytical models (Hubbard's, Lee-More's and Ichimaru's) widely used in hydrodynamics simulations of ICF capsule implosions. The Lorenz number, which is the ratio between thermal and electrical conductivities, is also computed and compared to the well-known Wiedemann-Franz law in different regimes ranging from the highly degenerate to the kinetic one. This allows us to deduce electrical conductivity from thermal conductivity for analytical model. We find that the coupling of Hubbard and Spitzer models gives a correct description of the behavior of electrical and thermal conductivities in the whole thermodynamic regime.

  20. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  1. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-10-14

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. Thus, with first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (? = 0.1 to 100 g/cm3 and T = 1,000 to 4,000,000 K). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosionsmore »on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ~5% reduction in implosion velocity and ~30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ~10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered lights from ICF implosions.« less

  2. Pulsed power considerations for electron beam pumped krypton fluoride lasers for inertial confinement fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, E.A.; McDonald, T.E.; Rosocha, L.A.; Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Smith, I.D. (Pulse Sciences, Inc., San Leandro, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program is developing the krypton-fluoride excimer laser for use as an ICF driver. The KrF laser has a number of inherent characteristics that make it a promising driver candidate, such as short wavelength (0.25 {mu}m), broad bandwidth to target (>100 cm{sup {minus}1}), pulse-shaping with high dynamic range, and the potential for high overall efficiency (>5%) and repetitive operation. The large KrF laser amplifiers needed for ICF drivers are electron-beam pumped. A key issue for all laser ICF drivers is cost, and a leading cost component of a KrF laser driver is associated with the pulsed power and electron diode. Therefore, the efficient generation of electron beams is a high priority. The Los Alamos ICF program is investigating pulsed-power and diode designs and technologies to further the development of affordable KrF laser ICF drivers. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Kime, S.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.

    2012-03-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MegaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 {mu}m were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  4. Magnetic particles confined in a modulated channel: structural transitions tunable by tilting a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Galván-Moya; D. Lucena; W. P. Ferreira; F. M. Peeters

    2014-01-03

    The ground state of colloidal magnetic particles in a modulated channel are investigated as function of the tilt angle of an applied magnetic field. The particles are confined by a parabolic potential in the transversal direction while in the axial direction a periodic substrate potential is present. By using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, we construct a phase diagram for the different crystal structures as a function of the magnetic field orientation, strength of the modulated potential and the commensurability factor of the system. Interestingly, we found first and second order phase transitions between different crystal structures, which can be manipulated by the orientation of the external magnetic field. A re-entrant behavior is found between two- and four-chain configurations, with continuous second order transitions. Novel configurations are found consisting of frozen in solitons. By changing the orientation and/or strength of the magnetic field and/or the strength and the spatial frequency of the periodic substrate potential, the system transits through different phases.

  5. An improved method for measuring the absolute DD neutron yield and calibrating neutron time-of-flight detectors in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, C. (Caleb Joseph)

    2014-01-01

    Since the establishment of nuclear physics in the early 1900's and the development of the hydrogen bomb in the 1950's, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been an important field in physics. Funded largely though the ...

  6. Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials Science Subcommittee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials, Columbia University 2 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT December 19, 2011 Summary The proposal for tritium-suppressed D-D fusion and the understanding of the turbulent pinch in magnetically confined plasma

  7. Study of internal magnetic field via polarimetry in fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Controlled thermonuclear fusion is a promising2007]. Controlled thermonuclear fusion is based on the

  8. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2008-01-01

    J. D. Lindl, Inertial Confinement Fusion: The Quest forusing the LASNEX inertial confinement fusion target physics

  9. Failure modes and effects analysis of fusion magnet systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmermann, M; Kazimi, M S; Siu, N O; Thome, R J

    1988-12-01

    A failure modes and consequence analysis of fusion magnet system is an important contributor towards enhancing the design by improving the reliability and reducing the risk associated with the operation of magnet systems. In the first part of this study, a failure mode analysis of a superconducting magnet system is performed. Building on the functional breakdown and the fault tree analysis of the Toroidal Field (TF) coils of the Next European Torus (NET), several subsystem levels are added and an overview of potential sources of failures in a magnet system is provided. The failure analysis is extended to the Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of interactions within the fusion device caused by the operation of the PF magnets is presented in the form of an Interaction Matrix. A number of these interactions may have significant consequences for the TF magnet system particularly interactions triggered by electrical failures in the PF magnet system. In the second part of this study, two basic categories of electrical failures in the PF magnet system are examined: short circuits between the terminals of external PF coils, and faults with a constant voltage applied at external PF coil terminals. An electromagnetic model of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is used to examine the mechanical load conditions for the PF and the TF coils resulting from these fault scenarios. It is found that shorts do not pose large threats to the PF coils. Also, the type of plasma disruption has little impact on the net forces on the PF and the TF coils. 39 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  11. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

  12. Strange quark matter in strong magnetic fields within a confining model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monika Sinha; Xu-Guang Huang; Armen Sedrakian

    2013-08-01

    We construct an equation of state of strange quark matter in strong magnetic field within a confining model. The confinement is modeled by means of the Richardson potential for quark-quark interaction modified suitably to account for strong magnetic field. We compare our results for the equation of state and magnetization of matter to those derived within the MIT bag model. The differences between these models arise mainly due to the momentum dependence of the strong interaction between quarks in the Richardson model. Specifically, we find that the magnetization of strange quark matter in this model has much more pronounced de Haas-van Alf\\'{v}en oscillations than in the MIT bag model, which is the consequence of the (static) gluon-exchange structure of the confining potential.

  13. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffman, Nelson M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)] (ORCID:000000030178767X); Zimmerman, George B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Molvig, Kim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rinderknecht, Hans G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Albright, B. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Simakov, Andrei N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sio, Hong [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017274236X); Zylstra, Alex B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Johnson, Maria Gatu [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Séguin, Fredrick H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, Johan A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Petrasso, Richard D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Higdon, David M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Srinivasan, Gowri [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Glebov, Vladimir Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, Christian [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, Wolf [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Sangster, T. Craig [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672)

    2015-05-01

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method described here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach will motivate continued theoretical research into the development of first-principles-based, comprehensive, self-consistent, yet useable models of kinetic multispecies ion behavior in ICF plasmas.

  14. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, Michael J.; Albright, B. J.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Sio, Hong; Zylstra, Alex B.; Johnson, Maria Gatu; et al

    2015-05-19

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method describedmore »here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach will motivate continued theoretical research into the development of first-principles-based, comprehensive, self-consistent, yet useable models of kinetic multispecies ion behavior in ICF plasmas.« less

  15. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be required to embark on a serious R&D program for this application.

  16. arXiv:1205.2327v1[math.AP]10May2012 Impact of strong magnetic fields on collision mechanism for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fusion is achieved by magnetic confinement i.e., the plasma is confined into a toroidal domain (tokamak of magnetic confinement. We investigate both first and second order asymptotic approxima- tions, when properties hold true. Motivated by the magnetic fusion, many research programs in plasma physics concern

  17. Development of a neutron imaging diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, G. L.; Berggren, R. R.; Bradley, P. A.; Cverna, F. H.; Faulkner, J. R.; Gobby, P. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Swenson, F. J.; Tegtmeier, J. A.; Walton, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    Pinhole imaging of the neutron production in laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments can provide important information about the performance of various capsule designs. This requires the development of systems capable of spatial resolutions on the order of 5 {mu}m or less for source strengths of 10{sup 15} and greater. We have initiated a program which will lead to the achievement of such a system to be employed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) facility. Calculated neutron output distributions for various capsule designs will be presented to illustrate the information which can be gained from neutron imaging and to demonstrate the requirements for a useful system. We will describe the lines-of-sight available at NIF for neutron imaging and explain how these can be utilized to reach the required parameters for neutron imaging. We will describe initial development work to be carried out at the Omega facility and the path which will lead to systems to be implemented at NIF. Beginning this year, preliminary experiments will be aimed at achieving resolutions of 30--60 {mu}m for direct-drive capsules with neutron outputs of about 10{sup 14}. The main thrust of these experiments will be to understand issues related to the fabrication and alignment of small diameter pinhole systems as well as the problems associated with signal-to-background ratios at the image plane. Subsequent experiments at Omega will be described. These efforts will be aimed at achieving resolutions of about 10 {mu}m. Proposed developments for new imaging systems as well as further refinement of pinhole techniques will be presented.

  18. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ?34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  19. Improving particle confinement in inertial electrostatic fusion for spacecraft power and propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Carl, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Fusion energy is attractive for use in future spacecraft because of improved fuel energy density and reduced radioactivity compared with fission power. Unfortunately, the most promising means of generating fusion power on ...

  20. Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yangfang [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany

    2012-08-08

    It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given voltage. Particle fluxes ranging from a few tens of particle per second up to thousands of particles per second have been achieved using this simple device. To achieve higher dust injection speed, another key consideration is how to accelerate dust at controlled amount. In addition to gravity, other possible acceleration mechanisms include electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration. Features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. We will also describe laboratory experiments on dust acceleration.

  1. Road Map for a Modular Magnetic Fusion Program Dale M. Meade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are now being done at the energy production scale. This paper describes a modular approach that addresses that limit the maximum plasma pressure, microinstabilities that limit the plasma energy confinement and fast for fusion, and until high-gain plasmas can be produced in the laboratory, the world fusion community

  2. Road Map for a Modular Magnetic Fusion Program Dale M. Meade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are now being done at the energy production scale. This paper describes a modular approach that addresses that limit the maximum plasma pressure, microinstabilities that limit the plasma energy confinement and fast for fusion, and until high­gain plasmas can be produced in the laboratory, the world fusion community

  3. Quark confinement due to non-Abelian magnetic monopoles in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi; Shibata, Akihiro; Shinohara, Toru; Kato, Seikou [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Computing Research Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Fukui National College of Technology, Sabae 916-8507 (Japan)

    2012-10-23

    We present recent results on quark confinement: in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory, confinement of fundamental quarks is obtained due to the dual Meissner effect originated from non-Abelian magnetic monopoles defined in a gauge-invariant way, which is distinct from the well-known Abelian projection scenario. This is achieved by using a non-Abelian Stokes theorem for the Wilson loop operator and a new reformulation of the Yang-Mills theory.

  4. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  5. Title of dissertation: DIAMAGNETISM OF A SUPERSONIC ROTATING MAGNETIZED PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    to centrifugally confine a hydrogen plasma with the goal of investigating a magnetic confinement scheme applicable as a fusion reactor. To demonstrate this axial confinement of plasma by centrifugal forces, an axial array at locations of magnetic minima, as expected for centrifugal confinement. Additionally, a visible light

  6. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    x NOMENCLATURE ICF Inertial Confinement Fusion IFE InertialJ.D. Lindl. Inertial Confinement Fusion. Springer-Verlag,for the laser inertial confinement Fusion-Fission energy (

  7. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ?10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (?10{sup ?10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (?10{sup 28}m{sup ?3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  8. Contemporary Instrumentation and Application of Charge Exchange Neutral Particle Diagnostics in Magnetic Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medley, S. S.; Donné, A. J.H.; Kaita, R.; Kislyakov, A. I.; Petrov, M. P.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2007-07-21

    An overview of the developments post-circa 1980's of the instrumentation and application of charge exchange neutral particle diagnostics on Magnetic Fusion Energy experiments is presented.

  9. Study of intermittent small-scale turbulence in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    or the external magnetic field. In this paper we report on experiments where closely matched confinement states, is currently being investi- gated in most magnetic confinement fusion devices. This pa- per is part transport. These perturbations could be either static (due to the magnetic field) or dynamic (due

  10. Magnetic confinement in a ring-cusp ion thruster discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, Anita [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    An experimental investigation, in conjunction with a volume averaged analytical model, has been developed to improve the confinement and production of the discharge plasma for plasma thrusters and ion sources. The research conducted explores the discharge performance of a ring-cusp ion source based on the magnetic field configuration, geometry, and power level. Analytical formulations for electron and ion confinement are developed to predict the ionization efficiency for a given discharge chamber design. Explicit determination of discharge loss and volume averaged plasma parameters are obtained via a series of experimental measurements on a ring-cusp NASA Solar Technology Application Readiness (NSTAR) ion thruster to assess the validity of the analytical model. Measurements of the discharge loss with multiple magnetic field configurations compare well with plasma parameter predictions for propellant utilizations between 80% and 95%. The results indicate that increasing the magnetic strength of the first closed magnetic contour line reduces Maxwellian electron diffusion and electrostatically confines the ion population and subsequent loss to the anode wall. The results also indicate that increasing the strength and minimizing the area of the magnetic cusps improves primary electron confinement, increasing the probability of an ionization collision prior to loss at the cusp.

  11. Production of direct drive cylindrical targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, N. E. (Norman E.); Day, R. D. (Robert D.); Hatch, D. J. (Douglas J.); Sandoval, D. L. (David L.); Gomez, V. M. (Veronica M.); Pierce, T. H. (Timothy H.); Elliott, J. E. (Joyce E.); Manzanares, R. (Ruben)

    2002-01-01

    We have made targets with cylindrical geometry for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. These targets are used in hydrodynamic experiments on the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester. The cylindrical design allows the study of three dimensional hydrodynamic effects in a pseudo 2D mode, simplifying data gathering and analysis. Direct drive refers to the fact that the target is illuminated directly by approximately 50 laser beams and is imploded by the material pressure generated from ablation of the outside of the target. The production of cylindrical targets involves numerous steps. These steps are shared in common with many other types of ICF targets but no other single target type encompasses such a wide range of fabrication techniques. These targets consist of a large number of individual parts, all fabricated from commercially purchased raw material, requiring many machining, assembly, electroplating and chemical process steps. Virtually every manufacturing and assembly process we currently possess is involved in the production of these targets. The generic target consists of a plastic cylinder (ablator) that is roughly lmm in diameter by 2.25mm long. The wall of the cylinder is roughly 0.07mm thick. There is an aluminum cylinder 0.5mm wide and O.Olmm thick centered on the inside of the plastic cylinder and coaxial with the outside plastic cylinder. The outside of this aluminum band has surface finishes of differing random average roughness. The required average surface roughness is determined in advance by experimental design based on the amount of turbulent mix to be observed. The interior of the cylinder is filled with low density polystyrene foam that is made in house. To produce a finished target additional features are added to each target. X-ray backlighters are cantilevered off the target that allow time resolved x-ray images of the imploding target to be recorded during the experiment. The x-ray backlighters are driven by additional laser beams that are delayed to record an image at the appropriate time after the main beams are fired. An aperture to limit the area imaged and reduce x-ray background is placed on the target opposite the backlighters. Finally, alignment fibers that allow the target to be located precisely in three dimensional space before being shot are placed in several locations on the outside of the target.

  12. Ion microtomography and particle-induced x-ray emission analysis of direct drive inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Micro Analytical Research Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia))

    1992-07-01

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide submicron-scale characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace-element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Rayleigh--Taylor instabilities. We obtain 1% total electron density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching 2 {mu}m. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few parts per million. We present examples of ICF target characterization by IMT and PIXE in order to demonstrate their potential impact in assessing target fabrication processes.

  13. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsventoukh, M. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as {beta} {approx} 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than those obtained with the simplest MHD description.

  14. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagayama, T; Florido, R; Mayes, D; Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Delettrez, J A; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  15. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Florido, R.; Mayes, D. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Tommasini, R.; Koch, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  16. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)] [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-15

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  17. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  18. Effects of Nonuniform Illumination on Implosion Asymmetry in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion C. K. Li, F. H. Se´guin, J. A. Frenje, and R. D. Petrasso* Plasma Science and Fusion Center York 14623, USA (Received 29 April 2003; published 19 May 2004) Target areal density (R) asymmetries is the capsule radius); thereafter they grow linearly [6]. Low-mode-number asymmetries (` 10) result primar- ily

  19. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

  20. MFE Concept Integration and Performance Measures Magnetic Fusion Concept Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFE Concept Integration and Performance Measures Magnetic Fusion Concept Working Group Contributors. Simonen, T. Thorson INTRODUCTION This subgroup of the Magnetic Fusion Concepts Working Group discussed, spherical torus, compact stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and spheromak The goal was to identify, for each

  1. Water confined in carbon nanotubes: Magnetic response and proton chemical shieldings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, P; Schwegler, E; Galli, G

    2008-11-14

    We study the proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) of a model system consisting of liquid water in infinite carbon nanotubes (CNT). Chemical shieldings are evaluated from linear response theory, where the electronic structure is derived from density functional theory (DFT) with plane-wave basis sets and periodic boundary conditions. The shieldings are sampled from trajectories generated via first-principles molecular dynamics simulations at ambient conditions, for water confined in (14,0) and (19,0) CNTs with diameters d = 11 {angstrom} and 14.9 {angstrom}, respectively. We find that confinement within the CNT leads to a large ({approx} -23 ppm) upfield shift relative to bulk liquid water. This shift is a consequence of strongly anisotropic magnetic fields induced in the CNT by an applied magnetic field.

  2. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sanjeev [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Thomas, K. J. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH, UK and Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J. [Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom); Pepper, M. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH, UK and Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-04

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation.

  3. 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berk, Herbert L.; Breizman, Boris N.

    2014-02-21

    The 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems took place in Austin, Texas (7–11 September 2011). This meeting was organized jointly with the 5th IAEA Technical Meeting on Theory of Plasma Instabilities (5–7 September 2011). The two meetings shared one day (7 September 2011) with presentations relevant to both groups. Some of the work reported at these meetings was then published in a special issue of Nuclear Fusion [Nucl. Fusion 52 (2012)]. Summaries of the Energetic Particle Conference presentations were given by Kazuo Toi and Boris Breizman. They respectively discussed the experimental and theoretical progress presented at the meeting. Highlights of this meeting include the tremendous progress that has been achieved in the development of diagnostics that enables the ‘viewing’ of internal fluctuations and allows comparison with theoretical predictions, as demonstrated, for example, in the talks of P. Lauber and M. Osakabe. The need and development of hardened diagnostics in the severe radiation environment, such as those that will exist in ITER, was discussed in the talks of V. Kiptily and V.A. Kazakhov. In theoretical studies, much of the effort is focused on nonlinear phenomena. For example, detailed comparison of theory and experiment on D-III-D on the n = 0 geodesic mode was reported in separate papers by R. Nazikian and G. Fu. A large number of theoretical papers were presented on wave chirping including a paper by B.N. Breizman, which notes that wave chirping from a single frequency may emanate continuously once marginal stability conditions have been established. Another area of wide interest was the detailed study of alpha orbits in a burning plasma, where losses can come from symmetry breaking due to finite coil number or magnetic field imperfections introduced by diagnostic or test modules. An important area of development, covered by M.A. Hole and D.A. Spong, is concerned with the self-consistent treatment of the induced fields that accounts for toroidally asymmetric MHD response. In addition, a significant number of studies focused on understanding nonlinear behavior by means of computer simulation of energetic particle driven instability. An under-represented area of investigation was the study of electron runaway formation during major tokamak disruptions. It was noted in an overview by S. Putvinski that electron energies in the 10–20 MeV range is to be expected during projected major disruptions in ITER and that reliable methods for mitigation of the runaway process needs to be developed. Significant recent work in the field of the disruption induced electron runaway, which was reported by J. Riemann, had been submitted to Physics of Plasmas [3]. Overall it is clear that reliable mitigation of electron runaway is an extremely important topic that is in need of better understanding and solutions.

  4. Homodyne target tracking for direct drive laser inertial fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spalding, Jon David

    2009-01-01

    direct drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, asto be used in >>>Inertial Confinement Fusion, as a means of

  5. Topological configurations of Yang-Mills field responsible for magnetic-monopole loops as quark confiner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiro Shibata; Kei-Ichi Kondo; Seikou Kato; Shoichi Ito; Toru Shinohara; Nobuyui Fukui

    2009-11-24

    We have given a new description of the lattice Yang-Mills theory a la Cho-Faddeev-Niemi-Shabanov, which has enabled us to confirm in a gauge-independent manner "Abelian"-dominance and magnetic-monopole dominance in the Wilson loop average, yielding a gauge-independent dual superconductor picture for quark confinement. In particular, we have given a new procedure (called reduction) for obtaining a gauge-independent magnetic monopole from a given Yang-Mills field. In this talk, we demonstrate how some of known topological configurations in the SU(2) Yang-Mills theory such as merons and instantons generate closed loops of magnetic-monopole current as the quark confiner, both of which are characterized by the gauge-invariant topological index, topological charge (density) and magnetic charge (density), respectively. We also try to detect which type of topological configurations exist in the lattice data involving magnetic-monopole loops generated by Monte Carlo simulation. Here we apply a new geometrical algorithm based on "computational homology" to discriminating each closed loop from clusters of magnetic-monopole current, since the magnetic-monopole current on a lattice is integer valued.

  6. Convectively stable pressure profile in magnetic confinement systems with internal rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsventoukh, M. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-15

    A convectively stable pressure profile in a long multiple-mirror (corrugated) magnetic confinement system with internal current-carrying rings is calculated. The plasma energy content in the axial region can be increased by using an internal ring that reverses the on-axis magnetic field direction and gives rise to an average magnetic well near the axis. The pressure profile in the outer region-outside the magnetic well-is considered in detail. It is shown that, in the radial pressure profile, a pedestal can be formed that leads to a higher pressure drop between the center and the plasma edge. The pressure profile is calculated from the Kruskal-Oberman criterion-a necessary and sufficient condition for the convective stability of a collisionless plasma. The revealed pedestal arises near the boundary of the average magnetic well in the region of the smallest but alternating-sign curvature of the magnetic field lines due to a break in the convectively stable pressure profile. Such a shape of the stable pressure profile can be attributed to the stabilizing effect of the alternating-sign curvature of the field lines in the multiple-mirror magnetic confinement systems under consideration.

  7. Proc. July 2007 Conf. on Unsolved Problems in Stellar Physics, Amer. Inst. of Physics, in press. Confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    . Confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field: some exact boundary-layer solutions T. S. Wood and M. E. Mc. The profiles of velocity and magnetic field within the confinement layer are fixed by two external conditions, solar tachocline, interior magnetic field confinement, Ferraro constraint, helium settling layer, helium

  8. Asymmetric Two-dimensional Magnetic Lattices for Ultracold Atoms Trapping and Confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Abdelrahman; P. Hannaford M. Vasiliev; K. Alameh

    2009-10-27

    A new method to implement an asymmetrical two-dimensional magnetic lattice is proposed. The asymmetrical two-dimensional magnetic lattice can be created by periodically distributing magnetic minima across the surface of magnetic thin film where the periodicity can be achieved by milling $n\\times n$ square holes on the surface of the film. The quantum device is proposed for trapping and confining ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases prepared in the low magnetic field seeking-state at low temperature, such as the Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) and ultracold fermions. We present detailed analysis of the analytical expressions and the numerical simulation procedure used to calculate the external magnetic field. We also, describe the magnetic band gap structure exhibited by the asymmetric effect of the magnetic minima and show some of the possible application. We analyze the effect of changing the characteristic parameters of the magnetic lattice, such as the separating periodicity length and the hole size along with the applications of the external magnetic bias fields to maintain and allocate a suitable non-zero magnetic local minima at effective $z$-distance above the thin film surface. Suitable values are shown which keep the trapped ultracold atoms away from the thermal Majorana spin-flip and the surface Casimir-Polder effect.

  9. Seiberg-Witten and 'Polyakov-like' Magnetic Bion Confinements are Continuously Connected

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-06-01

    We study four-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric pure-gauge (Seiberg-Witten) theory and its N = 1 mass perturbation by using compactification on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}. It is well known that on R{sup 4} (or at large S{sup 1} size L) the perturbed theory realizes confinement through monopole or dyon condensation. At small S{sup 1}, we demonstrate that confinement is induced by a generalization of Polyakov's three-dimensional instanton mechanism to a locally four-dimensional theory - the magnetic bion mechanism - which also applies to a large class of nonsupersymmetric theories. Using a large- vs. small-L Poisson duality, we show that the two mechanisms of confinement, previously thought to be distinct, are in fact continuously connected.

  10. Confinement Of Pure Ion Plasma In A Cylindrical Current Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    j ×B force. An equilibrium calculation using a relativistic, 1-D, cold-fluid model shows: the confine- ment of non-neutral ion plasmas that are adequately dense for controlled thermonu- clear fusion limit? Conventional magnetic fusion devices contain quasi-neutral plasmas in a toroidal or linear

  11. Block Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with Condensed Matter Cluster Type Targets for p-B11 Powered Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George H. [University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, NPL Associates 216 Talbot Laboratory 104 S. Wright St. Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales Sydney (Australia); Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Sheng Zhengming [Beijing National Laboratory for CondensedMatter Physics Institute of Physics Chinese Academy of ScienceBeijing 100080 (China); Zhang Jie [School of Computer Sciences, University of Western Sydney, Penrith (Australia); Osman, F. [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Zhang Weiyan [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing (China); Tuhe Xia [Institute of Physics, Academy of Science, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-03-16

    The use of laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) for space propulsion has been the subject of several earlier conceptual design studies, (see: Orth, 1998; and other references therein). However, these studies were based on older ICF technology using either 'direct' or 'in-direct x-ray driven' type target irradiation. Important new directions have opened for laser ICF in recent years following the development of 'chirped' lasers capable of ultra short pulses with powers of TW up to few PW which leads to the concept of 'fast ignition (FI)' to achieve higher energy gains from target implosions. In a recent publication the authors showed that use of a modified type of FI, termed 'block ignition' (Miley et al., 2008), could meet many of the requirements anticipated (but not then available) by the designs of the Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications (VISTA) ICF fusion propulsion ship (Orth, 2008) for deep space missions. Subsequently the first author devised and presented concepts for imbedding high density condensed matter 'clusters' of deuterium into the target to obtain ultra high local fusion reaction rates (Miley, 2008). Such rates are possible due to the high density of the clusters (over an order of magnitude above cryogenic deuterium). Once compressed by the implosion, the yet higher density gives an ultra high reaction rate over the cluster volume since the fusion rate is proportional to the square of the fuel density. Most recently, a new discovery discussed here indicates that the target matrix could be composed of B{sup 11} with proton clusters imbedded. This then makes p-B{sup 11} fusion practical, assuming all of the physics issues such as stability of the clusters during compression are resolved. Indeed, p-B{sup 11} power is ideal for fusion propulsion since it has a minimum of unwanted side products while giving most of the reaction energy to energetic alpha particles which can be directed into an exhaust (propulsion) nozzle. Power plants using p-B{sup 11} have been discussed for such applications before, but prior designs face formidable physics/technology issues, largely overcome with the present approach.

  12. Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Daniel Thomas

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)[superscript 4]He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)[superscript 4]He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement ...

  13. Studies of fast electron transport in the problems of inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frolov, Boris K.

    2006-01-01

    approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) [1-3] is Fastrelated to the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [2]. Toscheme of the Inertial Confinement Fusion [5] to medicine [

  14. On the change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caillabet, Laurent; Salin, Gwenaël; Mazevet, Stéphane; Loubeyre, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EoS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target (Hu et al., PRL 104, 235003 (2010)). We use here an advanced multi-phase equation of state (EoS), based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EoS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  15. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  16. Energy deposition of MeV electrons in compressed targets of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Energy deposition of MeV electrons in dense plasmas, important for fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion, is modeled analytically. It is shown that classical stopping and scattering dominate electron transport and energy deposition when the electrons reach the dense plasmas in the cores of compressed targets, while 'anomalous' stopping associated with self-generated fields and micro-instabilities (suggested by previous simulations) might initially play an important role in the lower-density plasmas outside the dense core. For MeV electrons in precompressed deuterium-tritium fast-ignition targets, the initial penetration results in approximately uniform energy deposition but the latter stages of penetration involve mutual couplings of energy loss, straggling, and blooming that lead to enhanced, nonuniform energy deposition. This model can be used for quantitatively assessing ignition requirements for fast ignition.

  17. Neutron penumbral imaging simulation and reconstruction for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xian-You Wang; Zhen-yun Fang; Yun-qing Tang; Zhi-Cheng Tang; Hong Xiao; Ming Xu

    2012-07-08

    Neutron penumbral imaging technique has been successfully used as the diagnosis method in Inertial Con?ned Fusion. To help the design of the imaging systems in the future in CHINA. We construct the Monte carlo imaging system by Geant4. Use the point spread function from the simulation and decode algorithm (Lucy-Rechardson algorithm) we got the recovery image.

  18. Neutron penumbral imaging simulation and reconstruction for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xian-You; Tang, Yun-qing; Tang, Zhi-Cheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Neutron penumbral imaging technique has been successfully used as the diagnosis method in Inertial Con?ned Fusion. To help the design of the imaging systems in the future in CHINA. We construct the Monte carlo imaging system by Geant4. Use the point spread function from the simulation and decode algorithm (Lucy-Rechardson algorithm) we got the recovery image.

  19. Measurements of R asymmetries at burn time in inertial-confinement-fusion capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . K. Li, J. A. Frenje, S. Kurebayashi, and R. D. Petrassoa) Plasma Science and Fusion Center Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 146211 Received 5 March 2002 include exponentially-growing Rayleigh­Taylor RT instabilities and linearly growing secular modes, either

  20. Time-Dependent Nuclear Measurements of Mix in Inertial Confinement Fusion J. R. Rygg, J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Seguin, and R. D. Petrasso*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time-Dependent Nuclear Measurements of Mix in Inertial Confinement Fusion J. R. Rygg, J. A. Frenje (Received 19 January 2007; published 24 May 2007) The first time-dependent nuclear measurements of turbulent reaction to proceed. The time necessary for Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth to induce mix delays peak nuclear

  1. EPS Conf. on Contr. Fusion and Plasma Physics, 2001, P3.11 Energy Confinement in Steady State ELMy H-modes in JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    28 th EPS Conf. on Contr. Fusion and Plasma Physics, 2001, P3.11 Energy Confinement in Steady State Association, D-85748 Garching, GERMANY; 3Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, Trilateral Euregio Cluster Jülich, Germany; 5EFDA-CSU, D-85748 Garching, Germany; 6PPPL, Princeton, Univ, NJ, USA. 1. INTRODUCTION

  2. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support. Annual report, January 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  3. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Valeo, Ernest J. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Goldhaber, Maurice (Bayport, NY)

    1988-01-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  4. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  5. Experimental study of fluctuations excited by a narrow temperature filament in a magnetized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Troy

    and mass. By contrast, in a strongly magnetized plasma the confining pres- sure provided by the magnetic be maintained, which is the central idea behind magnetic fusion research. However, for a given magnetic field the heating power of the electron beam and/or improving the radial confinement by operating at larger magnetic

  6. Study of internal magnetic field via polarimetry in fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion is a promising energy sourceenergy resources, especially nonrenewable fossil fuels [Freidberg, 2007]. Controlled thermonuclear

  7. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua Zheng; Aldo Bonasera

    2013-03-19

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obtained at the same velocity. A 'Hubble' type model gives also a reasonable description of the data. These considerations might be relevant for implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility as well.

  8. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obtained at the same velocity. A 'Hubble' type model gives also a reasonable description of the data. These considerations might be relevant for implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility as well.

  9. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October--December 1992. Volume 3, No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixit, S.N. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The Beamlet Front End: Prototype of a new pulse generation system;imaging biological objects with x-ray lasers; coherent XUV generation via high-order harmonic generation in rare gases; theory of high-order harmonic generation; two-dimensional computer simulations of ultra- intense, short-pulse laser-plasma interactions; neutron detectors for measuring the fusion burn history of ICF targets; the recirculator; and lasnex evolves to exploit computer industry advances.

  10. ANNUAL REPORT FOR ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIVISION. FISCAL YEAR 1979 OCTOBER 1978 - SEPTEMBER 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    Rings Theory MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY Neutral Beam SystemsDevelopment, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Heavy Ion Fusion.M. McElhiney. MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY The Magnetic Fusion

  11. Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masnari, Nino A. (Ann Arbor, MI); Rensel, Walter B. (Ann Arbor, MI); Robinson, Merrill G. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wise, Kensall D. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wuttke, Gilbert H. (Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw County, MI)

    1982-01-01

    An ICF target comprising a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a concentric shell; and a process for manufacturing the same which includes the steps of forming hemispheric shells of a silicon or other substrate material, adhering the shell segments to each other with a fuel pellet contained concentrically therein, then separating the individual targets from the parent substrate. Formation of hemispheric cavities by deposition or coating of a mold substrate is also described. Coatings or membranes may also be applied to the interior of the hemispheric segments prior to joining.

  12. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF Using novel neutron spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Daniel Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A novel neutron spectrometer, called the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), was designed, built, and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the neutron spectra from ...

  13. Magnetic monopole versus vortex as gauge-invariant topological objects for quark confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi; Shinohara, Toru; Shibata, Akihiro; Kato, Seikou

    2015-01-01

    First, we give a gauge-independent definition of chromomagnetic monopoles in $SU(N)$ Yang-Mills theory which is derived through a non-Abelian Stokes theorem for the Wilson loop operator. Then we discuss how such magnetic monopoles can give a nontrivial contribution to the Wilson loop operator for understanding the area law of the Wilson loop average. Next, we discuss how the magnetic monopole condensation picture are compatible with the vortex condensation picture as another promising scenario for quark confinement. We analyze the profile function of the magnetic flux tube as the non-Abelian vortex solution of $U(N)$ gauge-Higgs model, which is to be compared with numerical simulations of the $SU(N)$ Yang-Mills theory on a lattice. This analysis gives an estimate of the string tension based on the vortex condensation picture, and possible interactions between two non-Abelian vortices.

  14. Magnetic monopole versus vortex as gauge-invariant topological objects for quark confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kei-Ichi Kondo; Takaaki Sasago; Toru Shinohara; Akihiro Shibata; Seikou Kato

    2015-08-08

    First, we give a gauge-independent definition of chromomagnetic monopoles in $SU(N)$ Yang-Mills theory which is derived through a non-Abelian Stokes theorem for the Wilson loop operator. Then we discuss how such magnetic monopoles can give a nontrivial contribution to the Wilson loop operator for understanding the area law of the Wilson loop average. Next, we discuss how the magnetic monopole condensation picture are compatible with the vortex condensation picture as another promising scenario for quark confinement. We analyze the profile function of the magnetic flux tube as the non-Abelian vortex solution of $U(N)$ gauge-Higgs model, which is to be compared with numerical simulations of the $SU(N)$ Yang-Mills theory on a lattice. This analysis gives an estimate of the string tension based on the vortex condensation picture, and possible interactions between two non-Abelian vortices.

  15. Confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field: some exact boundary-layer solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Wood; M. E. McIntyre

    2007-09-10

    High-latitude laminar confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field is shown to be possible, as originally proposed by Gough and McIntyre (1998) but contrary to a recent claim by Brun and Zahn (A&A 2006). Mean downwelling as weak as 2x10^-6cm/s -- gyroscopically pumped by turbulent stresses in the overlying convection zone and/or tachocline -- can hold the field in advective-diffusive balance within a confinement layer of thickness scale ~ 1.5Mm ~ 0.002 x (solar radius) while transmitting a retrograde torque to the Ferraro-constrained interior. The confinement layer sits at the base of the high-latitude tachocline, near the top of the radiative envelope and just above the `tachopause' marking the top of the helium settling layer. A family of exact, laminar, frictionless, axisymmetric confinement-layer solutions is obtained for uniform downwelling in the limit of strong rotation and stratification. A scale analysis shows that the flow is dynamically stable and the assumption of laminar flow realistic. The solution remains valid for downwelling values of the order of 10^-5cm/s but not much larger. This suggests that the confinement layer may be unable to accept a much larger mass throughput. Such a restriction would imply an upper limit on possible internal field strengths, perhaps of the order of hundreds of gauss, and would have implications also for ventilation and lithium burning. The solutions have interesting chirality properties not mentioned in the paper owing to space restrictions, but described at http://www.atmos-dynamics.damtp.cam.ac.uk/people/mem/papers/SQBO/solarfigure.html

  16. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

  17. A new class of magnetic confinement device in the shape of a knot S.R. Hudson, E. Startsev, and E. Feibush

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Stuart

    A new class of magnetic confinement device in the shape of a knot S.R. Hudson, E. Startsev, and E) The principle of magnetically confining a plasma exploits the fact that the motion of charged particles in a strong magnetic field consists of a free-streaming motion parallel to the field combined with a small

  18. Gravitational Radiation from an Accreting Millisecond Pulsar with a Magnetically Confined Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Melatos; D. J. B. Payne

    2005-03-14

    The amplitude of the gravitational radiation from an accreting neutron star undergoing polar magnetic burial is calculated. During accretion, the magnetic field of a neutron star is compressed into a narrow belt at the magnetic equator by material spreading equatorward from the polar cap. In turn, the compressed field confines the accreted material in a polar mountain which is misaligned with the rotation axis in general, producing gravitational waves. The equilibrium hydromagnetic structure of the polar mountain, and its associated mass quadrupole moment, are computed as functions of the accreted mass, M_a, by solving a Grad-Shafranov boundary value problem. The orientation- and polarization-averaged gravitational wave strain, h_c ~ 6e-24 for a 0.6 kHz source at 1 kpc with M_a > 10^-5 M_Sun, exceeds previous estimates that failed to treat equatorward spreading and flux freezing self-consistently. It is concluded that an accreting millisecond pulsar emits a persistent, sinusoidal gravitational wave signal at levels detectable, in principle, by long baseline interferometers after phase-coherent integration, provided that the polar mountain is hydromagnetically stable. Magnetic burial also reduces the magnetic dipole moment, mu, monotonically, implying a novel, observationally testable scaling h_c(mu). The implications for the rotational evolution of (accreting) X-ray and (isolated) radio millisecond pulsars are explored.

  19. Effect of spatial confinement on magnetic hyperthermia via dipolar interactions in Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadat, M E [University of Cincinnati; Patel, Ronak [University of Cincinnati; Sookoor, Jason [University of Cincinnati; Bud'ko, Sergey L [Ames Laboratory; Ewing, Rodney C [Stanford University; Zhang, Jiaming [Stanford University; Xu, Hong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Wang, Yilong [Tongji University School of Medicine; Pauletti, Giovanni M [University of Cincinnati; Mast, David B [University of Cincinnati; Shi, Donglu [University of Cincinnati

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the effect of nanoparticle confinement on the magnetic relaxation of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NP) was investigated by measuring the hyperthermia heating behavior in high frequency alternating magnetic field. Three different Fe3O4 nanoparticle systems having distinct nanoparticle configurations were studied in terms of magnetic hyperthermia heating rate and DC magnetization. All magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems were constructed using equivalent ~10nm diameter NP that were structured differently in terms of configuration, physical confinement, and interparticle spacing. The spatial confinement was achieved by embedding the Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the matrices of the polystyrene spheres of 100 nm, while the unconfined was the free Fe3O4 nanoparticles well-dispersed in the liquid via PAA surface coating. Assuming the identical core MNPs in each system, the heating behavior was analyzed in terms of particle freedom (or confinement), interparticle spacing, and magnetic coupling (or dipole-dipole interaction). DC magnetization data were correlated to the heating behavior with different material properties. Analysis of DC magnetization measurements showed deviation from classical Langevin behavior near saturation due to dipole interaction modification of the MNPs resulting in a high magnetic anisotropy. It was found that the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of the unconfined nanoparticle systems were significantly higher than those of confined (the MNPs embedded in the polystyrene matrix). This increase of SAR was found to be attributable to high Néel relaxation rate and hysteresis loss of the unconfined MNPs. It was also found that the dipole-dipole interactions can significantly reduce the global magnetic response of the MNPs and thereby decrease the SAR of the nanoparticle systems.

  20. The impact of laser plasma interactions on three-dimensional drive symmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J. L., E-mail: peterson76@llnl.gov; Michel, P.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Achieving symmetric hohlraum radiation drive is an important aspect of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, when experimentally delivered laser powers deviate from ideal conditions, the resultant radiation field can become asymmetric. Two situations in which this may arise are random uncorrelated fluctuations, in as-delivered laser power and laser beams that do not participate in the implosion (either intentionally or unintentionally). Furthermore, laser plasma interactions in the hohlraum obfuscate the connection between laser powers and radiation drive. To study the effect of these situations on drive symmetry, we develop a simplified model for crossed-beam energy transfer, laser backscatter, and plasma absorption that can be used in conjunction with view factor calculations to expediently translate laser powers into three-dimensional capsule flux symmetries. We find that crossed-beam energy transfer can alter both the statistical properties of uncorrelated laser fluctuations and the impact of missing laser beams on radiation symmetry. A method is proposed to mitigate the effects of missing laser beams.

  1. An experimental and theoretical investigation of a magnetically confined dc plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondanini, Maurizio; Cavallotti, Carlo; Ricci, Daria; Chrastina, Daniel; Isella, Giovanni; Moiseev, Tamara; Kaenel, Hans von

    2008-07-01

    A magnetically confined dc plasma discharge sustained by a thermionic source was investigated using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. The discharge originates in an arc plasma source and is expanded in a cylindrical chamber, where it is stabilized by an annular anode. The plasma expansion is contained by an axial magnetic field generated by coils positioned at the top and the bottom of the reactor. The plasma reactor design allows control of the energy of ions impinging on the substrate and thus a high electron density of about 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} at 1 Pa can be reached. The plasma is studied using a model composed of the Poisson and of the charged species continuity equations, solved in the flow and temperature fields determined by solving the Navier-Stokes and Fourier equations. The model equations are integrated using the finite element method in a two-dimensional axial symmetric domain. Ionization rates are either assumed constant or determined by solving the Boltzmann transport equation in the local electric field with the Monte Carlo (MC) method. Electron and ion transport parameters are determined by accounting for magnetic confinement through a simplified solution of the ion and electron momentum conservation equations, which yielded parameters in good agreement with those determined with the MC simulations. Calculated electron densities and plasma potentials were satisfactorily compared to those measured using a Langmuir probe. The model demonstrates that the intensity of the magnetic field greatly influences the electron density, so that a decrease by a factor of 2 in its intensity corresponds to a decrease by almost an order of magnitude of the electron and ion concentrations.

  2. Confined partial filament eruption and its reformation within a stable magnetic flux rope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Kayshap, Pradeep; Uddin, Wahab; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Filippov, Boris; Chandra, Ramesh; Choudhary, Debi Prasad E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com

    2014-05-20

    We present observations of a confined partial eruption of a filament on 2012 August 4, which restores its initial shape within ?2 hr after eruption. From the Global Oscillation Network Group H? observations, we find that the filament plasma turns into dynamic motion at around 11:20 UT from the middle part of the filament toward the northwest direction with an average speed of ?105 km s{sup –1}. A little brightening underneath the filament possibly shows the signature of low-altitude reconnection below the filament eruptive part. In Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å images, we observe an activation of right-handed helically twisted magnetic flux rope that contains the filament material and confines it during its dynamical motion. The motion of cool filament plasma stops after traveling a distance of ?215 Mm toward the northwest from the point of eruption. The plasma moves partly toward the right foot point of the flux rope, while most of the plasma returns after 12:20 UT toward the left foot point with an average speed of ?60 km s{sup –1} to reform the filament within the same stable magnetic structure. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, we find filament chirality to be sinistral, while the activated enveloping flux rope shows a clear right-handed twist. Thus, this dynamic event is an apparent example of one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). From the coronal magnetic field decay index, n, calculation near the flux rope axis, it is evident that the whole filament axis lies within the domain of stability (i.e., n < 1), which provides the filament stability despite strong disturbances at its eastern foot point.

  3. Magnetic-Surface Quality in Nonaxisymmetric Plasma Equilibria Carolin Nuhrenberg*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Stuart

    received 21 January 2009; published 9 June 2009) The confinement of plasmas by magnetic fields A central requirement in magnetic confinement fusion is to balance the pressure force with the Lorentz force gradient is nonzero, both the magnetic field B and the current density j must lie on the constant pressure

  4. JET Papers presented at the 6th IAEA TCM on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Studies (JAERI, Naka, Japan, 12th ­ 14th October 1999)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JET Papers presented at the 6th IAEA TCM on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Studies (JAERI, Naka, Japan, 12th ­ 14th October 1999)

  5. A Key to Improved Ion Core Confinement in the JET Tokamak: Ion Stiffness Mitigation due to Combined Plasma Rotation and Low Magnetic Shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Key to Improved Ion Core Confinement in the JET Tokamak: Ion Stiffness Mitigation due to Combined Plasma Rotation and Low Magnetic Shear

  6. Magnetic Reconnection Rates and Energy Release in a Confined X-class Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veronig, A M

    2015-01-01

    We study the energy-release process in the confined X1.6 flare that occurred on 22 October 2014 in AR 12171. Magnetic-reconnection rates and reconnection fluxes are derived from three different data sets: space-based data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 1600 {\\AA} filter onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and ground-based H$\\alpha$ and Ca II K filtergrams from Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory. The magnetic-reconnection rates determined from the three data sets all closely resemble the temporal profile of the hard X-rays measured by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), which are a proxy for the flare energy released into high-energy electrons. The total magnetic-reconnection flux derived lies between $4.1 \\times 10^{21}$ Mx (AIA 1600 {\\AA}) and $7.9 \\times 10^{21}$ Mx (H$\\alpha$), which corresponds to about 2 to 4% of the total unsigned flux of the strong source AR. Comparison of the magnetic-reconnection flux dependence on the GOES class for 27 eruptive events collected fr...

  7. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-01-01

    Drive Approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion and the Targetthat determine inertial confinement fusion target gain and18] D. Keefe, Inertial confinement fusion, Annual Review of

  8. Rotation studies in fusion plasmas via imaging X-ray crystal spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ince-Cushman, Alexander Charles

    2008-01-01

    The increase in plasma performance associated with turbulence suppression via flow shear in magnetically confined fusion plasmas has been well documented. Currently, the standard methods for both generating and measuring ...

  9. Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J. A. Delettrez, V. N. Goncharov, F. J. Marshall, J. M. Soures, V. A. Smalyuk, P. B. Radha, B. Yaakobi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J 87545, USA J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Se´guin Plasma Science and Fusion Center May 2004) The mixing of cold, high-density shell plasma with the low-density, hot spot plasma

  10. Physics of Superthermal Ions in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    --General Atomics, M. Petrov--Ioffe Institute, D. Spong--ORNL Abstract In magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, superthermal ions with typical energies of tens to hundreds of keV are often used to heat the plasma to temperatures where the fusion reaction rate is significant, ie Ti>5 keV. These ions can originate from

  11. Laser-Driven Magnetic-Flux Compression in High-Energy-Density Plasmas O. V. Gotchev,1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement.57.Àz, 52.25.Xz, 52.55.Lf In the magnetic fusion energy (MFE) concept, a strong magnetic field confines with a strong external field (>50 kG) from a specially developed magnetic pulse generator. This seed field

  12. Compact Torus Accelerator Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Power Plant HYLIFE-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, B G; Moir, R W; Tabak, M; Bieri, R L; Hammer, J H; Hartman, C W; Hoffman, M A; Leber, R L; Petzoldt, R W; Tobin, M T

    2005-03-30

    A Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA) is used to accelerate a Compact Torus (CT) to 35 MJ kinetic energy which is focused to a 20 mm diameter where its kinetic energy is converted to a shaped x-ray pulse of 30 MJ. The capsule yield with a prescribed radiation profile is calculated to be (gain 60 times 30 MJ) 1.8 GJ. Schemes for achieving this profile are described. The CT is accelerated in a length of 30 m within an annulus of 150 mm ID and 300 mm OD where the maximum magnetic field is 28 T. A 2.5 m conical taper reduces the mean diameter of the CT from 225 mm to 20 mm. The conical section is made out of solid Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}. The target with its frozen conical guide section is accurately placed at the end of the accelerator about once per second. The reactor called HYLIFE uses liquid jets to attenuate blast effects including shrapnel from the shattered conical guide section and radiation so that the vessel is expected to last 30 years. The calculated cost of electricity is estimated (in constant 1988 dollars) to be about 4.8 cents/kW {center_dot} h compared to the future cost of nuclear and coal of 4.3 to 5.8 cents/kW {center_dot} h. The CT driver contributes 17% to the cost of electricity. Present CT's make 2 x 10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}; the goal of experiments in progress is 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} with further modifications to allow 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}, whereas the reactor requires 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} in a shaped pulse.

  13. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  14. Indirect hydrogen versus helium or nitrogen cooling for fusion cryogenic and magnet systems Clarke R.H1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowacki, Bartek A.

    347 Indirect hydrogen versus helium or nitrogen cooling for fusion cryogenic and magnet systems in fusion cryogenic and magnet systems may be possible through the use of 15-20 K cooling. This approach there is no substitute. By using an intermediate, leak-tight, pressurised helium loop the benefits of 15-20 K cooling can

  15. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000--000 (0000) Printed 7 June 2001 (MN L A T E X style file v2.2) The magnetic field and wind confinement of fi Cephei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donati, Jean-François

    .2) The magnetic field and wind confinement of fi Cephei: new clues for interpreting the Be phenomenon? J of the large scale magnetic field and of the associated magnetically confined wind and cir­ cumstellar field is strong enough to confine magnetically the wind of fi Cep up to a distance of about 8 to 9 R

  16. Competition between magnetic and superconducting pairing exchange interactions in confined systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying Zujian; Cuoco, Mario; Noce, Canio; Zhou Huanqiang

    2007-10-01

    We analyze the competition between magnetic and pairing interactions in confined systems relevant to either small superconducting grains or trapped ultracold atomic gases. The response to the imbalance of the chemical potential for the two spin states leads to various inhomogeneous profiles of the pair energy distribution. We show that the position in the energy spectrum for the unpaired particles can be tuned by varying the filling or the pairing strength. When small grains are considered, the antiferromagnetic exchange stabilizes the pair correlations, whereas for Fermi gases, a transition from a mixed configuration to a phase-separated one beyond a critical polarization threshold appears, as does an unconventional phase with a paired shell around a normal core.

  17. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  18. Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Daniel; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-08-16

    A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

  19. The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) will be the first experiment able to study high-beta plasma confined by a magnetic dipole with near classi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -temperature superconducting magnet · Levitation and stabilization system with distant, upper levitation coil #12;FirstThe Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) will be the first experiment able to study high-beta plasma confined by a magnetic dipole with near classi- cal energy confinement. LDX consists of three

  20. Improved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics Via Massive Resistive Electromagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conductor material operating at "room temperature" (300°K) can reduce the capital cost per unit fusion power two reasons for this situation: ·very high capital cost per watt of output power ·very high maintenance cost To put the capital cost issue into perspective, consider the following comparison, which

  1. Particle Control in Steady State Magnetic Fusion Devices by Moving-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    al., J. Nucl. Mater. 196-198(1992)45. Thick Liquid Wall After M. Abdou et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 54 2 3 ECR power ( W ) (c) (d) #12;POP exps. on particle control by MS-PFCs (Presented at ANS-TOFE, 2002) #12;Reduced H-recycling over a MS-PFC (Presented at ANS-TOFE, 2004) Time (sec) Normalized

  2. Fusion: Intro Fusion: Numerics and Asymptotics Fusion: Summary Superconductor: Problem Superconductor: Results Investigation into the Feasibility and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    Fusion: Intro Fusion: Numerics and Asymptotics Fusion: Summary Superconductor: Problem Superconductor: Results Investigation into the Feasibility and Operation of a Magnetized Target Fusion Reactor, Committee Member May 7, 2015 Michael Lindstrom Magnetized Target Fusion and Field Perturbations #12;Fusion

  3. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  4. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

    1988-01-01

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  5. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1987-02-20

    A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

  6. Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    damage and helium production on defect accumulation in SiC/SiC composites are also discussed. Ó 2010Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems M spectrum, and pulsed nature of neutron production result in significant differences in damage parameters

  7. Ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis direct drive of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Hornady, R.S. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Melbourne Univ. (Australia). Micro Analytical Research Centre)

    1991-11-20

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide micro-characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Taylor-Rayleigh instabilities. We obtain 1% density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching two microns. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few ppm. We present examples of IMT and PIXE analyses performed on several ICF targets.

  8. Development and validation of compressible mixture viscous fluid algorithm applied to predict the evolution of inertial fusion energy chamber gas and the impact of gas on direct-drive target survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Robert Scott

    2011-01-01

    2010 “Prediction of Inertial Confinement Fusion Chamber GasBarodiffusion on the Inertial Confinement Fusion Database. [barodiffusion in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions:

  9. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  10. MFE Burning Plasmas Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for development and innovation in magnetic fusion configurations Effective development of economic magnetic fusion stabilization ­ Magnetic vs electrostatic transport #12;EBH ­ Snowmass 7/19/02 The ICCs link our fusion energy will shorten the development time for magnetic fusion energy for all concepts All magnetic fusion energy

  11. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schissel, David P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Abla, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Burruss, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Feibush, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Fredian, T. W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Goode, M. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Greenwald, M. J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Keahey, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Leggett, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Li, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); McCune, D. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Papka, M. E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Randerson, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Sanderson, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Stillerman, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Thompson, M. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Uram, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wallace, G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2012-12-20

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES ??Grid (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid'??s resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

  12. Experimental demonstration of fusion-relevant conditions in magnetized

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent)pressure|the typEsilicaliner inertial fusion

  13. Experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Hantao

    - native concept fusion or the minimization and control of confinement-degrading effects in tokamak plasmas. Recent research on the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment2 MRX has focused on ion heating and accel

  14. TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (laser-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce

  15. Nuclear processes in magnetic fusion reactors with polarized fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michail P. Rekalo; Egle Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2000-10-16

    We consider the processes $d +d \\to n +{^3He}$, $d +{^3He} \\to p +{^4He}$, $d +{^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$, ${^3He} +{^3He}\\to p+p +{^4He}$, ${^3H} +{^3He}\\to d +{^4He}$, with particular attention for applications in fusion reactors. After a model independent parametrization of the spin structure of the matrix elements for these processes at thermal colliding energies, in terms of partial amplitudes, we study polarization phenomena in the framework of a formalism of helicity amplitudes. The strong angular dependence of the final nuclei and of the polarization observables on the polarizations of the fuel components can be helpful in the design of the reactor shielding, blanket arrangement etc..We analyze also the angular dependence of the neutron polarization for the processes $\\vec d +\\vec d \\to n +{^3He}$ and $\\vec d +\\vec {^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$.

  16. Picosecond-petawatt laser-block ignition of avalanche boron fusion by ultrahigh acceleration and ultrahigh magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hora, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the thermal laser-plasma interaction for fusion by nanosecond pulses, picosecond pulses offer a fundamentally different non-thermal direct conversion of laser energy into ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This allows to ignite boron fusion which otherwise is most difficult. Trapping by kilotesla magnetic fields and avalanche ignition leads to environmentally clean and economic energy generation.

  17. IEEE TRANS. PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. XX, NO. X, DECEMBER 201X 1 Dust dynamics in magnetic fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    IEEE TRANS. PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. XX, NO. X, DECEMBER 201X 1 Dust dynamics in magnetic fusion plasmas: generation, transport, destruction and applications Zhehui Wang, Member, IEEE, Robert Lunsford

  18. An in-situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science in magnetic fusion devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartwig, Zachary Seth

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-material interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices such as fuel retention, material erosion and redeposition, and material mixing present significant scientific and engineering challenges, particularly for the ...

  19. Stabilization of external kink modes in magnetic fusion experiments using a thin conducting shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1995-11-01

    In nearly all magnetic fusion devices the plasma is surrounded by a conducting shell of some description. In most cases this is the vacuum vessel. What effect does a conducting shell have on the stability of external kink modes? Is there any major difference between the effect of a perfectly conducting shell and a shell of finite conductivity? What happens if the shell is incomplete? These, and other, questions are explored in detail in this lecture using simple resistive magnetohydrodynamic (resistive MHD) arguments. Although the lecture concentrates on one particular type of magnetic fusion device, namely, the tokamak, the analysis is fairly general and could also be used to examine the effect of conducting shells on other types of device (e.g. Reversed Field Pinches, Stellerators, etc.).

  20. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation.

  1. External proton beam analysis of plasma facing materials for magnetic confinement fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, Harold Salvadore

    2009-01-01

    A 1.7MV tandem accelerator was reconstructed and refurbished for this thesis and for surface science applications at the Cambridge laboratory for accelerator study of surfaces (CLASS). At CLASS, an external proton beam ...

  2. Results from the Levitated Dipole Experiment MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Results from the Levitated Dipole Experiment J. Kesner MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center D December 15, 2011 Columbia University #12;FES: Advance the fundamental science of magnetically confined lead naturally to breadth in science and technology · Example: Confinement in the field of a levitated

  3. Development of accelerator based spatially resolved ion beam analysis techniques for the study of plasma materials interactions in magnetic fusion devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, Harold Salvadore

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-material interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices pose significant scientific and engineering challenges for the development of steady-state fusion power reactors. Understanding PMI is crucial for the develpment ...

  4. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  5. Stabilization of Interchange Modes by Rotating Magnetic Fields H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, R. D. Milroy, K. E. Miller, and G. R. Votroubek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    a key limiting instability for many magnetic confinement fusion configurations. In previous studies and are often referred to as fluting) and many other low magnetic shear confinement configurationsStabilization of Interchange Modes by Rotating Magnetic Fields H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, R. D

  6. Summary of the report of the Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdren, J.P.; Berwald, D.H.; Budnitz, R.J.; Crocker, J.G.; Delene, J.G.; Endicott, R.D.; Kazimi, M.S.; Krakowski, R.A.; Logan, B.G.; Schultz, K.R.

    1987-09-10

    The Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM) has assessed magnetic fusion energy's prospects for providing energy with economic, environmental, and safety characteristics that would be attractive compared with other energy sources (mainly fission) available in the year 2015 and beyond. ESECOM gives particular attention to the interaction of environmental, safety, and economic characteristics of a variety of magnetic fusion reactors, and compares them with a variety of fission cases. Eight fusion cases, two fusion-fission hybrid cases, and four fission cases are examined, using consistent economic and safety models. These models permit exploration of the environmental, safety, and economic potential of fusion concepts using a wide range of possible materials choices, power densities, power conversion schemes, and fuel cycles. The ESECOM analysis indicates that magnetic fusion energy systems have the potential to achieve costs-of-electricity comparable to those of present and future fission systems, coupled with significant safety and environmental advantages. 75 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

  7. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2010-01-08

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the ?burning plasma? regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  8. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ?R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (?R) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  9. A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J.; Cooper, G. W. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; Smelser, R.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been applied to the on-axis nTOF detectors located in the basement of the Z-Facility. It will be shown that this method can identify sources of neutron scattering, and is useful for predicting detector responses in future experimental configurations, and for identifying potential sources of neutron scattering when experimental set-ups change. This method can also provide insight on how much broadening neutron scattering contributes to the primary signals, which is then subtracted from them. Detector time responses are deconvolved from the signals, allowing a transformation from dN/dt to dN/dE, extracting neutron spectra at each detector location; these spectra are proportional to the absolute yield.

  10. Density profiles of plasmas confined by the field of a Levitating Dipole Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Alexander C

    2009-01-01

    A 4-channel microwave interferometer (center frequency: 60 GHz) has been constructed to measure the density profiles of plasmas confined within the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). LDX is the first and only experiment ...

  11. Frequency spectrum of gravitational radiation from global hydromagnetic oscillations of a magnetically confined mountain on an accreting neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. B. Payne; A. Melatos

    2005-10-03

    Recent time-dependent, ideal-magnetohydrodynamic (ideal-MHD) simulations of polar magnetic burial in accreting neutron stars have demonstrated that stable, magnetically confined mountains form at the magnetic poles, emitting gravitational waves at $f_{*}$ (stellar spin frequency) and $2 f_{*}$. Global MHD oscillations of the mountain, whether natural or stochastically driven, act to modulate the gravitational wave signal, creating broad sidebands (full-width half-maximum $\\sim 0.2f_*$) in the frequency spectrum around $f_{*}$ and $2 f_{*}$. The oscillations can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio achieved by a long-baseline interferometer with coherent matched filtering by up to 15 per cent, depending on where $f_*$ lies relative to the noise curve minimum. Coherent, multi-detector searches for continuous waves from nonaxisymmetric pulsars should be tailored accordingly.

  12. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  13. Fusion utility in the Knudsen layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2014-09-15

    In inertial confinement fusion, the loss of fast ions from the edge of the fusing hot-spot region reduces the reactivity below its Maxwellian value. The loss of fast ions may be pronounced because of the long mean free paths of fast ions, compared with those of thermal ions. We introduce a fusion utility function to demonstrate essential features of this Knudsen layer effect, in both magnetized and unmagnetized cases. The fusion utility concept is also used to evaluate the restoring reactivity in the Knudsen layer by manipulating fast ions in phase space using waves.

  14. Laser-Driven Magnetic-Flux Compression in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotchev, O. V.

    The demonstration of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement fusion targets is reported for the first time. The OMEGA laser [T.?R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. ...

  15. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D x-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labate, L.; Koester, P.; Levato, T.; Gizzi, L. A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    A novel x-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any x-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named energy-encoded pinhole camera) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available x-ray spectral domain is only limited by the quantum efficiency of scientific-grade x-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any x-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent inertial confinement fusion related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  16. Towards Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Blob-Filaments in Fusion Plasma Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lingfei; Sim, Alex; Churchill, Michael; Choi, Jong Y; Stathopoulos, Andreas; Chang, Cs; Klasky, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fusion could provide an inexhaustible, clean, and safe solution to the global energy needs. The success of magnetically-confined fusion reactors demands steady-state plasma confinement which is challenged by the blob-filaments driven by the edge turbulence. Real-time analysis can be used to monitor the progress of fusion experiments and prevent catastrophic events. However, terabytes of data are generated over short time periods in fusion experiments. Timely access to and analyzing this amount of data demands properly responding to extreme scale computing and big data challenges. In this paper, we apply outlier detection techniques to effectively tackle the fusion blob detection problem on extremely large parallel machines. We present a real-time region outlier detection algorithm to efficiently find blobs in fusion experiments and simulations. In addition, we propose an efficient scheme to track the movement of region outliers over time. We have implemented our algorithms with hybrid MPI/OpenMP and ...

  17. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ?60?000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60?000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  18. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 1, Executive summary and overview, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    Conceptual designs and assessments have been completed for two inertial fusion energy (IFE) electric power plants. The detailed designs and results of the assessment studies are presented in this report. Osiris is a heavy-ion-beam (HIB) driven power plant and SOMBRERO is a Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser-driven power plant. Both plants are sized for a net electric power of 1000 MWe.

  19. On_the_implementation_of_the_conditions_of_Inertial_Confinement_ Fusion by bombarding the target a macro particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolya, S N

    2013-01-01

    The acceleration of lithium tube segments with the length one centimeter, diameter sixteen microns wall thickness one nanometer is considered. These segments are electrically charged by proton beams produced by an electron beam source. Then, they are accelerated by the traveling wave field in a spiral waveguide. The segments are next sent to a target where they are compressed by three hundred times in the longitudinal direction and compressing target radially, so the conditions for thermonuclear fusion are realized.

  20. Stability of electrostatic modes in a levitated dipole Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of magnetized planets and neutron stars. The use of a dipole magnetic field generated by a levitated ring exceed the magnetic pressure, i.e., 1, and excellent confinement properties. By levitating the dipoleStability of electrostatic modes in a levitated dipole J. Kesner Plasma Fusion Center

  1. On the efficacy of imploding plasma liners for magnetized fusion target compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, P. B.

    2008-06-15

    A new theoretical model is formulated to study the idea of merging a spherical array of converging plasma jets to form a 'plasma liner' that further converges to compress a magnetized plasma target to fusion conditions [Y. C. F. Thio et al., 'Magnetized target fusion in a spheroidal geometry with standoff drivers', Current Trends in International Fusion Research II, edited by E. Panarella (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999)]. For a spherically imploding plasma liner shell with high initial Mach number (M=liner speed/sound speed) the rise in liner density with decreasing radius r goes as {rho}{approx}1/r{sup 2}, for any constant adiabatic index {gamma}=d ln p/d ln {rho}. Accordingly, spherical convergence amplifies the ram pressure of the liner on target by the factor A{approx}C{sup 2}, indicating strong coupling to its radial convergence C=r{sub m}/R, where r{sub m}(R)=jet merging radius (compressed target radius), and A=compressed target pressure/initial liner ram pressure. Deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma liners with initial velocity {approx}100 km/s and {gamma}=5/3, need to be hypersonic M{approx}60 and thus cold in order to realize values of A{approx}10{sup 4} necessary for target ignition. For optically thick DT liners, T<2 eV, n>10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, blackbody radiative cooling is appreciable and may counteract compressional heating during the later stages of the implosion. The fluid then behaves as if the adiabatic index were depressed below 5/3, which in turn means that the same amplification A=1.6x10{sup 4} can be accomplished with a reduced initial Mach number M{approx_equal}12.7({gamma}-0.3){sup 4.86}, valid in the range (10fusion {alpha}-particle heating of the collapsed liner indicates that 'spark' ignition of the DT liner fuel does not appear to be possible for magnetized fusion targets with typical threshold values of areal density {rho}R<0.02 g cm{sup -2}.

  2. Photons & Fusion Newsletter - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery Science on NIF: Exploring the Physics of Star Formation Article on MOIRE Optics on Cover of Applied Optics Mode 1 Drive Asymmetry in NIF Inertial Confinement Fusion...

  3. Photons & Fusion Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Senior Research Scientist Richard Petrasso's group at the MIT center has been creating detection techniques for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments for more than a...

  4. Experimental study of magnetically confined hollow electron beams in the Tevatron as collimators for intense high-energy hadron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and tested at Fermilab for this purpose. It was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses in the summer of 2010. We present the results of the first experimental tests of the hollow-beam collimation concept on 980-GeV antiproton bunches in the Tevatron.

  5. Nuclear Fusion: Bringing a star down to Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, A

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear fusion offers the potential for being a near limitless energy source by fusing together deuterium and tritium nuclei to form helium inside a plasma burning at 100 million kelvin. However, scientific and engineering challenges remain. This paper describes how such a plasma can be confined on Earth and discusses the similarities and differences with fusion in stars. It focusses on the magnetic confinement technique and, in particular, the method used in a tokamak. The confinement achieved in the equilibrium state is reviewed and it is shown how the confinement can be too good, leading to explosive instabilities at the plasma edge called Edge Localised modes (ELMs). It is shown how the impact of ELMs can be minimised by the application of magnetic perturbations and discusses the physics behind the penetration of these perturbations into what is ideally a perfect conducting plasma.

  6. Transmutation analysis of realistic low-activation steels for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabellos, O; Sanz, J; Garc?a-Herranz, N; D?az, S; Reyes, S; Piedloup, S

    2005-11-22

    A comprehensive transmutation study for steels considered in the selection of structural materials for magnetic and inertial fusion reactors has been performed in the IFMIF neutron irradiation scenario, as well as in the ITER and DEMO ones for comparison purposes. An element-by-element transmutation approach is used in the study, addressing the generation of: (1) H and He and (2) solid transmutants. The IEAF-2001 activation library and the activation code ACAB were applied to the IFMIF transmutation analysis, after proving the applicability of ACAB for transmutation calculations of this kind of intermediate energy systems.

  7. MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT OF RADIOTHERAPY BEAM-DOSE F.D. Becchetti, D.W. Litzenberg, J.M. Moran, T.W. O'Donnell, D.A. Roberts, B.A. Fraass, D.L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becchetti, Fred

    MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT OF RADIOTHERAPY BEAM-DOSE PROFILES F.D. Becchetti, D.W. Litzenberg, J.M. Moran the magnetic confinement of HE electron and photon beam-dose profiles for typical radiotherapy beams. The HE magnetic field can provide a substantial improvement and control of the dose profile of clinical electron

  8. The Vlasov-Poisson system with strong external magnetic field. Finite Larmor radius regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bostan, Mihai

    -scale character of the problem. Motivated by the magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) the study of strong magneticThe Vlasov-Poisson system with strong external magnetic field. Finite Larmor radius regime Mihai-Poisson equations with strong external magnetic field. The derivation of the limit model follows by formal expansion

  9. FUSION POWER ASSOCIATES Annual Meeting and Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agenda FUSION POWER ASSOCIATES 35TH Annual Meeting and Symposium Fusion Energy: Recent Progress Fusion and the Road Ahead 12:50 The Magnetic Fusion Program in Korea ­ G.S. Lee, Korea 1:10 The Magnetic Fusion Program in China ­ Yuanxi Wan, China 1:30 The Magnetic Fusion Program in Europe ­ Tony Donne, EuroFusion

  10. Activities of the University Fusion Association! D.P. Brennan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program"! !- D. Meade (Fusion Innovation Research and Energy): "Framework for a Roadmap to Magnetic Fusion

  11. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  12. Fast Pb-glass neutron-to-light converter for ICF (inertial confinement fusion) target burn history measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerche, R.A.; Cable, M.D.; Phillion, D.W.

    1990-09-01

    We are developing a streak camera based instrument to diagnose the fusion reaction rate (burn history) within laser-driven ICF targets filled with D-T fuel. Recently, we attempted measurements using the 16.7-MeV gamma ray emitted in the T(d,{gamma}){sup 5}He fusion reaction. Pb glass which has a large cross section for pair production acts as a gamma-ray-to-light converter. Gamma rays interact within the glass to form electron-positron pairs that produce large amounts (1000 photons/gamma ray) of prompt (<10 ps) Cerenkov light as they slow down. In our experimental instrument, an f/10 Cassegrain telescope optically couples light produced within the converter to a streak camera having 20-ps resolution. Experiments using high-yield (10{sup 13} D-T neutrons), direct-drive targets at Nova produced good signals with widths of 200 ps. Time-of-flight measurements show the signals to be induced by neutrons rather than gamma rays. The Pb glass appears to act as a fast neutron-to-light converter. We continue to study the interactions process and the possibility of using the 16.7-MeV gamma rays for burn time measurements.

  13. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 2, Designs, assessments, and comparisons, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    The primary objective of the of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was to provide the Office of Fusion Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The term reactor studies is somewhat of a misnomer since these studies included the conceptual design and analysis of all aspects of the IFE power plants: the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, other balance of plant facilities, target systems (including the target production, injection, and tracking systems), and the two drivers. The scope of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was quite ambitious. The majority of our effort was spent on the conceptual design of two IFE electric power plants, one using an induction linac heavy ion beam (HIB) driver and the other using a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser driver. After the two point designs were developed, they were assessed in terms of their (1) environmental and safety aspects; (2) reliability, availability, and maintainability; (3) technical issues and technology development requirements; and (4) economics. Finally, we compared the design features and the results of the assessments for the two designs.

  14. Plasma equilibrium in 3D magnetic confinement systems and soliton theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skovoroda, A. A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Nuclear Fusion Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-15

    Single-valued conformal flux (magnetic) coordinates can always be introduced on arbitrary toroidal magnetic surfaces. It is shown how such coordinates can be obtained by transforming Boozer magnetic coordinates on the surfaces. The metrics is substantially simplified and the coordinate grid is orthogonalized at the expense of a more complicated representation of the magnetic field in conformal flux coordinates. This in turn makes it possible to introduce complex angular flux coordinates on any toroidal magnetic surface and to develop efficient methods for a complex analysis of the geometry of equilibrium magnetic surfaces. The complex analysis reveals how the plasma equilibrium problem is related to soliton theory. Magnetic surfaces of constant mean curvature are considered to exemplify this relationship.

  15. Final Report on Development of Optimized Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Alan

    2013-11-01

    The University of New Mexico (UNM) proposed a collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop and test methods for improved formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas relevant to magnetized target fusion (MTF) energy research. MTF is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. LANL is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC's ultimate success as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI plasma sets the initial conditions from which the FRC is created. In particular, the PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. A ringing theta pinch ionization (RTPI) technique, such as currently used by the FRX-L device at LANL, has the advantages of high ionization fraction, simplicity (since no additional coils are required), and does not require internal electrodes which can introduce impurities into the plasma. However RTPI has been shown to only trap #24;50% of the initial bias flux at best and imposes additional engineering constraints on the capacitor banks. The amount of trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties, and provides increased ohmic heating of the FRC through induced currents as the magnetic field decays. Increasing the trapped flux also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we initially planned to develop and test a microwave break- down system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. The UNM team would design the microwave optics and oversee the fabrication and assembly of all components and assist with integration into the FRX-L machine control system. LANL would provide a preexisting 65 kW X-band microwave source and some associated waveguide hardware. Once constructed and installed, UNM would take the lead in operating the microwave breakdown system and conducting studies to optimize its use in FRC PI formation in close cooperation with the needs of the LANL MTF team. In conjunction with our LANL collaborators, we decided after starting the project to switch from a microwave plasma breakdown approach to a plasma gun technology to use for enhanced plasma formation in the FRX-L field-reversed configuration experiment at LANL. Plasma guns would be able to provide significantly higher density plasma with greater control over its distribution in time and space within the experiment. This would allow greater control and #12;ne-tuning of the PI plasma formed in the experiment. Multiple plasma guns would be employed to fill a Pyrex glass test chamber (built at UNM) with plasma which would then be characterized and optimized for the MTF effort.

  16. Report on the Levitated Dipole eXperiment (LDX): An Uplifting Fusion Adventure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Introduction to Magnetic Dipoles Why would you build LDX? #12;Levitated Dipole Confinement Concept, Levitation, Experiments, Catching J. Belcher #12;Floating Dipole Conceptual Design 1. Magnet Winding Pack 2Report on the Levitated Dipole eXperiment (LDX): An Uplifting Fusion Adventure Darren Garnier

  17. NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schimmerling, W.

    2010-01-01

    for driving inertial confinement fusion (Godlove, 1979}.Inertial fusion Neutral beam injection Magnetic confinement fusion

  18. Status of target physics for inertial confinement fusion: Report on the review at DOE Headquarters, Germantown, MD on November 14--17, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-09

    A four day review to assess the status of target physics of inertial confinement fusion was held at US Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters on November 14--17, 1988. This review completes the current series of reviews of the inertial fusion program elements to assess the status of the data base for a decision to proceed with the proposed Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) that is being planned. In addition to target physics, the program elements that have been reviewed previously include the driver technology development for KrF and solid-state lasers, and the light-on beam pulsed power system. This series of reviews was undertaken for internal DOE assessment in anticipation of the ICF program review mandated by the Congress in 1988 to be completed in 1990 to assess the significance and implications of the progress that has been realized in the laboratory and the underground Halite/Centurion experiments. For this target physics review, both the direct and the indirect drive approaches were considered. The principal issues addressed in this review were: Is the present target physics data base adequate for a decision to proceed with design and construction of LMF now as opposed to continue planning activities at this time What specific additional target physics data are desirable to reduce the risk for a DOE decision to construct an LMF What is the role for continuation of Halite/Centurion experiments What priority should be given to the direct drive approach Are the program elements optimally structured to resolve the critical issues for an LMF decision Specific findings relating to these five issues are summarized in the following.

  19. Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

  20. CELLULAR AUTOMATA MODELS: A SANDPILE MODEL APPLIED IN FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    CELLULAR AUTOMATA MODELS: A SANDPILE MODEL APPLIED IN FUSION Anastasios Anastasiadis Institute present the basic properties of a simple cellular automaton (CA) model proposed for the study insights regarding the dynamics of magnetically confined plasmas. 1 CELLULAR AUTOMATA AND SELF ORGANIZED

  1. 1. Introduction A hot plasma of hydrogen isotopes can be confined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoffrey B.

    nonlinear stability code show there are many three- dimensional (3D) solutions of the advanced tokamak1. Introduction A hot plasma of hydrogen isotopes can be confined in a strong magnetic field experiments. This has led to the discovery of advanced concepts that make fusion reactors a realistic prospect

  2. Confined Dissipative Droplet Solitons in Spin-Valve Nanowires with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoefer, Mark

    in nanoscale structures for magnetic storage and computation, but dissipative droplet studies have so far been possibilities for the study of low-dimensional solitons and droplet applications in nanostructures. DOI: 10 is achieved in devices known as spin valves (SVs) [5­8], where two magnetic layers are separated

  3. Extreme ultraviolet emission and confinement of tin plasmas in the presence of a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Amitava E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in; Murtaza Hassan, Syed; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-05-15

    We investigated the role of a guiding magnetic field on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma for various laser pulse duration and intensity. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064?nm, Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–15?ns) and intensity. A magnetic trap was fabricated with the use of two neodymium permanent magnets which provided a magnetic field strength ?0.5?T along the plume expansion direction. Our results indicate that the EUV conversion efficiency do not depend significantly on applied axial magnetic field. Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma show that the ion flux reduces by a factor of ?5 with the application of an axial magnetic field. It was found that the plasma plume expand in the lateral direction with peak velocity measured to be ?1.2?cm/?s and reduced to ?0.75?cm/?s with the application of an axial magnetic field. The plume expansion features recorded using fast photography in the presence and absence of 0.5?T axial magnetic field are simulated using particle-in-cell code. Our simulation results qualitatively predict the plasma behavior.

  4. Measurements of the Differential Cross Sections for the Elastic n-{sup 3}H and n-{sup 2}H Scattering at 14.1 MeV by Using an Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; McNabb, D. P.; Navratil, P.; Quaglioni, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Glebov, V. Yu; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2011-09-16

    For the first time the differential cross section for the elastic neutron-triton (n-{sup 3}H) and neutron-deuteron (n-{sup 2}H) scattering at 14.1 MeV has been measured by using an inertial confinement fusion facility. In these experiments, which were carried out by simultaneously measuring elastically scattered {sup 3}H and {sup 2}H ions from a deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion, the differential cross section for the elastic n-{sup 3}H scattering was obtained with significantly higher accuracy than achieved in previous accelerator experiments. The results compare well with calculations that combine the resonating-group method with an ab initio no-core shell model, which demonstrate that recent advances in ab initio theory can provide an accurate description of light-ion reactions.

  5. Magnetic Resonance - Ultrasound Fusion of the Prostate: Imaging for Cancer Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    fusion for prostate brachytherapy. Preliminary results,”Mri/trus data fusion for brachytherapy,” The Interna- tionalapplications in prostrate brachytherapy: analysis of phantom

  6. Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

  7. An in-flight radiography platform to measure hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, K. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; Haan, S. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Kroll, J. J.; Peterson, J. L.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Landen, O. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Salmonson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Peterson, K. J. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87125 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    A new in-flight radiography platform has been established at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure Rayleigh–Taylor and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules. The platform has been tested up to a convergence ratio of 4. An experimental campaign is underway to measure the growth of pre-imposed sinusoidal modulations of the capsule surface, as a function of wavelength, for a pair of ignition-relevant laser drives: a “low-foot” drive representative of what was fielded during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] and the new high-foot [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014)] pulse shape, for which the predicted instability growth is much lower. We present measurements of Legendre modes 30, 60, and 90 for the NIC-type, low-foot, drive, and modes 60 and 90 for the high-foot drive. The measured growth is consistent with model predictions, including much less growth for the high-foot drive, demonstrating the instability mitigation aspect of this new pulse shape. We present the design of the platform in detail and discuss the implications of the data it generates for the on-going ignition effort at NIF.

  8. Mitigation of two-plasmon decay in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion through the manipulation of ion-acoustic and Langmuir wave damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Maximov, A. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Vu, H. X. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States); DuBois, D. F.; Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue, P-5, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)] [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue, P-5, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States) [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The extended Zakharov model of the two-plasmon decay instability in an inhomogeneous plasma [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3983 (1995); D. A. Russell and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 428 (2001)] is further generalized to include the evolution of the electron distribution function in the quasi-linear approximation [cf., e.g., K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al. Phys. Plasmas 7, 2824 (2000); D. A. Russell et al., paper presented at the Workshop on SRS/SBS Saturation, Wente Vineyards, Livermore, CA, 2–5 April 2002]. This makes it possible to investigate anomalous absorption of laser light and hot electron production due to the two-plasmon decay instability of multiple overlapping electromagnetic waves. Scalings of hot-electron production in the (stationary) nonlinearly saturated regime relevant to recent experiments [B. Yaakobi et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 012704 (2012); D. H. Froula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165003 (2012)] have been obtained. They indicate a sensitivity to ion-acoustic wave (IAW) damping and to the collisional absorption of Langmuir waves. Such a sensitivity might be exploited in inertial confinement fusion target design by the use of mid-Z ablators.

  9. Effect of magnetic fluctuations on the confinement and dynamics of runaway electrons in the HT-7 tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, R. J.; Hu, L. Q.; Li, E. Z.; Xu, M.; Zhong, G. Q.; Xu, L. Q.; Lin, S. Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-03-15

    The nature of runaway electrons is such that the confinement and dynamics of the electrons can be strongly affected by magnetic fluctuations in plasma. Experimental results in the HT-7 tokamak indicated significant losses of runaway electrons due to magnetic fluctuations, but the loss processes did not only rely on the fluctuation amplitude. Efficient radial runaway transport required that there were no more than small regions of the plasma volume in which there was very low transport of runaways. A radial runaway diffusion coefficient of D{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 10 m{sup 2}s{sup -1} was derived for the loss processes, and diffusion coefficient near the resonant magnetic surfaces and shielding factor #Greek Upsilon With Hook Symbol#=0.8 were deduced. Test particle equations were used to analyze the effect of magnetic fluctuations on runaway dynamics. It was found that the maximum energy that runaways can gain is very sensitive to the value of {alpha}{sub s} (i.e., the fraction of plasma volume with reduced transport). {alpha}{sub s}=(0.28-0.33) was found for the loss processes in the experiment, and maximum runaway energy could be controlled in the range of E=(4 MeV-6 MeV) in this case. Additionally, to control the maximum runaway energy below 5 MeV, the normalized electric field needed to be under a critical value D{sub {alpha}}=6.8, and the amplitude normalized magnetic fluctuations b(tilde sign) needed to be at least of the order of b(tilde sign) Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}.

  10. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemon, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations (FRC's that contain purely poloidal field).

  11. Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, T

    2007-04-03

    The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

  12. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkel, W.B.

    2012-01-01

    escaping from magnetic confinement nuclear fusion devicesas a magnetic confinement scheme for advanced fuel fusion

  13. Non-diffusive cross field transport in scrape-off-layer in Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Guanghui

    2006-01-01

    technique, magnetic confinement fusion has been studied forkey problems of magnetic confinement fusion are still under

  14. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lei

    a Century of Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research, Instituteto realize fusion are magnetic and inertial confinement. The

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor stability of a strong vertical magnetic field at the Galactic center confined by a disk threaded with horizontal magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin D. G. Chandran

    2002-02-13

    Observations of narrow radio-emitting filaments near the Galactic center have been interpreted in previous studies as evidence of a pervasive vertical (i.e. perpendicular to the Galactic plane) milliGauss magnetic field in the central 150 pc of the Galaxy. A simple cylindrically symmetric model for the equilibrium in this central region is proposed in which horizontal (i.e. parallel to the Galactic plane) magnetic fields embedded in an annular band of partially ionized molecular material of radius 150 pc are wrapped around vertical magnetic fields threading low-density hot plasma. The central vertical magnetic field, which has a pressure that significantly exceeds the thermal pressure of the medium, is confined by the weight of the molecular material. The stability of this equilibrium is studied indirectly by analyzing a uniformly rotating cylinder of infinite extent along the z axis in cylindrical coordinates (r,theta,z), with low-density plasma and an axial magnetic field at rfield at r> 150 pc, and a gravitational acceleration g* proportional to r directed in the negative-r-hat direction. The density profile and gravity tend to destabilize the plasma, but the plasma tends to be stabilized by rotation and magnetic tension--since the interface between the high and low-density plasmas can not be perturbed without bending either the horizontal or vertical field. It is shown analytically that when beta= 8(pi)p/B^2 is small and the dense plasma is supported against gravity primarily by rotation, the necessary and sufficient condition for stability to k_z=0 modes is |g| < (2|Omega| a), where g = g* - Omega^2 r is the effective gravity, Omega is the uniform angular velocity, and "a" is the sound speed in the dense plasma.

  16. Reaching High-Yield Fusion with a Slow Plasma Liner Compressing a Magnetized Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D D; Parks, P B

    2008-03-18

    Dynamics of the compression of a magnetized plasma target by a heavy liner made of partially ionized high high-Z material is discussed. A 'soft-landing' (shockless) mode of the liner deceleration is analyzed. Conclusion is drawn that such mode is possible for the liners whose thickness at the time of the first contact with the target is smaller than, roughly, 10% of the initial (un-compressed) target radius. A combination of the plasma liner with one or two glide cones allows for a direct access to the area near the center of the reactor chamber. One can then generate plasma target inside the plasma liner at the optimum time. The other advantage of the glide cones is that they can be used to deliver additional fuel to the center of the target near the point of a maximum compression and thereby increase the fusion yield.

  17. The magnetic field and confined wind of the O star $?^1$~Orionis~C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Wade; A. W. Fullerton; J. -F. Donati; J. D. Landstreet; P. Petit; S. Strasser

    2006-01-26

    In this paper we confirm the presence of a globally-ordered, kG-strength magnetic field in the photosphere of the young O star $\\theta^1$~Orionis~C, and examine the properties of its optical line profile variations. A new series of high-resolution MuSiCoS Stokes $V$ and $I$ spectra has been acquired which samples approximately uniformly the rotational cycle of $\\theta^1$~Orionis~C. Using the Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) multiline technique, we have succeeded in detecting variable Stokes $V$ Zeeman signatures associated with the LSD mean line profile. These signatures have been modeled to determine the magnetic field geometry. We have furthermore examined the profi le variations of lines formed in both the wind and photosphere using dynamic spectra. Based on spectrum synthesis fitting of the LSD profiles, we determine that the polar strength of the magnetic dipole component is $1150 \\la B_{\\rm d}\\la 1800$~G and that the magnetic obliquity is $27\\degr \\la \\beta \\la 68\\degr$, assuming $i=45\\pm 20\\degr$. The best-fit values for $i=45\\degr$ are $B_{\\rm d} = 1300 \\pm 150 (1\\sigma)$~G and $\\beta = 50\\degr \\pm 6\\degr (1\\sigma)$. Our data confirm the previous detection of a magnetic field in this star, and furthermore demonstrate the sinusoidal variability of the longitudinal field and accurately determine the phases and intensities of the magnetic extrema. The analysis of ``photospheric'' and ``wind'' line profile variations supports previous reports of the optical spectroscopic characteristics, and provides evidence for infall of material within the magnetic equatorial plane.

  18. Extended gyrokinetic field theory for time-dependent magnetic confinement fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    A gyrokinetic system of equations for turbulent toroidal plasmas in time-dependent axisymmetric background magnetic fields is derived from the variational principle. Besides governing equations for gyrocenter distribution functions and turbulent electromagnetic fields, the conditions which self-consistently determine the background magnetic fields varying on a transport time scale are obtained by using the Lagrangian, which includes the constraint on the background fields. Conservation laws for energy and toroidal angular momentum of the whole system in the time-dependent background magnetic fields are naturally derived by applying Noether's theorem. It is shown that the ensemble-averaged transport equations of particles, energy, and toroidal momentum given in the present work agree with the results from the conventional recursive formulation with the WKB representation except that collisional effects are disregarded here.

  19. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1994-03-01

    The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

  1. Observations of improved confinement in field reversed configurations sustained by antisymmetric rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    plasma, resulting in a mostly azimuthal field near the FRC separatrix with a very small radial component rotating magnetic fields H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and L. C. Steinhauer Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory in field reversed configurations FRC . A major concern about this method has been the fear of opening up

  2. Dynamics of an electron confined to a "hybrid plane" and interacting with a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffaele Carlone; Pavel Exner

    2010-12-13

    We discuss spectral and resonance properties of a Hamiltonian describing motion of an electron moving on a "hybrid surface" consisting on a halfline attached by its endpoints to a plane under influence of a constant magnetic field which interacts with its spin through a Rashba-type term.

  3. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.

    2014-03-15

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100?ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  4. Three-dimensional linear peeling-ballooning theory in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weyens, T., E-mail: tweyens@fis.uc3m.es; Sánchez, R.; García, L. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid 28911 (Spain)] [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid 28911 (Spain); Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)] [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-04-15

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics theory is extended to fully 3D magnetic configurations to investigate the linear stability of intermediate to high n peeling-ballooning modes, with n the toroidal mode number. These are thought to be important for the behavior of edge localized modes and for the limit of the size of the pedestal that governs the high confinement H-mode. The end point of the derivation is a set of coupled second order ordinary differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions that minimize the perturbed energy and that can be solved to find the growth rate of the perturbations. This theory allows of the evaluation of 3D effects on edge plasma stability in tokamaks such as those associated with the toroidal ripple due to the finite number of toroidal field coils, the application of external 3D fields for elm control, local modification of the magnetic field in the vicinity of ferromagnetic components such as the test blanket modules in ITER, etc.

  5. Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

  6. The field line map approach for simulations of magnetically confined plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stegmeir, Andreas; Maj, Omar; Hallatschek, Klaus; Lackner, Karl

    2015-01-01

    In the presented field line map approach the simulation domain of a tokamak is covered with a cylindrical grid, which is Cartesian within poloidal planes. Standard finite-difference methods can be used for the discretisation of perpendicular (w.r.t.~magnetic field lines) operators. The characteristic flute mode property $\\left(k_{\\parallel}\\ll k_{\\perp}\\right)$ of structures is exploited computationally by a grid sparsification in the toroidal direction. A field line following discretisation of parallel operators is then required, which is achieved via a finite difference along magnetic field lines. This includes field line tracing and interpolation or integration. The main emphasis of this paper is on the discretisation of the parallel diffusion operator. Based on the support operator method a scheme is constructed which exhibits only very low numerical perpendicular diffusion. The schemes are implemented in the new code GRILLIX, and extensive benchmarks are presented which show the validity of the approach ...

  7. Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

  8. Prospects for fusion neutron NPLs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petra, M.; Miley, G.H.; Batyrbekov, E.; Jassby, D.L.; McArthur, D. [Fusion Studies Laboratory, University of Illinois, 100 NEL, 103 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801-2984 (United States)

    1996-05-01

    To date, nuclear pumped lasers (NPLs) have been driven by neutrons from pulsed research fission reactors. However, future applications using either a Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) neutron source or an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) source appear attractive. One unique combination proposed earlier would use a neutron feedback NPL driver in an ICF power plant. 14-MeV D-T neutrons (and 2.5-MeV D-D neutrons) provide a unique opportunity for a neutron recoil pumped NPL. Alternatively, these neutrons can be thermalized to provide thermal-neutron induced reactions for pumping. Initial experience with a fusion-pumped NPL can possibly be obtained using the D-T burn experiments in progress/planning at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak devices or at the planned National Ignition Facility (NIF) high-gain ICF target experimental facility. With neutron fluxes presently available, peak thermalized fluxes at a test laser in the shield region could exceed 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}/sec. Several low-threshold NPLs might be utilized in such an experiment, including the He-Ne-H{sub 2} NPL and the Ar-Xe NPL. Experimental set-ups for both the tokamak and the NIF will be described. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Framework for a Road Map to Magnetic Fusion Energy Status Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 14, 2014 #12;Why Work on a Fusion Roadmap Now? · To demonstrate that there are realistic technical

  10. Confined quantum fields under the influence of a uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Elizalde; F. C. Santos; A. C. Tort

    2002-07-10

    We investigate the influence of a uniform magnetic field on the zero-point energy of charged fields of two types, namely, a massive charged scalar field under Dirichlet boundary conditions and a massive fermion field under MIT boundary conditions. For the first, exact results are obtained, in terms of exponentially convergent functions, and for the second, the limits for small and for large mass are analytically obtained too. Coincidence with previously known, partial result serves as a check of the procedure. For the general case in the second situation --a rather involved one-- a precise numerical analysis is performed.

  11. Discovery Fusion Energy Science using a Superconducting Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Confinement Physics · Space geometry in lab helps test fundamental magnetic confinement physics · Simple) #12;Both Space and Lab Scientists study Magnetic Confinement... · Strongly magnetized * ~ 10+ , O+ , ... · Magnetic reconnection · ... Convection and flux-tube mixing drive profiles

  12. Space-charge waves in magnetized and collisional quantum plasma columns confined in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Abdikian, Alireza

    2014-04-15

    We study the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating in a column of quantum magnetized collisional plasma embraced completely by a metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The analysis is based on the quantum linearized hydrodynamic formalism of collective excitations within the quasi-static approximation. It is shown when the electronic de Broglie's wavelength of the plasma is comparable in the order of magnitude to the radius of the nanotube, the quantum effects are quite meaningful and our model anticipates one acoustical and two optical space-charge waves which are positioned into three propagating bands. With increasing the nanotube radius, the features of the acoustical branch remain unchanged, yet two distinct optical branches are degenerated and the classical behavior is recovered. This study might provide a platform to create new finite transverse cross section quantum magnetized plasmas and to devise nanometer dusty plasmas based on the metallic carbon nanotubes in the absence of either a drift or a thermal electronic velocity and their existence could be experimentally examined.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1993-98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chartock, Michael

    2009-01-01

    fusion. For magnetic confinement fusion, LBL's expertise inmagnets for magnetic-confinement fusion systems. The alloysinertial confinement and magnetic fusion energy programs.

  14. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2014-01-01

    plasmas   for   thermonuclear   fusion.   Because  of  the  Thermonuclear  Research  (CTR)  and  the  National  Magnetic   Fusion  

  15. Conference report on the 3rd international symposium on lithium application for fusion devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mazzitelli, G. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla fusione, Centro Ricerche di Frascati (Italy); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science and Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); Hu, J. S. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Mirnov, S. V. [TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nygren, R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shimada, M. [JAEA-International Fusion Research Centre, IFERC Obuchi (Japan); Ono, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Tabares, F. L. [National Institute for Fusion, As EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9–11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma–Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  16. Conference report on the 3rd international symposium on lithium application for fusion devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; NRNU MEPhI, Moscow; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9–11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy),more »T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma–Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.« less

  17. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  18. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (?1 m), high-current (?1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields – in between plasma shots – to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ?5 ?m into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  19. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  20. PPPL-3470 PPPL-3470 Road Map for a Modular Magnetic Fusion Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). This is the topolographical map for fusion showing the elevations marked by the Q values. This is the roadmap that the world