National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for magna cum laude

  1. Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology November 30, 2007 - 4:45pm Addthis DOE Celebrates One-Year ...

  2. NREL Scientists Lauded as Industry Pioneers - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Lauded as Industry Pioneers October 26, 2010 At the recent World Renewable Energy Congress/Network (WREN) in Abu Dhabi, three researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) were named WREN Pioneers. Dr. Falah Hasoon, Dr. Chuck Kutscher and Dr. David Renné were recognized for the impact their discoveries and innovations have made to the progress and acceptance of renewable energy technologies. Dr. Falah Hasoon is a senior scientist

  3. Norman Augustine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Norman R. Augustine was raised in Colorado and attended Princeton University where he graduated with a BSE in Aeronautical Engineering, magna cum laude, and an MSE. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa...

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Exploration Activity...

  5. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Exploration...

  6. Magnetotellurics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnetotellurics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Glass...

  7. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, ...

  8. Magna E-Car Opening | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Magna E-Car Opening Magna E-Car Opening April 27, 2012 - 4:40pm Addthis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager Patrick B. Davis gets ready to cut the ribbon at Magna E-Car's new electric drive component plant in Michigan. From left: Mike Finney - CEO, Michigan Economic Development Corporation; Gary Meyers - VP/General Manager, Magna E-Car USA, LP; Pat Davis; Kevin Pavlov - Chief Operating Officer, Magna E-Car Systems; Marilyn Hoffman, Township Supervisor, Grand Blanc Township, Michigan; Joseph

  9. 2012 Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Members 2012 Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Members 2012 Advisory Board Members Norman Augustine Photo of Norman Augustine Former Chairman and CEO, Lockheed Martin, Former Under Secretary for the Army Norman R. Augustine was raised in Colorado and attended Princeton University where he graduated with a BSE in Aeronautical Engineering, magna cum laude, and an MSE. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi. More about Norman Augustine

  10. Microsoft Word - Scott-CV2013Sept.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2013 David E. Scott Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, S.C. 29802 Phone: 803-725-5747 E-mail: scott@srel.edu Fax: 803-725-3309 Education: 1979-1983 MS (Environmental Sciences) University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. 1973-1977 BS (Biology), Phi Beta Kappa, Magna cum laude Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Employment: * 1984-present Research assistant in the herpetology program at SREL. Research responsibilities include the design and

  11. North America Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Norman Augustine About Us Norman Augustine - Former Chairman and CEO, Lockheed Martin, Former Under Secretary for the Army Photo of Norman Augustine Norman R. Augustine was raised in Colorado and attended Princeton University where he graduated with a BSE in Aeronautical Engineering, magna cum laude, and an MSE. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi. In 1958 he joined the Douglas Aircraft Company in California where he worked as a Research Engineer, Program Manager and Chief

  12. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon arravt027apepeaslee2012p.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Electric Drive Component...

  13. Tavis-Cummings model and collective multiqubit entanglement in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Retzker, A.; Solano, E.; Reznik, B.

    2007-02-15

    We present a method of generating collective multiqubit entanglement via global addressing of an ion chain performing blue and red Tavis-Cummings interactions, where several qubits are coupled to a collective motional mode. We show that a wide family of Dicke states and irradiant states can be generated by single global laser pulses, unitarily or helped with suitable postselection techniques.

  14. Vacuum-induced Berry phases in single-mode Jaynes-Cummings models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yu; Wei, L. F.; Jia, W. Z. [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Liang, J. Q. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Motivated by work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 220404 (2002)] for detecting the vacuum-induced Berry phases with two-mode Jaynes-Cummings models (JCMs), we show here that, for a parameter-dependent single-mode JCM, certain atom-field states also acquired photon-number-dependent Berry phases after the parameter slowly changed and eventually returned to its initial value. This geometric effect related to the field quantization still exists, even if the field is kept in its vacuum state. Specifically, a feasible Ramsey interference experiment with a cavity quantum electrodynamics system is designed to detect the vacuum-induced Berry phase.

  15. Dr. Martin Keller Named Director of National Renewable Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    his doctorate in Microbiology (Summa Cum Laude) from the University of Regensburg in Germany. He was appointed a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of...

  16. Maisah Khan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    She graduated summa cum laude from Arizona State University with a B.S. in Conservation Biology and Ecological Sustainability. Most Recent DOE Joins Pakistan's Energy Ministries to ...

  17. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Inc. | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt027_ape_peaslee_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

  18. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Inc. | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt027_ape_thomas_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Battery and Electric Drive Manufacturing Distribution Map - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding

  19. Exact mapping of the 2+1 Dirac oscillator onto the Jaynes-Cummings model: Ion-trap experimental proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Solano, E.

    2007-10-15

    We study the dynamics of the 2+1 Dirac oscillator exactly and find spin oscillations due to a Zitterbewegung of purely relativistic origin. We find an exact mapping of this quantum-relativistic system onto a Jaynes-Cummings model, describing the interaction of a two-level atom with a quantized single-mode field. This equivalence allows us to map a series of quantum optical phenomena onto the relativistic oscillator and vice versa. We make a realistic experimental proposal, in reach with current technology, for studying the equivalence of both models using a single trapped ion.

  20. President Obama Lauds Virginia Energy Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Barack Obama visited OPOWER, an Arlington, Va., energy company to praise the work going on there. “The work you do here, as we just heard, is making homes more energy efficient, it’s saving people money, it’s generating jobs and it’s putting America on the path to a clean energy future,” Obama said.

  1. NREL: Energy Sciences - William Tumas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Chemistry, summa cum laude, from Ithaca College in 1980. He received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Stanford University in 1985 as an NSF Graduate Fellow and a Hertz...

  2. Microsoft Word - The Oppenheimer Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oppenheimer Years 1943-1945 At 5:29:45 am MWT on July 16, 1945, the world's first atomic ... He graduated summa cum laude three years later. Oppenheimer wanted to attend graduate ...

  3. NREL Employees Lauded by Industry Peers - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advancement and electrochemistry. NREL was also named an Outstanding Large Company by IEEE. Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Recognizes Five NREL Employees The...

  4. President Obama lauds DOE energy efficiency program | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Welcomes 2013 Fermi Award Winners to the White House President Obama Welcomes 2013 Fermi Award Winners to the White House February 3, 2014 - 6:24pm Addthis Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz presents the 2013 Enrico Fermi Awards to Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler in a ceremony at the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., on February 3, 2014. Fae Jencks Confidential Assistant, White House Office of Science & Technology Policy Editor's note: This article

  5. DOE Lauds Successful U.S.-U.K. Collaborative Effort

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has announced numerous accomplishments coming out of a multi-year collaboration in the area of advanced materials research between the United States and the United Kingdom.

  6. Biomass and Solar Technologies Lauded - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The award is shared by NREL, Genencor International and Novozymes Biotech, Inc. NREL researchers who worked on this project included Michael Himmel, Jim McMillan, Dan Schell, Jody ...

  7. Synchrotron X-ray 2D and 3D Elemental Imaging of CdSe/ZnS Quantum dot Nanoparticles in Daphnia Magna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, B.; Pace, H; Lanzirotti, A; Smith, R; Ranville, J

    2009-01-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles to aquatic organisms is of interest given that increased commercialization will inevitably lead to some instances of inadvertent environmental exposures. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs) capped with zinc sulfide are used in the semiconductor industry and in cellular imaging. Their small size (<10 nm) suggests that they may be readily assimilated by exposed organisms. We exposed Daphnia magna to both red and green QDs and used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to study the distribution of Zn and Se in the organism over a time period of 36 h. The QDs appeared to be confined to the gut, and there was no evidence of further assimilation into the organism. Zinc and Se fluorescence signals were highly correlated, suggesting that the QDs had not dissolved to any extent. There was no apparent difference between red or green QDs, i.e., there was no effect of QD size. 3D tomography confirmed that the QDs were exclusively in the gut area of the organism. It is possible that the QDs aggregated and were therefore too large to cross the gut wall.

  8. Effects of charge and surface ligand properties of nanoparticles on oxidative stress and gene expression within the gut of Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, Gustavo A.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Torelli, Marco; Murphy, Catherine; Hamers, Robert J.; Orr, Galya; Klaper, Rebecca D.

    2015-05-01

    Concern has been raised regarding the current and future release of engineered nanomaterials into aquatic environments from industry and other sources. However, not all nanomaterials may cause an environ-mental impact and identifying which nanomaterials may be of greatest concern has been difficult. It is thought that the surface groups of a functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) may play a significant role in determining their interactions with aquatic organisms, but the way in which surface properties of NPs impact their toxicity in whole organisms has been minimally explored. A major point of interaction of NPs with aquatic organisms is in the gastrointestinal tract as they ingest particulates from the water column or from the sediment. The main goal of this study was to use model gold NP (AuNPs) to evaluate the potential effects of the different surfaces groups on NPs on the gut of an aquatic model organism, Daphnia magna. In this study, we exposed daphnids to a range of AuNPs concentrations and assessed the impact of AuNP exposure in the daphnid gut by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and expression of genes associated with oxidative stress and general cellular stress: glutathione S-transferase(gst), catalase (cat), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and metallothionein1 (mt1). We found ROS formation and gene expression were impacted by both charge and the specific surface ligand used. We detected some degree of ROS production in all NP exposures, but positively charged AuNPs induced a greater ROS response. Similarly, we observed that, compared to controls, both positively charged AuNPs and only one negatively AuNP impacted expression of genes associated with cellular stress. Finally, ligand-AuNP exposures showed a different toxicity and gene expression profile than the ligand alone, indicating a NP specific effect.

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Cohen Cohen Staff Scientist, Biological Nanostructures becohen@lbl.gov 510.486.6640 personal website Biography Dr. Cohen was a postdoctoral fellow with Lily Y. Jan at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Physiology at the University of California San Francisco. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Chemistry at the University of California Berkeley and his A.B. from Princeton University's Department of Chemistry, where he graduated cum laude. Research Interests

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shaul Aloni Svec Staff Engineer, Inorganic Nanostructures/Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures saloni@lbl.gov 510.486.7452 Biography Education 2001 Weizmann Institute of Science, Rechovot, Israel Ph.D. in Chemical Physics, Awarded Finberg prize for outstanding graduate research 1995 Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel M. Sc. in Materials Science and Engineering, Summa Cum Laude 1992 Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel B. Sc. in Materials Science and

  11. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels … Bio-Oil Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Report-Out Webinar February 9, 2012 David Dayton, Ph.D. RTI International Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Dr. David C. Dayton Director, Chemistry and Biofuels Center for Energy Technology RTI International 2007 - present RTI International 1993 - 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1991-1993 U.S. Army Research Laboratory * Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 2000 * B.S., Biochemistry, cum laude, Washington

  12. CMA lauds long-awaited Schaefer bill, but passage is unlikely

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, P.

    1996-07-24

    Representative Dan Schaefer (R., CO) has introduced a bill mandating competition in the retail electricity supply market by the end of 2000--a move that CMA estimates could save the energy-intensive chemical industry $600 million/year. Schaefer, who is chairman of the House Commerce Committee`s Energy and Power subcommittee, proposes that states implement competition; many are already implementing competition in retail markets (CW, March 13, p. 42). The bill would also repeal two federal laws regulating power companies--the Public Utilities Regulatory Policy and Holding Company Acts--and require that all generators of electricity employ renewable energy sources for at least 2% of their output.

  13. Katja Langen"2, Arlene J. Lennox2,3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Katie Clarkin About Us Katie Clarkin - Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Energy Katie Clarkin Katie Clarkin has served at the U.S. Department of Energy since August 2014, first as a Special Assistant in the Office of Scheduling Advance and shortly thereafter, as a Special Assistant and Scheduler. She is currently the Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Energy. Katie attended Kent State University, where she graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa with B.A. degrees in

  14. Katie Clarkin | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Katie Clarkin About Us Katie Clarkin - Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Energy Katie Clarkin Katie Clarkin has served at the U.S. Department of Energy since August 2014, first as a Special Assistant in the Office of Scheduling Advance and shortly thereafter, as a Special Assistant and Scheduler. She is currently the Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Energy. Katie attended Kent State University, where she graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa with B.A. degrees in

  15. Road to Fuel Savings: Ford, Magna Partnership Help Vehicles Shed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a subcompact car. | Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? ...

  16. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  17. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Calpine Corporation Mark Walters Melinda Wright Rosemary Antonopoulos Consultant John R. Haught Cumming Geoscience William Cumming Friends of Cobb Mt. Hamilton Hess GeothermEx, ...

  18. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute; William Cumming, Cumming Geoscience; Jerry Hamblin Subsurface Excellence; Stephen Hallinan, Western Geco; John Deymonaz Targets Milestones - Reduce the high level of...

  19. Alum Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cumming, Cumming Geoscience Partner 4 Jerry Hamblin, Subsurface Excellence Partner 5 Stephen Hallinan, Western Geco Partner 6 John Deymonaz Partner 7 GeothermEx, Inc. Funding...

  20. Pampa Apacheta

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (ENAP), Santiago, Chile Tom Powell, Thermochem Inc., Santa Rosa, CA William B. Cumming, Cumming Geoscience, Santa Rosa, CA Patrick Dobson, Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence ...

  1. SunShot Grand Challenge Highlights Ambitious Efforts along the Entire Solar Spectrum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today at the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit in Denver, Energy Secretary Steven Chu lauded progress in driving down the cost of solar.

  2. Report: President's Energy Efficiency Contracting for Federal Buildings a Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An industry report lauds the successes resulting from the President's challenge to federal agencies to enter into $2 billion worth of performance-based energy efficiency contracts.

  3. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Page 6 PARSII EV Data Validity (WBS Level) Report Note: This shows the far right portion of the report only. Negative SPA Values Inc SPA > Cum SPA BCWP > BAC andor BCWS > BAC Cum ...

  4. Photo: US ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strand * High Performance Magnetics, Tallahassee, FL; Toroidal Field conductor ... Petersburg * Tallahassee * Winter Springs Georgia Alpharetta * Atlanta * Cumming * Duluth ...

  5. Massachusetts Hydrogen Coalition | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrogen Coalition Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Massachusetts Hydrogen Coalition Name: Massachusetts Hydrogen Coalition Address: 100 Cummings Center Place: Beverly,...

  6. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TENNESSEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & INDUSTRY LAUDS OSTI by Kate Bannan on Thu, Jun 30, 2011 We ... Terms | Privacy RSS Feeds Blog Articles Blog Comments Page last updated on 2013-08-02 ...

  7. Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Magna E-Car Opening Magna E-Car Opening April 27, 2012 - 4:40pm Addthis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager Patrick B. Davis gets ready to cut the ribbon at Magna E-Car's new electric drive component plant in Michigan. From left: Mike Finney - CEO, Michigan Economic Development Corporation; Gary Meyers - VP/General Manager, Magna E-Car USA, LP; Pat Davis; Kevin Pavlov - Chief Operating Officer, Magna E-Car Systems; Marilyn Hoffman, Township Supervisor, Grand Blanc Township, Michigan; Joseph

  8. 09/14/2012 UEC Lunch Meeting Attended by: All 2012 UEC members...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UEC Lunch Meeting Attended by: All 2012 UEC members, Sean Smith, Peter Cummings, Tony ... Jeff Smith Deputy for Operations Internal Audit Gail Lewis, Director Information ...

  9. A Changing Market for Biofuels and Bioproducts

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Chance, Executive Vice President, Engineering, Algenol - Daniel Cummings, President, POET-DSM Advanced Biofuels - Jim Lane, Editor and Publisher, Biofuels Digest - Michael McAdams, ...

  10. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    X Cum CPI 3 Period Moving Average 06302013 07312013 08312013 09302013 1031... format * Advantage of this report is Excel Sort feature to view variances from ...

  11. UCRL-53768 Distribution Category UC-34 DISCLAIMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shocked to 60GPa Douglas Cummings Hamilton (Ph.D. Thesis) Manuscript date: October ... SHOCKED TO 80 GPa By Douglas Cunnings Hamilton DISSERTATION Submitted in partial ...

  12. "A State-Wide Research Network for Alzheimer'sDisease"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... food environment on residents's diets: The atherosclerosis risk in communities study. ... Cummings JL, et al. Practice parameter:Diagnosis of dementia (an evidence based review). ...

  13. Geothermometry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Geothermometry (Powell and Cumming, 2010) Any Spreadsheets for...

  14. Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Lin-Wang Wang Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Materials Sciences Peter Cummings Vanderbilt University Chemistry Burkhard Militzer UC Berkeley Chemistry Brian Austin...

  15. Preliminary Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research (NRL): Mike Simpson Theory, Modeling, Simulation (NTI): Peter Cummings 12:10 pm Buffet Lunch (selection of box lunches) Pollard Lobby 12.25 pm Bring your...

  16. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIRST Center Director, ORNL Ph: (865) 574-6903 Email: wesolowskid@ornl.gov Peter T. Cummings Thrust 1 Leader, Vanderbilt University Ph: (615) 322 8129 Email:...

  17. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanocrystals we have imaged the dynamics of individual SERT proteins using line scanning confocal microscopy. Host: Peter Cummings, (cummingspt@ornl.gov), 865.241.4779...

  18. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School-Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team: Project Mentors: TBD Project Description Project Team: Project Mentors: Ian Cummings Elizabeth Hilstrom Rielly Newton TBD Project Description Project Team: Project...

  19. Postdoctoral Society Members and Board | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society Members and Board PSA Officers Joshua Bergerson, ES (President) Marvin Cummings, XSD (Vice President) Rebecca Tissot, CSE (Secretary) Jessica Linville, ES (Liaison Officer)...

  20. Workshop Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Codes and Coupling of Length Scales February 9, 2010 | Author(s): Peter T. Cummings, Normand Modine and Randy Cygan | Defect Physics of Structural...

  1. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Archived CNMS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties, to be held June 24-29, 2012, in Boulder, CO, where Cummings will present the Touloukian award lecture during the opening plenary session of the conference....

  2. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6202014 FSI Models Peter Cummings (Vanderbilt) Larry Anovitz Ariel Chialvo Paul Fenter (ANL) Edward Hagaman Deen Jang Paul Kent Eugene Mamontov Gernot Rother Jianzhong Wu (UC...

  3. ZTEK Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cummings Park Place: Woburn, Massachusetts Zip: 01801 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Hydrogen Product: Development of solid oxide fuel cells Website: www.ztekcorp.com...

  4. Electrochem Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cummings Park Place: Woburn, Massachusetts Zip: 01801 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Hydrogen Product: Fuel cell hardware and testing equipment Website: fuelcell.com...

  5. Conservation Resource Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Conservation Resource Solutions Place: Cumming, Georgia Zip: 30040 Sector: Services Product: String representation "Conservation Re ......

  6. INEOS Bio: Commercialization of Advanced Biofuels From Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INEOS Bio: Commercialization of Advanced Biofuels From Waste INEOS Bio: Commercialization of Advanced Biofuels From Waste Update from INEOS Bio Dan Cummings, Vice President, INEOS ...

  7. Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Melosh, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    model of blue mountain. References Glenn Melosh, William Cumming, John Casteel, Kim Niggemann, Brian Fairbank (2010) Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for...

  8. Salt Lake County, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Creek Valley, Utah Magna, Utah Midvale, Utah Millcreek, Utah Mount Olympus, Utah Murray, Utah Riverton, Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Sandy, Utah South Jordan, Utah South Salt...

  9. There's More Than One Route to the Marketplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Christy M.

    2008-03-01

    PNNL software takes unconventional commercialization path with serial entrepreneur With thousands of researchers working in national laboratories across the country, innovations happen almost every day. Yet many of these innovations never see the light of day. Luckily, when it came to commercializing the much lauded Starlight™ software, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a solution almost as innovative as the technology itself.

  10. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY13 Fourth Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-12-02

    This quarterly report summarizes the status of the project planning to obtain all the approvals required for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). The final CRADA documents processed by PNNL’s Legal Services were submitted to all the parties for signatures.

  11. CNMS_UEC_19_Sep_2011_Smith.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peter Cummings, Laura Edwards, Tony Haynes, Sean Smith Meeting C onvened 1 2:15P CNMS Update Provided by Sean Smith (slides attached) Discussion P oints * It was noticed ...

  12. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lauer, Kenneth (2) Lu, Ming (2) Yan, Hui (2) Camino, Fernando (1) Chu, Yong S. (1) Clark, ... STM Yan, Hui ; Cummings, Marvin ; Camino, Fernando ; Xu, Weihe ; Lu, Ming ; Tong, ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... limited to TLSs within (thin) Josephson tunneling ... s was observed in a film of silicon nitride as analyzed with a Jaynes-Cummings spectral model, which is larger than ...

  14. World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cistern with a small pipe down which water ran when released by a valve. But it took another 200 years before Alexander Cummings developed the S-shaped pipe underneath the basin ...

  15. Workshop Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Codes and Coupling of Length Scales February 9, 2010 | Author(s): Peter T. Cummings, Normand Modine and Randy Cygan | The Nature of the Mineral-Water Interface: A...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... for x-ray diffraction on a synchrotron source,closequoteclosequote by Colin Nave, Ana Gonzalez, Graham Clark, Sean McSweeney, Stewart Cummings, and Michael Hart, Rev. Sci. ...

  17. Promise for Onion-Like Carbons as Supercapacitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JiangCummingsCoverLarge.gif Some of the capacitance and geometry effects revealed by molecular dynamics simulations at NERSC appearing on the cover of the March 13, 2012 issue...

  18. Why Onion-Like Carbons Make High-Energy Supercapacitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 1, 2012 JiangCummingsCoverLarge.gif Capacitance and geometry effects revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. The OLC and the ionic liquid that were the basis of the...

  19. Chemistry & Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greenhouse gas carbon dioxide to small molecules such as formic acid, formaldehyde, and methanol. Read More JiangCummingsCoverLarge.gif Promise for Onion-Like Carbons as...

  20. Why Onion-Like Carbons Make High-Energy Supercapacitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Why Onion-Like Carbons Make High-Energy Supercapacitors Why Onion-Like Carbons Make High-Energy Supercapacitors Simulations explain experimental results for electrical storage devices June 1, 2012 JiangCummingsCoverLarge.gif Capacitance and geometry effects revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. The OLC and the ionic liquid that were the basis of the simulation are shown in the lower left. (Guang Feng, De-en Jiang, Peter T. Cummings, © ACS Publications) The two most important electrical

  1. Generation and purification of maximally entangled atomic states in optical cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lougovski, P.; Walther, H.; Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We present a probabilistic scheme for generating and purifying maximally entangled states of two atoms inside an optical cavity via no-photon detection at the cavity output, where ideal detectors are not required. The intermediate mixed states can be continuously purified so as to violate Bell inequalities in a parametrized manner. The scheme relies on an additional strong-driving field that realizes, atypically, simultaneous Jaynes-Cummings and anti-Jaynes-Cummings interactions.

  2. Federal Laboratory Consortium Highlights Three NREL Research Projects -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Federal Laboratory Consortium Highlights Three NREL Research Projects McDonough Lauded as Outstanding Laboratory Representative September 16, 2011 The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer's (FLC) Mid-Continent Region recently recognized the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its partners with three awards for excellence in technology transfer. It also named NREL Commercialization and Technology Transfer

  3. U.S. Department of Energy, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham, Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science Director Raymond Orbach Salute Raymond Davis, Jr., Recipient of 2002 Nobel Prize 8, 2002 Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham, Office of Science Director Raymond Orbach Salute Raymond Davis, Jr., Recipient of 2002 Nobel Prize WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham lauded Raymond Davis, Jr., a retired chemist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven Laboratory, for receiving the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences made the announcement

  4. NREL Expert Honored for Energy Systems Innovations - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expert Honored for Energy Systems Innovations Analyst named to editorial board; green data center and window air conditioning analysis also lauded January 6, 2014 Photo of Dr. Ben Kroposki Dr. Ben Kroposki, director of Energy Systems Integration at NREL. The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently won several prestigious awards, including honors for innovations in window air-conditioning efficiency, data sharing, and its energy-efficient computer data center. Ben

  5. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awards The Energy Systems Integration Facility continues to receive awards for design, planning, construction, and efficiency. Highlights of recent awards are provided below. Photo of the exterior of the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The one-of-a-kind Energy Systems Integration Facility has been lauded for its unique approach to sustainable design-which includes the most energy-efficient data center in the world. R&D Magazine 2014 Laboratory of the Year The Energy Systems Integration

  6. Stantec Receives Engineering Industry's Highest Honor for DOE/NREL's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Support Facility - News Releases | NREL Stantec Receives Engineering Industry's Highest Honor for DOE/NREL's Research Support Facility American Council of Engineering Companies lauds designers for setting national example for sustainability on commercial properties April 4, 2011 Stantec's engineering design and sustainability consulting for one of the country's largest highly efficient buildings-the Research Support Facility (RSF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's

  7. Los Alamos physicist Hockaday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration names four to Laboratory Fellows list Wednesday, December 11, 2013 - 4:39pm Four scientists have been inducted into the Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellows, a distinguished organization that honors outstanding contributions to science and technology. Today, Laboratory Director Charles McMillan appoints new Fellows Mark Chadwick, Cheryl Kuske, Geoff Reeves and Frank Pabian. The fellows are lauded for their sustained, high-level achievements and exceptional promise.

  8. Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Hurdles Into the Future |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A team of vehicles experts was present during the crash test for Ford and Magna's Multimaterial Lightweight Vehicle. A team of vehicles experts was present during the crash test ...

  9. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY13 Third Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-08-06

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to obtain all the approvals required for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). The CRADA documents have been processed by PNNL Legal Services that is also coordinating the revision effort with the industrial parties to address DOEs comments.

  10. APPENDIX G - DATA MANAGEMENT INITIATIVES G-1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A CULINARY LOCAL 226 Wage and Fringe Benefit Supplement NSTec 9/30/2015 Classification (Alphabetical) Job Code Current Hourly Wage Rates Current Hourly Wage Rates Current Hourly Wage Rates 10/1/2013 (Allocation $0.20 wages, 0.35 HW) 10/1/2014 (Allocation $0.51 wages, 0.02 HW, 0.02 pension) 10/1/2015 (Allocation +$0.43 wages, +0.02 HW, +0.10 pension) $0.15 $0.200 $0.510 $0.43 $0.55 $0.55 $0.55 CU-M Assistant Storekeeper 030413 19.100 19.610 $20.04 CU-M Baker 030405 20.150 20.660 $21.09 CU-M

  11. "The Voyager Mission to the Outer Planets and Interstellar Space", Dr. Alan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C. Cummings, California Institute of Technology | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab October 17, 2012, 4:15pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium "The Voyager Mission to the Outer Planets and Interstellar Space", Dr. Alan C. Cummings, California Institute of Technology Presentation: Office presentation icon WC17OCT2012_ACCummings.ppt Thirty-five years after their launches in 1977, the twin Voyager spacecraft have completed the Grand Tour of the outer planets and are now exploring the outer regions

  12. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-04-04

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to initiate all the legal and contract documents required for establishing the subcontracts needed and a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). During the first quarter (10/1/2012 to 12/31/2012), the statements of work (SOW) for the subcontracts to Purdue University, University of Illinois, and PlastiComp, Inc. were completed. A draft of the CRADA SOW was sent to Autodesk, Toyota, and Magna for technical and legal reviews. PNNL Legal Services contacted project partners Legal counterparts for preparing legal documents for the project. A non-disclosure agreement was drafted and sent to all the parties for reviews.

  13. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-05-30

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to complete all the legal and contract documents required for establishing the subcontracts needed and a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). During the second quarter (1/1/2013 to 3/31/2013), all the technical and legal documents for the subcontracts to Purdue University, University of Illinois, and PlastiComp, Inc. were completed. The revised CRADA documents were sent to DOE, Autodesk, Toyota, and Magna for technical and legal reviews. PNNL Legal Services contacted project partners Legal counterparts for completing legal documents for the project. A non-disclosure agreement was revised and sent to all the parties for reviews.

  14. DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop - Opening Remarks & Agenda |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy National Laboratory Research Projects Win 31 R&D Awards for 2007 DOE National Laboratory Research Projects Win 31 R&D Awards for 2007 October 19, 2007 - 3:21pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Under Secretary for Science Raymond L. Orbach today lauded researchers from ten of the Department of Energy's world-class national laboratories that last night were awarded 31 of the world's top 100 scientific and technological innovations in 2007,

  15. DOE National Laboratory Research Projects Win 31 R&D Awards for 2007 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy National Laboratory Research Projects Win 31 R&D Awards for 2007 DOE National Laboratory Research Projects Win 31 R&D Awards for 2007 October 19, 2007 - 3:21pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Under Secretary for Science Raymond L. Orbach today lauded researchers from ten of the Department of Energy's world-class national laboratories that last night were awarded 31 of the world's top 100 scientific and technological innovations in 2007,

  16. Predictive engineering tools for injection-molded long-carbon-fiber thermoplastic composites - FY 2015 third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Mori, Steven; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Wang, Jin; Costa, Franco; Wollan, Eric J.; Tucker, III, Charles L.

    2015-07-01

    During the third quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Magna oversaw the tool build and prepared the molding plan for the complex part of Phase II. 2) PlastiComp hosted a visit by Magna and Toyota on April 23rd to finalize the molding scope and schedule. The plan for molding trials including selection of molding parameters for both LFT and D-LFT for the U-shape complex part was established. 3) Toyota shipped the U-shape complex part tool to Magna on May 28th, 2015. 4) Plasticomp provided 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 compounded pellets to Magna for molding the complex part. 5) Magna performed preliminary molding trials on June 2nd, 2015 to validate wall thickness, fill profile, tool temperature and shot size requirements for the complex part. 6) Magna performed the first complex part run on June 16th and 17th, 2015 at Magnas Composite Centre of Excellence in Concord, ON, Canada. Dale Roland of Plasticomp, and Umesh Gandhi of Toyota also attended the molding. 7) Magna discussed and finalized the plan with PNNL and the team for cutting samples from molded parts at selected locations for fiber orientation and length measurements. 8) Magna provided the computer-aided design (CAD) files of the complex parts with and without ribs to PNNL and Autodesk to build the corresponding ASMI models for injection molding simulations. Magna also provided the actual parameters used. 9) Plasticomps provided knowledge and experience of molding LCF materials essential to the successful molding of the parts including optimization of fill speed, tool temperatures, and plasticizing conditions for the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 materials in both rib and non-rib versions. 10) Magna molded additional parts for evaluation of mechanical property testing including torsional stiffness on June 29th and 30th, 2015 at Magnas Composite Center of Excellence. 11) Toyota began preparation for the torsion test of the specimens. Preparation of a computer-aided engineering (CAE) model to predict the performance is in progress. 12) Autodesk fixed an error in the implementation of the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) calculation of fiber length that had caused the ASMI solution to crash and provided an updated build of ASMI containing the fix. 13)Autodesk reviewed and provided feedback for the complex part molding and measurement locations. 14) Autodesk provided support to set up the workflow for ASMI-ABAQUS analysis, and provided a fix and workaround for a bug in the ASMI-ABAQUS output command. 15) Autodesk helped build ASMI analysis models for the complex parts with and without ribs. 16) Autodesk worked on improving the orientation prediction accuracy in the shearing layer for 3D meshes based on comparison to measured data of the plaque moldings. 17) PNNL installed a new ASMI version received from Autodesk and performed comparative analyses to assess mid-plane versus 3D fiber length predictions using the full fiber length model and the reduced-order model (ROM) using POD. 18) PNNL presented the project scope, accomplishments, significant results and future plans to DOE and the USCAR Materials Tech Team on June 3rd, 2015. 19) PNNL discussed the cutting of samples from molded parts and finalized a plan with Magna and the team suggesting the sample size, locations and number of samples per location. 20) PNNL and Autodesk built ASMI models for the complex parts with and without ribs, and preliminary analyses of the part with ribs were conducted using the actual molding parameters received from Magna. 21) PNNL worked on a procedure to extract fiber orientation and length results from a 3D ASMI analysis to a 3D ABAQUS model. This procedure is essential to import ASMI fiber orientation and length to a 3D ABAQUS model of the part allowing future part structural analysis for weight reduction study.

  17. CX-005077: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Magna E-Car Electric Drive System Components ManufacturingCX(s) Applied: A1, B1.24, B1.31Date: 01/26/2011Location(s): Grand Blanc, MichiganOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Densmore, J.D.; Park, H.; Wollaber, A.B.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; Knoll, D.A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm.

  19. Microsoft Word - 10-13-11 Final Testimony _Klara_.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Daniel Poneman Deputy Secretary U.S. Department of Energy Before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives August 1, 2013 Thank you, Chairman Issa, Ranking Member Cummings, and members of the Committee. I am here today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the allegations of prohibited personnel practices at BPA detailed in the recent Management Alert issued by DOE's Office of the Inspector General (IG). 1 DOE

  20. FY11 RL Priority List 6-12-09 Public Briefing 7-2009.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 PBS ABB FY11 FY11 PBS Cum FY11 Cumulative FY11 Impact Narrative RL-0020 Safeguards and Security $77,412 $77,412 $77,412 Funding supports site's ability to maintain protection of special nuclear materials and maintain site wide security. Specific security program impacts include Hanford site access controls, emergency response, and physical security at K Basins and the CSB. Other security programs that would be impacted include, but are not limited to: Material Control and Accountability,

  1. PPPL--2702 Power Radiated from ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    702 " Power Radiated from ITER and CIT by Impurities D E ~ O 014715 J. Cummings, S. A. Cohen, R Hulse, D. E. Post, M. H. Redi and J. Perkinst Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton University, Rinceton, NJ 08543 Abstract The MIST code has been used to model impurity radiation from the edge and core plasmas in ITER and CIT. A broad range of parameters have been varied, including Zeff, impurity species, impurity transport coefficients, and plasma temperature and density profiles,

  2. No Job Name

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dielectrophoretic Concentration and Separation of Live and Dead Bacteria in an Array of Insulators Blanca H. Lapizco-Encinas, † Blake A. Simmons, ‡ Eric B. Cummings, † and Yolanda Fintschenko* ,† Microfluidics Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969, MS 9951, Livermore, California 94551, and Materials Chemistry Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969, MS 9403, Livermore, California 94551 Insulator-based (electrodeless) dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is an

  3. Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Rheology of Confined and Bulk Alkane Liquids

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Classical Molecular Dynamics Codes and Coupling of Length Scales Peter T. Cummings 1,2 , Normand Modine 3 and Randy Cygan 4 1 Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vanderbilt U. 2 Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, ORNL 3 Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, SNL 4 Geochemistry Department, SNL BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Executive Meeting Center February 9-10, 2010 Tuesday, February 9, 2010 Classical Molecular Dynamics  A reminder...  For N atoms,

  4. A Freely Available Matlab Script for Automatic Spatial Drift Correction.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: A Freely Available Matlab Script for Automatic Spatial Drift Correction. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Freely Available Matlab Script for Automatic Spatial Drift Correction. Abstract not provided. Authors: Sugar, Joshua Daniel ; Robinson, David ; Cummings, Aron W. ; Jacobs, Benjamin W. Publication Date: 2013-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1121097 Report Number(s): SAND2013-10105J 483912 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000

  5. Effective quantum dynamics of interacting systems with inhomogeneous coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Christ, H.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of a single mode (particle) interacting inhomogeneously with a large number of particles and introduce an effective approach to find the accessible Hilbert space, where the dynamics takes place. Two relevant examples are given: the inhomogeneous Tavis-Cummings model (e.g., N atomic qubits coupled to a single cavity mode, or to a motional mode in trapped ions) and the inhomogeneous coupling of an electron spin to N nuclear spins in a quantum dot.

  6. Secretary Chu's Written Testimony before the House Committee on Oversight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Government Reform | Department of Energy Written Testimony before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Secretary Chu's Written Testimony before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform March 19, 2012 - 4:44pm Addthis Chairman Issa, Ranking Member Cummings, and Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss the Department of Energy's work through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to strengthen the U.S. economy and promote a

  7. BanuelosSANS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAXS and MD-derived mean RTIL density as a function of pore filling fraction. (b) MD-obtained RTIL density profiles inside micro/mesopores. FIRST Center Research Perspective: Structural and Dynamic Properties of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Confined within Hierarchical Porous Materials José Leobardo Bañuelos, Pasquale F. Fulvio, Gernot Rother, Sheng Dai, David J. Wesolowski Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Guang Feng, Song Li, Peter Cummings Vanderbilt University Research Summary: The

  8. Tf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MD model of a carbon surface in the ionic Emim + Tf 2 N - combined with experimental force spectroscopy data at a bias of 1 V. FIRST Center Research Perspective: Structure and Dynamics of Electrical Double Layer Using Integrated Scanning Probe Microscopy and Molecular Simulations Jennifer M. Black, Thomas Arruda, Pasquale F. Fulvio, Patrick C. Hillesheim, Sheng Dai, Sergei V. Kalinin, Nina Balke Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Guang Feng, Peter T. Cummings Vanderbilt University Min Heon,

  9. ChialvoCMDWater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figure 1. Schematic of the manipulation of the graphene surface wettability via strain engineering.[3] FIRST Center Research Perspective: Effects of Nano-Confinement on the Fluid Interfacial Structure, Dynamics and Thermodynamic behavior Ariel A. Chialvo Oak Ridge National Laboratory Peter T. Cummings Vanderbilt University Matthew C. F. Wander, Kevin L. Shuford Drexel University Research Summary: Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of graphene interactions with water and aqueous

  10. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  11. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  12. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  13. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  14. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  15. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  16. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  17. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  18. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  19. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  20. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  1. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  2. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  3. Sample News Story Four | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sample News Story Four Aliquam erat volutpat. Sed lacinia turpis sit amet risus sollicitudin ac commodo mi vestibulum. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nam consectetur magna eget orci venenatis porttitor. Pellentesque euismod interdum tempor. Donec varius, nibh nec convallis accumsan, elit ligula venenatis felis, sed semper libero lacus id augue. Phasellus eros ipsum, facilisis at tempor vel, aliquam eget dui. Sed ac lorem eget lectus adipiscing fringilla quis ut tellus. Maecenas faucibus, nibh

  4. Assessment of chronic toxicity from stormwater runoff in Lincoln Creek, Milwaukee, WI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleist, J.; Crunkilton, R.

    1995-12-31

    Stormwater runoff is believed to be responsible for a severely degraded biotic community in Lincoln Creek, a stream which drains portions of metropolitan Milwaukee. A previous study using Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas indicated little or no acute toxicity could be attributed to stormwater runoff. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for chronic toxicity in the stream during periods of stormwater runoff. Reproduction and survival in Daphnia magna, and growth and survival in P. promelas were monitored to assess chronic effects. Seven consecutive 14 day tests were performed between June and September, 1994, in eighteen flow-through aquaria housed within a US Geological Survey gauging station located adjacent to Lincoln Creek. Mortality in D. magna consistently did not occur before day 4 of exposure, but averaged 64% at day 14. Reproduction in D. magna and growth in P. promelas in surviving individuals was not significantly reduced; all effects were manifested as mortality. Results of data analysis after 14 days of exposure contrast markedly with analysis made earlier in the same test. Statistical interpretation of the mortality data at typical endpoints of 48 hours for invertebrates and 96 hours for fish failed to identify adverse impacts of stormwater runoff the authors observed in longer exposures. Short-term toxicity tests appear insensitive to the detection of contaminant related effects. Long-term tests (greater than 7 days) were needed to identify adverse biological impacts that could in part explain the severely degraded biotic community of this urban stream.

  5. 2012 CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review - Participant List

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Participants Affliation 1 Alison Silverstein Guest 2 Anjan Bose CERTS, DOE 3 Bharat Bhargava CERTS 4 Bob Cummings Guest, NERC 5 Brett Amidan CERTS 6 Carl Imhoff CERTS 7 Carlos Martinez CERTS 8 Dan Sobajic Guest, Consultant 9 Dan Trudnowski Non-CERTS performer, Montana Tech 10 Daniel Kheloussi Guest, Energetics 11 Donald Davies Guest, WECC 12 Eddy Lim Guest, FERC 13 Gil Bindewald Guest, DOE 14 Gil Tam CERTS 15 Henry Huang CERTS 16 Isabelle Snyder CERTS 17 Jay Caspany Guest, DOE 18 Jeff Dagle

  6. Evolution of entanglement under echo dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosen, Tomaz; Znidaric, Marko [Physics Department, FMF, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Seligman, Thomas H. [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, University of Mexico (UNAM), Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2003-04-01

    Echo dynamics and fidelity are often used to discuss stability in quantum-information processing and quantum chaos. Yet fidelity yields no information about entanglement, the characteristic property of quantum mechanics. We study the evolution of entanglement in echo dynamics. We find qualitatively different behavior between integrable and chaotic systems on one hand and between random and coherent initial states for integrable systems on the other. For the latter the evolution of entanglement is given by a classical time scale. Analytic results are illustrated numerically in a Jaynes-Cummings model.

  7. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search DOepatents Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records 5 results for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Fintschenko, Yolanda" × All Patents Filters × Filter Search Results Patents (5 results) Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Patents 5 Filter Results Filter by Author Cummings, Eric B. (5) Fintschenko, Yolanda (5) Simmons, Blake A. (4) Hill, Vincent R. (2)

  8. In-depth survey report: control technology for falling solids at Cincinnati Paint and Varnish, Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heitbrink, W.A.

    1988-04-01

    A visit was made to the Cincinnati Paint and Varnish Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, to determine the effectiveness of control measures used to contain dust generated during the manufacturing of custom coatings. Dust arose when 50 pound bags of different powdered materials, titanium dioxide, talc, and crystalline silica, were emptied into 600-gallon mixing tanks by a worker. The worker slit the bags with a knife, lifted the bag, poured the contents into the mixer, and returned the empty bags to the floor. Exterior surfaces of the bags were dusty; handling them released some dust into the atmosphere. A slot hood was used to capture dust generated during the operation. Air velocity toward th slot hood along the lip of the tank where the bags were emptied ranged from 50 to 100 feet per minute. The total dust concentrations determined for crystalline silica during this operation averaged 3.0mg/cum. During a revisit to the site this worker's exposure was below 0.15mg/cum for a time-weighted average of less than 0.004 mg/m/sup 3/. The difference in liquid level in the tank at the time each powdered ingredient was added may have significantly affected the amount of dust released. Measurements of the actual process indicated that the silica had to fall almost 1 meter before reaching any liquid in the mixing tank whereas the talc had to fall only 25 centimeters.

  9. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed {sup 252}Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the U.S. government and to universities for educational, research, and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of {sup 252}Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments, and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations.

  10. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Beamline 1.4.3 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:08 FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized

  11. Microsoft Word - reu_presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REU PRESENTATIONS, 2010 Thursday, August 5, 2010 1) 9:15 - 9:35 am Ruslan Idelfonso Magna Vsevolodovna Virial Expansion of The Nuclear Equation of State 2) 9:40 - 10:00 am Jennifer Erchinger Investigating The Fragmentation of Excited Nuclear Systems 3) 10:05 - 10:25 am Victor Siller Precise Measurement of α k For The 65.7 keV M4 Transition From 119m Sn: A Test of Internal Conversion Theory 10:30 - 10:45 am BREAK 4) 10:45 - 11:05 am Kenneth . A. Whitmore Production and Separation of Exotic Beams

  12. On the Inclusion of Energy-Shifting Demand Response in Production Cost Models: Methodology and a Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, Niamh; Hale, Elaine; Doebber, Ian; Jorgenson, Jennie

    2015-07-20

    In the context of future power system requirements for additional flexibility, demand response (DR) is an attractive potential resource. Its proponents widely laud its prospective benefits, which include enabling higher penetrations of variable renewable generation at lower cost than alternative storage technologies, and improving economic efficiency. In practice, DR from the commercial and residential sectors is largely an emerging, not a mature, resource, and its actual costs and benefits need to be studied to determine promising combinations of physical DR resource, enabling controls and communications, power system characteristics, regulatory environments, market structures, and business models. The work described in this report focuses on the enablement of such analysis from the production cost modeling perspective. In particular, we contribute a bottom-up methodology for modeling load-shifting DR in production cost models. The resulting model is sufficiently detailed to reflect the physical characteristics and constraints of the underlying flexible load, and includes the possibility of capturing diurnal and seasonal variations in the resource. Nonetheless, the model is of low complexity and thus suitable for inclusion in conventional unit commitment and market clearing algorithms. The ability to simulate DR as an operational resource on a power system over a year facilitates an assessment of its time-varying value to the power system.

  13. Acute toxicity and aqueous solubility of some condensed thiophenes and their microbial metabolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, D.T.; Hrudey, S.E.; Fedorak, P.M.; Verbeek, A.G.

    1997-04-01

    Petroleum or creosote contamination of surface waters, soils, or groundwaters introduces countless aromatic compounds to these environments. Among these are condensed thiophenes that were shown to be oxidized to sulfoxides, sulfones, and 2,3-diones by microbial cultures. In this study, the acute toxicities of 12 compounds (benzothiophene, benzothiophene sulfone, benzothiophene-2,3-diones, dibenzothiophene, dibenzothiophene sulfoxide, and dibenzothiophene sulfone) were determined by the Microtox{reg_sign} and Daphnia magna bioassays. To aid in determining the toxicities, the solubilities of many of these compounds were determined, which showed that the oxidized compounds were much more water soluble than the parent thiophenes. In nearly every case, the oxidized compounds were less toxic than their parent thiophenes. The Microtox method was more sensitive than the D. magna bioassay, but in general, there was a good correlation between toxicities measured by the two tests. Samples were removed from batch cultures of a Pseudomonas strain capable of oxidizing the thiophenes, and these samples were subjected to Microtox bioassays. These experiments showed that the toxicities of the culture supernatants decreased with incubation time.

  14. Kinetics of complex plasma with liquid droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-12-15

    This paper provides a theoretical basis for the reduction of electron density by spray of water (or other liquids) in hot plasma. This phenomenon has been observed in a hypersonic flight experiment for relief of radio black out, caused by high ionization in the plasma sheath of a hypersonic vehicle, re-entering the atmosphere. The analysis incorporates a rather little known phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of ions from the surface and includes the charge balance on the droplets and number cum energy balance of electrons, ions, and neutral molecules; the energy balance of the evaporating droplets has also been taken into account. The analysis has been applied to a realistic situation and the transient variations of the charge and radius of water droplets, and other plasma parameters have been obtained and discussed. The analysis through made in the context of water droplets is applicable to all liquids.

  15. Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES): Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, Julian C.

    2013-02-19

    The Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) project was a multi-institutional research effort funded jointly by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR) and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) within the Department of Energy?¢????s Office of Science. The effort was led by our Principal Investigator, CS Chang, at the Courant Institute for Mathematical Sciences at New York University. The Center included participants from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Columbia University, Lehigh University, Rutgers University, University of Colorado, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Davis, University of California at Irvine, North Carolina State University, and Georgia Institute of Technology. This report concerns the work performed by Dr. Julian C. Cummings, who was the institutional Principal Investigator for the CPES project at Caltech.

  16. H O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O I - * , TWl rrporl «lf pnpmd u u iccouni of work fponiortd by fbc Unfad Suirs Gomuncnl. KtHka U» Unllii s u m nor Ih. Vaiui SHIM Atomic EnotT Comminjon, oar cur or tncir cnptoynf. nor Mr of ihtk caatrutott, ubcoRtmuirB, or tlwk cmptorra. milMsuir w n a f r . «prM§orimp&cd.of iMnmauy _ { l i . UBl Ibbililr or raponiiMlitr ror Ui. n e o n , , cum- *** pUUuu or tmfol«B or W larornutloa. ippiniia. proaoct or procac rfiKlowd. or rtprucnu Out iu use would not fafrinf* pririirly owned

  17. Acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, B.; Haws, R.; Little, D.; Reese, D.; Peterson, C.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    This study develops data on the acute aquatic toxicity of selected biodiesel fuels which may become subject to environmental effects test regulations under the US Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The test substances are Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Methyl Soyate (MS), a biodiesel mixture of 20% REE and 80% Diesel, a biodiesel mixture of 50% REE and diesel, and a reference substance of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel. The test procedure follows the Daphnid Acute Toxicity Test outlined in 40 CFR {section} 797.1300 of the TSCA regulations. Daphnia Magna are exposed to the test substance in a flow-through system consisting of a mixing chamber, a proportional diluter, and duplicate test chambers. Novel system modifications are described that accommodate the testing of oil-based test substances with Daphnia. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an EC50, an effective concentration producing immobility in 50% of the test specimen.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Anaerococcus prevotii type strain (PC1T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaButti, Kurt; Pukall, Rudiger; Steenblock, Katja; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Barry, Kerrie; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerococcus prevotii (Foubert and Douglas 1948) Ezaki et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its arguable assignment to the provisionally arranged family Peptostreptococcaceae . A. prevotii is an obligate anaerobic coccus, usually arranged in clumps or tetrads. The strain, whose genome is described here, was originally isolated from human plasma; other strains of the species were also isolated from clinical specimen. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus. Next to Finegoldia magna, A. prevotii is only the second species from the family Peptostreptococcaceae for which a complete genome sequence is described. The 1,998,633 bp long genome (chromosome and one plasmid) with its 1852 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 First Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sangid, Michael D.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2014-02-19

    The CRADA between PNNL, Autodesk, Toyota and Magna has been effective since October 28th, 2013. The whole team including CRADA and subcontract partners kicked off the project technically on November 1st, 2013. This report describes work performed during the first quarter of FY 2014. The following technical progresses have been made toward project milestones: 1) The project kickoff meeting was organized at PlastiComp, Inc. in Winona on November 13th, 2013 involving all the project partners. During this meeting the research plan and Gantt chart were discussed and refined. The coordination of the research activities among the partners was also discussed to ensure that the deliverables and timeline will be met. 2) Autodesk delivered a research version of ASMI to PNNL for process modeling using this tool under the project. PNNL installed this research version on a PNNL computer and tested it. Currently, PNNL is using ASMI to prepare the models for PlastiComp plaques. 3) PlastiComp has compounded long carbon-fiber reinforced polypropylene and polyamide 6,6 compounds for rheological and thermal characterization tests by the Autodesk laboratories in Melbourne, Australia. 4) Initial mold flow analysis was carried out by PlastiComp to confirm that the 3D complex part selected by Toyota as a representative automotive part is moldable. 5) Toyota, Magna, PlastiComp and PNNL finalized the planning for molding the Toyota 3D complex part. 6) Purdue University worked with PNNL to update and specify the test matrix for characterization of fiber length/orientation. 7) Purdue University developed tools to automate the data collection and analysis of fiber length and orientation measurements. 8) Purdue University designed and specified equipment to replace the need for equipment using the technology established by the University of Leeds at General Motors.

  20. Evaluating charge noise acting on semiconductor quantum dots in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basset, J.; Stockklauser, A.; Jarausch, D.-D.; Frey, T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Wallraff, A.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.

    2014-08-11

    We evaluate the charge noise acting on a GaAs/GaAlAs based semiconductor double quantum dot dipole-coupled to the voltage oscillations of a superconducting transmission line resonator. The in-phase (I) and the quadrature (Q) components of the microwave tone transmitted through the resonator are sensitive to charging events in the surrounding environment of the double dot with an optimum sensitivity of 8.510{sup ?5}?e/?(Hz). A low frequency 1/f type noise spectrum combined with a white noise level of 6.610{sup ?6} e{sup 2}/Hz above 1?Hz is extracted, consistent with previous results obtained with quantum point contact charge detectors on similar heterostructures. The slope of the 1/f noise allows to extract a lower bound for the double-dot charge qubit dephasing rate which we compare to the one extracted from a Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian approach. The two rates are found to be similar emphasizing that charge noise is the main source of dephasing in our system.

  1. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S. M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cum are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74{+ or -}0.0w K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u=0.021{+ or -}0.002 and temperature 2.823{+ or -}0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential mu{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  2. Reduced Variance for Material Sources in Implicit Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-06-25

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC), a time-implicit method due to Fleck and Cummings, is used for simulating supernovae and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems where x-rays tightly and nonlinearly interact with hot material. The IMC algorithm represents absorption and emission within a timestep as an effective scatter. Similarly, the IMC time-implicitness splits off a portion of a material source directly into the radiation field. We have found that some of our variance reduction and particle management schemes will allow large variances in the presence of small, but important, material sources, as in the case of ICF hot electron preheat sources. We propose a modification of our implementation of the IMC method in the Jayenne IMC Project. Instead of battling the sampling issues associated with a small source, we bypass the IMC implicitness altogether and simply deterministically update the material state with the material source if the temperature of the spatial cell is below a user-specified cutoff. We describe the modified method and present results on a test problem that show the elimination of variance for small sources.

  3. Quantum measurements of atoms using cavity QED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dada, Adetunmise C.; Andersson, Erika [SUPA, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Jones, Martin L.; Kendon, Vivien M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Everitt, Mark S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Generalized quantum measurements are an important extension of projective or von Neumann measurements in that they can be used to describe any measurement that can be implemented on a quantum system. We describe how to realize two nonstandard quantum measurements using cavity QED. The first measurement optimally and unambiguously distinguishes between two nonorthogonal quantum states. The second example is a measurement that demonstrates superadditive quantum coding gain. The experimental tools used are single-atom unitary operations effected by Ramsey pulses and two-atom Tavis-Cummings interactions. We show how the superadditive quantum coding gain is affected by errors in the field-ionization detection of atoms and that even with rather high levels of experimental imperfections, a reasonable amount of superadditivity can still be seen. To date, these types of measurements have been realized only on photons. It would be of great interest to have realizations using other physical systems. This is for fundamental reasons but also since quantum coding gain in general increases with code word length, and a realization using atoms could be more easily scaled than existing realizations using photons.

  4. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2015 First Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Kijewski, Seth A.; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Tucker, III, Charles L.; Mathur, Raj N.; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven

    2015-01-29

    During the first quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Autodesk delivered a new research version of ASMI to PNNL. This version includes the improved 3D fiber orientation solver, and the reduced order model (ROM) for fiber length distribution using the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) implemented in the mid-plane, dual-domain and 3D solvers. 2) Autodesk coordinated a conference paper with PNNL reporting ASMI mid-plane fiber orientation predictions compared with the measured data for two PlastiComp plaques. This paper was accepted for presentation at the 2015 Society for Plastics Engineers (SPE) ANTEC conference. 3) The University of Illinois (Prof. Tucker) assisted team members from Purdue with fiber orientation measurement techniques, including interpretation of off-axis cross sections. 4) The University of Illinois assisted Autodesk team members with software implementation of the POD approach for fiber length modeling, and with fiber orientation modeling. 5) The University of Illinois co-authored in the SPE ANTEC paper, participated with the team in discussions of plaque data and model results, and participated in the definition of go/no-go experiments and data. 6) Purdue University (Purdue) conducted fiber orientation measurements for 3 PlastiComp plaques: fast-fill 30wt% LCF/PP center-gated, fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated and fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 center-gated plaques, and delivered the fiber orientation data for these plaques at the selected locations (named A, B, and C) to PNNL. However, the data for the fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated plaque exhibited unusual variations and could not be used for the model validation. Purdue will re-measure fiber orientation for this plaque. 7) Based on discussions with the University of Illinois Purdue explained the ambiguity in the measurements of the fiber orientation components. 8) PNNL discussed with team members to establish a go/no-go decision plan for the project and submitted the established plan to DOE. 9) PNNL performed ASMI mid-plane analyses for the fast-fill center-gated 30wt% LCF/PP and 50wt% LCF/PA66 plaques and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue at Locations A, B, and C on these plaques. 10) Based on discussions with the University of Illinois and Autodesk, PNNL proposed a procedure to adjust fiber orientation data for Location A of the center-gated plaques so that the data can be expressed and interpreted in the flow/cross-flow direction coordinate system. 11) PNNL tested the new ASMI version received from Autodesk, examined and discussed 3D fiber orientation predictions for PlastiComp plaques. 12) PlastiComp, Inc. (PlastiComp), Toyota Research Institute North America (Toyota) and Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corp. (Magna) participated in discussions with team members on the go/no-go plan and the issues related to fiber length measurements. Toyota continued the discussion with Magna on tool modification for molding the complex part in order to achieve the target fiber length in the part.

  5. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Second FY 2015 Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Kijewski, Seth A.; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Costa, Franco; Tucker, III, Charles L.; Mathur, Raj N.; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven

    2015-05-19

    During the second quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Autodesk reviewed 3D fiber orientation distribution (FOD) comparisons and provided support on improving accuracy. 2) Autodesk reviewed fiber length distribution (FLD) data comparisons and provided suggestions, assisted PNNL in FOD and FLD parameter settings optimization, and advised PNNL on appropriate through thickness thermal conductivity for improved frozen layer effect on FOD predictions. Autodesk also participated in project review meetings including preparations and discussions towards passing the go/no-go decision point. 3) Autodesk implemented an improved FOD inlet profile specification method through the part thickness for 3D meshes and provided an updated ASMI research version to PNNL. 4) The University of Illinois (Prof. C.L. Tucker) provided Autodesk with ideas to improve fiber orientation modeling 5) Purdue University re-measured fiber orientation for the fast-fill 50wt% LCF/PA66 edge-gated plaque, and delivered the fiber orientation data for this plaque at the selected locations (named A, B, and C, Figure 1) to PNNL. Purdue also re-measured fiber orientation for locations A on the fast-fill 30wt% LCF/PP and 50wt% LCF/PA66 center-gated plaques, which exhibited anomalous fiber orientation behavior. 6) Purdue University conducted fiber length measurements and delivered the length data to PNNL for the purge materials (slow-fill 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 purge materials) and PlastiComp plaques selected on the go/no-go list for fiber length model validation (i.e., slow-fill edge-gated 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 plaques, Locations A, B, and C). 7) PNNL developed a method to recover intact carbon fibers from LCF/PA66 materials. Isolated fibers were shipped to Purdue for length distribution analysis. 8) PNNL completed ASMI mid-plane analyses for all the PlastiComp plaques defined on the go/no-go list for fiber orientation (FO) model validation and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue at Locations A, B, and C on these plaques. The 15% accuracy criterion based on evaluation of tensile and bending stiffness was used to assess the accuracy in fiber orientation predictions. 9) PNNL completed ASMI mid-plane analyses for all the PlastiComp plaques defined on the go/no-go list for fiber length distribution (FLD) model validation and compared the predicted length distributions with the measured data provided by Purdue at Locations A, B, and C on these plaques. The 15% accuracy criterion based on evaluation of tensile and bending stiffness was used to assess the accuracy in fiber orientation predictions. 10) PNNL tested the new ASMI version received from Autodesk in March 2015, examined and discussed 3D fiber orientation predictions for PlastiComp plaques. 11) PlastiComp, Inc. (PlastiComp), Toyota Research Institute North America (Toyota) and Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corporation (Magna) participated in discussions with team members on the go/no-go plan. Toyota continued the discussion with Magna on tool modification for molding the complex part in order to achieve the target fiber length in the part.

  6. Modular Energy Storage System for Alternative Energy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Janice; Ervin, Frank

    2012-05-15

    An electrical vehicle environment was established to promote research and technology development in the area of high power energy management. The project incorporates a topology that permits parallel development of an alternative energy delivery system and an energy storage system. The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles plugin electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. In order to meet the project objectives, the Vehicle Energy Management System (VEMS) was defined and subsystem requirements were obtained. Afterwards, power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls were designed. Finally, these subsystems were built, tested individually, and integrated into an electric vehicle system to evaluate and optimize the subsystems performance. Phase 1 of the program established the fundamental test bed to support development of an electrical environment ideal for fuel cell application and the mitigation of many shortcomings of current fuel cell technology. Phase 2, continued development from Phase 1, focusing on implementing subsystem requirements, design and construction of the energy management subsystem, and the integration of this subsystem into the surrogate electric vehicle. Phase 2 also required the development of an Alternative Energy System (AES) capable of emulating electrical characteristics of fuel cells, battery, gen set, etc. Under the scope of the project, a boost converter that couples the alternate energy delivery system to the energy storage system was developed, constructed and tested. Modeling tools were utilized during the design process to optimize both component and system design. This model driven design process enabled an iterative process to track and evaluate the impact of design alternatives and the impact of changes. Refinement of models was accomplished through correlation studies to measured data obtained from functioning hardware. Specifically, correlation and characterization of the boost converter resulted in a model that was effectively used to determine overall VEMS performance. The successful development of the boost converter can be attributed to utilization of previously proven technologies and adapting to meet the VEMS requirements. This program provided significant improvement in development time of various generations of boost converters. The software strategies and testing results support the development of current energy management systems and directly contribute to the future of similar, commercial products at Magna E-Car Systems. Because of this development project, Magna E-Car Systems is able to offer automotive customers a boost converter system with reduced time to market and decreased product cost, thus transferring the cost and timing benefits to the end use consumer.

  7. Process Development for Stamping Á-Pillar Covers with Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Rohatgi, Aashish; Smith, Mark T.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2015-02-20

    In this work, performed in close collaboration with PACCAR and Magna International, a 6XXX series aluminum alloy was used for the development of A-Pillar cover for the cab of a typical heavy-duty Class-8 truck. The use of Al alloy for the A-pillar cover represents an approximately 40% weight savings over its steel or molded fiberglass composite counterpart. For the selected Al alloy, a small amount of cold work (5% tensile strain), following prior hot-forming, was found to significantly improve the subsequent age-hardening response. The role of solutionizing temperature and rate of cooling on the age-hardening response after paint-bake treatment were investigated. For the temperature range selected in this work, higher solutionizing temperature correlated with greater subsequent age-hardening and vice-versa. However, the age-hardening response was insensitive to the mode of cooling (water quench vs. air cooling). Finally, a two-step forming process was developed where, in the first step, the blank was heated to solutionizing temperature, quenched, and then partially formed at room temperature. For the second step, the pre-form was re-heated and quenched as in the first step, and the forming was completed at room temperature. The resulting A-pillars had sufficient residual ductility to be compatible with hemming and riveting

  8. Evaluation of leaching and ecotoxicological properties of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Papadimitriou; I. Haritou; P. Samaras; A.I. Zouboulis

    2008-03-15

    The objectives of this work were the evaluation of sewage sludge stabilization by mixing with fly ash, the examination of the physicochemical properties of the produced materials and their leachates and the assessment of their environmental impact by the evaluation of the ecotoxic characteristics. Different ratios of fly ash and sewage sludge (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:6, and 1:9) were mixed for 48 and 72 h. After mixing, the liquid phase of the produced materials was analyzed for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, while the solid residue was dried and tested for the leaching characteristics by the application of TCLP and EN 12457-2 standard leaching methods. Furthermore, the produced leachates were analyzed for their content of specific metals, while their ecotoxicological characteristics were determined by the use of toxicity bioassays, using the marine photobacterium Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia magna. The phytotoxicity of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures was also determined by utilizing seeds of three higher plants (one monocotyl and two dicotyls). The mixtures exhibited low metal leaching in all cases, while the ecotoxic properties increased with the increase of fly ash/sewage sludge ratio. The phytotoxicity testing showed increased root length growth inhibition.

  9. Fire flood recovery process effects upon heavy oil properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichert, C.; Fuhr, B.; Sawatzky, H.; Lefleur, R.; Verkoczy, B.; Soveran, D.; Jha, K.

    1988-06-01

    The steady decline in proven conventional oil deposits world wide has increased the emphasis on the use of heavy oil and bitumen. Most of the heavy oil and oil sand deposits share the common problem of providing very little or no primary production. They require a reduction in viscosity of the oil to make it flow. The oil in place and the reservoir characteristics are generally studied carefully to determine the design of the recovery process most applicable to the deposit and to evaluate its potential. Many of these same characteristics are also used to evaluate the oil with respect to upgrading, refining and final usage in the form of products. A variety of processes have been developed most of which utilize heat either in the form of steam or combustion to mobolize the oil in the reservoir. These processes vary considerably from rather mild conditions for steam stimulation to quite severe for combustion recovery. Figure 1 shows a typical schematic of an insitu combustion process. Many variations of forward combustion are used in the field to produce oil. Depending upon the severity of the recovery process in the recovered oil may be similar to the oil in the deposit or may be highly modified (oxidized, polymerized or upgraded). A memorandum of Understanding was signed by the Governments of the United States of America, Canada and the Provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta to study different aspects of the problems related to the recovery of oil from heavy oil and sand deposits. One phase of the study is to determine the effects of different methods of in-situ recovery on the composition of recovered bitumen and heavy oils. This paper describes the findings from a study of fireflood process in a heavy oil deposit located in the Cummings formation of the Eyehill Field in Saskatchewan, Canada.

  10. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor Yuan T. Lee & Professor George Schatz. Professor Lees research has been based on the development & use of advanced chemical kinetics & molecular beams to investigate & manipulate the behavior of fundamental chemical reactions. Lees work has been recognized by many awards, including the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986, as well as Sloan Fellow, Dreyfus Scholar, Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Fellowship in the American Physical Society, Guggenheim Fellow, Member National Academy of Sciences, Member Academia Sinica, E.O. Lawrence Award, Miller Professor, Berkeley, Fairchild Distinguished Scholar, Harrison Howe Award, Peter Debye Award, & the National Medal of Science. Lee also has served as the President of the Academia Sinica in Taiwan (ROC). Professor Schatzs research group is interested in using theory & computation to describe physical phenomena in a broad range of applications relevant to chemistry, physics, biology & engineering. Among the types of applications that we interested are: optical properties of nanoparticles & nanoparticle assemblies; using theory to model polymer properties; DNA structure, thermodynamics & dynamics; modeling self assembly & nanopatterning; & gas phase reaction dynamics. Among his many awards & distinctions have been appointment as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, the Fresenius Award, Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Max Planck Research Award, Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, & election to the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences & the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Dr Schatz is also lauded for his highly successful work as Editor for the Journal of Physical Chemistry. We requested $10,000 from DOE in support of this meeting. The money was distributed widely among the student & post doctoral fellows & some used to attract the very best scientists in the field. The organizers were committed to encouraging women & minorities as well as encourage the field of Chemical Physics in scientific

  11. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 Third Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2014-08-15

    This report describes the technical progresses made during the third quarter of FY 2014: 1) Autodesk introduced the options for fiber inlet condition to the 3D solver. These options are already available in the mid-plane/dual domain solver. 2) Autodesk improved the accuracy of 3D fiber orientation calculation around the gate. 3) Autodesk received consultant services from Prof. C.L. Tucker at the University of Illinois on the implementation of the reduced order model for fiber length, and discussed with Prof. Tucker the methods to reduce memory usage. 4) PlastiComp delivered to PNNL center-gated and edge-fan-gated 20-wt% to 30-wt% LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 (7”x7”x1/8”) plaques molded by the in-line direct injection molding (D-LFT) process. 5) PlastiComp molded ASTM tensile, flexural and impact bars under the same D-LFT processing conditions used for plaques for Certification of Assessment and ascertaining the resultant mechanical properties. 6) Purdue developed a new polishing routine, utilizing the automated polishing machine, to reduce fiber damage during surface preparation. 7) Purdue used a marker-based watershed segmentation routine, in conjunction with a hysteresis thresholding technique, for fiber segmentation during fiber orientation measurement. 8) Purdue validated Purdue’s fiber orientation measurement method using the previous fiber orientation data obtained from the Leeds machine and manually measured data by the University of Illinois. 9) PNNL conducted ASMI mid-plane analyses for a 30wt% LCF/PP plaque and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue University at the selected locations on this plaque. 10) PNNL put together the DOE 2014 Annual Merit Review (AMR) presentation with the team and presented it at the AMR meetings on June 17, 2014. 11) PNNL built ASMI dual domain models for the Toyota complex part and commenced mold filling analyses of the complex part with different wall thicknesses in order to support part molding. 12) Toyota and Magna discussed with PNNL on tool modification for molding the complex part. Toyota sent the CAD files of the complex part to PNNL to build ASMI models of the part for mold filling analysis to provide guidance to tooling and part molding.

  12. Causes of Indoor Air Quality Problems in Schools: Summary of Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayer, C.W.

    2001-02-22

    In the modern urban setting, most individuals spend about 80% of their time indoors and are therefore exposed to the indoor environment to a much greater extent than to the outdoors (Lebowitz 1992). Concomitant with this increased habitation in urban buildings, there have been numerous reports of adverse health effects related to indoor air quality (IAQ) (sick buildings). Most of these buildings were built in the last two decades and were constructed to be energy-efficient. The quality of air in the indoor environment can be altered by a number of factors: release of volatile compounds from furnishings, floor and wall coverings, and other finishing materials or machinery; inadequate ventilation; poor temperature and humidity control; re-entrainment of outdoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and the contamination of the indoor environment by microbes (particularly fungi). Armstrong Laboratory (1992) found that the three most frequent causes of IAQ are (1) inadequate design and/or maintenance of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, (2) a shortage of fresh air, and (3) lack of humidity control. A similar study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH 1989) recognized inadequate ventilation as the most frequent source of IAQ problems in the work environment (52% of the time). Poor IAQ due to microbial contamination can be the result of the complex interactions of physical, chemical, and biological factors. Harmful fungal populations, once established in the HVAC system or occupied space of a modern building, may episodically produce or intensify what is known as sick building syndrome (SBS) (Cummings and Withers 1998). Indeed, SBS caused by fungi may be more enduring and recalcitrant to treatment than SBS from multiple chemical exposures (Andrae 1988). An understanding of the microbial ecology of the indoor environment is crucial to ultimately resolving many IAQ problems. The incidence of SBS related to multiple chemical sensitivity versus bioaerosols (aerosolized microbes), or the contribution of the microorganisms to the chemical sensitivities, is not yet understood. If the inhabitants of a building exhibit similar symptoms of a clearly defined disease with a nature and time of onset that can be related to building occupancy, the disease is generally referred to as ''building-related illness.'' Once the SBS has been allowed to elevate to this level, buildings are typically evacuated and the costs associated with disruption of the building occupants, identification of the source of the problem, and eventual remediation can be significant. Understanding the primary causes of IAQ problems and how controllable factors--proper HVAC system design, allocation of adequate outdoor air, proper filtration, effective humidity control, and routine maintenance--can avert the problems may help all building owners, operators, and occupants to be more productive (Arens and Baughman 1996). This paper provides a comprehensive summary of IAQ research that has been conducted in various types of facilities. However, it focuses primarily on school facilities because, for numerous reasons that will become evident, they are far more susceptible to developing IAQ problems than most other types of facilities; and the occupants, children, are more significantly affected than adults (EPA 1998).

  13. inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, Mora K.; Hiemstra, T; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.; Machesky, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Acid base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in principle does not require a molecular picture. The models are typically calibrated to relatively simple solid-electrolyte solution pairs and may provide poor descriptions of complex multicomponent mineral aqueous solutions, including those found in natural environments. Surface complexation models may be improved by incorporating molecular-scale surface structural information to constrain the modeling efforts. Here, we apply a concise, molecularly-constrained surface complexation model to a diverse suite of surface titration data for rutile and thereby begin to address the complexity of multi-component systems. Primary surface charging curves in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl electrolyte media were fit simultaneously using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model [Hiemstra T. and Van Riemsdijk W. H. (1996) A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: the charge distribution (CD) model. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488 508], coupled with a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer. In addition, data for the specific interaction of Ca2+ and Sr2+ with rutile, in NaCl and RbCl media, were modeled. In recent developments, spectroscopy, quantum calculations, and molecular simulations have shown that electrolyte and divalent cations are principally adsorbed in various inner-sphere configurations on the rutile 110 surface [Zhang Z., Fenter P., Cheng L., Sturchio N. C., Bedzyk M. J., Pr edota M., Bandura A., Kubicki J., Lvov S. N., Cummings P. T., Chialvo A. A., Ridley M. K., Be ne zeth P., Anovitz L., Palmer D. A., Machesky M. L. and Wesolowski D. J. (2004) Ion adsorption at the rutile water interface: linking molecular and macroscopic properties. Langmuir 20, 4954 4969]. Our CD modeling results are consistent with these adsorbed configurations provided adsorbed cation charge is allowed to be distributed between the surface (0-plane) and Stern plane (1-plane). Additionally, a complete description of our titration data required inclusion of outer-sphere binding, principally for Cl which was common to all solutions, but also for Rb+ and K+. These outer-sphere species were treated as point charges positioned at the Stern layer, and hence determined the Stern layer capacitance value. The modeling results demonstrate that a multi-component suite of experimental data can be successfully rationalized within a CD and MUSIC model using a Stern-based description of the EDL. Furthermore, the fitted CD values of the various inner-sphere complexes of the mono- and divalent ions can be linked to the microscopic structure of the surface complexes and other data found by spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics (MD). For the Na+ ion, the fitted CD value points to the presence of bidenate inner-sphere complexation as suggested by a recent MD study. Moreover, its MD dominance quantitatively agrees with the CD model prediction. For Rb+, the presence of a tetradentate complex, as found by spectroscopy, agreed well with the fitted CD and its predicted presence was quantitatively in very good agreement with the amount found by spectroscopy.

  14. Smisc - A collection of miscellaneous functions

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-08-31

    A collection of functions for statistical computing and data manipulation. These include routines for rapidly aggregating heterogeneous matrices, manipulating file names, loading R objects, sourcing multiple R files, formatting datetimes, multi-core parallel computing, stream editing, specialized plotting, etc. • Smisc-package A collection of miscellaneous functions allMissing Identifies missing rows or columns in a data frame or matrix as.numericSilent Silent wrapper for coercing a vector to numeric comboList Produces all possible combinations of a set ofmore » linear model predictors cumMax Computes the maximum of the vector up to the current index cumsumNA Computes the cummulative sum of a vector without propogating NAs d2binom Probability functions for the sum of two independent binomials dataIn A flexible way to import data into R. dbb The Beta-Binomial Distribution df2list Row-wise conversion of a data frame to a list dfplapply Parallelized single row processing of a data frame dframeEquiv Examines the equivalence of two dataframes or matrices dkbinom Probability functions for the sum of k independent binomials factor2character Converts all factor variables in a dataframe to character variables findDepMat Identify linearly dependent rows or columns in a matrix formatDT Converts date or datetime strings into alternate formats getExtension Filename manipulations: remove the extension or path, extract the extension or path getPath Filename manipulations: remove the extension or path, extract the extension or path grabLast Filename manipulations: remove the extension or path, extract the extension or path ifelse1 Non-vectorized version of ifelse integ Simple numerical integration routine interactionPlot Two-way Interaction Plot with Error Bar linearMap Linear mapping of a numerical vector or scalar list2df Convert a list to a data frame loadObject Loads and returns the object(s) in an ".Rdata" file more Display the contents of a file to the R terminal movAvg2 Calculate the moving average using a 2-sided window openDevice Opens a graphics device based on the filename extension p2binom Probability functions for the sum of two independent binomials padZero Pad a vector of numbers with zeros parseJob Parses a collection of elements into (almost) equal sized groups pbb The Beta-Binomial Distribution pcbinom A continuous version of the binomial cdf pkbinom Probability functions for the sum of k independent binomials plapply Simple parallelization of lapply plotFun Plot one or more functions on a single plot PowerData An example of power data pvar Prints the name and value of one or more objects qbb The Beta-Binomial Distribution rbb And numerous others (space limits reporting).« less

  15. GRASSLAND BIRD DISTRIBUTION AND RAPTOR FLIGHT PATTERNS IN THE COMPETITIVE RENEWABLE ENERGY ZONES OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Erik

    2013-08-10

    The consistent wind resource in the Great Plains of North America has encouraged the development of wind energy facilities across this region. In the Texas Panhandle, a high quality wind resource is only one factor that has led to the expansion of wind energy development. Other factors include federal tax incentives and the availability of subsidies. Moreover, the State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), mandating production of 10,000 mega-watts of renewable energy in the state by 2025, has contributed to an amicable regulatory and permitting environment (State Energy Conservation Office 2010). Considering the current rate of development, the RPS will be met in coming years (American Wind Energy Association 2011) and the rate of development is likely to continue. To meet increased energy demands in the face of a chronically constrained transmission grid, Texas has developed a comprehensive plan that organizes and prioritizes new transmission systems in high quality wind resource areas called Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZ). The CREZ plan provides developers a solution to transmission constraints and unlocks large areas of undeveloped wind resource areas. In the northern Texas panhandle, there are two CREZs that are classified Class 3 wind (Class 5 is the highest) and range from 862,725 to 1,772,328 ha in size (Public Utility Commission of Texas 2008). Grassland bird populations have declined more than any other bird group in North America (Peterjohn and Sauer 1999, Sauer et al. 2004). Loss of grassland habitat from agricultural development has been the greatest contributor to the decline of grassland bird populations, but development of non-renewable (i.e., oil, coal, and gas) and renewable energy (i.e., wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal) sources have contributed to the decline as well (Pimentel et al. 2002, Maybe and Paul 2007). The effects of wind energy development on declining grassland bird populations has become an area of extensive research, as we attempt to understand and minimize potential impacts of a growing energy sector on declining bird populations. Based on data from post-construction fatality surveys, two grassland bird groups have been the specific focus of research, passerines (songbird guild) and raptors (birds of prey). The effects of wind energy development on these two groups of birds, both of conservation concern, have been examined over the last decade. The primary focus of this research has been on mortality resulting from collision with wind turbines (Kuvlesky et al. 2007). Most studies just quantify post-construction fatality levels (e.g., Erickson et al. 2002) while very few studies provide a comparison of bird populations prior to development through a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) study design. Before-After-Control-Impact studies provide powerful evidence of avian/wind energy relationships (Anderson et al. 1999). Despite repeated urgency on conducting these types of studies (Anderson et al. 1999, Madders and Whitfield 2006, Kuvelsky et al. 2007), few have been conducted in North America. Although several European researchers (Larsson 1994, de Lucas et al. 2007) have used BACI designs to examine whether wind facilities modified raptor behavior, there is a scarcity of BACI data relating to North America grassland ecosystems that examine avian-wind energy relationships. There are less than a handful of studies in the entire United States, let alone the southern short grass prairie ecosystem, that incorporate preconstruction data to form the baseline for post-construction impact estimates (Johnson et al. 2000, Erickson et al. 2002). Although declines in grassland bird populations are well-documented (Peterjohn and Sauer 1999, Sauer et al. 2004), the causal mechanisms affecting the decline of grassland birds with increasing wind energy development in the southern short grass prairie are not well-understood (Kuvlesky et al. 2007, Maybe and Paul 2007). Several factors may potentially affect the bird population when wind turbines are constructed in areas with high bird densities (de Lucas et al. 2007). Habitat fragmentation, noise from turbines, physical movement of turbine blades, and increased vehicle traffic have been suggested as causes of decreased density of nesting grassland birds in Minnesota (Leddy et al. 1999), Oklahoma (O’Connell and Piorkowski 2006), and South Dakota (Shaffer and Johnson 2008). Similarly, constructing turbines in areas where bird flight patterns place them at similar heights of turbine blades increases the potential for bird collisions (Johnson et al. 2000, Hoover 2002). Raptor fatalities have been associated with topographic features such as ridges, saddles and rims where birds use updrafts from prevailing winds (Erickson et al. 2000, Johnson et al. 2000, Barrios and Rodriquez 2004, Hoover and Morrison 2005). Thus, wind energy development can result in indirect (e.g., habitat avoidance, decreased nest success) and direct (e.g., collision fatalities) impacts to bird populations (Anderson et al. 1999). Directly quantifying the level of potential impacts (e.g., estimated fatalities/mega-watthour) from wind energy development is beyond the scope of this study. Instead, I aim to quantify density, occupancy and flight behavior for the two bird groups mentioned earlier: obligate grassland songbirds and raptors, respectively, predict where impacts may occur, and provide management recommendations to minimize potential impacts. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Allocation, contracted Texas Tech University to investigate grassland bird patterns of occurrence in the anticipated CREZ in support of DOE’s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 initiative. In cooperation with Iberdrola Renewables, Inc., studies initiated by Wulff (2010) at Texas Tech University were continued at an area proposed for wind energy development and a separate reference site unassociated with wind energy development. I focused on four primary objectives and this thesis is accordingly organized in four separate chapters that address grassland bird density, grassland bird occupancy, raptor flight patterns, and finally I summarize species diversity and composition. The following chapters use formatting from the Journal of Wildlife Management guidelines (Block et al. 2011) with modifications as required by the Texas Tech University Graduate School. 1) I estimate pre-construction bird density patterns using methods that adjust for imperfect detection. I used a distance sampling protocol that effectively accounts for incomplete detection in the field where birds are present but not detected (Buckland et al. 2001). I improved density estimates with hierarchical distance sampling models, a modeling technique that effectively incorporates the detection process with environmental covariates that further influence bird density (Royle et al. 2004, Royle and Dorazio 2008). Covariates included road density and current oil and gas infrastructure to determine the relationship between existing energy development and bird density patterns. Further, I used remote sensing techniques and vegetation field data to investigate how landcover characteristics influenced bird density patterns. I focused species-specific analyses on obligate grassland birds with >70 detections per season namely grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) and horned lark (Eremophila alpestris). Chapter II focuses on hierarchical models that model and describe relationships between grassland bird density and anthropogenic and landscape features. 2) A large number of bird detections (>70) are needed to estimate density using distance sampling and collection of such quantity are often not feasible, particularly for cryptic species or species that naturally occur at low densities (Buckland et al. 2001). Occupancy models operate with far fewer data and are often used as a surrogate for bird abundance when there are fewer detections (MacKenzie and Nichols 2004). I used occupancy models that allow for the possibility of imperfect detection and species abundance to improve estimates of occurrence probability (Royal 2004). I focused species-specific analyses on grassland birds with few detections: Cassin’s sparrow (Peucaea cassinii), eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), and upland sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda). Chapter III uses a multi-season dynamic site occupancy model that incorporates bird abundance to better estimate occurrence probability. 3) When I considered the topographic relief of the study sites, the proposed design of the wind facility and its location within the central U.S. migratory corridor, I expanded the study to investigate raptor abundance and flight behavior (Hoover 2002, Miller 2008). I developed a new survey technique that improved the accuracy of raptor flight height estimates and compared seasonal counts and flight heights at the plateau rim and areas further inland. I used counts and flight behaviors to calculate species-specific collision risk indices for raptors based on topographic features. I focused species-specific analyses on raptors with the highest counts: American kestrel (Falco sparverius), northern harrier (Circus cyaneus), red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Swainson’s hawk (Buteo swainsoni), and turkey vulture (Cathartes aura). Chapter IV describes patterns of seasonal raptor abundance and flight behavior and how topography modulates collision risk with proposed wind energy turbines. 4) Finally, for completeness, in Chapter V I summarize morning point count data for all species and provide estimates of relative composition and species diversity with the Shannon-Wiener Diversity Index (Shannon and Weaver 1949).