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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Specific Molecular Features of Potassium-Containing Cryolite Melts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

2

MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

PROCESSING OF SODIUM--POTASSIUM NIOBATE CERAMICS.  

SciTech Connect

Sintering studies of undoped (Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3} and the same material doped with 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 mole percent BaO and 2 mole % B{sub 2}O{sub 3} were made. The persistence of a second phase after calcining to form the compound led to a study of reactions occurring during calcination. The calcining of sodium-potassium niobates involves the formation of an intermediate compound (the second phase) and its subsequent reaction with sodium oxide and potassium oxide to form (Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3}. Sintering data show that up to 1/2 mole % BaO added to the system increases the initial densification. However, the sintered bodies then exhibit densification and form sharp cubic grains and large voids. Indications are that a liquid phase is the major contributor to densification of this system through the mechanism of particle rearrangement, and that the contribution of any sintering mechanism to densification is negligible.

Powell, B.R. Jr.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Potassium, calcium, and magnesium in the tropics and subtropics  

SciTech Connect

The potential for increased food production in the world is undoubtedly greater than even the most optimistic surveys predict. Proper use of adequate amounts of potassium, calcium, and magnesium in fertilizers, soil amendments, crop residues and other byproducts, and minerals will be necessary if crop production potentials are to be realized. Use of these three plant nutrients with others will be an increasingly important part of the exploitation of natural resources as new lands of the tropics and subtropics are brought into production. Most of the increase in food production will come from more intensive use of lands already in production, however, and the soils of these lands will need larger amounts of all plant nutrients if high yields are to be reached and maintained. This report is intended to point out some of the complexities of the soil and fertilizer problems involving potassium, calcium, and magnesium. It is hoped that the information it contains will be helpful in the research, education, and development that will be required to point the way to increased food and crop production on soils of the tropics and subtropics throughout the world.

Munson, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride. Author(s) ...

7

Electrochemical corrosion of iron-magnesium-alumina spinel (FMAS) in molten potassium salts and coal slag  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron, magnesium-alumina spinel (FMAS) (0.25 Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ . 0.75 MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/) has been considered for use as an electrode in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator channels. Predominantly an electronic conductor, FMAS has adequate electrical conductivity (>1 S/m) above 520/sup 0/K. In addition, FMAS can be easily fabricated into a form and sintered in air to >90% theoretical density and has a melting point of 2124 +- 20/sup 0/K. Laboratory tests to measure both the electrochemical and chemical corrosion of FMAS in molten K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and coal slags were developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to evaluate the relative corrosion of FMAS. Under isothermal conditions, a direct electric current was passed between an anode and a cathode through a molten electrolyte. The molten coal slags were synthetic high-calcium, low-iron Montana Rosebud and low-calcium, high-iron Illinois No. 6. Evaluations of electrochemical corrosion were made as functions of current density, temperature, and slag composition. These results were compared to those of FMAS tested without electric current. The corrosion rates and reaction products were investigated by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Overall, FMAS has too-high an electrochemical corrosion rate to be considered as MHD electrodes in Montana Rosebud coal slag or in systems where only molten potassium salts are present. However, FMAS may be considered for use in high-iron coal slags although the corrosion rates are still quite high even in these slags.

Marchant, D.D.; Griffin, C.W.; Bates, J.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Theoretical study of sodium and potassium resonance lines pressure broadened by helium atoms  

SciTech Connect

We perform fully quantum mechanical calculations in the binary approximation of the emission and absorption profiles of the sodium 3s-3p and potassium 4s-4p resonance lines under the influence of a helium perturbing gas. We use carefully constructed potential energy surfaces and transition dipole moments to compute the emission and absorption coefficients at temperatures from 158 to 3000 K. Contributions from quasibound states are included. The resulting red and blue wing profiles agree well with previous theoretical calculations and with experimental measurements.

Zhu, Cheng; Babb, James F.; Dalgarno, Alex [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels - Potassium Channels and Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels Resources with Additional Information · Patents Roderick MacKinnon Courtesy of The Rockefeller University Roderick MacKinnon, M.D., a visiting researcher at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry 'for structural and mechanistic studies of ion channels.' His research explains "how a class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses - the electrical activity that underlies all movement, sensation, and perhaps even thought. The work leading to the prize was done primarily at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source [CHESS] and the National Synchrotron Light Source [NSLS] at Brookhaven. The proteins, called ion channels, are tiny pores that stud the surface of all of our cells. These channels allow the passage of potassium, calcium, sodium, and chloride molecules called ions. Rapid-fire opening and closing of these channels releases ions, moving electrical impulses from the brain in a wave to their destination in the body."1

10

Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW{sub t} reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz-lamp-heated boilers to screen candidate boiling-stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750{degree}C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot-press-sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric-discharge-machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

REDUCTION OF PLUTONIUM TO Pu$sup +3$ BY SODIUM DITHIONITE IN POTASSIUM CARBONATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Plutonium values are reduced in an alkaline aqueous medlum to the trlvalent state by means of sodium dlthionite. Plutonlum values are also separated from normally assoclated contaminants by metathesizing a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate containing plutonium with a hydroxide solution, performing the metathesis in the presence of about 0.2 M sodium dithionite at a temperature of between 40 and 90 icient laborato C.

Miller, D.R.; Hoekstra, H.R.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Sodium  

SciTech Connect

Some of the properties of sodium are reviewed, particularly its properties which make it useful as a FBR coolant. The FFTF and other sodium research facilities at HEDL are described. (DLC)

1979-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

A High Temperature (400 to 650oC) Secondary Storage Battery Based on Liquid Sodium and Potassium Anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This STTR Phase I research program was on the development of high temperature (400 to 650 C), secondary batteries with roundtrip efficiency > 90% for integration with a 3 to 10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. In fulfillment of this objective, advanced planar high temperature rechargeable batteries, comprised of an alkali metal ion conducting, highly refractory, beta'' alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) sandwiched between liquid sodium (or potassium) anode and liquid metal salt cathode, were developed at MSRI. The batteries have been successfully demonstrated at a working temperature as high as 600 C. To our knowledge, so far no work has been reported in the literature on planar rechargeable batteries based on BASE, and results obtained in Phase I for the very first time demonstrated the viability of planar batteries, though relatively low temperature tubular-based sodium-sulfur batteries and ZEBRA batteries have been actively developed by very limited non U.S. companies. The results of this Phase I work have fulfilled all the goals and stated objectives, and the achievements showed much promise for further, substantial improvements in battery design and performance. The important results of Phase I are briefly described in what follows: (1) Both Na-BASE and K-BASE discs and tubes have been successfully fabricated using MSRI's patented vapor phase process. Ionic conductivity measurements showed that Na-BASE had higher ionic conductivity than K-BASE, consistence with the literature. At 500 C, Na-BASE conductivity is 0.36 S/cm, which is more than 20 times higher than 8YSZ electrolyte used for SOFC at 800 C. The activation energy is 22.58 kJ/mol. (2) CuCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2}, ZnCl{sub 2}, and AgCl were identified as suitable salts for Na/metal salt or K/metal salt electrochemical couples based on thermochemical data. Further open circuit voltage measurements matched those deduced from the thermochemical data. (3) Tubular cells with CuCl{sub 2} as the cathode and Na as the anode were constructed. However, it was discovered that CuCl{sub 2} was somewhat corrosive and dissolved iron, an element of the cathode compartment. Since protective coating technology was beyond this Phase I work scope, no further work on the CuCl{sub 2} cathode was pursued in Phase I. Notwithstanding, due to its very high OCV and high specific energy, CuCl{sub 2} cathode is a very attractive possibility for a battery capable of delivering higher specific energy with higher voltage. Further investigation of the Na-CuCl{sub 2} battery can be done by using suitable metal coating technologies developed at MSRI for high temperature applications. (4) In Phase I, FeCl{sub 2} and ZnCl{sub 2} were finalized as the potential cathodes for Na-metal salt batteries for delivering high specific energies. Planar Na-FeCl{sub 2} and Na-ZnCl{sub 2} cells were designed, constructed, and tested between 350 and 600 C. Investigation of charge/discharge characteristics showed they were the most promising batteries. Charge/discharge cycles were performed as many as 27 times, and charge/discharge current was as high as 500 mA. No failure was detected after 50 hours testing. (5) Three-cell planar stacks were designed, constructed, and evaluated. Preliminary tests showed further investigation was needed for optimization. (6) Freeze-thaw survival was remarkably good for planar BASE discs fabricated by MSRI's patented vapor phase process.

Tao, Greg; Weber, Neill

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

14

Automated on-line determination of PPB levels of sodium and potassium in low-Btu coal gas and fluidized bed combustor exhaust by atomic emission spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), US Department of Energy, is involved in the development of processes and equipment for production of low-Btu gas from coal and for fluidized bed combustion of coal. The ultimate objective is large scale production of electricity using high temperature gas turbines. Such turbines, however, are susceptible to accelerated corrosion and self-destruction when relatively low concentrations of sodium and potassium are present in the driving gas streams. Knowledge and control of the concentrations of those elements, at part per billion levels, are critical to the success of both the gas cleanup procedures that are being investigated and the overall energy conversion processes. This presentation describes instrumentation and procedures developed at the Ames Laboratory for application to the problems outlined above and results that have been obtained so far at METC. The first Ames instruments, which feature an automated, dual channel flame atomic emission spectrometer, perform the sodium and potassium determinations simultaneously, repetitively, and automatically every two to three minutes by atomizing and exciting a fraction of the subject gas sample stream in either an oxyhydrogen flame or a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The analytical results are printed and can be transmitted simultaneously to a process control center.

Haas, W.J. Jr.; Eckels, D.E.; Kniseley, R.N.; Fassel, V.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

It's Elemental - The Element Magnesium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum The Element Magnesium [Click for Isotope Data] 12 Mg Magnesium 24.3050 Atomic Number: 12 Atomic Weight: 24.3050 Melting Point: 923 K (650°C or 1202°F) Boiling Point: 1363 K (1090°C or 1994°F) Density: 1.74 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? For Magnesia, a district in the region of Thessaly, Greece. Say what? Magnesium is pronounced as mag-NEE-zhi-em. History and Uses: Although it is the eighth most abundant element in the universe and the seventh most abundant element in the earth's crust, magnesium is never found free in nature. Magnesium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an

16

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

17

Magnesium Technology 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2009 ... Print Book and CD-ROM: Magnesium Technology 2007. Hardcover book and CD set: Magnesium Technology 2008 ...

18

Study of the interactions of molten sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate 50 mol % mixture with water vapor and carbon dioxide in air. Final report, June 2, 1980-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interactions of aerial components such as water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen with the binary 50 mol % mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate have been studied in the temperature range 300 to 600/sup 0/C using electrochemical methods. In addition, the behavior of nitrite ions in this melt was investigated electrochemically. By judicious choice of techniques, in situ electroanalysis was possible and the necessary relevant data to accomplish this is presented, as well as insight into the corresponding electrochemical mechanisms associated with the electroactive species. The influence of each atmospheric component was examined separately. At temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, nitrite ions are found to accumulate due to thermal decomposition of the nitrate. Water is highly soluble in the salt mixture, but no hydrolytic reactions were observed. Two methods of in situ analysis for water are described. Pure carbon dioxide is found to attack the melt at all temperatures above 250/sup 0/C producing carbonate. (LEW)

White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

NIST Tech Beat - Oct. 12, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... iron, magnesium, manganese, sodium, potassium, zinc, arsenic cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, lead and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Potassium (K)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 33   Electron binding energies of potassium...Table 33 Electron binding energies of potassium Shell Electron configuration Binding energy, eV K 1 s 3608.4 L(I) 2 s 378.6 L(II) 2 p 1/2 297.3 L(III) 2 p 3/2 294.6 M(I) 3 s 34.8 M(II) 3 p 1/2 18.3 M(III) 3 p 3/2 18.3 Source: Ref 300...

22

Magnesium Electrolytic Production Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 1, 1999 ... The process is adopted at magnesium and titanium-magnesium plants of Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine. The best modern projects are realised ...

23

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center - BOOK: Magnesium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 6, 2008 ... This book presents all aspects of magnesium production, properties and application, including primary production, alloy development, ...

24

SURVEY OF SODIUM PUMP TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented of the current status of sodium pump development as related to nuclear power applications. A description is given of the design features and performance characteristics of the more important types of sodium and sodium-- potassium alloy (NaK) pumps. Some requirements for sodium pumps for future large liquid metal reactor systems are presented with some preliminary consideration of the potential of various pump types to meet these requirements. (auth)

Nixon, D.R.

1963-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

It's Elemental - The Element Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium The Element Sodium [Click for Isotope Data] 11 Na Sodium 22.98976928 Atomic Number: 11 Atomic Weight: 22.98976928 Melting Point: 370.95 K (97.80°C or 208.04°F) Boiling Point: 1156 K (883°C or 1621°F) Density: 0.97 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word soda and from the Medieval Latin word sodanum, which means "headache remedy." Sodium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for sodium carbonate, natrium. Say what? Sodium is pronounced as SO-dee-em. History and Uses: Although sodium is the sixth most abundant element on earth and comprises

26

REACTIONS OF SODIUM PEROXIDE WITH COMPONENTS OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at >900 C resists dissolution in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3})-potassium fluoride (KF) solutions, a common method for their dissolution. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an alternate method for large samples of PuO{sub 2}-bearing materials using sodium peroxide (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2}) fusion as a pretreatment. The products of the reaction between Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} have been reported in the literature. As part of the SRNL development effort, additional data about the reaction between Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} were required. Also needed were data concerning the reaction of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} with other components that may be present in the feed materials. Sodium peroxide was reacted with aluminum metal (Al), beryllium metal (Be), graphite, potassium chloride (KCl), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}). The paper reports and discusses the reaction products of these and related compounds with Na{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

Pierce, R.; Missimer, D.; Crowder, M.

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

27

Potassium Fluoride (KF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potassium Fluoride (KF), F 1 K 1 (l). ... PREVIOUS: December 1963, CURRENT: June 1969. Potassium Fluoride (KF), F 1 K 1 (l). ...

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Potassium Fluoride (KF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potassium Fluoride (KF), F 1 K 1 (cr,l). Enthalpy ... PREVIOUS: CURRENT: June 1969. Potassium Fluoride (KF), F 1 K 1 (cr,l). Download ...

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

29

Magnesium Technology 2014  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... Emerging Applications (hydrogen storage, additive manufacturing of ... with an electrolytic process for magnesium production from serpentine.

30

Magnesium Technology Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for Materials Science & Technology 2013 ... Scope, The magnesium technology symposium will cover a broad spectrum of theoretical and ...

31

The Magnesium Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...salt lakes (for example, the Great Salt Lake in Utah) or salt deposits as the raw material. Both magnesium and chlorine are produced.

32

Magnesium Technology 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Processing Aspects of Magnesium Alloy Stent Tube ... The Effect of Rare Earth Elements on the Texture and Formability of Asymmetrically ...

33

Recycling - Magnesium - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines to assist in buying and selling of various types of Scrap. ... A cooperative effort between EPA and US magnesium industry to reduce emissions of SF6.

34

Magnesium Technology 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inno\\ ative Vacuum Distillation for Magnesium Recjvcling ........................................... .................... 3 3. Tiunhrri ZJ711. A.irihr Li, "iicioniing .\\lei. '4 lfi-cd I'ii, mid ...

35

WEB RESOURCE: Gas Welding Magnesium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2007 ... This webpage offers advice on gas welding of magnesium. Launch Site SOURCE: "Gas Welding Magnesium". Weldwell Corporate Website.

36

Current Efficiency Predictive Model and Its Calibration and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

37

Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

38

Latest Results from PFC Investigation in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

39

Anodic Electrochemical Behavior in Low Alumina Concentration ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

40

Electrolytic Cell Gas Cooling Upstream of Treatment Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Current Distribution and Lorentz Field Modelling Using Cathode ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

42

Busbar Displacement Study of Aluminum Reduction Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

43

DX+, An Optimized Version of DX Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

44

Impacts of Anode Set on the Energy Re-distribution of PB Aluminum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

45

Pot-Shell Exfoliation behind SiC Sidewall Block in a Cathode of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

46

Numerical Simulation on Coupled Multi-field of the Perforated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

47

Impurity Elements in Raw Gas Ultra-Fines from Aluminum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

48

Method for Testing Thermal Properties of Reduction Cell Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

49

Visualising the Sources of Potroom Dust in Aluminium Smelters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

50

Operating Parameters of Aluminum Electrolysis in a KF-AlF 3 Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

51

The Restart of Two Idled Pot Lines at Ormet Primary Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

52

AP40  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

53

Prebake Potline Restart after Power Supply Interruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

54

About this Abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

55

Electromagnetic and MHD Study to Improve Cell Performance of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

56

Air Amplified Boosted Suction (AABS) System for Pot Flow Control ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

57

Virtual Pot Simulator for aluminum smelting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

58

Applying Nano Technology to Remove Toxic Sulfur Gases ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

59

Statistical Method to Predict Anode Effect Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

60

Two-Phase 3D Model of Reduction Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermo-Electro-Mechanical Investigation of Voltage Drop on Anode ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

62

CFD Simulation of Anode Bubble Behavior in Aluminum Reduction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

63

Liquidus Temperatures of the System Na  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

64

The Study and Applications of Modern Potline Fume Treatment Plant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

65

Behavior Estimation and Control of Aluminum Reduction Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

66

Update on the Development of D18 Cell Technology at Dubal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

67

Studies of Perfluorocarbon Formation on Anodes in Cryolite Melts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

68

Optimization of the Thermal Management in Aluminum Smelting Pot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

69

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

70

WEB RESOURCE: Magnesium Welding - Information Sources for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2007 ... This web-based, magnesium welding resource is a compilation of: ... SOURCE: “ Magnesium Welding – Information Sources for Magnesium ...

71

Magnesium - Rare Earth Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... Location: Washington State Convention Center ... The Use of Computer Modeling for Producing DC Cast WE43 Magnesium Alloy Slab: ... However, there is a limited operating window within which favourable textures arise.

72

ASM Specialty Handbook: Magnesium and Magnesium Alloys - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... Prepared with the cooperation of the International Magnesium Association, this handbook presents current industrial practices and provides ...

73

Magnesium fluoride recovery method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

Gay, Richard L. (Canoga Park, CA); McKenzie, Donald E. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Molten Salts, Magnesium and Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... Chloride 2011: Practice and Theory of Chloride-Based Metallurgy: Molten Salts, Magnesium and Aluminum Sponsored by: The Minerals, ...

75

Magnesium Workshop Madrid 2013: Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnesium Workshop Madrid 2013. An International Workshop on Processing- Microstructure-Mechanical Property of Magnesium Alloys May 21-24, 2013 ...

76

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

in 1943, the mission of the International Magnesium Association (IMA) is to promote the use of the metal magnesium in material selection and encourage innovative applications of...

77

Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AdvancedLightSource Home Science Highlights Industry @ ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Print Wednesday, 23...

78

The Magnesium Industry Today: A Global Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World demand for magnesium continues to remain subdued, succumbing to the ... Magnesium Alloy Sheets and Lubricants for Warm-Forming - Friction Effects.

79

Atomic Transition Probabilities of Sodium and Magnesium. A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rev. Lett. 76, 2866 1996. 73The Opacity Team, The Opacity Project IOP, Bristol, En- gland, 1994, Vol. I, http://legacy.gsfc.nasa.gov/topbase 77E. ...

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

It's Elemental - The Element Potassium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium The Element Potassium [Click for Isotope Data] 19 K Potassium 39.0983 Atomic Number: 19 Atomic Weight: 39.0983 Melting Point: 336.53 K (63.38°C or 146.08°F) Boiling Point: 1032 K (759°C or 1398°F) Density: 0.89 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word potash. Potassium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for alkali, kalium. Say what? Potassium is pronounced as poh-TASS-ee-em. History and Uses: Although potassium is the eighth most abundant element on earth and comprises about 2.1% of the earth's crust, it is a very reactive element

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lithium, Potassium, and Sodium Additions to Cement Pastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement and Concrete Research 2004, 34, 2045-2056. 16. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. CRC Press, 1987. 17. ...

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

82

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center - ARTICLE: Safe Machining of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 7, 2007... Other ==== Miscellaneous Digital Resources in Magnesium. Spacer ... Topic Title: ARTICLE: Safe Machining of Magnesium Parts by Cutting ...

83

Slashing Greenhouse Emissions from Magnesium Production - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... Topic Title: Slashing Greenhouse Emissions from Magnesium Production Topic Summary: CSIRO, an Australia's national science agency ...

84

Synthesis of superconducting magnesium diboride objects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.

Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Canfield, Paul C. (Ames, IA); Bud' ko, Sergey L. (Ames, IA); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Petrovic, Cedomir (Ames, IA); Cunningham, Charles E. (Ames, IA); Lapertot, Gerard (Grenoble, FR)

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Synthesis Of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Objects.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.

Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Canfield, Paul C. (Ames, IA); Bud' ko, Sergey L. (Ames, IA); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Petrovic, Cedomir (Ames, IA); Cunningham, Charles E. (Ames, IA); Lapertot, Gerard (Grenoble, FR)

2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

86

STATUS OF POTASSIUM IODIDE ACTIVITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide to the Commission revised draft NUREG-1633 (Attachment 1), “Assessment of the Use of Potassium Iodide (KI) as a Supplemental Public Protective Action During Severe Reactor Accidents ” for approval for public comment as directed in Staff Requirements- Affirmation

William D. Travers; Contacts Patricia; A. Milligan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Cell Fundamentals, Phenomena and Alternatives II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride: Asbjorn ...

88

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

89

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements International Magnesium Association Logo In response to President Bush's challenge to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fifteen U.S. companies along with the International Magnesium Association (IMA) have voluntarily committed to eliminate SF6 emissions by 2010. This commitment builds on the efforts of the SF6 Emission Reduction Partnership for the Magnesium Industry, a partnership program that EPA has had with the industry since 1999. These industry leaders represent 100% of domestic primary magnesium production and 90% of U.S. magnesium casting capacity. In addition, the IMA's members operate on five continents and represent 80% of the global magnesium industry. The magnesium industry commonly uses a potent and long-lived greenhouse

90

REDUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE RETENTION ON BEDS OF MAGNESIUM FLUORIDE USED FOR REMOVAL OF TECHNETIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

The excessive loss of uranium incurred when discarding magnesium fluoride, (the adsorber used to selectively remove technetium hexafluoride from uranium hexafluoride streams) is a problem common to all volatility processes for recovering enriched uranium fuels. As a result of the work described, two schemes for the release of the uranium hexafluoride from the magnesium fluoride and its separation from the technetium hexafluoride are proposed. One scheme depends on preferential thermal desorption of the uranium hexafluoride at 350 deg C and the other on selective adsorption of the uranium hexafluoride on sodium fluoride pellets following the codesorption of the two hexafluorides with fluorine at 500 deg C from the magnesium fluoride pellets. These proposals are aimed at reducing the amount of retained uranium to less than 1 g per 1000 g of discardable magnesium fluoride. In the work reported, the deposition of uranium on magnesium fluoride as a function of heating, fluorination, and hydrogen fluoride pretreatment of the magnesium fluoride pellets prior to exposure to uranium hexafluoride was characterized in a series of gasometric studies. The dependence of the quantity of uranium hexafluoride adsorbed on pressure and temperature was also determined. The data show that physical adsorption is the mechanism for the deposition of most of the uranium hexafluoride on well- stabilized magnesium fluoride pellets. More than 90% of the adsorbate can be removed by heating to 350 deg C. Chemisorption (formation of a double salt) is probably not involved because of the small (<0.05) mole ratio of UF/sub 6//MgF/ sub 2/ observed. (auth)

Katz, S.

1964-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Substrate and method for the formation of continuous magnesium diboride and doped magnesium diboride wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemically doped boron coating is applied by chemical vapor deposition to a silicon carbide fiber and the coated fiber then is exposed to magnesium vapor to convert the doped boron to doped magnesium diboride and a resultant superconductor.

Suplinskas, Raymond J. (Haverhill, MA); Finnemore, Douglas (Ames, IA); Bud' ko, Serquei (Ames, IA); Canfield, Paul (Ames, IA)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

92

Method for magnesium sulfate recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for obtaining magnesium sulfate substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is then contacted with a concentrated sulfuric acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a solid product. The particulate solid product and a minor amount of the liquid is then treated to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium sulfate substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than 1,000 pCi/gm. In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the initial acid treatment and a final solid residue has a radioactivity level of less than about 50 pCi/gm.

Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Promising Magnesium Battery Research Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Print Wednesday, 23 January 2013 16:59 toyota battery a) Cross-section of the in situ electrochemical/XAS cell with annotations. b) Drawing and c) photograph of the assembled cell. Alternatives to the current lithium-ion-based car batteries are at the forefront of the automotive industry's research agenda-manufacturers want to build cars with longer battery life, and to do that they're going to have to find new solutions. One promising battery material is magnesium (Mg)-it is more dense than lithium, it is safer, and the magnesium ion carries a two-electron charge, giving it potential as a more efficient energy source. Magnesium has a high volumetric capacity, which could mean

94

IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

1963-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

plans, the International Magnesium Association and the federal government will begin tracking progress. The results will be measured by metrics developed by the industry, in...

96

Materials Design in Magnesium Alloy Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation will provide insight into the status of materials design tools in its application to magnesium alloy development as well as provide forecasts as to ...

97

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center -- Background - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures Link provided to Chapter 4: Magnesium Alloys, 0, 780 ...

98

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center -- Databases - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures Link provided to Chapter 4: Magnesium Alloys, 0, 958 ...

99

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center -- Background - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures Link provided to Chapter 4: Magnesium Alloys, 0, 793 ...

100

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center -- Databases - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures Link provided to Chapter 4: Magnesium Alloys, 0, 1005 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Magnesium/manganese dioxide electrochemical cell  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a magnesium/manganese dioxide electrochemical cell that has been stored following partial usage and including an alloy of magnesium as the anode, a moist cathode mix of carbon black, manganese dioxide, magnesium hydroxide, barium chromate and lithium chromate as the cathode, and 3.5 to 4.0 normal magnesium perchlorate as the electrolyte. The improvement involves increasing the moisture content of the cathode mix from 34 to 38 percent at the time of making the cell to reduce the self discharge and increase the operating capacity after the cell has been stored following partial usage.

Jarvis, L.P.; Brundage, M.T.; Atwater, T.B.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center Text Topic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 11, 2007 ... E. Aghion, B. Bronfin, F. Von Buch, S. Schumann and H. Friedrich. "Dead Sea Magnesium Alloys Newly Developed for High Temperature ...

103

Nanoparticles in Magnesium Alloys: Novel Nanoscale Phenomena ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Also, the in-situ creation of nanoparticles in magnesium alloy and consequent simultaneous ... Processing and Mechanical Behavior of Unalloyed Plutonium.

104

PDF: Automotive Magnesium Applications and Life Cycle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 11, 2007 ... This presentation includes images of a die cast magnesium steering wheel, AZ91D cam cover, AZ91D transmission housing, AM50 door inner, ...

105

Understanding Protective Film Formation by Magnesium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Magnesium-based alloys are the lightest structural metals, and thus ... The present work aims to understand the mechanism(s) of protective film ...

106

Fluid Bed Dehydration of Magnesium Chloride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is provided based on open literature sources, including papers and patents. ... Demonstration of Solar-Pumped Laser-Induced Magnesium Production from ...

107

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center - ARTICLE: Forming of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2007 ... This paper addresses the formability of magnesium extrusions with respect to rotary-draw bending and hydro-mechanical forming, presenting ...

108

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Work Plans  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Work Plans EPA's SF6 Emission Reduction Partnership for the Magnesium Industry in cooperation with the International Magnesium Association has developed a work plan for achieving...

109

Hydrogen Storage property of sandwiched magnesium hydride naoparticle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage property of sandwiched magnesium hydride naoparticle thin film Title Hydrogen Storage property of sandwiched magnesium hydride naoparticle thin film Publication Type...

110

2003 TMS Annual Meeting: Short Courses--Magnesium Metallurgy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2003 ... Returned to China and started in the magnesium business in 1991 selling metals , including magnesium to the end users. Has worked on the ...

111

A laboratory-scale burner seeded with potassium for calibration of potassium emission/absorption instruments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power systems, potassium may be used to enhance the electrical conductivity of the high temperature products of combustion. In order to better evaluate the performance of MHD generators, it is desirable to be able to measure the distribution of the electrical conductivity of the gases throughout the channel through which the hot gases are passing. One such system is based on the emission/absorption spectra of potassium as a function of temperature. Diagnostic instruments, based on the emission/absorption characteristics of potassium in a flame or plasma require calibration in known temperature and potassium concentration conditions. A laboratory-scale hydrogen/oxygen burner which is seeded with gaseous potassium has been designed, fabricated, and operated for the purpose of providing a calibration facility for the potassium emission/absorption spectrographic (PE/AS) instrument. A nickel block was machined appropriately to provide separate flows of oxygen, hydrogen, and potassium vapor in a hot nitrogen stream mixed with hydrogen. A potassium evaporator was designed and fabricated to allow hot nitrogen gas to bubble through hot molten potassium to provide a known mass fraction of potassium to the resultant flame. The vapor pressure variation of the potassium with temperature was used to predict the amount of potassium carried to the flame by assuming that the hot nitrogen stream resulted in a saturated mixture as it bubbled through the heated molten potassium. Operational aspects as well as safety considerations in the operation of this burner are described. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Bouchillon, C.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Analytical Controlled Losses of Potassium from Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the ashing process. Chlorine is present in the strawsuch as potassium and chlorine in biomass ash is criticalnitrogen sulfur oxygen chlorine moisutre (% wet basis)

Thy, P.; Grundvig, S.; Jenkins, B. M.; Shiraki, R.; Lesher, C. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

Knighton, J.B.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Exxon catalytic coal gasification process: predevelopment program. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 31, 1976. [Potassium and other carbonates as catalysts; incentives for secondary gasification  

SciTech Connect

The pilot plant fluidized bed gasifier was recommissioned, tested and then repaired and finally checked out with respect to instrument and data acquisition system operation and baseline performance. Bench scale fixed-bed experiments were made with potassium carbonate and potassium-sodium carbonate mixtures as catalysts: The more expensive potassium carbonate performed appreciably better. Catalyst recovery studies were begun. An engineering study with respect to the need for a secondary gasification unit (after the primary one) was inconclusive: The small predicted gains (of the order of 3 percent) in gas cost savings led to the conclusion that this alternative should be held in reserve until more definitive data is obtained. (LTN)

Kalina, T.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs U.S. EPA's SF6 Emission Reduction Partnership for the Magnesium Industry Leading magnesium producers and casting companies are working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to alleviate the global environmental threat of climate change. EPA is very proud to cooperate with the industry through the SF6 Emission Reduction Partnership for the Magnesium Industry and the International Magnesium Association (IMA) to protect the climate. This voluntary initiative is guiding research of new technologies, promoting environmental stewardship, and providing a valuable forum to freely exchange technical information. Significant progress has been made to identify and implement SF6 emission reduction strategies since the partnership's inception.

116

Magnesium Alloys - TMS: Knowledge Resource Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A.A. Luo, A.K. Sachdev, R.K. Mishra, and R.C. Kubic. An Internal Variable Approach to the Superplastic Deformation of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy [pp. 149] H.S. Lee ...

117

Innovative Vacuum Distillation for Magnesium Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2001 ... TMS Member price: 10.00. Non-member price: 25.00. TMS Student Member price : 10.00. Product In Stock. Description Magnesium recycling ...

118

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Process for preparation of potassium-38  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solution of potassium-38 suitable for use as a radiopharmaceutical and a method for its production. Argon is irradiated with protons having energies above the threshold for the .sup.40 Ar(p,3n).sup.38 K reaction. The resulting potassium-38 is dissolved in a sterile water and any contaminating chlorine-38 is removed.

Lambrecht, Richard M. (Quogue, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Demonstration of Solar-Pumped Laser-Induced Magnesium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Magnesium Technology 2012. Presentation Title, Demonstration of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

greenhouse gas balance of magnesium parts for automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... GREENHOUSE GAS BALANCE OF MAGNESIUM PARTS FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS by Simone Ehrenberger, Horst E. Friedrich ...

122

TMS Professional Honors and Awards: LMD Magnesium Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS ENERGY INITIATIVES · KNOWLEDGE ... 2005, “Heated Hydro-Mechanical Deep Drawing of Magnesium Sheet Metal” Gerrit Kurz, University of Hanover.

123

Direct Hydrogenation Magnesium Boride to Magnesium Borohydride: Demonstration of >11 Weight Percent Reversible Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We here for the first time demonstrate direct hydrogenation of magnesium boride, MgB2, to magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2 at 900 bar H2-pressures and 400°C. Upon 14.8wt% hydrogen release, the end-decomposition product of Mg(BH4)2 is MgB2, thus, this is a unique reversible path here obtaining >11wt% H2 which implies promise for a fully reversible hydrogen storage material.

Severa, Godwin; Ronnebro, Ewa; Jensen, Craig M.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Improved magnesium/manganese dioxide electrochemical cell  

SciTech Connect

A magnesium/manganese dioxide electrochemical cell, stored following partial usage, is improved by increasing the cathode moisture content at the time of making the cell to reduce the self-discharge and increase the operating capacity after the cell has been stored following partial usage.

Jarvis, L.P.; Brundage, M.T.; Atwater, T.B.

1988-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

METHOD FOR REMOVING SODIUM OXIDE FROM LIQUID SODIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing sodium oxide from a fluent stream of liquid sodium by coldtrapping the sodium oxide. Apparatus utilizing this method is disclosed in United States Patent No. 2,745,552. Sodium will remain in a molten state at temperatures below that at which sodium oxide will crystallize out and form solid deposits, therefore, the contaminated stream of sodium is cooled to a temperature at which the solubility of sodium oxide in sodium is substantially decreased. Thereafter the stream of sodium is passed through a bed of stainless steel wool maintained at a temperature below that of the stream. The stream is kept in contact with the wool until the sodium oxide is removed by crystal growth on the wool, then the stream is reheated and returned to the system. This method is useful in purifying reactor coolants where the sodium oxide would otherwise deposit out on the walls and eventually plug the coolant tubes.

Bruggeman, W.H.; Voorhees, B.G.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

128

Human Sodium Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

comes from restaurants and it can be hard for a person to tell how much sodium is in restaurant foods. Brands of foods matter: Different brands of the same foods may have...

129

Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated. 3 figs.

Swift, C.D.; Bergum, J.W.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties  

SciTech Connect

The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5% in AM50 to over 9% in AZ91, more of the intermetallic Mg17Al12 is formed in the microstructure. For instance, for 15 increase in the aluminum content from AM50 to AM60, the volume fraction of eutectic present in the microstructure increases by 35%! Eventually, the brittle Mg17Al12 compound forms an interconnected network that reduces ductility and impact resistance. The lower aluminum in AM50 and AM60 are therefore a desirable feature in applications that call for higher impact resistance. Further improvement in impact resistance depends on the processing condition of the casting. Sound castings without porosity and impurities will have better mechanical properties. Since magnesium oxidizes readily, good melting and metal transfer practices are essential. The liquid metal has to be protected from oxidation at all times and entrainment of oxide films in the casting needs to be prevented. In this regard, there is evidence that us of vacuum to evacuate air from the die casting cavity can improve the quality of the castings. Fast cooling rates, leading to smaller grain size are beneficial and promote superior mechanical properties. Micro-segregation and banding are two additional defect types often encountered in magnesium alloys, in particular in AZ91D. While difficult to eliminate, segregation can be minimized by careful thermal management of the dies and the shot sleeve. A major source of segregation is the premature solidification in the shot sleeve. The primary solid dendrites are carried into the casting and form a heterogeneous structure. Furthermore, during the shot, segregation banding can occur. The remedies for this kind of defects include a hotter shot sleeve, use of insulating coatings on the shot sleeve and a short lag time between pouring into the shot sleeve and the shot.

David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Reversible Dehydrogenation of Magnesium Borohydride to Magnesium Triborane in the Solid State Under Moderate Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal decomposition of magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2, in the solid state was studied by a combination of PCT, TGA/MS and NMR spectroscopy. Dehydrogenation of Mg(BH4)2 at 200 °C, results in the highly selective formation of magnesium triborane, Mg(B3H8)2. This process is reversible at 250 °C under 120 atm H2. Dehydrogenation at higher temperature, > 300 °C, produces a complex mixture of polyborane species. Solution phase 11B NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed decomposition products reveals the formation of the B3H8 anion, boric acid from hydrolysis of the unstable polyboranes (BnHx) (n = 3-11, x >8), and the closoborane B12H12 dianion as a minor product. A BH condensation mechanism involving metal hydride formation is proposed to explain the limited reversible hydrogen storage in magnesium borohydride.

Chong, Marina; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jalisatgi, Satish; Jensen, Craig M.

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Formation of Vanadate Conversion Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present investigation, a chromate-free, corrosion-resistant conversion coating using vanadium based solution was applied to AZ31 magnesium alloy.

133

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminium-Free Magnesium Alloys in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminium-Free Magnesium Alloys in a Simulated Human Body Fluid. Author(s), Lokesh Choudhary, R. K. Singh ...

134

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information The magnesium industry directly emits SF6 from its primary metal production, parts casting, and recycling operations. In 2005, the industry's SF6 emissions were...

135

Fatigue Predictions of Various Joints of Magnesium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, a front shock tower of passenger vehicle is developed with various magnesium alloys and joining methods. To predict the fatigue behavior of the joints ...

136

Recycling Magnesium Alloy Housings for Notebook Computers - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... This article from Fujitsu Laboratories describes two recycling processes for magnesium alloy housings: one for recycling the excess material ...

137

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols The Magnesium Industry Partnership's SF6 emissions tracking and reporting software tool (Excel based) can be accessed by visiting the Partnership's...

138

WEB RESOURCE: Magnesium Wrought Products Flow Chart - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 18, 2007 ... The following flow charts attempt to list important wrought magnesium products being made as extrusions, forgings, sheet and plate. In these ...

139

WEB RESOURCE: Magnesium Cast Products Flow Chart - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 18, 2007 ... The following flow charts attempt to list important cast magnesium products being made as die castings, sand and permanent mold castings ...

140

Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries: Low-Cost Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries with High Energy Density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEEST Project: Pellion Technologies is developing rechargeable magnesium batteries that would enable an EV to travel 3 times farther than it could using Li-ion batteries. Prototype magnesium batteries demonstrate excellent electrochemical behavior; delivering thousands of charge cycles with very little fade. Nevertheless, these prototypes have always stored too little energy to be commercially viable. Pellion Technologies is working to overcome this challenge by rapidly screening potential storage materials using proprietary, high-throughput computer models. To date, 12,000 materials have been identified and analyzed. The resulting best materials have been electrochemically tested, yielding several very promising candidates.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Stationary storage and purification of hydrogen using nickel-coated magnesium powder. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following conclusions were reached: (1) The concept of a coating on a magnesium particle serving as a well-supported hydrogen-permselective membrane is sound. (2) Magnesium nitride can be made to coat magnesium particles through chemical vapor deposition within a fluidized bed. (3) Magnesium nitride exhibits the properties necessary for such a coating. (4) Magnesium nitride is not chemically inert to hydrogen in the absence of ammonia at temperatures typically used to hydride/dehydride magnesium.

NONE

1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sodium sulfur battery seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nano-engineering of magnesium hydride for hydrogen storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The destabilization of magnesium hydride (MgH"2) by solid-state reaction with Si in a nanoscale under vacuum was studied. The nanostructured Si films were deposited on the nanocrystalline MgH"2/Mg composite substrate by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD). ... Keywords: Destabilization, Magnesium hydride, Microstructure, Nano-engineering, Silicon

J. Bystrzycki; T. P?oci?ski; W. Zieli?ski; Z. Winiewski; M. Polanski; W. Mróz; Z. Bojar; K. J. Kurzd?owski

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.?

Schwam, David [Case Western Reserve University] [Case Western Reserve University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

Sodium sulfur battery seal  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

Topouzian, Armenag (Birmingham, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Resources and Links  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technical Information Technical Information Publications CD-ROMs Publications The following publications are available for download as Adobe PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader Cooperative Study of Magnesium Melt Protection Technologies: Emissions Characterization and Occupational Exposure. (PDF 275 KB) EPA Conference on SF6 and the Environment (2006) presentation by Holger Brandt, Lunt Manufacturing, and Scott Bartos, U.S. EPA. The Alternatives to SF6 for Magnesium Melt Protection brochure, published in Chinese, English, and Japanese language versions, was first introduced to the industry and public at the 63rd Annual World Magnesium Conference in Beijing, China on May 21, 2006. EPA collaborated with the International Magnesium Association (IMA), China Magnesium Association (CMA), and Japan

147

Cross sections for electron scattering from magnesium  

SciTech Connect

A B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) method has been used to perform a systematic study of angle-differential cross sections for electron scattering from neutral magnesium. The calculations cover elastic scattering and excitation of the five excited states (3s3p) {sup 3,1}P{sup o}, (3s3d) {sup 1}D, (3s4s) {sup 1}S, and (3s4p) {sup 1}P{sup o}. A multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal orbitals was employed for an accurate representation of the target wave functions. The close-coupling expansion for the collision problem included 37 bound states of neutral magnesium. Angle-differential cross sections are presented for incident electron energies from 10 to 100 eV. These results, as well as the corresponding angle-integrated cross sections, are compared with various experimental data and predictions from other close-coupling and distorted-wave calculations. In spite of a few remaining discrepancies, the overall agreement between our results and the experimental data is very satisfactory.

Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Gedeon, Sergey; Gedeon, Viktor; Lazur, Vladimir; Nagy, Elizabeth [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States); Department of Theoretical Physics, Uzhgorod State University, Uzhgorod 88000 (Ukraine)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fluorescence Spectroscopic Studies of (Acetamide + Sodium/Potassium Thiocyanates) Molten Mixtures: Composition and Temperature Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is sterically accessible to it. Models of molecules and macromolecules were created by com- puter simulations using the software ``Materials Studio'' (Accelrys Inc., San Diego, USA). The computer simulations were) Thermochim Acta 294:65­69 21. Manos G, Gartforth A, Dwyer J (2000) Ind Eng Chem Res 39:1198­1202 22. Sakata Y

Biswas, Ranjit

149

Mechanical Properties of Sodium and Potassium Activated Metakaolin-Based Geopolymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geopolymers (GPs) are a new class of inorganic polymers that have been considered as good candidate materials for many applications, including fire resistant and refractory panels, adhesives, and coatings, waste encapsulation material, etc. The aim of this study is to establish relationship between structural and mechanical properties of geopolymers with different chemical compositions. The metakaolin-based geopolymers were prepared by mechanically mixing metakaolin and alkaline silicate aqueous solutions to obtain samples with SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio that ranges from 2.5 to 5, and Na/Al or K/Al atomic ratios equal to 1. Geopolymer samples were cured in a laboratory oven at 80°C and ambient pressure for different times in the sealed containers. Structural characterization of the samples with different chemical compositions was carried out using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic-Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The mechanical characterization included Micro-indentation, Vickers indentation and fracture toughness measurement, as well as compressive testing. It was found that structure and mechanical properties of GPs depend on their chemical composition. The Na-GPs with ratio 3 have a highest compressive strength and Young‘s modulus of 39 MPa and 7.9 GPa, respectively. The results of mechanical testing are discussed in more detail in this thesis and linked to structural properties of processed geopolymers.

Kim, Hyunsoo

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa) Jump to:...

151

Process for converting magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a process for the conversion of magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride whereby magnesium fluoride is decomposed by heating in the presence of calcium carbonate, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Magnesium fluoride is a by-product of the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride to form uranium metal and has no known commercial use, thus its production creates a significant storage problem. The advantage of this invention is that the quality of calcium fluoride produced is sufficient to be used in the industrial manufacture of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, steel mill flux or ceramic applications.

Kreuzmann, A.B.; Palmer, D.A.

1984-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

Potassium emission absorption system. Topical report 12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Potassium Emission Absorption System is one of the advanced optical diagnostics developed at Mississippi State University to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the upstream of an MHD flow, the system directly measures gas temperature and neutral potassium atom number density through spectroscopic emission absorption techniques. From these measurements the electron density can be inferred from a statistical equilibrium calculation and the electron conductivity in the MHD channel found by use of an electron mobility model. The instrument has been utilized for field test measurements on MHD facilities for almost a decade and has been proven to provide useful measurements as designed for MHD nozzle, channel, and diffuser test sections. The theory of the measurements, a system description, its capabilities, and field test measurement results are reported here. During the development and application of the instrument several technical issues arose which when addressed advanced the state of the art in emission absorption measurement. Studies of these issues are also reported here and include: two-wavelength measurements for particle-laden flows, potassium D-line far wing absorption coefficient, bias in emission absorption measurements arising from dirty windows and misalignments, non-coincident multiwavelength emission absorption sampling errors, and lineshape fitting for boundary layer flow profile information. Although developed for NLHD application, the instrument could be applied to any high temperature flow with a resonance line in the 300 to 800 nm range, for instance other types of flames, rocket plumes or low temperature plasmas.

Bauman, L.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Enhancing Tensile and Compressive Strength of AZ41 Magnesium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Al and 1 wt.% Al with 1.5 vol.% nano-sized Al2O3 (50 nm) particulates in to AZ31 magnesium alloy, respectively, using disintegrated melt deposition technique.

154

Controlling the Biodegradation Rate of Magnesium-Based Implants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Z. Pu, D. Puleo, O.W. Dillon, Jr., I.S. Jawahir. On-Site ... By proper selection of machining conditions, magnesium-based implants with customized ...

155

SF6 Emission Reduction Partnership for the Magnesium Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic Summary: A cooperative effort between EPA and US magnesium industry to reduce emissions of SF6. Created On: 7/1/2008 9:12 AM, Topic View:.

156

Carbon Steel and Magnesium Oxide Dissolution for H-Canyon Process Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H Area Operations is planning to process plutonium-contaminated uranium metal scrap in its efforts to de-inventory excess nuclear materials. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) performed flowsheet development to support the decision to process the scrap in H-Canyon using 2M nitric acid (HNO3) / 0.025M potassium fluoride (KF) and 2 g/L boron. The scrap will be charged to the H-Canyon dissolver via a stainless steel charging bundle with a carbon steel end cap that must dissolve in an appropriate time frame. Experimental work was performed with a range of potential materials to be used to fabricate the bundle end cap. Testing was conducted with samples of metal plate, wire, cans, rods, and rivets to assess their dissolution characteristics in 2M HNO3/ 0.025M KF and 2 g/L boron. Experiments also measured the amount of hydrogen gas generated during carbon steel dissolution using the above dissolver solution. Each material type and its associated dissolution characteristic relate to specific bundle end cap designs being considered. Supplemental studies were conducted to evaluate the behavior and effect of magnesium oxide (MgO) sand on dissolution of uranium metal in 2M HNO3/ 0.025M KF and 2 g/L boron. The potential exists for a small quantity of MgO to be introduced into the dissolution flowsheet due to the use of MgO sand to extinguish uranium metal fires.

PIERCE, RA

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Coal desulfurization with sodium hypochlorite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wet desulfurization of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Illinois No. 6 coal were conducted with sodium hypochlorite in the laboratory. Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was… (more)

Li, Wei, M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Solutions and Their Effects on Fluid Flow in Unsaturated Media Tianfu Xu and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT. Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of

159

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

160

Potential automotive uses of wrought magnesium alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available to improve automotive fuel efficiency. High-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to reduce weight significantly, but substantial additional reductions could be achieved by greater use of low-density magnesium (Mg) and its alloys. Mg alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts, generally limited to die castings (e.g., housings). Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel/aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Mg sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. This study identifies high cost as the major barrier to greatly increased Mg use in autos. Two technical R and D areas, novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, could enable major cost reductions.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Synthesis and Characterization of Magnesium-Silicon and Magnesium-Tin Solid Solutions for Thermoelectric Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The environmentally friendly n-type Mg2(Si, Sn) thermoelectric solid solutions have a strong potential of commercial utilization in thermoelectric (TE) energy conversion due to their availability, low density (~3.02 g/cm3), and high stability at middle temperature range (400-600 ?C) that are typically observed from waste heat dissipating systems. The bulk materials were prepared from element powders via slow cooking under vacuum condition and current-assisted hot-press sintering. Temperature vs time curves have been researched in this thesis for fully reacted magnesium-silicide & magnesium-stannide green ingots with doping materials i.e. antimony, bismuth by different doping ratios. These ingots were ground by a high energy ball miller, uniaxial cold pressed into half inch pallets and then sintered by Direct Current-assisted hot pressing. Different synthesis conditions such as ball milling, sintering time, pressure, have been compared by SEM images and XRD tests analysis to figure out optimized process parameters. Several samples’ thermal conductivities (?) were plotted as a function of temperature to study different synthesis strategies and doping materials’ effects on phonon scattering inside bulk thermoelectric materials.

Hu, Fang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Switchable Mirrors Based on Nickel-Magnesium Films  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Switchable Mirrors Based on Nickel-Magnesium Films Switchable Mirrors Based on Nickel-Magnesium Films Title Switchable Mirrors Based on Nickel-Magnesium Films Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-47180 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Jonathan L. Slack, Robert D. Armitage, Robert Kostecki, Baker Farangis, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Applied Physics Letters Volume 78 Pagination 3047 Call Number LBNL-47180 Abstract An electrochromic mirror electrode based on reversible uptake of hydrogen in nickel magnesium alloy films is reported. Thin, magnesium-rich Ni-Mg films prepared on glass substrates by cosputtering from Ni and Mg targets are mirror-like in appearance and have low visible transmittance. Upon exposure to hydrogen gas or on cathodic polarization in alkaline electrolyte, the films take up hydrogen and become transparent. When hydrogen is removed, the mirror properties are recovered. The transition is believed to result from reversible formation of Mg2NiH4 and MgH2. A thin overlayer of palladium was found to enhance the kinetics of hydrogen insertion and extraction, and to protect the metal surface against oxidation.

163

Hydrogen Storage Properties of the Tetrahydrofuran Treated Magnesium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electronic structure, crystalline feature and morphology of the tetrahydrofuran (THF) treated magnesium, along with its hydriding and dehydriding properties have been investigated. The THF treated magnesium absorbs 6.3 wt per cent hydrogen at 723K and 3.5 MPa. After hydrogenation, in addition to the expected MgH2, a new less-stable hydride phase appears at 673K, but not at a lower temperature. Desorption produces 5.5 wt per cent hydrogen at 723K against a back pressure of 1.3 Pa after 20 cycles of hydriding-dehydriding. The THF treatment improves the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption significantly. From 723K to 623K, the THF treated Mg demonstrates acceptable reaction rates. XPS studies show that tetrahydrofuran treatment causes the electronic energy state of the magnesium surface atoms to change, but the XRD studies show the crystal structure remains unchanged. Metallographic observation of the bulk hydrides of THF treated magnesium reveal they are poly-crystalline wi th the wide-spreading slip bands and twins within the crystals, indicating the phase transformation upon hydriding causes serious stress and distortion. It appears this microstructural deformation explains the much higher energy requirements (higher pressure and temperature) for magnesium hydrogenation than the simple lattice expansion that accompany hydrogen uptake for LaNi5 and FeTi.

AU, MING

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

Low-Cost Zero-Emission Primary Magnesium Production by Solid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis is a new low-cost process for direct extraction of magnesium oxide to pure magnesium and oxygen gas. .... Grain Refinement of AZ91 Alloy by Addition of Ceramic Particles.

165

Simulation of sodium boiling experiments with THERMIT sodium version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and forced convection experiments(SBTF and French) are simulated with the sodium version of the thermal-hydraulic computer code THERMIT. Simulation is done for the test secti- -on with the pressure-velocity boundary ...

Huh, Kang Yul

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Water simulation of sodium reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal hydraulic simulation of a large sodium reactor by a scaled water model is examined. The Richardson Number, friction coefficient and the Peclet Number can be closely matched with the water system at full power and the similarity is retained for buoyancy driven flows. The simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions in a reactor vessel provided by a scaled water experiment is better than that by a scaled sodium test. Results from a correctly scaled water test can be tentatively extrapolated to a full size sodium system.

Grewal, S.S.; Gluekler, E.L.

1981-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

168

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO October 27, 1989 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Prepared by: R.F. Weston/Office of Technical Services BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to identify and examine the radiological conditions at sites used in the early years of nuclear energy development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), is administered by the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy through the

169

Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.  

SciTech Connect

Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

Sigmund, Wolfgang M. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Woan, Karran V. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Bell, Nelson Simmons

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

Sigmund, Wolfgang M. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Woan, Karran V. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Bell, Nelson Simmons

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Heat transfer during film condensation of potassium vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this work is to investigate theoretically and experimentally the following two phases of heat transfer during condensation of potassium vapore, a. Heat transfer during film condensation of pure saturated ...

Kroger, Detlev Gustav

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Background Although alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), and solvent blends have been developed as commercially-viable options for the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from waste gases, natural gas, and hydrogen streams, further process improvements are required to cost-effectively capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. The promotion of potassium carbonate (K

173

Analysis of the potential for new automotive uses of magnesium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the scope of a new project, just initiated, for the Lightweight Materials Program within the Office of Transportation Materials. The Center for Transportation Research and the Energy Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory will assess the feasibility and technical potential of using magnesium and its alloys in place of steel or aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications in order to enable more energy-efficient, lightweight passenger vehicles. The analysis will provide an information base to help guide magnesium research and development in the most promising directions.

Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and...

175

Magnesium oxide inserts for the LECO Carbon Analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LECO carbon analysis of plutonium metal and plutonium oxide at the Rocky Flats Plant generates several hundred kilograms of high silica residues each year. The plutonium in these residues is difficult and expensive to recover using production dissolution processes. A magnesium oxide (MgO) insert has been developed that significantly lowers the plutonium recovery costs without adversely affecting accuracy of the carbon analysis.

Bagaasen, L.M.; Jensen, C.M.

1991-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

Applications of Computer in Engineering Especially in Electrolysis Magnesium Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In modern times, computers have closely connection with everyone, especially scientist and engineer. Computer programs can now solve difficult problems in a fraction of the time it used to take. Computer-Aided engineering is a powerful tool and necessary ... Keywords: CFD, CAE, Electrochemistry, electrolysis, molten magnesium salt

Ze Sun; Bing Li; Jianguo Yu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

REGENERATION OF FISSION-PRODUCT-CONTAINING MAGNESIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of regenerating a magnesium-thorium alloy contaminated with fission products, protactinium, and uranium is presented. A molten mixture of KCl--LiCl-MgCl/sub 2/ is added to the molten alloy whereby the alkali, alkaline parth, and rare earth fission products (including yttrium) and some of the thorium and uranium are chlorinated and

Chiotti, P.

1964-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa) Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: High heat flow in the Zuni Mountains, New Mexico, U.S.A., has been explained by the possible presence of a buried felsic pluton. Alternately, high K, U, Th abundances have been proposed to account for part of the high heat flow. The mean radiogenic heat contribution for 60 samples of Precambrian core rocks is 7.23 μcal/gm-yr, which is slightly

179

Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems  

SciTech Connect

Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

Yoder, JR.G.L.

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Vacuum pyrolysis of sodium stearate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vacuum pyrolysis of sodium stearate was studied to provide useful information for Green River oil shale pyrolysis. Sodium stearate is a typical compound of carboxylic acid salts amounting to 3.6% of total organic materials in the oil shale by methanol extraction. Sodium stearate contained in a stainless steel miniature reactor was heated at 450/sup 0/C in a fluidized sand bath. Pyrolysis times ranged from 15 to 120 minutes. The amounts of gas and liquid products were measured and composition determined by gas chromatography. Ethane, methane, propylene plus propane, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide are the major gaseous products, in order of decreasing concentration. The predominant liquid product is a C/sub 17/ alkene with C/sub 12/-C/sub 21/ alkene/alkane pairs present. The first order decomposition rate constant for sodium stearate at 450/sup 0/C was calculated to be 6.4 x 10/sup -3/ min./sup -1/. 18 refs., 7 figs.

Chong, S.L.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Seal for sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

Topouzian, Armenag (Birmingham, MI); Minck, Robert W. (Lathrup Village, MI); Williams, William J. (Northville, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

Mikkor, Mati (Ann Arbor, MI)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Energy Basics: Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color...

184

Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Carbonation in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Geochemistry of Magnesium Silicate Carbonation in an Aqueous Medium (Carbon Mineralization) Jon Benner, Deb Bergfeld, Dave Bish, Darrin Byler, Bill Carey, Steve Chipera, George Guthrie, Klaus Lackner, Hans Ziock Hydrology, Geochemistry, Geology Group Los Alamos National Laboratory LA-UR-01-4206 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited George Guthrie gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340 Mineral Carbonation: Conversion of CO 2 into Carbonates * alkali carbonates too soluble * alkaline earth carbonates ideal sources: Ca-silicates (feldspar) Mg-silicates (olivine, serpentine, clays) Mg 2+ + CO 3 2- => MgCO 3 Mg 2 SiO 4 + 4H + => 2Mg 2+ + SiO 2(aq) Ultramafic rocks are an abundant Mg source (~0.2 km) 3 serpentine / GW-yr Challenges for Mineral-Carbonation

185

Switchable mirrors based on nickel-magnesium films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new type of electrochromic mirror electrode based on reversible uptake of hydrogen in nickel magnesium alloy films is reported. Thin,magnesium-rich Ni-Mg films prepared on glass substrates by cosputtering from Ni and Mg targets are mirror-like in appearance and have low visible transmittance. Upon exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films take up hydrogen and become transparent. When hydrogen is removed, the mirror properties are recovered. The transition is believed to result from reversible formation of Mg2NiH4 and MgH2. A thin overlayer of palladium was found to enhance the kinetics of hydrogen insertion and extraction,and to protect the metal surface against oxidation.

Richardson,Thomas J.; Slack, Jonathan L.; Armitage, Robert D.; Kostecki, Robert; Farangis, Baker; Rubin, Michael D.

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Heat transfer during film condensation of potassium vapor on a horizontal plate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of the investigation is to analyze the following two features of heat transfer during condensation of potassium vapor: a. Heat transfer during film condensation of a pure saturated potassium vapor on a horizontal ...

Meyrial, Paul M.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Efficient One-Step Electrolytic Recycling of Low-Grade and Post-Consumer Magnesium Scrap  

SciTech Connect

Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies, Inc. (abbreviated MOxST, pronounced most) and Boston University (BU) have developed a new low-cost process for recycling post-consumer co-mingled and heavily-oxidized magnesium scrap, and discovered a new chemical mechanism for magnesium separations in the process. The new process, designated MagReGenTM, is very effective in laboratory experiments, and on scale-up promises to be the lowest-cost lowest-energy lowest-impact method for separating magnesium metal from aluminum while recovering oxidized magnesium. MagReGenTM uses as little as one-eighth as much energy as today's methods for recycling magnesium metal from comingled scrap. As such, this technology could play a vital role in recycling automotive non-ferrous metals, particularly as motor vehicle magnesium/aluminum ratios increase in order to reduce vehicle weight and increase efficiency.

Adam C. Powell, IV

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hydrogen Storage Properties of Magnesium Base Nanostructured Composite Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work, nanostructured composite materials have been synthesized using the mechanical alloying process. The new materials produced have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transition electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) for their phase compositions, crystal structure, grain size, particle morphology and the distribution of catalyst element. Hydrogen storage capacities and the hydriding-dehydriding kinetics of the new materials have been measured at different temperatures using a Sieverts apparatus. It is observed that mechanical alloying accelerates the hydrogenation kinetics of the magnesium based materials at low temperature, but a high temperature must be provided to release the absorbed hydrogen from the hydrided magnesium based materials. It is believed that the dehydriding temperature is largely controlled by the thermodynamic configuration of magnesium hydride. Doping Mg-Ni nano/amorphous composite materials with lanthanum reduces the hydriding and dehydriding temperature. Although the stability of MgH2 can not be easily reduced by ball milling alone, the results suggest the thermodynamic properties of Mg-Ni nano/amorphous composite materials can be alternated by additives such as La or other effective elements. Further investigation toward understanding the mechanism of additives will be rewarded.

AU, M

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Potential applications of wrought magnesium alloys for passenger vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available for improving automotive fuel efficiency. Although high-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to achieve significant weight reductions, substantial additional weight reductions could be achieved by increased use of magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, which have very low density. Magnesium alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts; use is generally limited to die castings, such as housings. The Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel or aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. This study identifies technical and economic barriers to this replacement and suggests R&D areas to enable economical large-volume use. Detailed results of the study will be published at a later date. Magnesium sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. Currently, Mg sheet has found limited use in the aerospace industry, where costs are not a major concern. The major barrier to greatly increased automotive use is high cost; two technical R&D areas are identified that could enable major reductions in costs. These are novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, possibly operating at lower temperatures and involving superplastic behavior.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Stodolsky, F.; Wu, S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

Essebaggers, Jan (39 Honeyman Dr., Succasunna, NJ 07876)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

BROCHURE ON POTASSIUM IODIDE (KI) FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potassium Iodide Activities ” dated June 29, 2001, the staff is submitting revised draft NUREG-1633 to the Commission for review prior to publication for public comment. This paper also provides the text of a proposed public information brochure for Commission review and comment. BACKGROUND:

William D. Travers; Kathy Halvey Gibson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H. [Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark); Jensen, Torben R., E-mail: trj@chem.au.dk [Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Adsorption of Propane on the Magnesium Oxide (100) Surface and Synthesis of Anodized Aluminum Oxide.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work is divided into two parts: the adsorption of propane on the magnesium oxide (100) surface and the synthesis of anodized aluminum oxide. The… (more)

Felty, Michael John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

Buttrey, K.E.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

195

Regulation of the sodium/potassium/chloride cotransporter by calcium and cyclic AMP in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells  

SciTech Connect

The activity of the Na/K/Cl cotransporter in smooth muscle cells cultured from rat aorta was assayed by measuring the initial rate of furosemide-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb influx or efflux. Five uM furosemide or 0.2 uM bumetanide inhibited influx by 50%. Furosemide-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb influx depended on the presence of all 3 ions in the external medium. The dependence on Na and K was hyperbolic with apparent Km values of 45 and 5 mM, respectively. The dependence on Cl was sigmoidal. Assuming a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 for Na:K:Cl, a Km for Cl of 60 mM was obtained from a Hofstee plot of the data. Rapidly growing cells had 3 fold higher cotransport activity than quiescent cells. Angiotensin II (ANG) stimulated furosemide-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb efflux by 2 fold. An ANG receptor antagonist prevented ANG from increasing cotransport activity. Two calcium ionophores, A23187 and ionomycin, increased cotransport activity by 2 fold. Phorbol myristate acetate had no effect on cotransport activity. Isoproterenol, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, cholera toxin, or methylisobutylxanthine inhibited furosemide-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx by 35 to 50%. From these findings they conclude that increasing cytoplasmic free calcium stimulates cotransport activity, whereas increasing cellular cyclic AMP inhibits the cotransporter.

Higgins, B.L.; Smith, L.; Smith, J.B.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Performance characteristics of gravity-assisted, potassium heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Experiments with potassium-stainless steel gravity-assisted heat pipes were performed. Performance limitations due to entrainment or flooding of the liquid return flow are compared with analytical model predictions. The effect of heated pool height was investigated and problems with surface wetting are discussed. A comparison between entrainment limits for smooth-walled and textured-walled heat pipes was made and a minimum internal surface texturing depth is suggested.

Prenger, F.C.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sodium technology, 1972--1973  

SciTech Connect

References to 897 publications on sodium and NaK technology cited in Nuclear Science Abstracts Volume 26 (1972) through Volume 27 (1973 through June) are contained in this bibliography. Keyword indexing is displayed under each citation to provide information on the contents of the document. References are arranged in order by the original NSA abstract number which approximately places them in chronological order. Sequence numbers appear beside each reference, and the personal author index refers to these sequence numbers. The subject index refers to the original abstract numbers. (auth)

1974-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modeling Study of Proposed Field Calibration Source Using K-40 Source and High-Z Targets for Sodium Iodide Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has ruled that all sealed radioactive sources, even those considered exempt under Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations, are subject to radioactive material controls. However, sources based on the primordial isotope potassium-40 (40K) are not subject to these restrictions. Potassium-40’s beta spectrum and 1460.8 keV gamma ray can be used to induce K-shell fluorescence x rays in high-Z metals between 60 and 80 keV. A gamma ray calibration source is thus proposed that uses potassium chloride salt and a high-Z metal to create a two-point calibration for a sodium iodide field gamma spectroscopy instrument. The calibration source was designed in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code. The x ray production was maximized while attempting to preserve the detector system’s sensitivity to external sources by minimizing the count rate and shielding effect of the calibration source. Since the source is intended to be semi-permanently fixed to the detector, the weight of the calibration source was also a design factor. Two methods of x-ray production were explored. First, a thin high-Z layer (HZL) was interposed between the detector and the potassium chloride-urethane source matrix. Second, bismuth metal powder was homogeneously mixed with a urethane binding agent to form a potassium chloride-bismuth matrix (KBM). The two methods were directly compared using a series of simulations, including their x ray peak strengths, pulse-height spectral characteristics, and response to a simulated background environment. The bismuth-based source was selected as the development model because it is cheap, nontoxic, and outperforms the high-Z layer method in simulation. The overall performance for the bismuth-based source was significantly improved by splitting the calibration source longitudinally into two halves and placing them on either side of the detector. The performance was improved further by removing the binding agent and simulating a homogeneous mixture of potassium chloride and bismuth powder in a 0.1 cm plastic casing. The split plastic-encased potassium chloride-bismuth matrix would serve as a light, cheap, field calibration source that is not subject to DOE restrictions.

Rogers, Jeremy 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Batteries with Orthorhombic Sodium Manganese Oxide Cathodes  

Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have discovered a low-cost, low-toxicity manganese oxide for rechargeable lithium and sodium batteries.

200

Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes  

SciTech Connect

An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Low-temperature electron irradiation and annealing in pure magnesium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study of magnesium after 1.0 MeV electron irradiations at 1.55/sup 0/K, it has been observed that the damage production rate in Mg is (3.57 +- 0.03) x 10/sup -26/ ..cap omega..cm/(e/sup -/ cm/sup 2/). There is no evidence for thermal annealing up to 4/sup 0/K. The low temperature recovery in magnesium is found to consist of two broad substages between 4 to 14/sup 0/K, both of which exhibit evidence for correlated and uncorrelated recovery processes. The two substages are found to have very different frequency factors for annealing, and there is evidence that the recovery processes in the second substage are influenced by those in the first. A model for recovery is proposed using the split configuration in the plane which explains the first substage as being due to interstitial migration in the basal plane and the second to migration perpendicular to the plane.

Simester, J.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Laboratory Evaluation of the Effects of Potassium Acetate Deicing Chemicals on the Performance of Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent evidence suggests that the most commonly used salt for snow and ice control on airfield pavements, potassium acetate (KAc), may adversely impact long-term durability of concrete. This report provides interim findings from a study on effects of potassium acetate on performance of concrete. The main objectives of this program are as follows: Determine whether potassium acetate solution exacerbates alkali-silica reaction (ASR) under field conditions and in the laboratory under simulated field and ac...

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

203

Block of voltage-gated potassium channels by Pacific ciguatoxin-1 contributes to increased neuronal excitability in rat sensory neurons  

SciTech Connect

The present study investigated the actions of the polyether marine toxin Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) on neuronal excitability in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using patch-clamp recording techniques. Under current-clamp conditions, bath application of 2-20 nM P-CTX-1 caused a rapid, concentration-dependent depolarization of the resting membrane potential in neurons expressing tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium (Na{sub v}) channels. This action was completely suppressed by the addition of 200 nM TTX to the external solution, indicating that this effect was mediated through TTX-sensitive Na{sub v} channels. In addition, P-CTX-1 also prolonged action potential and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) duration. In a subpopulation of neurons, P-CTX-1 also produced tonic action potential firing, an effect that was not accompanied by significant oscillation of the resting membrane potential. Conversely, in neurons expressing TTX-resistant Na{sub v} currents, P-CTX-1 failed to alter any parameter of neuronal excitability examined in this study. Under voltage-clamp conditions in rat DRG neurons, P-CTX-1 inhibited both delayed-rectifier and 'A-type' potassium currents in a dose-dependent manner, actions that occurred in the absence of alterations to the voltage dependence of activation. These actions appear to underlie the prolongation of the action potential and AHP, and contribute to repetitive firing. These data indicate that a block of potassium channels contributes to the increase in neuronal excitability, associated with a modulation of Na{sub v} channel gating, observed clinically in response to ciguatera poisoning.

Birinyi-Strachan, Liesl C. [Neurotoxin Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway NSW (Australia); Gunning, Simon J. [Neurotoxin Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway NSW (Australia); Lewis, Richard J. [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD (Australia); Nicholson, Graham M. [Neurotoxin Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: Graham.Nicholson@uts.edu.au

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Resources and Links  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Plant Assessments Plant Assessments Greenhouse Gas Protocol (PDF 190 KB) Download Acrobat Reader Paper written by Bill Palmer, Cheminfo Services, Inc. Molten magnesium and its alloys are volatile substances that have a tendency to oxidize explosively in air and require surface protection in casting processes. Save Energy Now Assessments The Save Energy Now assessments program is one way for plants of all sizes to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). Large plants are eligible to apply for a system level assessment on their steam, process heating, compressed air, fans, or pumping systems. Assessments are conducted over a three day site visit by teams of DOE Energy Experts and plant personnel. The plant personnel are trained to identify energy savings opportunities using the DOE software tools. Most plants find an average of

206

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Resources and Links  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Software Tools Software Tools The magnesium industry intends to eliminate emissions of SF6 by evaluating and adopting environmentally friendly alternative protective cover gases. The industry may also seek to improve its energy efficiency and therefore reduce its CO2 emissions. DOE has developed the following software tools that may assist companies in such efforts. DOE BestPractices Software Tools DOE BestPractices offers a range of software tools and databases that help manufacturers assess their plant's steam, compressed air, motor, and process heating systems. DOE Plant Energy Profiler Industry experience has shown that many plant utility personnel do not have an adequate understanding of their energy cost structure and where the major focus should be for any energy savings program. This tool will

207

SO/sub 2/ scrubbing: more work for sodium  

SciTech Connect

The effects that dry scrubbing of flue gases with sodium sorbents could have on supplies of naturally-occurring sodium compounds such as nahcolite and trona are discussed.

Not Available

1984-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

208

X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITION METAL-MAGNESIUM HYDRIDE FILMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films T. J. Richardson a, *, B. Farangis a , J. L. Slack a , P. Nachimuthu b , R. Pereira b , N. Tamura b , and M. Rubin a a Environmental Energy Technologies Division, b Advanced Light Source, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720, USA *Corresponding author, E-mail address: tjrichardson@lbl.gov Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large changes in both reflectance and transmittance on exposure to hydrogen gas. Changes in electronic structure and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic in situ transmission mode X-ray absorption

209

An experimental study of magnesium-isotope fractionation in chlorophyll-a photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616. whcasey@ucdavis.edu keywords: photosynthesis, magnesium isotopes,Isotope Fractionation in Chlorophyll-a Photosynthesis Jay R. Black Department of Chemistry Department of Geology,

Black, J R; Yin, Q Z; Casey, W H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Near Net-Shaped Magnesium Aluminate Spinel by the Oxidation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ductile magnesium can endow the precursor with the green strength ..... by Oxidation of Melt Spun Ag-Ho-Ba-Cu Alloy Ribbon," Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 27[2] ...

211

Novel Nonflammable Electrolytes for Secondary Magnesium Batteries and High Voltage Electrolytes for Electrochemcial Supercapacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnesium has been used successfully in primary batteries, but its use in rechargeable cells has been stymied by the lack of suitable non-aqueous electrolyte that can conduct Mg+2 species, combined with poor stripping and plating properties. The development of a suitable cathode material for rechargeable magnesium batteries has also been a roadblock, but a nonflammable electrolyte is key. Likewise, the development of safe high voltage electrochemical supercapaitors has been stymied by the use of flammable solvents in the liquid electrolyte; to wit, acetonitrile. The purpose of the research conducted in this effort was to identify useful compositions of magnesium salts and polyphosphate solvents that would enable magnesium ions to be cycled within a secondary battery design. The polyphosphate solvents would provide the solvent for the magnesium salts while preventing the electrolyte from being flammable. This would enable these novel electrolytes to be considered as an alternative to THF-based electrolytes. In addition, we explored several of these solvents together with lithium slats for use as high voltage electrolytes for carbon-based electrochemical supercapacitors. The research was successful in that: 1) Magnesium imide dissolved in a phosphate ester solvent that contains a halogented phosphate ester appears to be the preferred electrolyte for a rechargeable Mg cell. 2) A combination of B-doped CNTs and vanadium phosphate appear to be the cathode of choice for a rechargeable Mg cell by virtue of higher voltage and better reversibility. 3) Magnesium alloys appear to perform better than pure magnesium when used in combination with the novel polyphosphate electrolytes. Also, this effort has established that Phoenix Innovationâ??s family of phosphonate/phosphate electrolytes together with specific lithium slats can be used in supercapacitor systems at voltages of greater than 10V.

Dr. Brian Dixon

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Title X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50574 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Baker Farangis, Jonathan L. Slack, Ponnusamy Nachimuthu, Rupert C. C. Perera, Nobumichi Tamura, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Journal of Alloys and Compounds Volume 356-357 Start Page 204 Pagination 204-207 Date Published 08/2003 Keywords A. hydrogen storage materials, NEXAFS, thin film s; C. EXAFS, x-ray diffraction Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large changes in both reflectance and transmittance on exposure to hydrogen gas. Changes in electronic structure and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic in situ transmission mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Mg K-edge and Ni, Co, and Ti L-edge spectra reflect both reversible and irreversible changes in the metal environments. A significant shift in the nickel L absorption edge shows it to be an active participant in hydride formation. The effect on cobalt and titanium is much less dramatic, suggesting that these metals act primarily as catalysts for formation of magnesium hydride.

213

Effect of Potassium Addition on Coprecipitated Iron Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Using Bio-oil-syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of potassium addition and the potassium content on the activity and selectivity of coprecipitated iron catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) were studied in a fixed bed reactor at 1.5 MPa

Zhao-xiang Wang; Ting Dong; Tao Kan; Quan-xin Li

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Radial power flattening in sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to improve a new design for a uranium startup sodium cooled fast reactor which was proposed at MIT, this thesis evaluated radial power flattening by varying the fuel volume fraction at a fixed U-235 enrichment of ...

Krentz-Wee, Rebecca (Rebecca Elizabeth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Low-temperature Sodium-Beta Battery  

Rechargeable metallic sodium batteries have application in large-scale energy storage applications such as electric power generation and distribution, in motive applications such as electric vehicles, hybrids, and plug-in hybrids, and for aerospace ...

216

Method of preparing silicon from sodium fluosilicate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing high purity silicon metal from Na.sub.2 SiF.sub.6 (sodium fluosilicate). The sodium fluosilicate is heated to decomposition temperature to form NaF, which retains most of the impurities, and gaseous SiF.sub.4. The SiF.sub.4 is then reduced by the bomb reduction method using a reductant having a low packing density.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Rehbein, David (Ames, IA); Chiotti, Premo (Ames, IA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Multiple Shaker potassium channels in a primitive metazoan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voltage-gated potassium channels are critical elements in providing functional diversity in nervous systems. The diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels in modern triploblastic metazoans (such as mollusks, arthropods and vettebrates) is provided primarily by four gene subfamilies (Shaker, Shal, Shab, and Shaw), but there has been no data from the ancient diploblastic metazoans until now. Diploblasts, represented by jellyfish and other coelenterates, arose during the first major metazoan radiation and are the most structurally primitive animals to have true nervous systems. By comparing the K+ channels of diploblasts and triploblasts, we may determine the fundamental set of K+ channels present in the first nervous systems. We now report the isolation of two Shaker subfamily cDNA clones, jShak1 and jShak2, from the hydrozoan jellyfish Polyorchis

Timothy Jegla; Nikita Grigoriev; Z Warren J. Gallin; Lawrence Salkoff; Andrew N. Spencer

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

High temperature vapor pressure and the critical point of potassium  

SciTech Connect

The vapor pressure of potassium was experimentally determined from 2100 deg F up to-its critical temperature. An empirical equation of the form ln P = A + B/T + C ln T + DT/sup 1.5/ was found to best fit the data. A critical pressure of 2378.2 plus or minus 4.0 psia (161.79 plus or minus 0.27 ata) was measured. The corresponding critical temperature, extrapolated from the pressure-- temperature curve, is 4105.4 plus or minus 5 deg R (2280.8 plus or minus 3 deg K). The technique employed was tae pressure tube method developed earlier in this laboratory and used for determining the vapor pressure of rubidium and cesium. This method measures tae critical pressure directly, as well as the vapor pressure st lower temperatures. (4 tables, 6 figures, 26 references) (auth)

Jerez, W.R.; Bhise, V.S.; Das Gupta, S.; Bonilla, C.F.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Photoionization of potassium atoms from the ground and excited states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dirac-based B-spline R-matrix method is used to investigate the photoionization of atomic potassium from the 4s ground and 4p, 5s-7s, 3d-5d excited states. The effect of the core polarization by the outer electron is included through the polarized pseudostates. Besides the dipole core polarization, we also found a noticeable influence of the quadrupole core polarization. We obtained excellent agreement with experiment for cross sections of the 4s photoionization, including accurate description of the near-threshold Cooper-Seaton minimum. We also obtained close agreement with experiment for the 4p photoionization, but there are unexpectedly large discrepancies with available experimental data for photoionization of the 5d and 7s excited states.

Zatsarinny, O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States); Tayal, S. S. [Department of Physics, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia 30314 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Summary of potassium/argon dating, 1981. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analytical results for the last fiscal year effort in potassium/argon dating in support of US Department of Energy programs are summarized. Nearly 100 new dates have been generated. Recalibration of the argon extraction tables resulted in refinement of values for tracer ratios and depletion constants for our two extraction lines. Tracer ratios are ({sup 36}Ar/{sup 38}Ar){sub T} = 0.0308 and 0.0000449; ({sup 40}Ar/{sup 38}Ar){sub T} = 0.0501 and 0.0014 for extraction tables 1 and 2, respectively. Tracer depletion constants are -0.0002250 and -0.0005501 for tables 1 and 2, respectively. Initial values for the argon tracer pipettes are 3.2522 x 10{sup -11} moles and 3.9329 x 10{sup -11} moles for tables 1 and 2, respectively.

Evans, S.H. Jr.; Brown, F.H.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MUTLI-OBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN WROUGHT MAGNESIUM ALLOYS  

SciTech Connect

The microstructural features that govern the mechanical properties of wrought magnesium alloys include grain size, crystallographic texture, and twinning. Several processes based on shear deformation have been developed that promote grain refinement, weakening of the basal texture, as well as the shift of the peak intensity away from the center of the basal pole figure - features that promote room temperature ductility in Mg alloys. At ORNL, we are currently exploring the concept of introducing nano-twins within sub-micron grains as a possible mechanism for simultaneously improving strength and ductility by exploiting a potential dislocation glide along the twin-matrix interface a mechanism that was originally proposed for face-centered cubic materials. Specifically, we have developed an integrated modeling and optimization framework in order to identify the combinations of grain size, texture and twin spacing that can maximize strength-ductility combinations. A micromechanical model that relates microstructure to material strength is coupled with a failure model that relates ductility to a critical shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress. The micro-mechanical model is combined with an optimization tool based on genetic algorithm. A multi-objective optimization technique is used to explore the strength-ductility space in a systematic fashion and identify optimum combinations of the microstructural parameters that will simultaneously maximize the strength-ductility in the alloy.

Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Convergent close-coupling calculations of positron-magnesium scattering  

SciTech Connect

The single-center convergent close-coupling method has been applied to positron-magnesium scattering at incident energies from 0.01 to 100 eV. Cross sections are presented for elastic scattering and excitation of 3 {sup 1}P, as well as for the total ionization and total scattering processes. We also provide an estimate of the positronium formation cross section. The results agree very well with the measurements of the total cross section by Stein et al. [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. Sect. B 143, 68 (1998)], and consistent with the positronium formation measurements of Surdutovich et al. [Phys. Rev. A 68, 022709 (2003)] for positron energies above the ionization threshold. For energies below the positronium formation threshold (0.8 eV) we find a large P-wave resonance at 0.17 eV. A similar resonance behavior was found by Mitroy and Bromley [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 173001 (2007)] at an energy of 0.1 eV.

Savage, Jeremy S.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Multivitamin/Multielement Dietary Supplement SRM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chromium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, phosphorous, potassium, selenium, silicon, tin, vanadium, and zinc. ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best K{sup +}/PZ solvent, 4.5 m K{sup +}/4.5 m PZ, requires equivalent work of 31.8 kJ/mole CO{sub 2} when used with a double matrix stripper and an intercooled absorber. The oxidative degradation of piperazine or organic acids is reduced significantly by inhibitor A, but the production of ethylenediamine is unaffected. The oxidative degradation of piperazine in 7 m MEA/2 m PZ is catalyzed by Cu{sup ++}. The thermal degradation of MEA becomes significant at 120 C. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA/PZ solvents is increased at greater CO{sub 2} loading. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA concentration. The base case corrosion rate in 5 M MEA/1.2M PZ is 22 mpy. With 1 wt% heat stable salt, the corrosion rate increases by 50% to 160% in the order: thiosulfate< oxalate

Gary T. Rochelle; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lightning arrestor connector lead magnesium niobate qualification pellet test procedures.  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced knowledge preservation for DOE DP technical component activities has recently received much attention. As part of this recent knowledge preservation effort, improved documentation of the sample preparation and electrical testing procedures for lead magnesium niobate--lead titanate (PMN/PT) qualification pellets was completed. The qualification pellets are fabricated from the same parent powders used to produce PMN/PT lightning arrestor connector (LAC) granules at HWF&T. In our report, the procedures for fired pellet surface preparation, electrode deposition, electrical testing and data recording are described. The dielectric measurements described in our report are an information only test. Technical reasons for selecting the electrode material, electrode size and geometry are presented. The electrical testing is based on measuring the dielectric constant and dissipation factor of the pellet during cooling from 280 C to 220 C. The most important data are the temperature for which the peak dielectric constant occurs (Curie Point temperature) and the peak dielectric constant magnitude. We determined that the peak dielectric constant for our procedure would be that measured at 1 kHz at the Curie Point. Both the peak dielectric constant and the Curie point parameters provide semi-quantitative information concerning the chemical and microstructural homogeneity of the parent material used for the production of PMN/PT granules for LACs. Finally, we have proposed flag limits for the dielectric data for the pellets. Specifically, if the temperature of the peak dielectric constant falls outside the range of 250 C {+-} 30 C we propose that a flag limit be imposed that will initiate communication between production agency and design agency personnel. If the peak dielectric constant measured falls outside the range 25,000 {+-} 10,000 we also propose that a flag limit be imposed.

Tuohig, W. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Mahoney, Patrick A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Wheeler, Jill Susanne

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Method of making a sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

A method of making a portion of a sodium sulfur battery is disclosed. The battery portion made is a portion of the container which defines the volume for the cathodic reactant materials which are sulfur and sodium polysulfide materials. The container portion is defined by an outer metal casing with a graphite liner contained therein, the graphite liner having a coating on its internal diameter for sealing off the porosity thereof. The steel outer container and graphite pipe are united by a method which insures that at the operating temperature of the battery, relatively low electrical resistance exists between the two materials because they are in intimate contact with one another.

Elkins, Perry E. (Santa Ana, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Experimental evaluation and modeling of a turbine blade with potassium evaporative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method of turbine blade cooling, the Return Flow Cascade, has been developed in which vaporization of a liquid metal such as potassium is used to maintain the blade surface at a nearly uniform temperature. Turbine ...

Townsend, Jessica Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Geochemical Aspects of the Carbonation of Magnesium Silicates in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES IN AN AQUEOUS MEDIUM George D. Guthrie, Jr. (gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340) J. William Carey (bcarey@lanl.gov 505-667-5540) Deborah Bergfeld (debberrg@lanl.gov 505-667-1812) Darrin Byler (dbyler@lanl.gov 505-665-9562) Steve Chipera (chipera@lanl.gov 505-667-1110) Hans-Joachim Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov 505-667-7265) Hydrology, Geochemistry, & Geology Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Klaus Lackner (ksl@lanl.gov 505-667-5694) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Columbia University, New York, NY KEYWORDS: CO 2 sequestration, magnesium silicate, mineral carbonation INTRODUCTION The volume of carbon dioxide associated with the use of fossil fuels to produce

229

Cohesion enhancing effect of magnesium in aluminum grain boundary: A first-principles determination  

SciTech Connect

The effect of magnesium on grain boundary cohesion in aluminum was investigated by means of first-principles calculations using the Rice-Wang model [Rice and Wang, Mater. Sci. Eng. A 107, 23 (1989)]. It is demonstrated that magnesium is a cohesion enhancer with a potency of -0.11 eV/atom. It is further determined through electronic structure and bonding character analysis that the cohesion enhancing property of magnesium is due to a charge transfer mechanism which is unusually strong and overcomes the negative result of the size effect mechanism. Consistent with experimental results, this work clarifies the controversy and establishes that Mg segregation does not contribute to stress corrosion cracking in Al alloys.

Zhang Shengjun; Freeman, Arthur J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Kontsevoi, Oleg Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Olson, Gregory B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Coordination Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how ligands affect their performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnesium battery is potentially a safe, cost-effective, and high energy density technology for large scale energy storage. However, the development of magnesium battery has been hindered by the limited performance and the lack of fundamental understandings of electrolytes. Here, we present a coordination chemistry study of Mg(BH4)2 in ethereal solvents. The O donor denticity, i.e. ligand strength of the ethereal solvents which act as ligands to form solvated Mg complexes, plays a significant role in enhancing coulombic efficiency of the corresponding solvated Mg complex electrolytes. A new and safer electrolyte is developed based on Mg(BH4)2, diglyme and optimized LiBH4 additive. The new electrolyte demonstrates 100% coulombic efficiency, no dendrite formation, and stable cycling performance with the cathode capacity retention of ~90% for 300 cycles in a prototype magnesium battery.

Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Li, Guosheng; Gu, Meng; Nie, Zimin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Xiao, Jie; Lu, Dongping; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

231

Influence of Si Co-doping on electrical transport properties of magnesium-doped boron nanoswords  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnesium-doped boron nanoswords were synthesized via a thermoreduction method. The as-prepared nanoswords are single crystalline and {beta}-rhombohedral ({beta}-rh) phase. Electrical transport measurements show that variable range hopping conductivity increases with temperature, and carrier mobility has a greater influence than carrier concentration. These results are consistent with the three dimensional Mott's model (M. Cutler and N. F. Mott, Phys. Rev. 181, 1336 (1969)) besides a high density of localized states at the Fermi level compared with bulk {beta}-rh boron. Conductivity of Mg-doped boron nanoswords is significantly lower than that of ''pure'' (free of magnesium) boron nanoswords. Electron energy loss spectroscopy studies confirm that the poorer conductivity arises from silicon against magnesium doping.

Tian Yuan; Lu Hongliang; Tian Jifa; Li Chen; Hui Chao; Shi Xuezhao; Huang Yuan; Shen Chengmin; Gao Hongjun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Improved efficiency in the sulfur dioxide-iodine hydrogen cycle through the use of magnesium oxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of iodine with dry magnesium oxide and magnesium sulfite hexahydrate was studied experimentally as a possible means of improving the efficiency of the sulfur dioxide-iodine cycle. When no extra water was introduced, the maximum product yield was 67% obtained at 423 K. With excess water vapor, a nonporous plug was formed which prevented complete reaction. In the second case, maximum yield was 62% measured at 433 K showing that added water does not increase reaction products. This reaction gives an alternate route for producing hydrogen from water via the sulfur dioxide-iodine process.

Mason, C.F.V.; Bowman, M.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

PROGRAM TOPIC: GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES PREVENTING AGGLOMERATION PROBLEMS DURING GASIFICATION OF HIGH-SODIUM LIGNITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous gasification studies have shown that sodium vapor released from high-sodium lignites can react with silica to form sticky sodium silicates. 1,2,3

Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; Southern Company Services; Wanwang Peng; Southern Company Services; Pannalal Vimalch; Southern Company Services

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

INHIBITION OF WASHED SLUDGE WITH SODIUM NITRITE  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

Congdon, J.; Lozier, J.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

235

The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na{sub 2}S{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 5} were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360{degree}C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

Meihui Wang

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Viscosity and density tables of sodium chloride solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A file is presented containing tabulated data extracted from the scientific literature on the density and viscosity of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Also included is a bibliography of the properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. (MHR)

Fair, J.A.; Ozbek, H. (comps.) [comps.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Structure and Properties of Piezoelectric Sodium Bismuth Titanate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Structure and Properties of Piezoelectric Sodium Bismuth Titanate ... Nanostructures and Their Potential for Mechanical Energy Scavenging.

238

Performance correlations for high temperature potassium heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Potassium heat pipes designed for operation at a nominal temperature of 775K have been developed for use in a heat pipe cooled reactor design. The heat pipes operate in a gravity assist mode with a maximum required power throughput of approximately 16 kW per heat pipe. Based on a series of sub-scale experiments with 2.12 and 3.2 cm diameter heat pipes the prototypic heat pipe diameter was set at 5.7 cm with a simple knurled wall wick used in the interests of mechanical simplicity. The performance levels required for this design had been demonstrated in prior work with gutter assisted wicks and emphasis in the present work was on the attainment of similar performance with a simplified wick structure. The wick structure used in the experiment consisted of a pattern of knurled grooves in the internal wall of the heat pipe. The knurl depth required for the planned heat pipe performance was determined by scaling of wick characteristic data from the sub-scale tests. These tests indicated that the maximum performance limits of the test heat pipes did not follow normal entrainment limit predictions for textured wall gravity assist heat pipes. Test data was therefore scaled to the prototype design based on the assumption that the performance was controlled by an entrainment parameter based on the liquid flow depth in the groove structure. This correlation provided a reasonable fit to the sub-scale test data and was used in scale up of the design from the 8.0 cm/sup 2/ cross section of the largest sub-scale heat pipe to the 25.5 cm/sup 2/ cross section prototype. Correlation of the model predictions with test data from the prototype is discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sodium and sulfur release and recapture during black liquor burning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide data on sulfur and sodium volatilization during black liquor burning, and on SO2 capture by solid sodium carbonate and sodium chloride. This data was interpreted and modeled into rate equations suitable for use in computational models for recovery boilers.

Frederick, W.J.; Iisa, K.; Wag, K.; Reis, V.V.; Boonsongsup, L.; Forssen, M.; Hupa, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.  

SciTech Connect

This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of {approx}550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at {approx}1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable carbon to diffuse through iron and dissolve into sodium. The method enables addition of dissolved carbon (without carb

Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Niobium 1% zirconium/potassium and titanium/potassium life-test heat pipe design and testing  

SciTech Connect

Experimental lifetime performance studies currently in progress use Niobium-1% Zirconium (Nb-1Zr) and Titanium (Ti) heat pipes with potassium (K) as the working fluid. A heat pipe life-test matrix has been developed for testing the heat pipes. Because the corrosion rates in alkali metal heat pipes are affected by temperature and working fluid evaporation flux, the variable parameters of the experimental matrix are established as steady operating temperature and input heat flux density. Total impurity inventory is a factor in corrosion rate so impurity levels are being evaluated in the heat pipe materials before and after testing. Eight Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two of the heat pipes have completed testing whereas the other six are currently in test. These are gravity-assist heat pipes operating in a reflux mode. The heat pipes are tested by sets, one set of two and two sets of three heat pipes. Three Ti/K heat pipes are also in life test. These heat pipes are tested as a set in a horizontal position in a capillary pumped annular flow mode. Each of the heat pipes is encapsulated in a quartz vacuum container with a water calorimeter over the vacuum container for power throughput measurements. Thermocouples are attached to the heat pipes for measuring temperature. Heat input to the heat pipes is via an rf coil. The heat pipes are operating at between 800 and 900 K, with heat input fluxes of 13.8 to 30 W/sq cm. Of the Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes, two of the heat pipes have been in operation for 14,000 hours, three over 10,000 hours, and three over 7,000 hours. The Ti/K heat pipes have been in operation for 1,266 hours. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Roberts, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

243

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Roberts, K.; Edwards, T.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m/sup 3/ Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA concentration. The base case corrosion rate in 5 M MEA/1,2M PZ is 22 mpy. With 1 wt% heat stable salt, the corrosion rate increases by 50% to 160% in the order: thiosulfate< oxalate

Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marus Hiilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sodium Plugging Test Loop - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Plugging Test Loop Sodium Plugging Test Loop Sodium Plugging Test Loop Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Sodium Plugging Test Loop This experimental setup is part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Fuel Cycle R&D work carried out at Argonne on advanced sodium component technology. Bookmark and Share For long range sodium technology research and development, employing supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion technology as an advanced balance of plant technology is being considered. The component that provides the interface between the sodium and supercritical CO2 is a compact heat exchanger known as a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE). This heat exchanger has very small coolant flow passages that may foul or

247

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

248

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:17am Addthis Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and security lighting, where color is not important. Low-pressure sodium lamps work somewhat like fluorescent lamps. Like high-intensity discharge lighting, low-pressure sodium lamps require up to 10 minutes to start and have to cool before they can restart. Therefore, they are most suitable for applications in which they stay on for hours at a time. They are not suitable for use with motion detectors. The chart below compares low-pressure sodium lamps and high-intensity

249

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

250

Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four alloys was comparable after sodium exposures at 550 C; the weight loss of ferritic-martensitic steels, G92 and G91 is more significant than that of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS after sodium exposures at 650 C. Sodium exposures up to 2700 h at 550 C had no significant influence on tensile properties, while sodium exposures up to 5064 h at 650 C dramatically lowered the tensile strengths of the four alloys. The ultimate tensile strength of H1 G92, H2 G92, and G91 ferritic-martensitic steels was reduced to as much as nearly half of its initial value after sodium exposures at 650 C. Though the uniform elongation was recovered to some extent, these three ferritic-martensitic steels showed considerable strain softening after sodium exposures. The yield stress of HT-UPS austenitic stainless steel increased, the ultimate tensile strength decreased, and the total elongation was reduced after sodium exposures at 650 C. The dynamic strain aging effect observed in the as-received HT-UPS specimens became less pronounced after sodium exposures at 650 C. Microstructural characterization of sodium-exposed specimens showed no appreciable surface deterioration or grain structure changes under an optical microscope, except for the H2 G92 steel, in which the martensite structure transformed to large grain ferrite after sodium exposures at 650 C. TEM observations of the sodium-exposed H2 G92 steel showed significant recrystallization after sodium exposure for 2700 h at 550 C, and transformation of martensite to ferrite and high density of precipitates in nearly dislocation-free matrix after sodium exposures at 650 C. Further microstructural analysis and evaluation of decarburization/carburization behavior is needed to understand the dramatic changes in the tensile strengths of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels after sodium exposures at 650 C.

Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Tensile mechanical properties and strengthening mechanism of hybrid carbon nanotube and silicon carbide nanoparticle-reinforced magnesium alloy composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AZ91 magnesium alloy hybrid composites reinforced with different hybrid ratios of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticulates were fabricated by semisolid stirring assisted ultrasonic cavitation. The results showed that grains ...

Xia Zhou; Depeng Su; Chengwei Wu; Liming Liu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

An approach to modeling the cost-strength-weight tradeoff in aluminum and magnesium extrusions for automotive applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In light of volatile fuel prices and tightening emissions regulations, automobile manufacturers have been increasingly considering the use of light-weight magnesium in their efforts to improve fuel economy. While mainly ...

Komander, Johann Kasper

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Identifying barriers to the availability and use of Magnesium Sulphate Injection in resource poor countries: A case study in Zambia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

barriers to the availability and use of Magnesium Sulphateto identify barriers to the availability and use of MgSO4 infacilitators to the availability and use of MgSO4 identified

Ridge, Anna L; Bero, Lisa A; Hill, Suzanne R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Super-radiance in the sodium resonance lines from sodium iodide arc lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Super-radiance observed within the centers of the sodium resonance D lines emitted by arc lamps containing sodium iodide as additive in a high-pressure mercury plasma environment was studied by high-resolution emission spectroscopy. The spectral radiance of these self-reversed lines including super-radiance was simulated by considering a local enhancement of the source function due to the presence of an additional source of radiation near the arc wall. Causes of this hitherto unrecognized source of radiation are given.

Karabourniotis, D. [Department of Physics, Institute of Plasma Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Drakakis, E. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

Buechele, A.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sol-gel preparation of lead magnesium niobate (PMN) powders and thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing a lead magnesium niobium oxide (PMN), Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}, precursor solution by a solvent method wherein a liquid solution of a lead-complex PMN precursor is combined with a liquid solution of a niobium-complex PMN precursor, the combined lead- and niobium-complex liquid solutions are reacted with a magnesium-alkyl solution, forming a PMN precursor solution and a lead-based precipitate, and the precipitate is separated from the reacted liquid PMN precursor solution to form a precipitate-free PMN precursor solution. This precursor solution can be processed to form both ferroelectric powders and thin films. 3 figs.

Boyle, T.J.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

Sol-Gel Preparation Of Lead Magnesium Ni Obate (Pmn) Powdersand Thin Films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing a lead magnesium niobium oxide (PMN), Pb(Mg.sub.1/3 Nb.sub.2/3)O.sub.3, precursor solution by a solvent method wherein a liquid solution of a lead-complex PMN precursor is combined with a liquid solution of a niobium-complex PMN precursor, the combined lead- and niobium-complex liquid solutions are reacted with a magnesium-alkyl solution, forming a PMN precursor solution and a lead-based precipitate, and the precipitate is separated from the reacted liquid PMN precursor solution to form a precipitate-free PMN precursor solution. This precursor solution can be processed to form both ferroelectric powders and thin films.

Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium-Beta Batteries Sodium-Beta Batteries Improving the performance and reducing the cost of sodium-beta batteries for large-scale energy storage Sodium-beta batteries (Na-beta batteries or NBBs) use a solid beta-alumina (ß˝-Al 2 O 3 ) electrolyte membrane that selectively allows sodium ion transport between a positive electrode (e.g., a metal halide) and a negative sodium electrode. NBBs typically operate at temperatures near 350˚C. They are increasingly used in renewable storage and utility applications due to their high round-trip efficiency, high energy densities, and energy storage capacities ranging from a few kilowatt-hours to multiple megawatt-hours. In fact, U.S. utilities

259

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Phase Equilibria II. Phase Equilibria Title Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1996 Authors Ridgway, Paul L., Frank R. McLarnon, and John S. Newman Journal Journal of the Electrochemistry Society Volume 143 Issue 2 Pagination 412-417 Keywords 25 ENERGY STORAGE, 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE, ALUMINIUM OXIDES, equilibrium, performance, PHASE DIAGRAMS, PHOSPHIDES, PHOSPHORUS ADDITIONS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM SULFIDES, SODIUM-SULFUR BATTERIES Abstract Equilibrium open-circuit cell voltage data from a sodium/{beta}{double_prime}-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cell utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, and 0.332 and a sodium atom fraction ranging from 0 to 0.4 were interpreted to construct ternary phase diagrams of the Na-P-S ternary system at 350 and 400 C.

260

SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS FOR HANDLING PLUTONIUM, URANIUM, THORIUM, THE ALKALI METALS, ZIRCONIUM, TITANIUM, MAGNESIUM, AND CALCIUM  

SciTech Connect

BS>This report compiles from various sources safety considerations for work with the special metals plutonium, uranium, thorium, the alkali group, magnesium, titanium, calcium, and zirconium. General criteria to be observed in handling all of these metals and their alloys are listed, as well as characteristics of individual metals with regard to health hazards, pyrophoricity, explosiveness, and other chemical reactions, in both handling and storage. (auth)

Stout, E.L. comp.

1957-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride Millennium Cell Inc. Prepared by Ying Wu Michael T. Kelly Jeffrey V. Ortega Under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-04GO14008 August 2004 Table of Contents Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Section 1: Commercially Practiced Sodium Borohydride Synthesis Process ............................... 2 The Brown-Schlesinger Process ................................................................................................. 2 The Bayer Process.......................................................................................................................

262

METHOD FOR REDUCING THE IMPURITY RESISTIVITY OF SODIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The inherent resistivity of sodium, at cryogenic temperatures, can be reduced by clustering the impurity atoms within the crystal latiice structure of the sodium, thereby reducing the effective electron collision cross section and thus reducing the number of collisions between the electrons and such lattice imperfections. The clustering is effected by heating the sodium to a temperature approaching its melting point, and maintaining the temperature for a period of time ranging generally from two to six days. (AEC)

Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

1963-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

263

Process for CO.sub.2 capture using a regenerable magnesium hydroxide sorbent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for CO.sub.2 separation using a regenerable Mg(OH).sub.2 sorbent. The process absorbs CO.sub.2 through the formation of MgCO.sub.3 and releases water product H.sub.2O. The MgCO.sub.3 is partially regenerated through direct contact with steam, which acts to heat the magnesium carbonate to a higher temperature, provide heat duty required to decompose the magnesium carbonate to yield MgO and CO.sub.2, provide an H.sub.2O environment over the magnesium carbonate thereby shifting the equilibrium and increasing the potential for CO.sub.2 desorption, and supply H.sub.2O for rehydroxylation of a portion of the MgO. The mixture is polished in the absence of CO.sub.2 using water product H.sub.2O produced during the CO.sub.2 absorption to maintain sorbent capture capacity. The sorbent now comprised substantially of Mg(OH).sub.2 is then available for further CO.sub.2 absorption duty in a cyclic process.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Stevens, Jr., Robert W

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sodium tetraphenylborate solubility and dissolution rates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate of solid sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) dissolution in In-Tank Precipitation salt solutions has been experimentally determined. The data indicates that the dissolution rate of solid NaTPB is a minor contributor the lag time experienced in the 1983 Salt Decontamination Demonstration Test and should not be considered as the rate determining step. Current analytical models for predicting the time to reach the composite lower flammability limit assume that the lag time is not more than 6 hours, and the data supports this assumption (i.e., dissolution by itself requires much less than 6 hours). The data suggests that another step--such as mass transport, the reaction of a benzene precursor or the mixing behavior--is the rate determining factor for benzene release to the vapor space in Tank 48H. In addition, preliminary results from this program show that the degree of agitation employed is not a significant parameter in determining the rate of NaTPB dissolution. As a result of this study, an improved equation for predicting equilibrium tetraphenylborate solubility with respect to temperature and sodium ion concentration has been determined.

Barnes, M.J.; Peterson, R.A.; Swingle, R.F.; Reeves, C.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sodium Reactor Experiment decommissioning. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) located at the Rockwell International Field Laboratories northwest of Los Angeles was developed to demonstrate a sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor for civilian use. The reactor reached full power in May 1958 and provided 37 GWh to the Southern California Edison Company grid before it was shut down in 1967. Decommissioning of the SRE began in 1974 with the objective of removing all significant radioactivity from the site and releasing the facility for unrestricted use. Planning documentation was prepared to describe in detail the equipment and techniques development and the decommissioning work scope. A plasma-arc manipulator was developed for remotely dissecting the highly radioactive reactor vessels. Other important developments included techniques for using explosives to cut reactor vessel internal piping, clamps, and brackets; decontaminating porous concrete surfaces; and disposing of massive equipment and structures. The documentation defined the decommissioning in an SRE dismantling plan, in activity requirements for elements of the decommissioning work scope, and in detailed procedures for each major task.

Carroll, J.W.; Conners, C.C.; Harris, J.M.; Marzec, J.M.; Ureda, B.F.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project ? Countdown to Startup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date: March 19, 2012 Media Contact: Natalie Packer, 208-533-0253 Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project Countdown to Startup Marking completion of another major...

267

Energy absorber for sodium-heated heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which water-carrying tubes are heated by liquid sodium and in which the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes is minimized. An energy absorbing chamber contains a compressible gas and is connected to the body of flowing sodium by a channel so that, in the event of a sodium-water reaction, products of the reaction will partially fill the energy absorbing chamber to attenuate the rise in pressure within the heat exchanger.

Essebaggers, J.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Battery Electrode Materials Based on Layered Sodium Titanates  

Berkeley Lab researcher Marca Doeff and colleagues have developed a new electrode material based on a layered sodium titanate compound that can be ...

269

Interaction of sodium vapor and graphite studied by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics of the reaction between graphite and sodium vapor is analyzed with support ... High temperature compression test to determine the anode paste ...

270

Low Temperature Sodium-Sulfur Grid Storage and EV Battery  

Berkeley Lab researcher Gao Liu has developed an innovative design for a battery, made primarily of sodium and sulfur, that holds promise for both ...

271

Low Temperature Sodium-Sulfur Grid Storage and EV Battery ...  

Berkeley Lab researcher Gao Liu has developed an innovative design for a battery, made primarily of sodium and sulfur, that holds promise for both large-scale grid ...

272

NASICON-Type Electrolytes for Low Temperature Sodium Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, NASICON-Type Electrolytes for Low Temperature Sodium Battery Applications. Author(s), Hui Zhang, Xingbo Liu. On-Site Speaker ( Planned) ...

273

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLC 35 Hartwell Avenue Lexington, MA 02421-3102 www.TIAXLLC.com Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) Peer Review and Update...

274

Sodium cobalt bronze batteries and a method for making same  

SciTech Connect

A solid state secondary battery utilizing a low cost, environmentally sound, sodium cobalt bronze electrode. A method is provided for producing same.

Doeff, Marca M. (Hayward, CA); Ma, Yanping (Berkeley, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Reductive Sulfur-fixation Smelting of Stibnite Concentrate in Sodium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A new process to extracted antimony directly from stibnite concentrate by reductive sulfur-fixation smelting in sodium molten salt has been ...

276

Influence of Petroleum Coke Sulphur Content on the Sodium ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 1993 ... Influence of Petroleum Coke Sulphur Content on the Sodium Sensitivity of Carbon Anodes by S.M. Hume ... TMS Student Member price: 0.00.

277

Sodium cobalt bronze batteries and a method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state secondary battery utilizing a low cost, environmentally sound, sodium cobalt bronze electrode is described. A method is provided for producing same. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Planar Sodium Metal Halide Battery for Renewable Integration and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we will present a sodium ߔ-alumina cell designed for widespread renewable energy integration and electrical grid applications. The new generation ...

279

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect

Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Thermodynamics of carbon dioxide in aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate systems at stripper conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Fluka Chemie GmbH, 98.0% pure), K2CO3 (Fluka Chemie GmbH, 99.0% pure), potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3%. Heat of CO2 Absorption A ChemiSens CPA122 reaction calorimeter was used to take direct calorimetric

Rochelle, Gary T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1 M. C.) grown on these soils did not respond to K applications. The soils contained high levels of total K, and was contained in the sand fractionsof the soils. Kineticsof K release from the whole soils and from the coarse

Sparks, Donald L.

282

Solvent Reclaiming by Crystallization of Potassium Sulfate Qing Xu, B. S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost and solve other problems in the existing reclaiming processes. The solubility of potassium sulfate balance was studied and energy and chemical costs were estimated under one case. The total cost is about at Austin for equipment using in his lab, Dr. Chau- Chyun Chen in Aspen Technology Inc. for his help

Rochelle, Gary T.

283

Adsorption of Potassium on the MoS2(100) Surface: A First-Principles Investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to investigate the interaction that potassium with the Mo and S edges of the MoS2(100) surface. Both neutral and cationic (+1) charged potassium-promoted systems at different sulfur coverages were considered. Our calculations indicate that the potassium atom readily donates its single 4s valence electron to the MoS2 structure for the neutral potassium-promoted system, and the neutral and cationic potassium-promoted systems demonstrate a similar adsorption behavior. Moreover, potassium changes the magnetic properties known to occur at the metallic edge surface, which have implications for electron spin dependent surface characterization methods (i.e., electron spin/paramagnetic spectroscopy). Potassium in both the neutral and cationic systems tends to maximize its interactions with the available sulfur atoms at the edge surface, preferring sites over four-fold S hollows on fully sulfided Mo and S edges and over the interstitial gap where two to four edge surface S atoms are available for coordination. As the potassium coverage increases, the adsorption energy per potassium atom, surface work function, and transfer of the K 4s electron to the MoS2(100) surface decreases, which is in line with an increased metallization of the potassium adlayer. The potassium adlayer tends to form chains along the interstitial with K-K distances ~1 Å, which is notably less than those of bulk bcc K metal (4.61 Å). Density of states for the potassium-saturated surface suggests enhanced involvement of broad K 3d states beginning just above the Fermi level. Potassium-promotion of MoS2(100) has implications for alcohol catalysis: increasing the surface basicity by increasing the electron charge of the surface, providing hydrogenation-promoting CO site, blocking edge surface that dissociate CO and lead to methanation, and limiting H2 dissociative adsorption to the edge surface and possibly inhibiting the H2 dissociative adsorption via s character electron repulsion. This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for DOE.

Andersen, Amity; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lilga, Michael A.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Mei, Donghai

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 3, Transport of sodium-sulfur and sodium-metal-chloride batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the shipping regulations that govern the shipment of dangerous goods. Since the elemental sodium contained in both sodium-sulfur and sodium-metal-chloride batteries is classified as a dangerous good, and is listed on both the national and international hazardous materials listings, both national and international regulatory processes are considered in this report The interrelationships as well as the differences between the two processes are highlighted. It is important to note that the transport regulatory processes examined in this report are reviewed within the context of assessing the necessary steps needed to provide for the domestic and international transport of sodium-beta batteries. The need for such an assessment was determined by the Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) of the EV Battery Readiness Working Group (Working Group), created in 1990. The Working Group was created to examine the regulatory issues pertaining to in-vehicle safety, shipping, and recycling of sodium-sulfur batteries, each of which is addressed by a sub-working group. The mission of the SSWG is to establish basic provisions that will ensure the safe and efficient transport of sodium-beta batteries. To support that end, a proposal to the UN Committee of Experts was prepared by the SSWG, with the goal of obtaining a proper shipping name and UN number for sodium-beta batteries and to establish the basic transport requirements for such batteries (see the appendix for the proposal as submitted). It is emphasized that because batteries are large articles containing elemental sodium and, in some cases, sulfur, there is no existing UN entry under which they can be classified and for which modal transport requirements, such as the use of packaging appropriate for such large articles, are provided for. It is for this reason that a specific UN entry for sodium-beta batteries is considered essential.

Hammel, C.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sodium waste technology: A summary report. [Melt-drain-evaporation-calcination (MEDEC)  

SciTech Connect

The Sodium Waste Technology (SWT) Program was established to resolve long-standing issues regarding disposal of sodium-bearing waste and equipment. Comprehensive SWT research programs investigated a variety of approaches for either removing sodium from sodium-bearing items, or disposal of items containing sodium residuals. The most successful of these programs was the design, test, and the production operation of the Sodium Process Demonstration Facility at ANL-W. The technology used was a series of melt-drain-evaporate operations to remove nonradioactive sodium from sodium-bearing items and then converting the sodium to storable compounds.

Abrams, C.S.; Witbeck, L.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Low temperature sodium-beta battery  

SciTech Connect

A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, a cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, and a separator and electrolyte within the enclosure between the anode and the cathode. The anode is a sodium eutectic anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower. The cathode is a low melting ion liquid cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower.

Farmer, Joseph C

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Update; Sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept developed by the team of Rockwell International, Combustion Engineering, and Bechtel during the 3-year period extending from January 1985 to December 1987 as one element in the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Program. In January 1988, the team was expanded to include Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., and the concept development was extended under DOE's Program for Improvement in Advanced Modular LMR Design. The SAFR plant concept employs a 450-MWe pool-type liquid metal cooled reactor as its basic module. The reactor assembly module is a standardized shop-fabricated unit that can be shipped to the plant site by barge for installation. Shop fabrication minimizes nuclear-grade field fabrication and reduces the plant construction schedule. Reactor modules can be used individually or in multiples at a given site to supply the needed generating capacity.

Oldenkamp, R.D.; Brunings, J.E. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Guenther, E. (Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (US)); Hren, R. (Bechtel National Inc., San Francisco, CA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

FUEL PROGRAMMING FOR SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of fuel programming, i.e., the scheme used for changing fuel in a core, on the reactivity and specific power of a sodium graphite reactor is discussed Fuel programs considered Include replacing fuel a core-load at a time or a radial zone at a time, replacing fuel to manutain the same average exposure of fuel elements throughout the core, and replacing and transferring fuel elements to maintain more highly exposed fuel in the center or at the periphery of the core. Flux and criticality calculations show the degree of power flattening and the concurrent decrease in effective multiplication which results from maintaining more exposed fuel toward the core center. Corverse effects are shown for the case of maintaining more exposed fuel near the core periphery. The excess reactivity which must be controlled in the various programs is considered. Illustrative schedules for implementing each of these programs in an SGR are presented. (auth)

Connolly, T.J.

1959-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method of removing bulk sodium from metallic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of removing sodium from an article, particularly one made of stainless steel, by treating it with a mixture of water vapor and a gas which is inert to sodium is described. By selecting combinations of temperature and water vapor-to-gas ratio, the reaction temperature is controlled to prevent damage to the articles.

Maffei, H.P.; Borisch, R.R.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

290

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at SBWTP. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred in April and May 2012. SBWTP is one of DOE's largest nuclear

291

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for

292

EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition In October 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) issued the Final Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287 (Final EIS)). The Final EIS contains an evaluation of reasonable alternatives for the management of mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW),1 mixed HLW calcine, and associated low-level waste (LLW), as well as disposition alternatives for HLW facilities when their missions are completed. DOE/EIS-0287, Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology, Office of Environmental Management, Idaho, 70 FR 44598 (August

293

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as

294

Solid-state sodium batteries using polymer electrolytes and sodium intercalation electrode materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state sodium cells using polymer electrolytes (polyethylene oxide mixed with sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate: PEO{sub n}NaCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}) and sodium cobalt oxide positive electrodes are characterized in terms of discharge and charge characteristics, rate capability, cycle life, and energy and power densities. The P2 phase Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} can reversibly intercalate sodium in the range of x = 0.3 to 0.9, giving a theoretical specific energy of 440 Wh/kg and energy density of 1,600 Wh/l. Over one hundred cycles to 60% depth of discharge have been obtained at 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Experiments show that the electrolyte/Na interface is stable and is not the limiting factor to cell cycle life. Na{sub 0.7}CoO{sub 2} composite electrodes containing various amounts of carbon black additive are investigated. The transport properties of polymer electrolytes are the critical factors for performance. These properties (the ionic conductivity, salt diffusion coefficient, and ion transference number) are measured for the PEO{sub n}NaCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} system over a wide range of concentrations at 85 C. All the three transport properties are very salt-concentration dependent. The ionic conductivity exhibits a maximum at about n = 20. The transference number, diffusion coefficient, and thermodynamic factor all vary with salt concentration in a similar fashion, decreasing as the concentration increases, except for a local maximum. These results verify that polymer electrolytes cannot be treated as ideal solutions. The measured transport-property values are used to analyze and optimize the electrolytes by computer simulation and also cell testing. Salt precipitation is believed to be the rate limiting process for cells using highly concentrated solutions, as a result of lower values of these properties, while salt depletion is the limiting factor when a dilute solution is used.

Ma, Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

J. A. (Bart) Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect

This research was intended to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of high-activity tank waste can be evaluated. Primary focus has been on sodium hydroxide separation, with potential Hanford application. Value in sodium hydroxide separation can potentially be found in alternative flowsheets for treatment and disposal of low-activity salt waste. Additional value can be expected in recycle of sodium hydroxide for use in waste retrieval and sludge washing, whereupon additions of fresh sodium hydroxide to the waste can be avoided. Potential savings are large both because of the huge cost of vitrification of the low-activity waste stream and because volume reduction of high-activity wastes could obviate construction of costly new tanks. Toward these ends, the conceptual development begun in the original proposal was extended with the formulation of eight fundamental approaches that could be undertaken for extraction of sodium hydroxide.

Bruce A. Moyer; Alan P. Marchand; Peter V. Bonnesen; Jeffrey C. Bryan; Tamara J. Haverlock

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

A study of start-up characteristics of a potassium heat pipe from the frozen state  

SciTech Connect

The start-up characteristics of a potassium heat pipe were studied both analytically and experimentally. Using the radiation heat transfer mode the heat pipe was tested in a vacuum chamber. The transition temperature calculated for potassium was then compared with the experimental results of the heat pipe with various heat inputs. These results show that the heat pipe was inactive until it reached the transition temperature. In addition, during the start-up period, the evaporator experienced dry-out with a heat input smaller than the capillary limit calculated at the steady state. However, when the working fluid at the condenser was completely melted, the evaporator was rewetted without external aid. The start-up period was significantly reduced with a large heat input.

Jang, J.H.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets  

SciTech Connect

Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear.First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test.All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C. [Research and Development, Forming Technology voestalpine Stahl GmbH, Voest-Alpine Strasse 3, 4031 Linz (Austria)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

MAGNESIUM OXIDE AN ENGINEERED BARRIER 2009 EPA WIPP RECERTIFICATION FACT SHEET United States Environmental Protection Agency | Office of Air and Radiation (6608J) | June 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAGNESIUM OXIDE ­ AN ENGINEERED BARRIER 2009 EPA WIPP RECERTIFICATION FACT SHEET United States Environmental Protection Agency | Office of Air and Radiation (6608J) | June 2009 http://www.epa.gov/radiation/wipp/index.html MAGNESIUM OXIDE ­ AN ENGINEERED BARRIER Why is MgO Used At WIPP? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE

300

Experimental investigations on sodium plugging in narrow flow channels.  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments was performed to investigate the potential for plugging of narrow flow channels of sodium by impurities (e.g., oxides). In the first phase of the experiments, clean sodium was circulated through the test sections simulating flow channels in a compact diffusion-bonded heat exchanger such as a printed circuit heat exchanger. The primary objective was to see if small channels whose cross sections are semicircles of 2, 4, and 6 mm in diameter are usable in liquid sodium applications where sodium purity is carefully controlled. It was concluded that the 2-mm channels, the smallest of the three, could be used in clean sodium systems at temperatures even as low as 100 to 110 C without plugging. In the second phase, sodium oxide was added to the loop, and the oxygen concentration in the liquid sodium was controlled by means of varying the cold-trap temperature. Intentional plugging was induced by creating a cold spot in the test sections, and the subsequent plugging behavior was observed. It was found that plugging in the 2-mm test section was initiated by lowering the cold spot temperature below the cold-trap temperature by 10 to 30 C. Unplugging of the plugged channels was accomplished by heating the affected test section.

Momozaki, Y.; Cho, D. H.; Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coal Tar Treatability Test Program: Chemical Oxidation Effects on Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Using Potassium Permanganate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has initiated a progressive program to investigate the effectiveness of using potassium permanganate to mitigate the impact of coal tar on groundwater at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using potassium permanganate to reduce the rate of dissolution of chemical constituents present in coal-tar-derived dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) into the surrounding groundwater. The focus of the research was 1) to develop a proof of concept for using pot...

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

CO{sub 2} absorption using dry potassium-based sorbents with different supports  

SciTech Connect

The CO{sub 2} capture characteristics of dry potassium-based sorbents were investigated with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a bubbling fluidized-bed reactor. Potassium-based sorbents were prepared by impregnation with potassium carbonate on supports such as coconut activated charcoal (AC1), coal active carbon (AC2), silica gel (SG), and activated alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Sorbents such as K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/AC1, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/AC2, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed excellent carbonation capacity; The total conversion rates of those sorbents were 97.2, 95.9, and 95.2%, respectively in the TG test, and 89.2, 87.9, and 87.6%, respectively, in the fluidized-bed test. However, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/SG showed poor carbonation capacity, the total conversion rates were only 34.5 and 18.8%, respectively, in TG and fluidized-bed tests. The differences in carbonation capacity of those sorbents were analyzed by studying the microscopic structure and crystal structure of the supports and the sorbents with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and N{sub 2} adsorption tests. 23 refs., 10 figs.

Chuanwen Zhao; Xiaoping Chen; Changsui Zhao [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). China School of Energy and Environment

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Synthesis and characterization of AlPO{sub 4}-36 and MAPO-36 with different magnesium content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to perform a systematic study regarding the effect of different synthesis parameters on the crystallization of AlPO{sub 4}-36 and MAPO-36 (aluminophosphate molecular sieve type 36, ATS, structure). MAPO-36 samples were synthesized from gels containing different magnesium contents in order to obtain catalysts with different degrees of acidity. Under the synthesis conditions employed in this work, the formation of AlPO{sub 4}-36 and MAPO-36 increased when the reaction mixture was aged at room temperature; however, small amounts of AlPO{sub 4}-5 always crystallize parallel to the ATS materials. The presence of magnesium in the reaction mixture can also favor the formation of the ATS structure; nevertheless, the synthesis of pure MAPO-36 from reaction mixtures having very low magnesium content was not possible under several conditions. Pseudoboehmite was a better aluminum source than aluminum isopropoxide for the formation of MAPO-36. A practically pure ATS structure was obtained from reaction mixtures containing molar fractions of Mg between 0.033 and 0.133. For higher magnesium contents, traces of another unidentified phase were detected. Energy-dispersive spectrometry analysis indicates a uniform chemical composition of the MAPO-36 particles, and Scanning electron microscopy shows that the ATS samples have a needlelike morphology. Thermogravimetric analysis of ATS samples reveals that the weight loss corresponding to the decomposition of protonated amine is linearly correlated with magnesium content in the solid up to 0.8 mmol of magnesium per gram of solid.

Machado, M.S.; Cardoso, D.; Perez-Pariente, J.; Sastre, E.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Molecular dynamics study of sodium using a model pseudopotential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of sodium is investigated using the coulomb and Born-Mayer interaction augmented by a model pseudopotential to represent the electron interactions including screening, exchange, and correlation. The model parameters were previously determined and have been shown to accurately reproduce experimental equation-of-state, lattice vibration, and crystal phase properties of sodium in the harmonic limit. In this paper the equation-of-state and structural properties are examined in molecular dynamics calculations. The long range effects of the potential are included. Typically, each particle interacts with about 500 neighbors. The calculated equation of state of sodium in the hcp, bcc, and liquid structures is discussed.

Swanson, R.E.; Straub, G.K.; Holian, B.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sodium Bearing Waste Processing Alternatives Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A multidisciplinary team gathered to develop a BBWI recommendation to DOE-ID on the processing alternatives for the sodium bearing waste in the INTEC Tank Farm. Numerous alternatives were analyzed using a rigorous, systematic approach. The data gathered were evaluated through internal and external peer reviews for consistency and validity. Three alternatives were identified to be top performers: Risk-based Calcination, MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange. A dual-path through early Conceptual design is recommended for MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange since Risk-based Calcination does not require design. If calcination alternatives are not considered based on giving Type of Processing criteria significantly greater weight, the CsIX/TRUEX alternative follows CsIX in ranking. However, since CsIX/TRUEX shares common uncertainties with CsIX, reasonable backups, which follow in ranking, are the TRUEX and UNEX alternatives. Key uncertainties must be evaluated by the decision-makers to choose one final alternative. Those key uncertainties and a path forward for the technology roadmapping of these alternatives is provided.

Murphy, James Anthony; Palmer, Brent J; Perry, Keith Joseph

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Structure and Aqueous Solubility of Sodium Isosaccharinate  

SciTech Connect

It has been recently shown that isosaccharinic acid, C6H12O6 (ISA), and its derivative salts have a great potential for practical application in the area of nuclear waste treatment and disposal sites management. Several studies demonstrated the effect of ISA complexation on radionuclide solubility and sorptive properties, especially on actinides in (+4) oxidation state like Np(IV) and Th(IV). The presence of ISA and/or its derivatives strongly affects the migration of radionuclides by increasing their solubility in water by several orders of magnitude and Na-ISA has been proposed as a component of decontamination formulations for actinide-contaminated surfaces. Here we report the synthesis, crystal's structure and characterization (FTIR, TGA) of sodium isosaccharate, NaC6H11O6-H2O (Na-ISA). The structure has been solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The solubility of Na-ISA has been evaluated and compared to that of Ca-ISA based on the structural features of both compounds.

Bontchev, Ranko P.; Moore, Robert; Tucker, Mark; Holt, Kathleen

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

THE SUITABILITY OF SODIUM PEROXIDE FUSION FOR PRODUCTION-SCALE PLUTONIUM PROCESSING OPERATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sodium peroxide (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2}) fusion is a method that offers significant benefits to the processing of high-fired plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) materials. Those benefits include reduction in dissolution cycle time, decrease in residual solids, and reduction of the potential for generation of a flammable gas mixture during dissolution. Implementation of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} fusion may also increase the PuO{sub 2} throughput in the HB-Line dissolving lines. To fuse a material, Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} is mixed with the feed material in a crucible and heated to 600-700 C. For low-fired and high-fired PuO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} reacts with PuO{sub 2} to form a compound that readily dissolves in ambient-temperature nitric acid without the use of potassium fluoride. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) demonstrated the feasibility of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} fusion and subsequent dissolution for the processing of high-fired PuO{sub 2} materials in HB-Line. Testing evaluated critical dissolution characteristics and defined preliminary process parameters. Based on experimental measurements, a dissolution cycle can be complete in less than one hour, compared to the current processing time of 6-10 hours for solution heating and dissolution. Final Pu concentrations of 30-35 g/L were produced without the formation of precipitates in the final solution.

Pierce, R.; Edwards, T.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

NMR monitoring of intracellular sodium in dog and rabbit kidney tubules  

SciTech Connect

{sup 23}Na-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to monitor intra- and extracellular sodium in suspensions of dog cortical tubules, rabbit cortical tubules, and dog thick ascending limbs. The NMR visibility of the intracellular sodium was determined by comparing the NMR and flame photometry results and by redistributing the sodium ions between the intra- and extracellular compartments using the ionophore nystatin (influx) or sodium substitution for choline in the extracellular fluid (efflux). The intracellular sodium visibility was {approximately}30% for the total sodium and 58% for the transportable sodium. Addition of sodium to sodium-depleted homogenates of dog renal cortex also showed a loss of visibility. The values of the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} were determined but could not be correlated with the visibility measurements. The intracellular sodium concentration in dog cortical tubules incubated in optimal biochemical conditions was estimated at 51 mM was dependent on the extracellular sodium concentration.

Boulanger, Y.; Vinay, P.; Boulanger, M. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ADVANCED ONCE-THROUGH STEAM GENERATOR FOR SODIUM APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary design calculations were performed for a once-through type steam generator and reheater for advanced sodium power plants in the 300-Mwe range. Parameters and performance data are presented. (D.L.C.)

Terpe, G.R.

1960-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal structure, hygroscopic and Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Print Friday, 13 May 2011 00:00 Scientists recently combined experimental approaches and molecular dynamics modeling to gain new insights into the internal structure of sea salt particles and relate it to their fundamental chemical reactivity in the atmosphere. This research shows that surface enhancement or depletion of chemical components in marine particles can occur because of the difference in the chemical nature of the species. Because the atmospheric chemistry of the salt particles takes place at the gas-particle interface, understanding their complex surfaces provides new insights about their effect on the environment and climate change. Article Link.

312

Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF), is a risk-informed ...

Denman, Matthew R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes February 1, 2008 - 11:13am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S Department of Energy (DOE), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and...

314

Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the… (more)

Denman, Matthew R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Reactor protection system design alternatives for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, unprotected transients have been viewed as design basis events that can significantly challenge sodium-cooled fast reactors. The perceived potential consequences of a severe unprotected transient in a ...

DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium-based Battery Development - Dave...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sodium-based Battery Development A Family of Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage D. Ingersoll, C....

318

Wall pressure exerted by hydrogenation of sodium aluminum hydride.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wall pressure exerted by the bulk expansion of a sodium aluminum hydride bed was measured as a function of hydrogen content. A custom apparatus was designed and loaded with sodium alanates at densities of 1.0, 1.1, and 1.16 g/cc. Four complete cycles were performed to identify variations in measured pressure. Results indicated poor correlation between exerted pressure and hydrogen capacity of the sodium alanate beds. Mechanical pressure due to the hydrogenation of sodium alanates does not influence full-scale system designs as it falls within common design factors of safety. Gas pressure gradients within the porous solid were identified and may limit reaction rates, especially for high aspect ratio beds.

Perras, Yon E.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Zimmerman, Mark D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

SODIUM-HEATED STEAM GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT. Interim Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Design and development of a once -through sodiumheated steam generator are discussed. Research proposals are discussed for evaluating: carbon transfer and mass transfer effects in the steam generator, effect on heat transfer and two- phase flow of coiling tubes, corrosion of Croloy 21/4 in products of sodium-water reactions, procedure for welding tube to back side of the tube sheet, radiographic inspection of back side tube welds, and chemical simulation of sodium environment for leak testing. (N.W.R.)

1964-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

High temperature sodium testing of the CRBR prototype primary pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Qualification testing in sodium of the CRBR primary pump was conducted through 1982. This paper presents an overview of the test program, a description of the Sodium Pump Test Facility (largest of its kind in the world), a brief description of the test article and summary overview of results. Of special interest were the high temperature gas convection tests and the extensive flow/speed control (dynamic) tests. Special innovative test methods were employed to investigate these phenomena.

Tessier, M.J.; Grimaldi, J.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alignment and operability analysis of a vertical sodium pump  

SciTech Connect

With the objective of identifying important alignment features of pumps such as FFTF, HALLAM, EBR II, PNC, PHENIX, and CRBR, alignment of the vertical sodium pump for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is investigated. The CRBRP pump includes a flexibly coupled pump shaft and motor shaft, two oil-film tilting-pad hydrodynamic radial bearings in the motor plus a vertical thrust bearing, and two sodium hydrostatic bearings straddling the double-suction centrifugal impeller in the pump.

Gupta, V.K.; Fair, C.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Process for modifying the metal ion sorption capacity of a medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for modifying a medium is disclosed that includes treating a medium having a metal ion sorption capacity with a solution that includes: A) an agent capable of forming a complex with metal ions; and B) ions selected from the group consisting of sodium ions, potassium ions, magnesium ions, and combinations thereof, to create a medium having an increased capacity to sorb metal ions relative to the untreated medium.

Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project- November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project

327

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, Wayne H. (Richland, WA); Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The optical properties of magnesium oxide containing transition metal ions and defects produced by fast neutron irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The photoluminescence (PL), its excitation (PLE) and optical absorption of MgO crystals containing transition metal ions and defects produced by fast neutron irradiation fluence up to 1020cm-2 (E>0.1 MeV) are investigated. Three ... Keywords: absorption, luminescence spectra, magnesium oxide, radiation defect, transition metal ions

Vera Skvortsova; Laima Trinkler

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Density Functional Theory Simulations Predict New Materials for Magnesium-Ion Batteries (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

SciTech Connect

Multivalence is identified in the light element, B, through structure morphology. Boron sheets exhibit highly versatile valence, and the layered boron materials may hold the promise of a high-energy-density magnesium-ion battery. Practically, boron is superior to previously known multivalence materials, especially transition metal compounds, which are heavy, expensive, and often not benign. Based on density functional theory simulations, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have predicted a series of stable magnesium borides, MgB{sub x}, with a broad range of stoichiometries, 2 < x < 16, by removing magnesium atoms from MgB{sub 2}. The layered boron structures are preserved through an in-plane topological transformation between the hexagonal lattice domains and the triangular domains. The process can be reversibly switched as the charge transfer changes with Mg insertion/extraction. The mechanism of such a charge-driven transformation originates from the versatile valence state of boron in its planar form. The discovery of these new physical phenomena suggests the design of a high-capacity magnesium-boron battery with theoretical energy density 876 mAh/g and 1550 Wh/L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DEVELOPMENTS IN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF GAS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fire suppression mechanism (dilution, cooling, and strain ... oxidizers, such as potassium nitrate or potassium ... like coininon table salt, sodium chloride ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fast Flux Test Facility, Sodium Storage Facility project-specific project management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Project-Specific Project Management Plan describes the project management methods and controls used by the WHC Projects Department to manage Project 03-F-031. The Sodium Storage Facility provides for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF Plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

Shank, D.R.

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

332

Magnesium (Mg)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...J.L. Bernard, R. Caillat, and R. Darras, Progress in Nuclear Energy, Metallurgy and Fuels, Vol 2, Pergamon

333

Kinetics and mechanism of the potassium-catalyzed carbon/carbon dioxide gasification  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic effect of potassium on the rate of CO/sub 2/ gasification of a bituminous coal char and a pure carbon substrate is investigated. The gasification rate depends on both the catalyst concentration (K/C atomic ratio) and the internal porous structure of the solid. For low values of the K/C atomic ratio, the initial gasification rate increases sharply with the addition of catalyst; at higher values, the rate profile levels off. The sharp increase in rate is due to the activation of reaction sites while the plateau is attributed to the saturation of the surface with active sites. The variation of the instantaneous gasification rate (based on remaining carbon) with carbon conversion at various initial K/C ratios is studied. The important reasons for the change in rate are the change in the solid surface area, the loss of active sites, the loss of catalyst by vaporization and the change in the K/C ratio due to carbon depletion. The loss of catalyst from the pure carbon substrate by vaporization is also determined. Temperature programmed experiments show that under inert atmospheres, both KOH and K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ react with carbon to give a reduced form of the catalyst which appears to be a prerequisite for the rapid vaporization of potassium. The effect of catalyst loss on both the initial gasification rate and the variation in rate with conversion is determined. The proposed redox mechanism contains three surface complexes: -CO/sub 2/K, -COK and -CK. The oxide groups are the intermediates during C/CO/sub 2/ gasification. The completely reduced form, -CK, is the end product of catalyst reduction and is the precursor for K loss. The stoichiometries of these surface groups are confirmed by oxygen and potassium balance.

Sams, D.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Overview of DOE'S programs on aluminum and magnesium for automotive application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy will present an update and review of its programs in aluminum and magnesium for automotive and heavy-duty vehicle applications. While the main programs focused on vehicle materials are in the Office of Transportation Technologies, contributing efforts will be described in the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and the DOE Office of Energy Research. The presentation will discuss materials for body/chassis and power train, and will highlight the considerable synergy among the efforts. The bulk of the effort is on castings, sheet, and alloys with a smaller focus on metal matrix composites. Cost reduction and energy savings are the overriding themes of the programs.

Carpenter, J.; Diamond, S.; Dillich, S.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Milliken, J.; Sklad, P.

1999-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Elastic Properties and Internal Friction of Two Magnesium Alloys at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The elastic properties and internal friction of two magnesium alloys were studied from 25 C to 450 C using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). The Young's moduli decrease with increasing temperature. At 200 C, a change in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants is observed. The internal friction increases significantly with increasing temperature above 200 C. The observed changes in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants and the internal friction are the result of anelastic relaxation by grain boundary sliding at elevated temperatures. Elastic properties govern the behavior of a materials subjected to stress over a region of strain where the material behaves elastically. The elastic properties, including the Young's modulus (E), shear modulus (G), bulk modulus (B), and Poisson's ratio (?), are of significant interest to many design and engineering applications. The choice of the most appropriate material for a particular application at elevated temperatures therefore requires knowledge of its elastic properties as a function of temperature. In addition, mechanical vibration can cause significant damage in the automotive, aerospace, and architectural industries and thus, the ability of a material to dissipate elastic strain energy in materials, known as damping or internal friction, is also important property. Internal friction can be the result of a wide range of physical mechanisms, and depends on the material, temperature, and frequency of the loading. When utilized effectively in engineering applications, the damping capacity of a material can remove undesirable noise and vibration as heat to the surroundings. The elastic properties of materials can be determined by static or dynamic methods. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS), used in this study, is a unique and sophisticated non-destructive dynamic technique for determining the complete elastic tensor of a solid by measuring the resonant spectrum of mechanical resonance for a sample of known geometry, dimensions, and mass. In addition, RUS allows determination of internal friction, or damping, at different frequencies and temperatures. Polycrystalline pure magnesium (Mg) exhibits excellent high damping properties. However, the poor mechanical properties limit the applications of pure Mg. Although alloying can improve the mechanical properties of Mg, the damping properties are reduced with additions of alloying elements. Therefore, it becomes necessary to study and develop Mg-alloys with simultaneous high damping capacity and improved mechanical properties. Moreover, studies involving the high temperature dynamic elastic properties of Mg alloys are limited. In this study, the elastic properties and internal friction of two magnesium alloys were studied at elevated temperatures using RUS. The effect of alloy composition and grain size was investigated. The wrought magnesium alloys AZ31 and ZK60 were employed. Table 1 gives the nominal chemical compositions of these two alloys. The ZK60 alloy is a commercial extruded plate with a T5 temper, i.e. solution-treated at 535 C for two hours, quenched in hot water, and aged at 185 C for 24 hours. The AZ31 alloy is a commercial rolled plate with a H24 temper, i.e. strain hardened and partially annealed.

Freels, M.; Liaw, P. K.; Garlea, E.; Morrell, J. S.; Radiovic, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Analysis of the potential for new automotive uses of wrought magnesium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within the US Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought magnesium and its alloys to replace steel or aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available for improving automotive fuel efficiency. Although high-strength steels, Al, and polymers are already being used to achieve significant weight reductions, substantial additional weight reductions could be achieved by increased use of Mg (whose density is less than one-fourth that of steel and only two-thirds that of Al). This study shows that Mg sheet could be used in automotive body nonstructural and semistructural applications, whereas extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. The primary barrier to such uses of wrought Mg is high cost.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Multi-Objective Optimization of a Wrought Magnesium Alloy for High Strength and Ductility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimization technique is coupled with crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) computations to aid the microstructural design of a wrought magnesium alloy for improved strength and ductility. The initial microstructure consists of a collection of sub-micron sized grains containing deformation twins. The variables used in the simulations are crystallographic texture, and twin spacing within the grains. It is assumed that plastic deformation occurs mainly by dislocation slip on two sets of slip systems classified as hard and soft modes. The hard modes are those slip systems that are inclined to the twin planes and the soft mode consists of dislocation glide along the twin plane. The CPFE code calculates the stress-strain response of the microstructure as a function of the microstructural parameters and the length-scale of the features. A failure criterion based on a critical shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to define ductility. The optimization is based on the sequential generation of an initial population defined by the texture and twin spacing variables. The CPFE code and the optimizer are coupled in parallel so that new generations are created and analyzed dynamically. In each successive generation, microstructures that satisfy at least 90% of the mean strength and mean ductility in the current generation are retained. Multiple generation runs based on the above procedure are carried out in order to obtain maximum strength-ductility combinations. The implications of the computations for the design of a wrought magnesium alloy are discussed. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Anisotropic compression of a synthetic potassium aluminogermanate zeolite with gismondine topology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compression behavior of a potassium aluminogermanate with a gismondine framework topology (K-AlGe-GIS) was studied using in-situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. In contrast to the potassium gallosilicate analogue (K-GaSi-GIS), no elastic anomaly due to pressure-induced hydration and/or cation relocation was observed in K-AlGe-GIS. The Birch-Murnaghan fit to the pressure-volume data results in a bulk modulus of B{sub 0} = 31(1) GPa. The derived linear-axial compressibilities (i.e., {beta}{sub a} = 0.0065(5) GPa{sup -1}, {beta}{sub b} = 0.0196(4) GPa{sup -1}, {beta}{sub c} = 0.0081(7) GPa{sup -1}) indicate that the b-axis, normal to the 8-ring channels, is about three times more compressible than the a and c axes, parallel to the elliptical 8-ring channels. As a consequence a gradual flattening of the so-called 'double crankshaft' structural building units of the gismondine framework is observed. In K-AlGe-GIS, this flattening occurs almost linear with pressure, whereas it is nonlinear in the GaSi-analogue due to structural changes of the water-cation assembly under hydrostatic pressures.

Jang, Y.N.; Kao, C.; Vogt, T.; Lee, Y.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors February 17, 2006 - 11:58am Addthis FUKUI , JAPAN - The Department of Energy today announced that the United States signed a sodium-cooled fast reactor systems arrangement with France and Japan, providing the framework for collaboration among these countries on the research and development of these advanced nuclear reactors. The signing of the agreement took place on February 16, 2006. This arrangement will support the development of technologies associated with the U.S.-led Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), announced earlier this month by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. GNEP is a

340

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal - June 2012 Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for the SBWTP-IWTU. This review also provides additional data regarding

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341

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor - June 2012 Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as opportunities for improvement (OFIs) and items identified for further

342

Method of forming and starting a sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

A method of forming a sodium sulfur battery and of starting the reactive capability of that battery when heated to a temperature suitable for battery operation is disclosed. An anodic reaction zone is constructed in a manner that sodium is hermetically sealed therein, part of the hermetic seal including fusible material which closes up openings through the container of the anodic reaction zone. The hermetically sealed anodic reaction zone is assembled under normal atmospheric conditions with a suitable cathodic reaction zone and a cation-permeable barrier. When the entire battery is heated to an operational temperature, the fusible material of the hermetically sealed anodic reaction zone is fused, thereby allowing molten sodium to flow from the anodic reaction zone into reactive engagement with the cation-permeable barrier.

Paquette, David G. (Costa Mesa, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium-based Battery Development - Dave Ingersoll, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium-based Battery Development Sodium-based Battery Development A Family of Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage D. Ingersoll, C. Apblett, E. Spoerke, K. Zavadil, R. Cygan, J. Ihlefeld, F. Delnick, & T. Anderson Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM Prof. E. Wachsman University of Maryland, College Park, MD Profs. R. Kee & J. Porter, Dr. H. Zhu Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO S. Bhavaraju & M. Robins Ceramatec, Inc, Salt Lake City, UT D. Beeaff CoorsTek, Inc, Golden, CO J. Martin Boulder Ionics, Golden CO US DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Peer Review, Washington, DC, Sept. 26-28, 2012 Sodium-based batteries  Purpose  Demonstrate a family of sodium-based battery chemistries  sodium-iodine, sodium-bromine, sodium-air, sodium insertion, sodium-metal, etc

344

Study of cesium volatility from sodium carbonate based melts  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this study was to obtain thermodynamic data on cesium volatility from sodium carbonate-based molten salts for application to the Rockwell-ETEC molten salt oxidation process. At 1073 to 1373 K, volatility tests were conducted on a horizontal and a vertical transpiration apparatus using a carrier gas composed of CO{sub 2}(g) and H{sub 2}O(g) which was passed over or bubbled through a sodium carbonate bath containing cesium carbonate and various additives. The major vapor species was identified to be CsOH(g) except when greater than 3% chloride is present in the melt, then the major vapor species is CsCl(g). The decrease in volatility of cesium as a function of cesium concentration in Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3{minus}}Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures follows Raoult`s law very closely. Thus, this system exhibits close to ideal solution behavior. Addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate decreases the cesium volatility by just under a factor of 2, and the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride increases the cesium volatility about an order of magnitude. The addition of 2.0 wt % ash, molecular sieve, or silica show little or no effect. However, the data indicate that higher concentrations of ash will decrease the cesium volatility. For the addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate the activity coefficient, {gamma}(Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sup {1/2}}, is calculated to be 0.720 {plus_minus} 0.068, and for the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride, the activity coefficient, {gamma}(CsCl), is calculated to be 8.118 {plus_minus} 2.317. Assuming that Henry`s law applies, these activity coefficients are used to extrapolate the effect on cesium retention in the molten salt oxidizer of sulfate and chloride at lower cesium concentrations.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.; Adamson, M.G.; Fleming, D.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Sodium and lithium corrosion in molybdenum heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Sodium and lithium corrosin in molybdenum heat pipes has been shown to be impurity dependent rather than solubility dependent. Impurities represent the major contributors to corrosion in the heat pipes tested. Our experiments have shown no evidence of direct solution of molybdenum by either sodium or lithium. Analysis has suggested that a critical concentration of impurities is required to initiate corrosion. Thus it appears that corrosion in Mo/Na and Mo/Li heat pipes can be controlled if impurity concentration can be limited by removal of impurities from the working fluid and heat pipe components prior to operation or by internal gettering during operation.

Lundberg, L.B.; Merrigan, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Solid-state laser system for laser cooling of Sodium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a frequency-stabilized, all-solid laser source at 589 nm with up to 800 mW output power. The laser relies on sum-frequency generation from two laser sources at 1064 nm and 1319 nm through a PPKTP crystal in a doubly-resonant cavity. We obtain conversion efficiency as high as 2 W/W^2 after optimization of the cavity parameters. The output wavelength is tunable over 60 GHz, which is sufficient to lock on the Sodium D2 line. The robustness, beam quality, spectral narrowness and tunability of our source make it an alternative to dye lasers for atomic physics experiments with Sodium atoms.

Emmanuel Mimoun; Luigi de Sarlo; Jean-Jacques Zondy; Jean Dalibard; Fabrice Gerbier

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

Solid-state laser system for laser cooling of Sodium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a frequency-stabilized, all-solid laser source at 589 nm with up to 800 mW output power. The laser relies on sum-frequency generation from two laser sources at 1064 nm and 1319 nm through a PPKTP crystal in a doubly-resonant cavity. We obtain conversion efficiency as high as 2 W/W^2 after optimization of the cavity parameters. The output wavelength is tunable over 60 GHz, which is sufficient to lock on the Sodium D2 line. The robustness, beam quality, spectral narrowness and tunability of our source make it an alternative to dye lasers for atomic physics experiments with Sodium atoms.

Mimoun, Emmanuel; Zondy, Jean-Jacques; Dalibard, Jean; Gerbier, Fabrice

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Experimental Study on the Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas Using Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors with Aqueous Solution of Potassium Glycinate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental study on CO2 removal from flue gas using polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactors were conducted. Aqueous solutions of potassium glycinate were used as absorption solution to absorb CO2 in the experiments. Under moderate operating ... Keywords: Gas absorption, Carbon dioxide, Potassium glycinate, Hollow fiber membrane contactor, Membrane absorption

Weifeng Zhang; Qiuhua Wang; Mengxiang Fang; Zhongyang Luo; Kefa Cen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Sodium-Doped Molybdenum Targets for Controllable Sodium Incorporation in CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells is enhanced when Na is incorporated in the CIGS absorber layer. This work examines Na incorporation in CIGS utilizing Na-doped Mo sputtered from targets made with sodium molybdate-doped (MONA) powder. Mo:Na films with varying thicknesses were sputtered onto Mo-coated borosilicate glass (BSG) or stainless steel substrates for CIGS solar cells. By use of this technique, the Na content of CIGS can be varied from near-zero to higher than that obtained from a soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate. Targets and deposition conditions are described. The doped Mo films are analyzed, and the resulting devices are compared to devices fabricated on Mo-coated SLG as well as Mo-coated BSG with NaF. Completed devices utilizing MONA exceeded 15.7% efficiency without anti-reflective coating, which was consistently higher than devices prepared with the NaF precursor. Strategies for minimizing adhesion difficulties are presented.

Mansfield, L. M.; Repins, I. L.; Glynn, S.; Carducci, M. D.; Honecker, D. M.; Pankow, J.; Young, M.; DeHart, C.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Beall, C. L.; To, B.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

EFFECT OF QUARTZ/MULLITE BLEND CERAMIC ADDITIVE ON IMPROVING RESISTANCE TO ACID OF SODIUM SILICATE-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENT. CELCIUS BRINE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We evaluated the usefulness of manufactured quartz/mullite blend (MQMB) ceramic powder in increasing the resistance to acid of sodium silicate-activated slag (SSAS) cementitious material for geothermal wells. A 15-day exposure to 90{sup o} CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed that the MQMB had high potential as an acid-resistant additive for SSAS cement. Two factors, the appropriate ratio of slag/MQMB and the autoclave temperature, contributed to better performance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement in abating its acid erosion. The most effective slag/MQMB ratio in minimizing the loss in weight by acid erosion was 70/30 by weight. For autoclave temperature, the loss in weight of 100 C autoclaved cement was a less than 2%, but at 300 C it was even lower. Before exposure to acid, the cement autoclaved at 100 C was essentially amorphous; increasing the temperature to 200 C led to the formation of crystalline analcime in the zeolitic mineral family during reactions between the mullite in MQMB and the Na from sodium silicate. In addition, at 300 C, crystal of calcium silicate hydrate (1) (CSH) was generated in reactions between the quartz in MQMB and the activated slag. These two crystalline phases (CSH and analcime) were responsible for densifying the autoclaved cement, conveying improved compressive strength and minimizing water permeability. The CSH was susceptible to reactions with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, forming two corrosion products, bassanite and ionized monosilicic acid. However, the uptake of ionized monosilicic acid by Mg dissociated from the activated slag resulted in the formation of lizardite as magnesium silicate hydrate. On the other hand, the analcime was barely susceptible to acid if at all. Thus, the excellent acid resistance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement was due to the combined phases of lizardite and analcime.

SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; VAN DE PUTTE, T.R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Performance Analysis of Potassium Heat Pipes Radiator for HP-STMCs Space Reactor Power System  

SciTech Connect

A detailed design and performance results of C-C finned, and armored potassium heat pipes radiator for a 110 kWe Heat Pipes-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters (HP-STMCs) Space Reactor Power system (SRPS) are presented. The radiator consists of two sections; each serves an equal number of STMCs and has 162 longitudinal potassium heat pipes with 0.508 mm thick C-C fins. The width of the C-C fins at the minor diameter of the radiator is almost zero, but increases with distance along the radiator to reach 3.7 cm at the radiator's major diameter. The radiator's heat pipes (OD = 2.42 cm in front and 3.03 cm in rear) have thin titanium (0.0762 mm thick) liners and wicks (0.20 mm thick with an effective pore radius of 12-16 {mu}m) and a 1.016 mm thick C-C wall. The wick is separated from the titanium liner by a 0.4 mm annulus filled with liquid potassium to increase the capillary limit. The outer surfaces of the heat pipes in the front and rear sections of the radiator are protected with a C-C armor that is 2.17 mm and 1.70 mm thick, respectively. The inside surface of the heat pipes in the front radiator is thermally insulated while the C-C finned condensers of the rear heat pipes are exposed, radiating into space through the rear opening of the radiator cavity. The heat pipes in both the front and the rear radiators have a 1.5 m long evaporator section and each dissipates 4.47 kW while operating at 43.6% of the prevailing sonic limit. The front and rear radiator sections are 5.29 m and 2.61 m long with outer surface area and mass of 47.1 m2 and 314.3 kg, and 39.9 m2 and 243.2 kg, respectively. The total radiator is 7.63 m long and has minor and major diameters of 1.48 m and 5.57 m, respectively, and a total surface area of 87 m2; however, the effective radiator area, after accounting for heat rejection through the rear of the radiator cavity, is 98.8 m2. The radiator's total mass including the C-C armor is 557.5 kg and the specific area and specific mass are 6.41 kg/m2 and 5.07 kg/kWe, respectively.

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept., University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nickel container of highly-enriched uranium bodies and sodium  

SciTech Connect

A fuel element comprises highly a enriched uranium bodies coated with a nonfissionable, corrosion resistant material. A plurality of these bodies are disposed in layers, with sodium filling the interstices therebetween. The entire assembly is enclosed in a fluid-tight container of nickel.

Zinn, Walter H. (Hinsdale, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Volatility of Aqueous Acetic Acid, Formic Acid, and Sodium Acetate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of water and steam is central to ensuring power plant component availability and reliability. A key part of developing operating cycle chemistry guidelines is an understanding of the impurity distribution between water and steam. This report examines the volatility of some of the principal cycle organic corrodents: acetic acid, formic acid, and sodium acetate.

2000-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

356

Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester. Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating  

SciTech Connect

A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

Ludwig, Frank A. (Irvine, CA); Higley, Lin R. (Santa Ana, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

An Electrical Cathode Model of a High Pressure Sodium Lamp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrical cathode model (ECM) of a high pressure sodium lamp (HPS) based on physical laws has been developed. The proposed ECM calculates the instantaneous voltage drop in a cathode sheath and the temperature distribution inside the cathode using ... Keywords: cathode model, HPS lamp ballast designs

Jose Luis Tapia; Joel O. Pacheco Sotelo; Eduardo Diaz Rodriguez; Yulia Nikolaevna Ledeneva; Rene Arnulfo Garcia Hernandez

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Energy and Technolgy Assessment of Zinc and Magnesium Casting Plants, Technical Report Close-out, August 25,2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twin City Die Castings Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Twin City Die Castings Company was awarded project No. DE-FG36-05GO15097 to perform plant wide assessments of ten (10) die casting facilities that produce zinc and magnesium alloy castings in order to determine improvements and potential cost savings in energy use. Mr. Heider filled the role of team leader for the project and utilized the North American Die Casting Association (NADCA) to conduct audits at team participant plants so as to hold findings specific to each plant proprietary. The intended benefits of the project were to improve energy use through higher operational and process efficiency for the plants assessed. An improvement in energy efficiency of 5 – 15% was targeted. The primary objectives of the project was to: 1) Expand an energy and technology tool developed by the NADCA under a previous DOE project titled, “Energy and Technology Assessment for Die Casting Plants” for assessing aluminum die casting plants to be more specifically applicable to zinc and magnesium die casting facilities. 2) Conduct ten (10) assessments of zinc and magnesium die casting plants, within eight (8) companies, utilizing the assessment tool to identify, evaluate and recommend opportunities to enhance energy efficiency, minimize waste, and improve productivity. 3) Transfer the assessment tool to the die casting industry at large.

Twin City Die Castings Company; Tom Heider; North American Die Castings Association

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

Kinetics of Potassium Desorption in Soil using Miscible Displacement1 D. L. SPARKS, L. W. ZELAZNY, AND D. C. MARTENSZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of Potassium Desorption in Soil using Miscible Displacement1 D. L. SPARKS, L. W. ZELAZNY, and B22t horizons of two Dothan (Plinthic Pa- leudults) soils. Aluminum- and calcium- saturated samples was subsequently de- sorbed suggesting K adsorption-desorption in the Dothan soils was reversible. A linear

Sparks, Donald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Detection of frozen salt in pipes using gamma-ray spectrometry of potassium self-activity  

SciTech Connect

Solar plants that use molten salts as heat transfer fluid need careful control to avoid the freezing of the salt in the pipes; if such a problem occurs, a diagnostic instrument to localize where is the frozen salt plug and to determine its length is useful. If the salt contains potassium (as is the case of the most common mixture used in solar plants, NaNO{sub 3}/KNO{sub 3} 60/40% by weight), the gamma decay of the natural unstable isotope {sup 40}K can be exploited to detect the frozen salt in a non-invasive way. Simulations and experimental results regarding the detectability of such plugs with different masses/lengths are presented. (author)

Grena, Roberto; Scafe, Raffaele; Pisacane, Fabrizio; Pilato, Renzo; Crescenzi, Tommaso; Mazzei, Domenico [ENEA, Casaccia Research Centre, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Chemical kinetic studies on dry sorbents. Final report. [Sodium bicarbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of this research investigation has included a review of potential additives suitable for dry flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) and a bench scale laboratory study to determine the chemical kinetics for the reaction of five different sorbents with sulfur dioxide. The sorbents chosen included sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO/sub 3/), soda ash (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/), trona, lime (CaO) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). This study has shown that: (1) The reaction rate increases with temperature for soda ash and calcium oxide. The reaction temperature has an inverse effect on sodium bicarbonate and trona due, primarily, to the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. The calcium hydroxide-SO/sub 2/ reaction increased up to 550/sup 0/F, and then decreased, due to uneven gas flow distribution. (2) The reaction rates for soda ash, calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were increased by decreasing their particle size. This effect was not confirmed for sodium bicarbonate and trona where reaction temperature was the most important reaction parameter. (3) Reaction with soda ash was found to be limited by the presence of an impervious ash layer which prevented interparticle gaseous diffusion. Calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were found to be limited by a slow chemical reaction rate. Results on the rate-limiting steps for sodium bicarbonate and trona were inconclusive because of the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. (4) The effect of thermal activation was to increase the reaction rate for sodium bicarbonate and trona at lower temperatures. This effect was less pronounced at higher temperatures. (5) Results obtained for nitric oxide show limited adsorption for the five sorbents tested as compared to the finding for sulfur dioxide.

Davis, W.T.; Keener, T.C.

1982-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

1983-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

365

A new approach in signal processing for sodium boiling noise detection by probability density function estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probability density function (pdf) method of noise signal processing has been investigated for its capability and quality in detecting sodium boiling noise. In an attempt to identify proper features of the pdf for sodium boiling noise detection, the segmented areas under the pdf curves have been found sensitive to sodium boiling noise. New approaches have been followed in selecting the feature threshold and achieving the targeted probabilities for false and missed sodium boiling noise detection.

Reddy, C.P.; Singh, O.P.; Vyjayanthi, R.K.; Prabhakar, R.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Transient Heat and Material Flow Modeling of Friction Stir Processing of Magnesium Alloy using Threaded Tool  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to investigate the material flow and heat transfer during friction stir processing (FSP) in an AZ31B magnesium alloy. The material was assumed to be a non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluid, and the Zener-Hollomon parameter was used to describe the dependence of material viscosity on temperature and strain rate. The material constants used in the constitutive equation were determined experimentally from compression tests of the AZ31B Mg alloy under a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. A dynamic mesh method, combining both Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, was used to capture the material flow induced by the movement of the threaded tool pin. Massless inert particles were embedded in the simulation domain to track the detailed history of material flow. The actual FSP was also carried out on a wrought Mg plate where temperature profiles were recorded by embedding thermocouples. The predicted transient temperature history was found to be consistent with that measured during FSP. Finally, the influence of the thread on the simulated results of thermal history and material flow was studied by comparing two models: one with threaded pin and the other with smooth pin surface.

Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Choo, Hahn [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Plutonium and americium recovery from spent molten-salt-extraction salts with aluminum-magnesium alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development work was performed to determine the feasibility of removing plutonium and americium from spent molten-salt-extraction (MSE) salts using Al-Mg alloys. If the product buttons from this process are compatible with subsequent aqueous processing, the complex chloride-to-nitrate aqueous conversion step which is presently required for these salts may be eliminated. The optimum alloy composition used to treat spent 8 wt % MSE salts in the past yielded poor phase-disengagement characteristics when applied to 30 mol % salts. After a limited investigation of other alloy compositions in the Al-Mg-Pu-Am system, it was determined that the Al-Pu-Am system could yield a compatible alloy. In this system, experiments were performed to investigate the effects of plutonium loading in the alloy, excess magnesium, age of the spent salt on actinide recovery, phase disengagement, and button homogeneity. Experimental results indicate that 95 percent plutonium recoveries can be attained for fresh salts. Further development is required for backlog salts generated prior to 1981. A homogeneous product alloy, as required for aqueous processing, could not be produced.

Cusick, M.J.; Sherwood, W.G.; Fitzpatrick, R.F.

1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Polymer Stable Magnesium Nanocomposites Prepared by Laser Ablation for Efficient Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a promising alternative energy carrier that can potentially facilitate the transition from fossil fuels to sources of clean energy because of its prominent advantages such as high energy density (142 MJ per kg), great variety of potential sources (for example water, biomass, organic matter), and low environmental impact (water is the sole combustion product). However, due to its light weight, the efficient storage of hydrogen is still an issue investigated intensely. Various solid media have been considered in that respect among which magnesium hydride stands out as a candidate offering distinct advantages. Recent theoretical work indicates that MgH2 becomes less thermodynamically stable as particle diameter decreases below 2 nm. Our DFT (density functional theory) modeling studies have shown that the smallest enthalpy change, corresponding to 2 unit-cell thickness (1.6 {\\AA} Mg/3.0{\\AA} MgH2) of the film, is 57.7 kJ/molMg. This enthalpy change is over 10 kJ per molMg smaller than that of the bulk...

Makridis, S S; Panagakos, G; Kikkinides, E S; Stubos, A K; Wagener, P; Barcikowski, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Chemical and mechanical consequences of environmental barrier coating exposure to calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of Si-based ceramics as high-temperature structural materials for gas turbine applications relies on the use of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) with low silica activity, such as Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} (BSAS), which protect the underlying components from oxidation and corrosion in combustion environments containing water vapor. One of the current challenges concerning EBC lifetime is the effect of sandy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass that melt during engine operation and react with the EBC, changing both its composition and stress state. In this work, we study the effect of CMAS exposure at 1300 C on the residual stress state and composition in BSAS-mullite-Si-SiC multilayers. Residual stresses were measured in BSAS multilayers exposed to CMAS for different times using high-energy X-ray diffraction. Their microstructure was studied using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Our results show that CMAS dissolves the BSAS topcoat preferentially through the grain boundaries, dislodging the grains and changing the residual stress state in the topcoat to a nonuniform and increasingly compressive stress state with increasing exposure time. The presence of CMAS accelerates the hexacelsian-to-celsian phase transformation kinetics in BSAS, which reacts with the glass by a solution-reprecipitation mechanism. Precipitates have crystallographic structures consistent with Ca-doped celsian and Ba-doped anorthite.

Harder, B.; Ramirez-Rico, J.; Almer, J. D.; Kang, L.; Faber, K. (X-Ray Science Division); (NASA Glenn Research Center); (Univ. of Seville); (Rolls-Royce Corp.); (Northwestern Univ.)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Long-range southeastward transport of Asian biosmoke pollution: Signature detected by aerosol potassium in Northern Taiwan - article no. D14301  

SciTech Connect

Total potassium was determined in aerosol particles between 2002 and early 2007 in northern Taiwan (25{sup o} 02'N, 121{sup o} 31'E). Biosmoke potassium (non-sea-salt/noncrustal) was assessed and used as a tracer of biosmoke pollution, which essentially represents the combination of coal and biofuel combustion and biomass burning. PM10-associated potassium displays a typical seasonality, peaking during the winter and waning during the summer. The size distribution showed a bimodal pattern, peaking at a supermicron size (2.5-5.{mu}m) and at around 1 {mu}m, demonstrating multiple sources. Size distribution patterns revealed an evident seasonality, indicative of the different domination of natural and biosmoke sources in the two main periods of the northeasterly and summer monsoons, respectively. The relative contributions of biosmoke and natural sources to the total potassium were estimated to be 50-75% and 25-50%, respectively; the seasonality of biosmoke potassium is similar to that of total potassium. Substantial correlations existed between biosmoke potassium and selected trace metals (As, Se, Pb, and Mn), suggesting that the latter are essentially associated with biosmoke pollution. Another significant finding is that the seasonal mean concentrations of aerosol potassium between 2002 and early 2007 tend to increase. This could primarily be attributed to the increased consumption of coal in China, posing an urgent issue relevant to pollution mitigation in China. The southward inflow flux of biosmoke potassium to the south of 25{sup o} N during the northeasterly monsoon months has been estimated to be 56-79 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, which could be applied to the assessment of other biosmoke-related species.

Hsu, S.C.; Liu, S.C.; Huang, Y.T.; Chou, C.C.K.; Lung, S.C.C.; Liu, T.H.; Tu, J.Y.; Tsai, F.J. [Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan). Research Center for Environmental Changes

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Microsoft Word - EC Sodium coolant removal.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 SECTION A. Project Title: MFC - EBR-II Sodium Removal/RCRA Closure Activities SECTION B . Project Description The proposed action will remove the sodium from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II piping system and tanks to achieve clean-closure for eventual decommissioning, deactivation and demolition (DD&D). The clean-closure will be completed in compliance with the EBR-II Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Storage and Treatment Permit PER-120, which includes the closure plan. EBR-II is located at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory. The EBR-II DD&D actions will be addressed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act, specifically, the Engineering Evaluation/Cost

372

First-Principles Study on Electron Conduction in Sodium Nanowire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present detailed first-principles calculations of the electron-conduction properties of a three-sodium-atom nanowire suspended between semi-infinite crystalline Na(001) electrodes during its elongation. Our investigations reveal that the conductance is ? 1 G0 before the nanowire breaks and only one channel with the characteristic of the 3s orbital of the center atom in the nanowire contributes to the electron conduction. Moreover, the channel fully opens around the Fermi level, and the behavior of the channel-current density is insensitive to the structural deformation of the nanowire. These results verify that the conductance trace as a function of the electrode spacing exhibits a flat plateau at ? 1 G0 during elongation. First-Principles Study on Electron Conduction in Sodium Nanowire 2 1.

Yoshiyuki Egami; Takashi Sasaki; Tomoya Ono

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Preventing ash agglomeration during gasification of high-sodium lignite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various additives were evaluated to assess their ability to prevent ash agglomeration during the gasification of high-sodium lignite. Additives that showed promise in simple muffle furnace tests included meta-kaolin, vermiculite, two types of silica fume, and one type of bauxite. Additives that were tested and rejected included dolomite, calcite, sand flour, kaolinite, fine kaolin, and calcined bauxite. Based on the muffle furnace test results, the meta-kaolin was selected for a follow-on demonstration in a pilot-scale coal gasifier. Pilot-scale testing showed that the addition of coarse (minus 14-mesh, 920-{mu}m mean size) meta-kaolin at a feed rate roughly equivalent to the ash content of the lignite (10 wt %) successfully prevented agglomeration and deposition problems during gasification of high-sodium lignite at a maximum operating temperature of 927{sup o}C (1700{sup o}F). 13 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; WanWang Peng; Roxann F. Leonard; Pannalal Vimalchand [Southern Research Institute and Southern Company Services, Wilsonville, AL (USA). Power Systems Development Facility

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status and Challenges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sodium-beta alumina batteries, have been extensively developed for a few decades and encouraging progress has been achieved so far. The anode is typically molten sodium while the cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). The electrolyte typically used is a ?"-Al2O3 solid membrane. The issues prohibiting broad commercialization of this type of technology are dependent on the materials used, but can be broadly described as relatively high cost, safety (particularly for the Na-S couple), and low power. This paper offers a review on materials and designs for the batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

TEN-YEAR SODIUM-REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

>A 10-year program of development and construction of large-scale, sodium-cooled reactors is summarized. The current state of development of the SGR and its associated components is sufficiently advanced to permit construction of economic plants within the 10-year period. Two advanced Sodium Reactor concepts are presented. A construction program involving two reactor experiments and two full-scale plants with a capacity of 550 Mwe, together with associated development, is estimated to cost 6 million. Of this amount approximately 06 million would be borne by the AEC and the remainder by power utility companies. Escalation and construction loan interest charges are included in these figures. The cost of power from the larger power plant would be approximately 6 mills/kw-hr, based on 1959 dollars. (auth)

1959-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

CORE PARAMETER STUDY FOR A 300-MW SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

A core parameter study of the operating costs was performed for a 300- Mwe sodium graphite reactor, a scale-up of the Hallam Power Reactor. The results of the study indicate that the core design is nsar optimum and that core modifications would reduce the power costs by less than 5%. The lattice spacing, fuel rod diameter, and sodium flow can be varied within a rather broad range without significant changes in power generation costs. The effect of the fuel cladning thickness is more significant; fuel cycle costs can be reduced if stainless steel canning is replaced with zirconium canning. Use of UC in place of uraniummolybdenum fuel would also permit cost reductions. (D.L.C.)

Corcoran, W.P.

1959-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

Sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to improve current understanding of sodium voiding behavior under postulated LMFBR accident conditions. Multi-dimensional computer models are being developed under low flow and low power conditions. The following computer codes are being developed and assessed: NATOF-2D, THERMIT-S-6E, and THERMIT-S-4E. The effect of virtual mass on the characteristics and numerical stability in two-phase flows was studied. (DLC)

Not Available

1981-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Chaotic Dynamos Generated by a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium  

SciTech Connect

We report the observation of several dynamical regimes of the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Stationary dynamos, transitions to relaxation cycles or to intermittent bursts, and random field reversals occur in a fairly small range of parameters. Large scale dynamics of the magnetic field result from the interactions of a few modes. The low dimensional nature of these dynamics is not smeared out by the very strong turbulent fluctuations of the flow.

Ravelet, F.; Monchaux, R.; Aumaitre, S.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B. [Service de Physique de lEtat Condense, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, CEA-Saclay, CNRS URA 2464, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de lEcole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR 8550, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bourgoin, M.; Odier, Ph.; Plihon, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Volk, R. [Laboratoire de Physique de lEcole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 46 allee dItalie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect

Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Development of the sodium/sulfur technology for energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has supported the development of the sodium-sulfur technology since 1973. The programs have focused on progressing core aspects of the technology and completing initial battery engineering for both mobile and stationary applications. An overview of the Office of Energy Management (OEM) activities is contained in this paper. Two major development programs have been active: the first with Ford Aerospace and Communications Corporation (1975 to 1985), and the second with Chloride Silent Power Limited (1985 to 1990). With the completion this year of the qualification of a cell suitable for initial Solar Energy Systems (SES) applications, the emphasis of future DOE/OEM sodium/sulfur programs will shift to SES-battery engineering and development. The initial effort will resolve a number of issues related to the feasibility of utilizing the sodium/sulfur technology in these large-scale applications. This multi-year activity will represent the initial phase of an integrated long-term DOE-supported program to produce a commercially viable battery system.

Landgrebe, A. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Energy Management); Magnani, N.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Compact intermediate heat transport system for sodium cooled reactor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combination with a sodium cooled reactor having an intermediate heat exchanger for extracting heat in a nonradioactive secondary sodium loop from the sodium rector. It comprises: first and second upstanding closed cylindrical vessels, one of the cylindrical vessels being exterior of the other of the cylindrical vessels; the other of the cylindrical vessels being interior, smaller, and concentric of the larger cylindrical vessel so as to define between the inside of the larger vessel and the outside of the smaller vessel an interstitial annular volume; at least one feedwater inlet plenums at the bottom of the larger vessel communicated to the interstitial annular volume; at least one feedwater outlet plenums at the top of the larger and outer vessel communicated to the interstitial annular volume; tubes communicated to the feedwater inlet plenum at the bottom of the vessels and to the steam outlet plenum at the top of the vessel; a first conduit; a large submersible electromagnetic pump; and a jet pump having an inlet, a venturi, and a diffusing outlet.

Boardman, C.E.; Maurer, J.P.

1990-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

382

Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill expedited response action proposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill. The Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Site was used in 1945 for disposal of crushed barrels. The site location is the sole waste site within the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. The Waste Information Data System (WIDS 1992) assumes that the crushed barrels contained 1% residual sodium dichromate at burial time and that only buried crushed barrels are at the site. Burial depth is shallow since visual inspection finds numerous barrel debris on the surface. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the ERA will present a final remediation of the 100-IU-4 operable unit.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Sodium meta-autunite colloids: Synthesis, characterization,stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste forms of U such as those in the United States Department of Energy's Hanford Site often contain high concentrations of Na and P. Low solubility sodium uranyl phosphates such as sodium meta-autunite have the potential to form mobile colloids that can facilitate transport of this radionuclide. In order to understand the geochemical behavior of uranyl phosphate colloids, we synthesized sodiummeta-autunite colloids, and characterized their morphology, chemical composition, structure, dehydration, and surface charge. The stability of these synthetic plate-shaped colloids was tested with respect to time and pH. The highest aggregation rate was observed at pH 3, and the rate decreases as pH increases, indicating that higher stability of colloid dispersion under neutral and alkaline pH conditions. The synthetic colloids are all negatively charged and no isoelectric points were found over a pH range of 3 to 9. The zeta-potentials of the colloids in the phosphate solution show a strong pH-dependence in the more acidic range over time, but are relatively constant in the neutral and alkaline pH range. The geochemical behavior of the synthetic colloids can be interpreted using DLVO theory. The results suggest that formation of mobile sodium meta-autunite colloids can enhance the transport of U in some contaminated sediments.

zzuoping@lbl.gov

2004-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear 306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 19, 2000 EIS-0306: Record of Decision Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 2000 EIS-0306: Final Environmental Impact Statement Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 1999 EIS-0306: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Treatment of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

385

Automotive storage of hydrogen using modified magnesium hydrides. Final report, March 1976-March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal hydrides can store more hydrogen per unit volume than normal high pressure or cryogenic techniques. Little energy is required to store the hydrogen in the hydride, and high stability at room temperature ensures low losses over long storage periods. Safety features of metal hydride storage are favorable. Because of its low weight and high hydrogen storage densities, modified magnesium hydride offers the greatest potential for automotive storage of hydrogen. Experimental and analytical work in this program has been directed toward the optimization of this storage system. Due to the relative stability of MgH/sub 2/, modifications of the MgMH/sub x/ (M = metal ion) have been made to decrease the dissociation temperature while retaining high hydrogen capacity. This parameter is crucial since vehicle exhaust will supply the thermal energy to dissociate the hydride in an automobile. System studies indicate that hydride dissociation temperature (T/sub D/) should be 200/sup 0/C to ensure uninterrupted fuel flow at all driving and idle conditions. From experimental data developed in this four task study, we conclude that alloys comprised of Mg, Cu and Ni have come closest to meeting the dissociation temperature goal. Small additions of rare-earth elements to the basic alloy also contribute to a reduction of T/sub D/. The best alloy developed in this program exhibits a T/sub D/ = 223/sup 0/C and a hydrogen capacity near four weight percent compared to a theoretical 7.65 percent for MgH/sub 2/. That alloy has been characterized for dissociation temperature, hydrogen capacity, kinetics, and P-C-T relationships. Dissociation temperature, hydrogen capacity and material cost are reported for each alloy tested in this program.

Rohy, D. A.; Nachman, J. F.; Hammer, A. N.; Duffy, T. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Growth of purified calcium fluoride and magnesium fluoride and degradation of optical properties by defects  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the purification and crystal growth portion of the research undertaken in this program. Several new devices for conducting chemical operations in isolated environments were perfected. The precipitator/decanter system was the most important of these. Without it the very large number of precipitate washing cycles required would have been prohibitive due to the time required using the older design. The purification process improved the purity of both fluorides. Precipitation of the alkaline earth carbonates from an alkaline solution was extremely effective in removing alkali ions. The second stage of the process used ion-exchange to remove transition metal ions and to reduce the concentration of other alkaline earths. The third stage of the process was the precipitation and washing of the product fluoride which proved to be difficult because these fluorides form gels or sols when pure. At an ammonium fluoride concentration near 8M a satisfactory precipitate was obtained. Only after a long resting period could the precipitate be washed without converting to a gel or sol. Magnesium fluoride had a much greater tendency to form gels than the calcium salt. Crystal growth was attempted by a Stockbarger method using HF as the reactive gas. The remainder of this report describes the research on the effect of defects on the optical properties of optical materials. The Landau-Placzek ratio and the method for calculating its theoretical value is described. This establishes a comparison standard for studies of doped crystals discussed in the remaining chapters of this report. As part of the preparation of the crystals for optical studies the distribution coefficients for cadmium, calcium and lead were measured and are reported. 121 refs., 30 figs., 22 tabs.

Fredericks, W.J.; Collins, P.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Microstructure-strength relationships of heavily deformed magnesium-lithium composites containing steel fibers  

SciTech Connect

The successful development of deformation-processed metal-metal composites (DMMC) offers the potential for ductile, high-strength structural materials with high-temperature stability. An infiltration casting process was used to permeate steel wool preforms with molten magnesium-lithium (Mg-Li) alloys. The selected matrix alloys were hexagonal close packed (HCP) Mg-4wt%Li or body centered cubic (BCC) Mg-12wt%Li; the low carbon steel wool fibers were predominantly BCC ferrite. These cast HCP/BCC and BCC/BCC composites were deformed by rolling or by extrusion and swaging. Mechanical properties, microstructure, and texture development of the composites were characterized at various levels of deformation. The HCP/BCC composites had limited formability at temperatures up to 400 C while the BCC/BCC composites had excellent formability during sheet rolling at room temperature but limited formability during swaging at room temperature. The tensile strengths of these HCP/BCC and BCC/BCC composite materials increased moderately with deformation, though less than predicted from rule of mixtures (ROM) calculations. The microstructure was characterized to correlate the filament size to the deformation strain and mechanical properties of the composite material. Stereological measurements of the filament size were used to adjust ROM calculations to reflect the actual deformation strain in the fibers. However, the experimental strengths of these composite materials were still less than ROM predictions, possibly due to the presence of considerably large fibers. Of the many models used to describe the strengthening observed in DMMC materials, the Hall-Petch relationship adequately described the experimental data. Texture development was also characterized to explain the deformation characteristics of the composite materials. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 are not included here. They are being processed separately.

Jensen, J.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

Persistent infrared spectral hole burning of NO; ions in potassium halide crystals. I. Priric9ple and satellite.holle generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Persistent infrared spectral hole burning of NO; ions in potassium halide crystals. I. Priric9ple spectroscopyand persistentinfrared spectralhole (PIRSH) burning separatelyand together. With interferometry cm --'and, with PIRSH burning, it has beendemijnstratedthat the narrowestlinesare

Sethna, James P.

389

C1700098Cu-1.7Be-0.3Co  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 30   Approximate corrosion resistance of C17000...Potassium sulfate Sodium hydroxide Picric acid Propane Sodium hypochlorite Potassium cyanide Rosin Sodium peroxide Silver chloride Sodium bicarbonate Sodium sulfide Sodium cyanide Sodium chloride Sulfur Stannic chloride Sodium sulfate Sulfur chloride Sulfuric acid, aerated Sulfur dioxide Sulfuric acid,...

390

C17200, C17300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 34   Approximate corrosion resistance of C17200 and C17300...Potassium hydroxide Phosphoric acid, aerated Propane Sodium hydroxide Picric acid Rosin Sodium hypochlorite Potassium cyanide Sodium bicarbonate Sodium peroxide Silver chloride Sodium chloride Sodium sulfide Sodium cyanide Sodium sulfate Sulfur Stannic chloride Sulfur dioxide Sulfur chloride Sulfuric...

391

Thin film growth and characterization of Potassium-Tantalate-Niobate room temperature ferroelectric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective in fabricating ferroelectric thin films is to duplicate the polar properties and characteristics of the corresponding bulk material. Potassium Tantalate-Niobate (KTN), KTa(,-,)Nb,03-, is a continuous solid solution between the perovskite compounds KNbO3 and KTaO3. The Curie temperature of KTN can be varied by a4justing x i.e.., the composition of niobium. In the vicinity of the ferroto-paraelectric phase transition, high dielectric permittivities, large pyroelectric as well as electro-optical and nonlinear optical coefficients can be observed. Bulk KTN single crystals synthesized from high temperature melts have limited device utility due to the occurence of lamellar growth, twins, etc. For these reasons thin films of KTN find enormous applications in spatial light modulators., pyroelectric devices, holographic storage., parametric oscillators and variable delay lines. The research undertaken involved the growth of KTN thin films on lattice matched substrates. The preferential groath directions, optimum growth conditions, ideal charge composition, and ideal regime in phase diagram were established. Liquidphase epitaxy (LPE) was the technique employed for the growth of thin films. The as grown films were optically and electrically characterized.

Muntha, Nageswara Rao Venkat

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Start Up of a Nb-1%Zr Potassium Heat Pipe From the Frozen State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The start up of a liquid-metal heat pipe from the frozen state was evaluated experimentally with a Nb-1%Zr heat pipe with potassium as the working fluid. The heat pipe was fabricated and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory. RF induction heating was used to heat 13 cm of the 1-m-long heat pipe. The heat pipe and test conditions are well characterized so that the test data may be used for comparison with numerical analyses. An attempt was made during steady state tests to calibrate the heat input so that the heat input would be known during the transient cases. The heat pipe was heated to 675C with a throughput of 600 W and an input heat flux of 6 W/cm 2 . Steady state tests, start up from the frozen state, and transient variations from steady state were conducted. Nomenclature English L length m . mass flow rate PS power setting r radius q heat flux q" heat flux per unit area T temperature v voltage V volume x axial location on heat pipe Greek e porosity r resist...

Since Its Founding; David E. Glass; Michael A. Merrigan; J. Tom Sena

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

HIGH SODIUM SIMULANT TESTING TO SUPPORT SB8 SLUDGE PREPARATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scoping studies were completed for high sodium simulant SRAT/SME cycles to determine any impact to CPC processing. Two SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having sodium supernate concentration of 1.9M at 130% and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Both of these failed to meet DWPF processing objectives related to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Another set of SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having a sodium supernate concentration of 1.6M at 130%, 125%, 110%, and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Only the run at 110% met DWPF processing objectives. Neither simulant had a stoichiometric factor window of 30% between nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation. Based on the 2M-110 results it was anticipated that the 2.5M stoichiometric window for processing would likely be smaller than from 110-130%, since it appeared that it would be necessary to increase the KMA factor by at least 10% above the minimum calculated requirement to achieve nitrite destruction due to the high oxalate content. The 2.5M-130 run exceeded the DWPF hydrogen limits in both the SRAT and SME cycle. Therefore, testing of this wash endpoint was halted. This wash endpoint with this minimum acid requirement and mercury-noble metal concentration profile appears to be something DWPF should not process due to an overly narrow window of stoichiometry. The 2M case was potentially processable in DWPF, but modifications would likely be needed in DWPF such as occasionally accepting SRAT batches with undestroyed nitrite for further acid addition and reprocessing, running near the bottom of the as yet ill-defined window of allowable stoichiometric factors, potentially extending the SRAT cycle to burn off unreacted formic acid before transferring to the SME cycle, and eliminating formic acid additions in the frit slurry.

Newell, J.

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Self-welding evaluation of reactor materials in flowing sodium  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was made of the self-welding of various combinations of FBR materials (304 ss, Inconel 718, A286, Stellite 156, and Stellite 6) in sodium at 800 to 1100$sup 0$F for time periods up to 6 months and contact stresses of 2 to 148 ksi. Stresses required to separate the surfaces were determined. Self-welding was observed only at temperatures of 1050$sup 0$F and above, with the breakaway force being less than 5 ksi. (DLC)

Chang, J.Y.; Flagella, P.N.; Schrock, S.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Electrolytic Treatment of ICPP Sodium-Bearing Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

Two proof-of-principle tests were conducted to determine if nitrate can be destroyed electrochemically in a simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Sodium-Bearing waste. Both tests demonstrated the destruction of nitrate as well as the removal of other metals in the simulant. Metals removal is believed to be due to precipitation as a result of a change in the pH of the waste solution from strongly acidic to highly alkaline and reduction to a metal or metal oxide. Although gas evolution at the cathode was visible during each test, there were no visible signs of NO{sub x} formation in either test.

Hobbs, D.T.

1995-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

Feed Composition for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Process  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of SBW by December 31, 2012. To support both design and development studies for the SBW treatment process, detailed feed compositions are needed. This report contains the expected compositions of these feed streams and the sources and methods used in obtaining these compositions.

Barnes, C.M.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

STATIC SODIUM TEST OF WESTINGHOUSE FLOW CONTROLLER BEARING  

SciTech Connect

Tests were carried out to determine the action of a static sodium environment on a special high-temperature ball bearing while operating at the specified speed and loading. The test bearing was operated at 85 rpm and 870 pounds axial load for 385 hr at 1000 deg F. Visual inspection of the test bearing showed a very marked increase in roughness of both the balls and the ball races. Details of the measurements and a photograph of the bearing parts after test are given. On the basis of this test it did not appear that this bearing will be satisfactory for the service intended. (M.C.G.)

Cygan, R.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The influence of zeta potential and yield stress on the filtration characteristics of a magnesium hydroxide simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the UK, irradiated fuels from Magnox reactors are often stored in water-filled ponds under alkaline conditions, so as to minimise corrosion of fuel cladding. This is important to prevent or reduce leakage of soluble fission products and actinides to the pond water. A variety of intermediate level wastes derived from Magnox materials are stored at power stations. Under these alkaline conditions, various species of magnesium are formed, of which magnesium hydroxide is the dominant material. The particle-fluid interactions are significant for the design and operation of facilities for hydraulic retrieval, filtration, dewatering and ion exchange treatment of fuel storage pond water and stored wet Magnox wastes. Here we describe a study of particulate properties and filtration characteristics of oxide particle simulants under laboratory conditions. Cake and medium resistance data were correlated across a range of pH conditions with electro-acoustic zeta potential and shear yield stress measurements, as a function of particle volume fractions. The influence of zeta potential on filtration properties arises directly from the interaction of particles within the sediment cake. (authors)

Biggs, Simon; Nabi, Rafiq; Poole, Colin [Leeds University/Nexia Solutions URA in Particle Science and Technology, Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Patel, Ashok [British Nuclear Group, Reactor Sites, Berkeley Centre, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, GL13 9PB (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes February 1, 2008 - 11:13am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S Department of Energy (DOE), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) today expanded cooperation to coordinate Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototype development through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by DOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis R. Spurgeon, CEA Chairman Alain Bugat and JAEA President Toshio Okazaki. The MOU establishes a collaborative framework with the ultimate goal of deploying sodium-cooled fast reactor prototypes. A sodium-cooled fast reactor uses liquid sodium

400

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

OPERATING EXPERIENCE WITH THE SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of sodium-oooled graphitemoderated reactors for central station power. The operating experience of SRE has provided valuable data for the design of the Hallam Nuclear Power Facillty (HNPF) now under construction. Some of the difficulties found in the SRE, which HNPF will be designed to avoid, are the sodium-sodium intermediate heat exchanger (horizontal position in SRE gave trouble; a vertical position will be used in HNPF), sodium pumps, handling of broken fuel elements, and excessive thermal stresses due to inadequate coolant flow. Other features of HNPF include the addition of an activity monitoring system for the core cover gas, elimination of tetralin for auxiliary cooling of plant equipment, instrumentation of fuel elements, and addition of carbon traps in the primary sodium system. SRE operation has demonstrated unusual reactor stability and capability for rapid power changes. (D.L.C.)

Beeley, R.J.; Mahlmeister, J.E.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Atomistic Modeling of Nanowires, Small-scale Fatigue Damage in Cast Magnesium, and Materials for MEMS'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Colorado at Boulder by providing funding for the lead author, Ken Gall, and his students, while he was a member of the University of Colorado faculty.

Dunn, Martin L. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Talmage, Mellisa J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); McDowell, David L., 1956- (,-Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); West, Neil (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gullett, Philip Michael (Mississippi State University , MS); Miller, David C. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Spark, Kevin (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University , MS); Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

AN ADVANCED SODIUM-GRAPHITE REACTOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

An advanced sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated nuclear power plant is described which utilizes high-pressure, high-temperature steam to generate electricity at a high thermal efficiency. Steam is generated at 2400 psig, superheated to 1050 deg F and, after partial expansion in the turbine, reheated to 1000 deg F. Net thermal efficiency of the plant is 42.3%. In a plant sized to produce a net electrical output of 256 Mw, the estimated cost is 8232/kw. Estimated cost of power generation is 6.7 mills/kwh. In a similar plant with a net electrical output of 530 Mw, the estimated power generating cost is 5.4 mills/ kwh. Most of the components of the plant are within the capability of current technology. The major exception is the fuel material, uranium carbide. Preliminary results of the development work now in progress indicate that uranium carbide would be an excellent fuel for high-temperature reactors, but temperature and burnup limitation have yet to be firmly established. Additional development work is also required on the steam generators. These are the single-barrier type similar to those which will be used in the Enrico Fernri Fast Breeder Reactor plant but produce steam at higher pressure and temperature. Questions also remain regarding the use of nitrogen as a cover gas over sodium at 1200 deg F and compatibility of the materials used in the primary neutron shield. All of these questions are currently under investigation. (auth)

Churchill, J.R.; Renard, J.

1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Synaptosomal calcium influx is activated by sodium fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neuronal calcium channels can be modulated by changes in membrane potential or by activation of channel-associated receptors. The latter may be modulated by guanine nucleotide binding proteins. NaF, which activates guanine nucleotide binding proteins, caused a large stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake by synaptosomes prepared from rat brain. Stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx by NaF (i) was apparent in media containing either 5 mM-K+ or 50 mM-K+, (ii) was slower than the fast-phase of voltage-dependent /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx but continued for a longer period of time than did depolarization-induced /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx, and (iii) was not mimicked or modified by a number of drugs, including ouabain, dinitrophenol, sodium azide or sodium vanadate. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that NaF activates a guanine nucleotide binding protein associated with receptor-coupled calcium channels, resulting in stimulation of calcium influx.

Jope, R.S.; Lally, K.M.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokai University, Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); AISA, Fuchu, Ishioka, Ibaraki 315-0013 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

408

Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank  

SciTech Connect

Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

Mercado, M.S.

1996-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sodium compatibility studies of low friction carbide coatings for reactor application  

SciTech Connect

Design requirements for low friction materials in FFTF have led to an experimental sodium compatibility program, the objective of which is to select and qualify a low friction coating for the fuel assembly duct load pad. Results are given for chromium carbide and titanium carbide-based coatings on stainless steel exposed to 1160 deg F sodium for several thousand hours. A chromium carbide coating (with a nichrome binder) having an average corrosion rate of approximately 0.25 mpy exhibits optimum sodium compatibility behavior of the materials examined. Both plasma-sprayed chromium carbide and titanium carbide based coatings were found to be unstable when exposed to sodium. (auth)

Whitlow, G.A.; Miller, R.L.; Schrock, S.L.; Wu, P.C.S.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Sodium-Lithium Ratio In Water Applied To Geothermometry Of Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sodium-Lithium Ratio In Water Applied To Geothermometry Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation,...

411

Study of Trona (Sodium Sesquicarbonate) Reactivity with Sulfur Dioxide in a Simulated Flue Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dry injection of sodium-based sorbents has gained a lot of attention in the last few years. With Dry injection, it is possible to achieve almost… (more)

Srinivasn, Rangesh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Application of the technology neutral framework to sodium cooled fast reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are considered as a novel example to exercise the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF) proposed in NUREG- 1860. One reason for… (more)

Johnson, Brian C. (Brian Carl)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Excess consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and sodium in children and adolescents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with 100% juice or water intake Milk intake inverselyOnce water is included with dietary intake, the differenceswater based on heath risks of excessive sodium intake and

Banerjee, Victoria; Dankiewicz, Cheryl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Research in Korea: Part II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The activities of sodium sulfur (NaS) battery research in Korea ... The presentation was focused on the development of tubular NaS batteries ...

415

Evaluating the improvement of corrosion residual strength by adding 1.0 wt.% yttrium into an AZ91D magnesium alloy  

SciTech Connect

The influence of yttrium on the corrosion residual strength of an AZ91D magnesium alloy was investigated detailedly. Scanning electron microscope was employed to analyze the microstructure and the fractography of the studied alloys. The microstructure of AZ91D magnesium alloy is remarkably refined due to the addition of yttrium. The electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve of the studied alloy was performed with a CHI 660b electrochemical station in the three-electrode system. The result reveals that yttrium significantly promotes the overall corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy by suppressing the cathodic reaction in corrosion process. However, the nucleation and propagation of corrosion pits on the surface of the 1.0 wt.% Y modified AZ91D magnesium alloy indicate that pitting corrosion still emerges after the addition of yttrium. Furthermore, stress concentration caused by corrosion pits should be responsible for the drop of corrosion residual strength although the addition of yttrium remarkably weakens the effect of stress concentration at the tip of corrosion pits in loading process.

Wang Qiang [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, 130025 (China); Liu Yaohui, E-mail: liuyaohui2005@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, 130025 (China); Fang Shijie [Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Song Yulai; Zhang Dawei; Zhang Lina; Li Chunfang [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, 130025 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL USING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS CONTAINING POTASSIUM FLUORIDE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deinventory and deactivation of the Savannah River Site's (SRS's) FB-Line facility required the disposition of approximately 2000 items from the facility's vaults. Plutonium (Pu) scraps and residues which do not meet criteria for conversion to a mixed oxide fuel will be dissolved and the solution stored for subsequent disposition. Some of the items scheduled for dissolution are composite materials containing Pu and tantalum (Ta) metals. The preferred approach for handling this material is to dissolve the Pu metal, rinse the Ta metal with water to remove residual acid, and burn the Ta metal. The use of a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) was initially recommended for the dissolution of approximately 500 g of Pu metal. However, prior to the use of the flowsheet in the SRS facility, a new processing plan was proposed in which the feed to the dissolver could contain up to 1250 g of Pu metal. To evaluate the use of a larger batch size and subsequent issues associated with the precipitation of plutonium-containing solids from the dissolving solution, scaled experiments were performed using Pu metal and samples of the composite material. In the initial experiment, incomplete dissolution of a Pu metal sample demonstrated that a 1250 g batch size was not feasible in the HB-Line dissolver. Approximately 45% of the Pu was solubilized in 4 h. The remaining Pu metal was converted to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Based on this work, the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal using a 4-6 h cycle time was recommended for the HB-Line facility. Three dissolution experiments were subsequently performed using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material to demonstrate conditions which reduced the risk of precipitating a double fluoride salt containing Pu and K from the dissolving solution. In these experiments, the KF concentration was reduced from 0.2 M to either 0.15 or 0.175 M. With the use of 4 M HNO{sub 3} and a reduction in the KF concentration to 0.175 M, the dissolution of 300 g of Pu metal is expected to be essentially complete in 6 h. The dissolution of larger batch sizes would result in the formation of PuO{sub 2} solids. Incomplete dissolution of the PuO{sub 2} formed from the metal is not a solubility limitation, but can be attributed to a combination of reduced acidity and complexation of fluoride which slows the dissolution kinetics and effectively limits the mass of Pu dissolved.

Rudisill, T.; Crowder, M.; Bronikowski, M.

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c~-?i-- c~-?i-- I ,3-l Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) .Complex and the Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana ,Fie!d Laboratory, Chatsworth, California ..:'..~::Yerlette Gatl in, MA-232 I am attaching for entry into the Public Document Room, one copy of the N -23 subject documentat ion. These documents are the backup data for the certification that the facilfties are radiologically acceptable for b- unrestricted use as noted in the certification statement published in the &aney Federal Register. Inasmuch as the certification for unrestricted use is 9/2(/85 being published in the Federal Register, it is prudent that the attached documentation also be available to the public. These documents should be retained In accordance with DOE Order 1324.2--disposal schedule 25.

418

Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

THE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR POWER PLANT FOR CPPD  

SciTech Connect

The plant arrangement, component design, and the functions of various systems are described and illustrated. Relative estimated costs of the systems and major components are indicated. The reactor core is designed around requiremouts for 254 thermal megawatts, 950 deg F maximum sodium temperature, stainless steel clad graphite moderator blocks, and low enrichment (0.015 to 0.04 U/sup 235/) uranium fuel elements. The fuel cycle is described for the possible fuel elements. The fuel cost factors are discussed. Burn-up limitations encountered for metallic fuel in the SGR temperature range indicate UO/sub 2/ the more desirable choice. The estimated cost of electrical energy associated with the UO/sub 2/ fuel is given. (auth)

Olson, R.L.; Gerber, R.C.; Gordon, R.B.; Ross-Clunis, H.A.; Stolz, J.F.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Sodium sulfur battery design for the ETX-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chloride Silent Power Limited (CSPL) has developed a number of laboratory and field test batteries in support of its sodium sulfur development program. The most demanding of these test batteries is being developed for the Ford ETX-II electric vehicle, under a three year contract from the US Department of Energy. A major milestone of this program is to build and test an Intermediate Deliverable (ID) battery which is a fully representative section of the final battery. This will allow the performance predictions to be evaluated using an operational battery before the final battery is built and delivered. The performance predictions for the battery have been made and are described in this paper. The Intermediate Deliverable Battery, representing one third of the full battery both electrically and thermally, has now been built and preliminary test results are available.

Mangan, M.F.; Leadbetter, A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

THE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR: TOMMORROW'S POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the Advanced Sodium Graphite Reactor Power Plant, including the reactor, heat transfer systems, generatirg plant, control systems, and the economics of producing 256 Mw(e). The safety of this design is due to its unusually low operating pressure, absence of chemically incompatible materials in the core, and excellent stability under atatic and dynamic conditions. The reactor is being constructed at Hallam, Nebraska, at a probable cost of 0 to 0/kw, exclusive of the first core costs. The 151 fuel elements of uranium carbide are enriched to 2.75 at.% U/sup 235/ and clad in stainless steel. The average thermal neutron flux in the fuel is 8 x 10/sup 13/ n/cm/sup 2/sec. (B.O.G.)

Beeley, R.J.; Lowell, E.G.; Polak, H.; Renard, J.

1960-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

424

Diffusion bonding resistant valve development for sodium service  

SciTech Connect

Unanticipated functional failures occurred in valves undergoing containment integrity testing for liquid sodium service. The failures resulted from diffusion bonding of the Stellite 6B valve plug to the Type 316 stainless steel (SS) seat. As a result of these failures, a valve development program was undertaken. A modified valve incorporating a Tribaloy 800 plug showed significant improvement in resistance to diffusion bonding but still failed after long term exposure in a closed position. A second modified valve using Tribaloy 800 in both the valve plug and seat successfully resisted diffusion bonding failure. This paper reports the details of the testing and posttest valve examinations. The results of scanning electron microscopy, dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and metallography provide the characteristics of the valve failures. Limitations of the various valve designs are also discussed.

Crandall, D.L.; Low, J.O.; Chung, D.T.; Loop, R.B.

1984-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Quantitative measurement of atomic sodium in the plume of a single burning coal particle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of volatile sodium during coal combustion is a significant factor in the fouling and corrosion of heat transfer surfaces within industrial coal-fired boilers. A method for measuring the temporal release of atomic sodium from a single coal particle is described. Laser absorption was used to calibrate laser-induced fluorescence measurements of atomic sodium utilising the sodium D1 line (589.59 nm) in a purpose-designed flat flame environment. The calibration was then applied to planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of sodium atoms in the plume from a single Victorian brown coal particle (53 mg) suspended within the flat flame. The peak concentration of atomic sodium was approximately 64.1 ppb after 1080.5 s, which appears to correspond to the end of char combustion. To our knowledge this is the first in situ quantitative measurement of the concentration field of atomic sodium in the plume above a burning particle. A simple kinetic model has been used to estimate the rate of sodium decay in the post-flame gases. Comparison of the estimated and measured decay rates showed reasonable agreement. (author)

van Eyk, P.J.; Ashman, P.J.; Alwahabi, Z.T. [Cooperative Research Centre for Clean Power from Lignite, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Sodium Chloride Hideout In a Simulated Steam Generator Tube and Tube Support Place Crevice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized corrosion of steam generator (SG) tubing in PWRs has been a serious problem that limits the life of this component. Preliminary measurements of sodium chloride hideout in simulated PWR SG crevices have shown that hideout rate increases with heat flux and concentration of sodium chloride in the bulk water.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Sodium Heat Engine Development Program. Phase 1, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.

Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Jaross, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Gregar, J.S.; Poeppel, R.B.; Raptis, A.C.; Valentin, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 1970 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4 % of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W; Stone, E; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

Research on Active Power Factor Correction of the Electronic Ballast for High-Pressure Sodium Lamps Based on L6563  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recent years, there has been a growing interest in the design of high-pressure sodium lamp electronic ballast. Two measures are proposed to improve the power factor of high-pressure sodium lamp electronic ballasts from the definition of harmonic ... Keywords: high-pressure sodium lamps, electronic ballast, active power factor correction, L6563

Sun Jing

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

TRUEX partitioning from radioactive ICPP sodium bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in Southeast Idaho is currently evaluating several treatment technologies applicable to waste streams generated over several decades of-nuclear fuel reprocessing. Liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), generated primarily during decontamination activities, is one of the waste streams of interest. The TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed at Argonne National Laboratory is currently being evaluated to separate the actinides from SBW. On a mass basis, the amount of the radioactive species in SBW are low relative to inert matrix components. Thus, the advantage of separations is a dramatic decrease in resulting volumes of high activity waste (HAW) which must be dispositioned. Numerous studies conducted at the ICPP indicate the applicability of the TRUEX process has been demonstrated; however, these studies relied on a simulated SBW surrogate for the real waste. Consequently, a series of batch contacts were performed on samples of radioactive ICPP SBW taken from tank WM-185 to verify that actual waste would behave similarly to the simulated waste. The test results with SBW from tank WM-185 indicate the TRUEX solvent effectively extracts the actinides from the samples of actual waste. Gross alpha radioactivity, attributed predominantly to Pu and Am, was reduced from 3.14E+04 dps/mL to 1.46 dps/mL in three successive batch contacts with fresh TRUEX solvent. This reduction corresponds to a decontamination factor of DF = 20,000 or 99.995% removal of the gross a activity in the feed. The TRUEX solvent also extracted the matrix components Zr, Fe, and Hg to an appreciable extent (D{sub Zr} > 10, D{sub Fe} {approx} 2, D{sub Hg} {approx}6). Iron co-extracted with the actinides can be successfully scrubbed from the organic with 0.2 M HNO{sub 3}. Mercury can be selectively partitioned from the actinides with either sodium carbonate or nitric acid ({ge} 5 M HNO{sub 3}) solutions.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the shipping regulations that govern the shipment of dangerous goods. Since the elemental sodium contained in both sodium-sulfur and sodium-metal-chloride batteries is classified as a dangerous good, and is listed on both the national and international hazardous materials listings, both national and international regulatory processes are considered in this report The interrelationships as well as the differences between the two processes are highlighted. It is important to note that the transport regulatory processes examined in this report are reviewed within the context of assessing the necessary steps needed to provide for the domestic and international transport of sodium-beta batteries. The need for such an assessment was determined by the Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) of the EV Battery Readiness Working Group (Working Group), created in 1990. The Working Group was created to examine the regulatory issues pertaining to in-vehicle safety, shipping, and recycling of sodium-sulfur batteries, each of which is addressed by a sub-working group. The mission of the SSWG is to establish basic provisions that will ensure the safe and efficient transport of sodium-beta batteries. To support that end, a proposal to the UN Committee of Experts was prepared by the SSWG, with the goal of obtaining a proper shipping name and UN number for sodium-beta batteries and to establish the basic transport requirements for such batteries (see the appendix for the proposal as submitted). It is emphasized that because batteries are large articles containing elemental sodium and, in some cases, sulfur, there is no existing UN entry under which they can be classified and for which modal transport requirements, such as the use of packaging appropriate for such large articles, are provided for. It is for this reason that a specific UN entry for sodium-beta batteries is considered essential.

Hammel, C.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

THE MAGNESIUM ISOTOPOLOGUES OF MgH IN THE A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using laboratory hollow cathode spectra we have identified lines of the less common magnesium isotopologues of MgH, {sup 25}MgH and {sup 26}MgH, in the A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} system. Based on the previous analysis of {sup 24}MgH, molecular lines have been measured and molecular constants derived for {sup 25}MgH and {sup 26}MgH. Term values and linelists, in both wavenumber and wavelength units, are presented. The A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} system of MgH is important for measuring the magnesium isotope ratios in stars. Examples of analysis using the new linelists to derive the Mg isotope ratio in a metal poor dwarf and giant are shown.

Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Wallace, Lloyd [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Ram, Ram S.; Bernath, Peter F. [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Sneden, Christopher [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Lucatello, Sara, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu, E-mail: wallace@noao.edu, E-mail: rr662@york.ac.uk, E-mail: pbernath@odu.edu, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report  

SciTech Connect

Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Office’s (NE-ID) and State of Idaho’s top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

High-temperature sodium nickel chloride battery for electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the sodium-nickel chloride cell couple has a high voltage (2.59 V) and a high specific energy (790 Wh/kg), the performance of present incarnations of this battery tend to be limited by their power. Because the nickel chloride electrode dominates the resistance and weight of the cell, research on this cell couple at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been primarily directed toward improving both the specific power and energy of the NiCl{sub 2} electrodes. During the course of these investigations a major breakthrough was achieved in lowering the impedance and increasing the usable capacity through the use of chemical additives and a tailored electrode morphology. This improved Ni/NiCl{sub 2} electrode has excellent performance characteristics, wide-temperature operation and fast recharge capability. Modeling studies done on this electrode indicate that a fully developed Na/NiCl{sub 2} battery based on ANL-single tube and bipolar designs would surpass the mid-term and approach the long-term goals of the US Advanced Battery Consortium.

Prakash, J.; Redey, L.; Nelson, P.A.; Vissers, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Electrotechnical Technology Program

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 °C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 °C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 °C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design ‘fixes’, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

Douglas L. Porter

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reflectance-based assessment of spider mite "bio-response" to maize leaves and plant potassium content in different irrigation regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely accepted that pest infestations elicit a change in plant physiology, which cause detectable changes in crop leaf reflectance. In this study, we test the hypothesis that crop leaf reflectance may also be used to forecast the risk of pest ... Keywords: Crop attractiveness, Hyperspectral imaging, Integrated pest management, Leaf potassium content, Remote sensing, Tetranychidae

C. Nansen, A. J. Sidumo, X. Martini, K. Stefanova, J.Dale Roberts

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

New Precision Mass Measurements of Neutron-Rich Calcium and Potassium Isotopes and Three-Nucleon Forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present precision Penning trap mass measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes in the vicinity of neutron number N=32. Using the TITAN system, the mass of 51K was measured for the first time, and the precision of the 51,52Ca mass values were improved significantly. The new mass values show a dramatic increase of the binding energy compared to those reported in the atomic mass evaluation. In particular, 52Ca is more bound by 1.74 MeV, and the behavior with neutron number deviates substantially from the tabulated values. An increased binding was predicted recently based on calculations that include three-nucleon (3N) forces. We present a comparison to improved calculations, which agree remarkably with the evolution of masses with neutron number, making neutron-rich calcium isotopes an exciting region to probe 3N forces.

Gallant, A. T. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Bale, J. C. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia/Simon Fraser University-Canada; Brunner, T. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Chowdhury, U. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia/ University of Manitoba-Canada; Ettenauer, S. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Lennarz, A. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia/Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität-Germany; Robertson, D. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Simon, V. V. [TRIUMF-Canada/Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg/Max-Planck-Inst.-Heidelberg, Germany; Chaudhuri, A. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Holt, J. D. [UTK/ORNL; Kwiatkowski, A. A. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Mané, E. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Menéndez, J. [Inst. für Kernphysik, Tech. Univ. Darmstadt-Germany/ExtreMe Matter Inst., GSI-Darmstadt; Schultz, B. E. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Simon, M. C. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Andreoiu, C. [Simon Fraser University, Canada; Delheij, P. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Pearson, M. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Savajols, H. [GANIL, Caen cedex, France; Schwenk, A. [Inst. für Kernphysik, Tech. Univ. Darmstadt-Germany/ExtreMe Matter Inst., GSI-Darmstadt; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway, Frank R. McLarnon, and Elton J. Cairns* Energy and Environment Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA ABSTRACT Sodium/°-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cells utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, 0.332, and 1.17 at temperatures from 350 to 500°C were studied by measurement of the equilibrium cell voltages at open circuit, and the steady-state cell voltages at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. States of charge, represented by sodium atom fraction in the P-S electrode, ranged from 0 to 0.4. Open-circuit voltages up to 2.65 V were measured. Theoretical specific energies up to 825 Wh/kg were cal-

442

Process for sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment of hexavalent chromium and other heavy metals  

SciTech Connect

433 of 9384 ) United States Patent 5,000,859 Suciu ,   et al. March 19, 1991 Process for sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment of hexavalent chromium and other heavy metals

Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wikoff, Penny M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Beller, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carpenter, Charles J. (Lynn Haven, FL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Applying risk informed methodologies to improve the economics of sodium-cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to support the increasing demand for clean sustainable electricity production and for nuclear waste management, the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is being developed. The main drawback has been its high capital ...

Nitta, Christopher C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

Levin, Alan Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Metal corrosion in a supercritical carbon dioxide - liquid sodium power cycle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A liquid sodium cooled fast reactor coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle is a promising combination for the next generation nuclear power production process. For optimum efficiency, a microchannel heat exchanger, constructed by diffusion bonding, can be used for heat transfer from the liquid sodium reactor coolant to the supercritical carbon dioxide. In this work, we have reviewed the literature on corrosion of metals in liquid sodium and carbon dioxide. The main conclusions are (1) pure, dry CO{sub 2} is virtually inert but can be highly corrosive in the presence of even ppm concentrations of water, (2) carburization and decarburization are very significant mechanism for corrosion in liquid sodium especially at high temperature and the mechanism is not well understood, and (3) very little information could be located on corrosion of diffusion bonded metals. Significantly more research is needed in all of these areas.

Moore, Robert Charles; Conboy, Thomas M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Ultracold molecules from ultracold atoms : interactions in sodium and lithium gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis presents results from experiments in which ultracold Sodium-6 and Lithium-23 atomic gases were studied near a Feshbach resonance at high magnetic fields. The enhanced interactions between atoms in the presence ...

Christensen, Caleb A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

An Evaluation of the Annular Fuel and Bottle-Shaped Fuel Concepts for Sodium Fast Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two innovative fuel concepts, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel and the bottle-shaped fuel, were investigated with the goal of increasing the power density and reduce the pressure drop in the sodium-cooled ...

Memmott, Matthew

448

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of innovative fuel configurations for the sodium fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sodium fast reactor (SFR) is currently being reconsidered as an instrument for actinide management throughout the world, thanks in part to international programs such as the Generation-IV and especially the Global ...

Memmott, Matthew J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Tools for supercritical carbon dioxide cycle analysis and the cycle's applicability to sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) and the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-C0?) Recompression cycle are two technologies that have the potential to impact the power generation landscape of the future. In order for their ...

Ludington, Alexander R. (Alexander Rockwell)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Materials Issues in High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers for Under-Sodium Viewing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970's, and, over the intervening 30+ years the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased array 2 MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Harris, Robert V.; Baldwin, David L.

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Bio-active sodium substituted zirconium was coated by sol-gel method ... Templates Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Improving the Resistance of Ceramic Surfaces to Biofilm Formation.

452

Solar test of an integrated sodium reflux heat pipe receiver/reactor for thermochemical energy transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A chemical reactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane was integrated into a sodium reflux heat pipe receiver and tested in the solar furnace of the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. The receiver/reactor was a heat pipe with seven tubes inside an evacuated metal box containing sodium. The catalyst, 0.5 wt% Rh on alumina, filled two of the tubes with the front surface of the box serving as the solar absorber. In operation, concentrated sunlight heated the front plate and vaporized sodium from a wire mesh wick attached to other side. Sodium vapor condensed on the reactor tubes, releasing latent heat and returning to the wick by gravity. The receiver system performed satisfactorily in many tests under varying flow conditions. The maximum power absorbed was 7.5 kW at temperatures above 800C. The feasibility of operating a heat pipe receiver/reactor under solar conditions was proven, and the advantages of reflux devices confirmed.

Diver, R.B.; Fish, J.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Levitan, R.; Levy, M.; Meirovitch, E.; Rosin, H. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)); Paripatyadar, S.A.; Richardson, J.T. (Univ. of Houston, TX (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Application of the Technology Neutral Framework to Sodium-­Cooled Fast Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are considered as a novel example to exercise the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF) proposed in NUREG-1860. One reason for considering SFRs is that they have historically had a licensing ...

Johnson, Brian C.

454

Application of the technology neutral framework to sodium cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are considered as a novel example to exercise the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF) proposed in NUREG- 1860. One reason for considering SFRs is that they have historically had a licensing ...

Johnson, Brian C. (Brian Carl)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Oxygen-hydrogen meter assembly for use in remote sodium sampling systems  

SciTech Connect

An assembly of an electrolytic oxygen meter and a diffusion type hydrogen meter was designed to fit into the Multipurpose Sampler hardware already installed and operating on the four FFTF sodium systems. One of the key elements in this assembly is a ceramic-metal sealed oxygen sensor which allows use of a metal tube to extend the 51 cm (20 in.) between the sampler top and the flowing sodium region.

Barton, G.B.; Bohringer, A.P.; Yount, J.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

457

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Novel Low-Cost Sodium-Zinc Chloride Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) battery has been considered as one of the most attractive energy storage systems for stationary and transportation applications. Even though Na-NiCl2 battery has been widely investigated, there is still a need to develop a more economical system to make this technology more attractive for commercialization. In the present work, a novel low-cost Na-ZnCl2 battery with a thin planar ??-Al2O3 solid electrolyte (BASE) was proposed, and its electrochemical reactions and battery performance were investigated. Compared to the Na-NiCl2 chemistry, the ZnCl2-based chemistry was more complicated, in which multiple electrochemical reactions including liquid-phase formation occurred at temperatures above 253°C. During the first stage of charge, NaCl reacted with Zn to form Na in the anode and Na2ZnCl4 in the cathode. Once all the residual NaCl was consumed, further charging led to the formation of a NaCl-ZnCl2 liquid phase. At the end of charge, the liquid phase reacted with Zn to produce solid ZnCl2. To identify the effects of liquid-phase formation on electrochemical performance, button cells were assembled and tested at 280°C and 240°C. At 280°C where the liquid phase formed during cycling, cells revealed quite stable cyclability. On the other hand, more rapid increase in polarization was observed at 240°C where only solid-state electrochemical reactions occurred. SEM analysis indicated that the stable performance at 280°C was due to the suppressed growth of Zn and NaCl particles, which were generated from the liquid phase during discharge of each cycle.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

460

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "magnesium potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs – loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphénix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANL’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Solar-thermal Water Splitting Using the Sodium Manganese Oxide Process & Preliminary H2A Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are three primary reactions in the sodium manganese oxide high temperature water splitting cycle. In the first reaction, Mn2O3 is decomposed to MnO at 1,500°C and 50 psig. This reaction occurs in a high temperature solar reactor and has a heat of reaction of 173,212 J/mol. Hydrogen is produced in the next step of this cycle. This step occurs at 700°C and 1 atm in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Finally, water is added in the hydrolysis step, which removes NaOH and regenerates the original reactant, Mn2O3. The high temperature solar�driven step for decomposing Mn2O3 to MnO can be carried out to high conversion without major complication in an inert environment. The second step to produce H2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide is also straightforward and can be completed. The third step, the low temperature step to recover the sodium hydroxide is the most difficult. The amount of energy required to essentially distill water to recover sodium hydroxide is prohibitive and too costly. Methods must be found for lower cost recovery. This report provides information on the use of ZnO as an additive to improve the recovery of sodium hydroxide.

Todd M. Francis, Paul R. Lichty, Christopher Perkins, Melinda Tucker, Peter B. Kreider, Hans H. Funke, Allan Lewandowski, and Alan W. Weimer

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

464

Characterization of High Strain Rate Mechanical behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy using 3D Digital Image Correlation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of the material mechanical behavior at sub-Hopkinson regime (0.1 to 1000 s{sup -1}) is very challenging due to instrumentation limitations and the complexity of data analysis involved in dynamic loading. In this study, AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet specimens are tested using a custom designed servo-hydraulic machine in tension at nominal strain rates up to 1000 s{sup -1}. In order to resolve strain measurement artifacts, the specimen displacement is measured using 3D Digital Image correlation instead from actuator motion. The total strain is measured up to {approx} 30%, which is far beyond the measurable range of electric resistance strain gages. Stresses are calculated based on the elastic strains in the tab of a standard dog-bone shaped specimen. Using this technique, the stresses measured for strain rates of 100 s{sup -1} and lower show little or no noise comparing to load cell signals. When the strain rates are higher than 250 s{sup -1}, the noises and oscillations in the stress measurements are significantly decreased from {approx} 250 to 50 MPa. Overall, it is found that there are no significant differences in the elongation, although the material exhibits slight work hardening when the strain rate is increased from 1 to 100 s{sup -1}.

Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Xu, Hanbing [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Starbuck, J Michael [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermodynamics of the conversion of calcium and magnesium fluorides to the parent metal oxides and hydrogen fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have used thermodynamic modeling to examine the reaction of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) with water (H{sub 2}O) at elevated temperatures. The calculated, equilibrium composition corresponds to the global free-energy minimum for the system. Optimum, predicted reaction temperatures and reactant mole ratios are reported for the recovery of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a valuable industrial feedstock. Complete conversion of MgF{sub 2} is found at 1,000 C and a ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of MgF{sub 2}. For CaF{sub 2}, temperatures as high as 1,400 C are required for complete conversion at a corresponding mole ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of CaF{sub 2}. The authors discuss the presence of minor chemical constituents as well as the stability of various potential container materials for the pyrohydrolysis reactions at elevated temperatures. CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} slags are available as wastes at former uranium production facilities within the Department of Energy Complex and other facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Recovery of HF from these wastes is an example of environmental remediation at such facilities.

West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center - BOOK: Magnesium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... Presents papers related to primary production and market; recycling and environmental issues; alloy development; phase transformations; ...

467

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Lithium/magnesium, lithium/sodium, and to a lesser extent, potassium/magnesium ratios in calcium carbonate tufa columns provide a fingerprint for distinguishing tufa columns formed from thermal spring waters versus those formed from non-thermal spring waters. These ratios form the basis of the Mg/Li, Na/Li, and K/Mg fluid geothermometers commonly used in geothermal exploration, which are based on the fact that at elevated temperatures, due to mineral-fluid equilibria, lithium