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1

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the...

2

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) links NEMS to the rest of the economy by providing projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of NEMS. The derivation of the baseline macroeconomic forecast lays a foundation for the determination of the energy demand and supply forecast. MAM is used to present alternative macroeconomic growth cases to provide a range of uncertainty about the growth potential for the economy and its likely consequences for the energy system. MAM is also able to address the macroeconomic impacts associated with changing energy market conditions, such as alternative world oil price assumptions. Outside of the Annual Energy Outlook setting, MAM represents a system of linked modules which can assess the potential impacts on the economy of changes in energy events or policy proposals. These economic impacts then feed back into NEMS for an integrated solution. MAM consists of five modules:

3

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Macro Bridge Procedure to Update Regional Macroeconomic Forecasts with National Macroeconomic Forecasts  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) uses macroeconomic variables such as income, employment, industrial production and consumer prices at both the national and regional1 levels as explanatory variables in the generation of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). This documentation explains how national macroeconomic forecasts are used to update regional macroeconomic forecasts through the RSTEM Macro Bridge procedure.

Information Center

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 19 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook2011 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module.

5

International Macroeconomic Data Set | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Macroeconomic Data Set International Macroeconomic Data Set Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data International Macroeconomic Data Set Dataset Summary Description The International Macroeconomic Data Set provides data from 1969 through 2020 for real (adjusted for inflation) gross domestic product (GDP), population, real exchange rates, and other variables for the 190 countries and 34 regions that are most important for U.S. agricultural trade. The data presented here are a key component of the USDA Baseline projections process, and can be used as a benchmark for analyzing the impacts of U.S. and global macroeconomic shocks. The data for the Baseline projections are updated once a year to reflect the assumptions used for the Baseline. The historical data will be revised several times a year as the underlying data evolve.

6

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

d022412A. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 18 Macroeconomic Activity Module To reflect uncertainty in the projection of...

7

Essays in macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines questions in macroeconomics motivated by the 2007-2008 financial crisis and its aftermath. Chapter 1 studies the impact of a housing bust on regional labor reallocation and the labor market. I document ...

Nenov, Plamen T. (Plamen Toshkov)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic assessment at EIA involves several modes of analysis. The first type of analysis, used in forecasting the Annual Energy Outlook where energy prices change, uses kernel regression and response surface techniques to mimic the response of larger macroeconomic and industrial models. This mode of analysis requires a given economic baseline and then calculates the economic impacts of changing energy prices, calculated from the chosen growth path. The economic growth cases are derived from the larger core models and can reflect either high, low, or reference case growth assumptions. Analyzing economic impacts from energy price changes uses the macroeconomic activity module (MAM) within NEMS and provides a subset of the macroeconomic variables available in the larger core models. The composition of the subset is determined by the other energy modules in NEMS, as they use various macroeconomic concepts as assumptions to their particular energy model.

9

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

10

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Document>ation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2009), (Washington, DC, January 2009).

11

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

12

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2008), (Washington, DC, January 2008).

13

Macroeconomic Activity Module (Mam) 1998 (Kernel Regression), Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) serves two functions within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). First, it provides consistent sets of baselines macroeconomic variables (GDP and components, aggregate prices, interest rates, industrial output, housing starts, commercial floorspace, newcar sales, etc.) which are used by the supply, demand and conversion modules in reaching an energy market equilibrium. Second, it is designed to provide a feedback mechanism that alters the baseline variables during the course of an integrated NEMS run.

Ron Earley

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Macroeconomic determinants of the stock market movements: empirical evidence from the Saudi stock market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation investigates the long run and short run relationships between Saudi stock market returns and eight macroeconomic variables. We investigate the ability of these (more)

Alshogeathri, Mofleh Ali Mofleh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook for 2013 (AEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

The evolution of consensus in macroeconomic forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When professional forecasters repeatedly forecast macroeconomic variables, their forecasts may converge over time towards a consensus. The evolution of consensus is analyzed with Blue Chip data under a parametric polynomial decay function that permits flexibility in the decay path. For the most part, this specification fits the data. We test whether forecast differences decay to zero at the same point in time for a panel of forecasters, and discuss possible explanations for this, along with its implications for studies using panels of forecasters.

Allan W. Gregory; James Yetman; Jel Codes C E; Robert Eggert; Fred Joutz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module

18

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

macroeconomic.gif (5367 bytes) macroeconomic.gif (5367 bytes) The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065, (Washington, DC, February 1994).

19

Essays in macroeconomics and experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of four chapters on empirical and experimental macroeconomics and other experimental topics. Chapter 1 uses a laboratory experiment to test the predictions of a dynamic global game designed to ...

Shurchkov, Olga

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Essays on macroeconomics and forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays. Chapter II uses the method of structural factor analysis to study the effects of monetary policy on key macroeconomic variables in a data rich environment. I propose two structural factor models. One is the structural factor augmented vector autoregressive (SFAVAR) model and the other is the structural factor vector autoregressive (SFVAR) model. Compared to the traditional vector autogression (VAR) model, both models incorporate far more information from hundreds of data series, series that can be and are monitored by the Central Bank. Moreover, the factors used are structurally meaningful, a feature that adds to the understanding of the â??black boxâ? of the monetary transmission mechanism. Both models generate qualitatively reasonable impulse response functions. Using the SFVAR model, both the â??price puzzleâ? and the â??liquidity puzzleâ? are eliminated. Chapter III employs the method of structural factor analysis to conduct a forecasting exercise in a data rich environment. I simulate out-of-sample real time forecasting using a structural dynamic factor forecasting model and its variations. I use several structural factors to summarize the information from a large set of candidate explanatory variables. Compared to Stock and Watson (2002)â??s models, the models proposed in this chapter can further allow me to select the factors structurally for each variable to be forecasted. I find advantages to using the structural dynamic factor forecasting models compared to alternatives that include univariate autoregression (AR) model, the VAR model and Stock and Watsonâ??s (2002) models, especially when forecasting real variables. In chapter IV, we measure U.S. technology shocks by implementing a dual approach, which is based on more reliable price data instead of aggregate quantity data. By doing so, we find the relative volatility of technology shocks and the correlation between output fluctuation and technology shocks to be much smaller than those revealed in most real-business-cycle (RBC) studies. Our results support the findings of Burnside, Eichenbaum and Rebelo (1996), who showed that the correlation between technology shocks and output is exaggerated in the RBC literature. This suggests that one should examine other sources of fluctuations for a better understanding of the business cycle phenomena.

Liu, Dandan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System April 2013 Independent Statistics & ...

23

Evaluation of Dosimetric Consequences of Seroma Contour Variability in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using a Constructed Representative Seroma Contour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Contouring variability of the seroma can have important implications in the planning and delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). This study aimed to quantify the dosimetric impact of these interobserver and intraobserver contouring variations by construction of a representative seroma contour (RSC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with a seroma suitable for APBI underwent four computed tomography (CT) scans: one planning CT and three additional CTs on the first, third, and fifth days of treatment. Three radiation oncologists contoured the seroma on each CT scan. For 3 patients, oncologists repeated contouring twice to assess intraobserver variations. Seroma contour variability was quantified by construction of an RSC. In addition, the percent volume overlap (PVO) was calculated. Root-mean-square (RMS) differences in seroma volume, size, and center of mass position compared to those of the RSC were calculated. Treatment fields from the original plan were applied to the repeated CTs by using the same isocenter shifts as the original plan. The dosimetric impact of the contour variations was assessed using V{sub 95} (volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Results: Interobserver RMS volume differences were, on average, 5.6 times larger than intraobserver differences. The median interobserver RMS seroma volume difference was 1.48 cm{sup 3}. The median PVO was 51.6%. V{sub 95} and EUD of the seroma contours were similar for all patients. The median RMS differences of the seroma V{sub 95} and EUD were 0.01% (range, 0%-3.99%) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0-0.98 Gy). Conclusions: Construction of the RSC showed that interobserver variations were most responsible for contour variations of the seroma. Current planning margins provided adequate dose coverage of the seroma despite these contour variations.

Kosztyla, Robert, E-mail: rkosztyla@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Olson, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Carolan, Hannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Balkwill, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kwan, Winkle [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 15,584 15,680 15,819 15,886 15,970 16,068 16,173 16,295 16,422 16,557 16,701 16,832 15,742 16,127 16,628 Real Disposable Personal Income (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 11,502 11,618 11,703 11,757 11,883 11,970 12,057 12,151 12,273 12,363 12,451 12,526 11,645 12,015 12,403 Real Personal Consumption Expend. (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 10,644 10,692 10,729 10,813 10,884 10,959 11,036 11,114 11,191 11,264 11,343 11,416 10,719 10,998 11,304 Real Fixed Investment (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 2,420 2,458 2,491 2,508 2,551 2,604 2,655 2,700 2,752 2,816 2,885 2,944 2,469 2,627 2,849 Business Inventory Change (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) .............

25

Essays on finance, learning, and macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of four essays on finance, learning, and macroeconomics. The first essay studies whether learning can explain why the standard consumption-based asset pricing model produces large pricing errors for ...

Doyle, Joseph Buchman, Jr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Essays in macroeconomics : liquidity and taxation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three independent chapters on the Macroeconomics of Liquidity and Taxation. The first chapter studies how concerns about future funding difficulties and liquidity dry ups influence investment ...

Iachan, Felipe Saraiva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Essays in macroeconomics and corporate finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines questions at the intersection of macroeconomics and finance. Chapter 1 studies the persistent effects of a decrease in firms' ability to borrow. I develop a tractable model of deleveraging that emphasizes ...

Goldberg, Jonathan E. (Jonathan Elliot)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Essays on political institutions and macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three chapters on the interaction of political institutions and macroeconomic activity in dynamic environments. Chapter 1 studies the optimal management of taxes and debt in a framework which ...

Yared, Pierre

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Representing Twentieth-Century SpaceTime Climate Variability. Part I: Development of a 196190 Mean Monthly Terrestrial Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of a 0.5 lat 0.5 long surface climatology of global land areas, excluding Antarctica, is described. The climatology represents the period 196190 and comprises a suite of nine variables: precipitation, wet-day frequency, mean ...

Mark New; Mike Hulme; Phil Jones

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Essays in International Macroeconomics and Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contains three essays in international macroeconomics and financial time series forecasting. In the first essay, I show, numerically, that a two-country New-Keynesian Sticky Prices model, driven by monetary and productivity shocks, is capable of explaining the highly positive correlation across the industrialized countries' inflation even though their cross-country correlation in money growth rate is negligible. The structure of this model generates cross-country correlations of inflation, output and consumption that appear to closely correspond to the data. Additionally, this model can explain the internal correlation between inflation and output observed in the data. The second essay presents two important results. First, gains from monetary policy cooperation are different from zero when the elasticity of substitution between domestic and imported goods consumption is different from one. Second, when monetary policy is endogenous in a two-country model, the only Nash equilibria supported by this model are those that are symmetrical. That is, all exporting firms in both countries choose to price in their own currency, or all exporting firms in both countries choose to price in the importer's currency. The last essay provides both conditional and unconditional predictive ability evaluations of the aluminum futures contracts prices, by using five different econometric models, in forecasting the aluminum spot price monthly return 3, 15, and 27-months ahead for the sample period 1989.01-2010.10. From these evaluations, the best model in forecasting the aluminum spot price monthly return 3 and 15 months ahead is followed by a (VAR) model whose variables are aluminum futures contracts price, aluminum spot price and risk free interest rate, whereas for the aluminum spot price monthly return 27 months ahead is a single equation model in which the aluminum spot price today is explained by the aluminum futures price 27 months earlier. Finally, it shows that iterated multiperiod-ahead time series forecasts have a better conditional out-of-sample forecasting performance of the aluminum spot price monthly return when an estimated (VAR) model is used as a forecasting tool.

Bejarano Rojas, Jesus Antonio

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Macroeconomic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of the Underlying Core Models Macroeconomic assessment at EIA involves several modes of analysis. The first type of analysis, used in forecasting the Annual Energy Outlook where...

32

The Long-run Macroeconomic Impacts of Fuel Subsidies in an Oil-importing Developing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developing and emerging market countries have subsidies on fuel products. Using a small open economy model with a non-traded sector I show how these subsidies impact the steady state levels of macroeconomic aggregates such as consumption, labor supply, and aggregate welfare. These subsidies can lead to crowding out of non-oil consumption, inefficient inter-sectoral allocations of labor, and other distortions in macroeconomic variables. Across steady states aggregate welfare is reduced by these subsidies. This result holds for a country with no oil production and for a net exporter of oil. The distortions in relative prices introduced by the subsidy create most of the welfare losses. How the subsidy is financed is of secondary importance. Aggregate welfare is significantly higher if the subsidies are replaced by lump-sum transfers of equal value.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

R&D Activity Investments and Macroeconomic Determinant Factors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Investments in R&D activities are essential to firms. Decisions to increase or decrease R&D investments may rely according to changes in macroeconomic factors. The (more)

Gardell, Pierre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Macroeconomic Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Macroeconomic Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic machines of macroeconomics. Ramsey, Solow, Samuelson-Diamond, RBCs, ISLM, Mundell-Fleming, Fischer-Taylor. How they work, what shortcuts they take, and how they can be used. Half-term subject. From the course ...

Blanchard, Olivier (Olivier J.)

36

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

37

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

38

BUSINESS CYCLES, FISCAL STABILIZATION AND VERTICAL FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT: ESSAYS IN INTERNATIONAL MACROECONOMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My dissertation studies various questions falling into the broad context of macroeconomics and international economics. The questions have macroeconomic components because they are concerned with the behavior of aggregates. Specifically, the second and third chapters of my dissertation study the causes of fluctuations in aggregate macroeconomic variables and the way policy can be coordinated internationally to reduce these fluctuations, respectively. In addition, chapters III and IV address questions that fall into the realm of international economics. They are concerned with the optimal exchange rate regime between two countries, the consequences of partial exchange rate pass-through and the effect of an increase in vertical Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) by domestic firms. The framework of my analysis is given by different versions of general equilibrium models. The second chapter of my dissertation decomposes fluctuations in aggregate observables for the UK economy during the 1980s recession. Using a modern accounting procedure, I estimate parameters that describe the economy using annual data from 1970 to 2002. Then, I simulate different versions of the model to find the distortions that are essential in driving the observed fluctuations. I find labor market distortions to be crucial in accounting for the episode, suggesting that the policies of the time were well targeted and effective. The third chapter of my dissertation studies policy coordination in a two-country framework allowing for partial pass-through. In particular, both countries are assumed to have monetary and fiscal stabilization instruments available. The optimal setting of these instruments under differing pass-through regimes is analytically derived. Fiscal policy is found to be used in a counter-cyclical fashion. In addition, the magnitude of fiscal stabilization is the largest when pass-through is partial. In the fourth chapter, I study the consequences of vertical FDI on aggregate productivity and welfare. The framework allows for heterogeneity across firms in two dimensions. It is firms that are at a disadvantage with respect to manufacturing costs that are benefiting most from moving their production process abroad. Overall, the ability to engage in vertical FDI increases productivity, lowers prices and thus increases welfare.

Kersting, Erasmus K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Oil price shocks: Testing a macroeconomic model  

SciTech Connect

The main research objective was to answer the following question: Will Consumer Price Index forecast models utilizing computer oil-consumption ratios have better predictive capability as indicated by lower numerical differences from actual results than a model utilizing oil prices as the energy-related variable Multiple linear regressions were run on the components of the United States CPI to reduce them to a kernel set with meaningful predictive capability. New linear regressions were run with this kernel set and crude oil prices during the 1973 to 1984 time period. Crude oil prices were rationalized with a 1972 = 100 based index of GNP base petroleum consumption, the index of net energy imports, and the index of petroleum imports to create new oil substitute constructs to be used in multiple regressions with the CPI. Predictions obtained from the model were compared with actual results in the 1985-1987 time period to determine which model version showed the greatest predictive power. Results of the model tests show that oil prices are strongly related to the CPI, but neither the use of oil prices or the index of GNP-based petroleum consumption produced results that closely predict future prices.

Williams, D.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Optimal Deterministic and Stochastic Macroeconomic Policies for Slovenia: An Application of the OPTCON Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports about applications of optimal control theory to the analysis of macroeconomic policies for Slovenia during its way into the Euro Area. For this purpose, the model SLOPOL4, a macroeconometric model for Slovenia, is used. Optimal policies ... Keywords: C5, E5, E6, Econometric model, Macroeconomic policy, O5, Optimal control, Sensitivity analysis, Slovenia, Stochastic control

Reinhard Neck; Gottfried Haber; Klaus Weyerstrass

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Methodology for the Assessment of the Macroeconomic Impacts of Stricter CAF. Standards  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For a full documentation of the macroeconomic linkage refer to "Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System," January 2002 found on the EIA web site at http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/FTPROOT/modeldoc/m065(2002).pdf Methodology for the Assessment of the Macroeconomic Impacts of Stricter CAFÉ Standards This assessment of the economic impacts of CAFÉ standards marks the first time EIA has used the new direct linkage of the DRI-WEFA Macroeconomic Model to NEMS in a policy setting. This methodology assures an internally consistent solution between the energy market concepts forecast by NEMS and the aggregate economy as forecast by the DRI-WEFA Macroeconomic Model of the U.S. Economy. While we refer to DRI- WEFA model as a macro model, the full DRI-WEFA model forecasts more than 1600 detailed concepts covering

43

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 Las Vegas, NV Agenda | Presentations | SSO Annual Award | Pictures | Summary Report 2011 Facility Representative of the Year Award 2011 WINNER: Congratulations to Bradley...

44

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

45

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

46

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

47

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

48

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

49

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Break 10:00 a.m. - Making Your Observations CountLeading Indicators - Mike Weis, Rocky Flats Field Office 10:45 a.m. - Facility Representative PanelQuestions and Answers (Ben...

50

Estimating macroeconomic effects of proposed safety and environmental regulations using the new DRI annual model of the US economy  

SciTech Connect

The long-run macroeconomic effects of proposed environmental and safety regulations are analyzed by use of DRI's (Data Resources, Inc.) new annual model of the US economy. This annual model has fewer variables than the DRI quarterly US economy model. Many short-run cyclical factors have been condensed while long-run supply factors have been enhanced. The model was used to estimate the macroeconomic effects of proposed simultaneous application of (1) new safety regulations regarding air bags or automatic seat belts on cars in 1984 and thereafter, and (2) tight acid-rain environmental regulations for coal-using electric utilities and industry. The effects of the regulations while favorable in the short run, were found to be quite adverse over the long run. Regulatory effects were further analyzed under the assumption that the initial application of regulations was accompanied by a shock in world oil prices (similar to situations in the 1970s when regulatory costs rose simultaneously with the two major energy price shocks). However, a synergistic effect between the shock and new regulation cost was not found.

Teotia, A.P.; Santini, D.J.; Caton, C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Facility Representative Program: 2004 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Facility Representative Workshop 4 Facility Representative Workshop May 18 - 20, 2004 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathy Carlson, Nevada Site Office Manager 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy Deputy Secretary's Remarks 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - NNSA Evaluation of Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report Brigadier General Ronald J. Haeckel, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Applications, NNSA Other Information: NASA’S Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report

52

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

53

Heterogeneous Enterprises in a Macroeconomic Agent-Based Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a macroeconomic agent-based model that combines several mechanisms operating at the same timescale, while remaining mathematically tractable. It comprises enterprises and workers who compete in a job market and a commodity goods market. The model is stock-flow consistent; a bank lends money charging interest rates, and keeps track of equities. Important features of the model are heterogeneity of enterprises, existence of bankruptcies and creation of new enterprises, as well as productivity increase. The model's evolution reproduces empirically found regularities for firm size and growth rate distributions. It combines probabilistic elements and deterministic dynamics, with relative weights that may be modified according to the considered problem or the belief of the modeler. We discuss statistical regularities on enterprises, the origin and the amplitude of endogeneous fluctuations of the system's steady state, as well as the role of the interest rate and the credit volume. We also summarize obtain...

Metzig, Cornelia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Transportation technology transitions and macroeconomic growth -- Contemporary evidence  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents international and temporal extensions of evidence for a theory developed by the author concerning the interaction of transportation technology transitions and macroeconomic growth. The period 1970 to the present is examined for the nations of Japan, the US, and Europe (France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom collectively). An addition to the abstract logic supporting the general arguments of the theory is also presented. The theory has been developed concerning the role of significant transportation technology transitions as a cause of significant macroeconomic declines in nations for which the manufacture of transportation vehicles (ships, locomotives, and automobiles) is a dominant economic activity. The theory offers an explanation for periods of pronounced multiyear decline in economic growth rate--sometimes called depressions and sometimes called stagnations. One purpose of this paper is to explore whether or not Japan and Europe have each recently experienced a multiyear event of this type. In the theory and the evidence presented for it, environmental regulation of transportation vehicles has been shown to be an initiating cause of significant technical change, with sharp, sustained fuel price increases being a second frequent initiating cause. These causes of significant technical change, and their possible consequences, are potentially important considerations for those proposing policies to deal with global warming, since both fuel economy regulation and fuel price increases have been recommended by policy analysts as means to reduce transportation`s contribution to global warming. The theory has been offered and supported by publications developing mathematical models and examining US historical evidence consistent with the theory.

Santini, D.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Senior Vice President Enclosure document8 This page intentionally left blankMacroeconomic Impacts of LNG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I am transmitting with this letter a clean copy of NERAs report on the macroeconomic impacts of LNG exports from the United States that was contracted for by the Department of Energy. Sincerely, W. David Montgomery

Www. Nera. Com; Dear Mr. Smith; Robert Baron; Nera Economic Consulting; Ha D. Tuladhar; Nera Economic Consulting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Property Representatives Lists- HQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These are the current lists of Headquarters Property Representatives. If you have any questions please contact:Ellen Hall, Office of Logistics Operations, (301) 903-2613.

57

European Macro-economic Policy and Technological Development: the case of Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent studies on economic and technological transformation in less developed countries emphasise that improvement of their performance in terms of competitiveness and successful integration into the world economy requires both economic stabilisation at the macroeconomic level and technological development. Greece is a typical case, which during the last twenty years has had to deal with specific imperatives: European integration, technological catch-up and macro-economic stability. These processes are envisaged under the pressure of the opening of the economy, which in principle could facilitate dissemination of new technologies on the one hand but constrain the development of national capabilities on the other. In this paper we present the specificities of the Greek productive system that have shaped its integration into the EC and attempt to link the process of European integration with its technological development. Special reference is made to the macroeconomic policy of the EU and its impact on technological transformation. 2

Ioanna Kastelli

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Industry Representatives Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computer science: Manitoba curriculum framework of outcomes. Draft Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-7711-3122-4 1. Computer scienceCurricula. 2. Computer scienceStudy and teaching (Secondary)Manitoba. 3. Electronic data processingCurricula. 4. Electronic data processingStudy and teaching (Secondary) Manitoba. I. Manitoba. Manitoba Education and Youth. Copyright 2003, the Crown in Right of Manitoba as represented by the Minister of Education and

Draft September Senior (s; Senior (s; Normand Chtel; Collge Bliveau; Louis Riel; School Division; Geoff Bresch; Scott Greenlay; Bruce Popham; David Tetlock

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Facility Representative Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

60

Table 9a. U.S. Macroeconomic Indicators and CO2 Emissions U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2012 2013 2014 Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product (billion chained 2005 dollars - SAAR) ..... 13,506 13,549 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Glossary Balancing Item: Represents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Balancing Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-report- ing problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of vari- ations in company accounting and billing practices; differ- ences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data- reporting systems that vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass Gas: A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. British Thermal

62

Macroeconomic impacts of clean coal technologies and acid rain legislation: A comparative analysis  

SciTech Connect

In 1987, the National Association of Manufacturers published a study documenting the negative macroeconomic impacts that could occur if proposed acid rain legislation were passed (NAM 1987). These negative impacts would result from the substantially higher electricity rates that would be needed to finance conventional pollution-control retrofits. The US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) wanted to evaluate the macroeconomic impacts of nonregulatory approaches to reduce the emissions of acid rain precursors. DOE/FE therefore directed Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to determine the potential for clean coal technologies (CCTs) to satisfy future electric load growth and achieve greater long-term reductions in emissions at a lower cost than could be achieved through a legislative mandate. This study documents the macroeconomic impacts of CCT deployment without acid rain legislation and compares these results with the corresponding impacts of using conventional technologies and meeting mandatory emission reductions. The Argonne Utility Simulation (ARGUS) model was used to determine the least-cost solution and incremental levelized system costs* over the period 1995-2030 for three scenarios: (1) a baseline scenario, in which no acid rain controls are mandated and no CCTs are deployed; (2) an acid rain (AR) scenario, in which legislation (S. 1894, 100th Congress) is mandated but no CCTs are deployed; and (3) a CCT scenario, in which maximum CCT deployment (specifically, integrated gasification combined-cycle or IGCC technology in repowering and new or greenfield'' applications) occurs but no acid rain legislation is mandated. The Data Resources Inc. (DRI) annual macroeconomic model (which was extended from 2010 to 2030) was used to compute the macroeconomic impacts of the AR and CCT scenarios. 2 refs., 28 figs.

Edwards, B.K.; South, D.W.; Veselka, T.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Gault, N.J. (DRI/McGraw-Hill Energy Service, Lexington, MA (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The macroeconomic effects of oil price shocks : why are the 2000s so different from the 1920s?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the macroeconomic performance of a set of industrialized economies in the aftermath of the oil price shocks of the 1970s and of the last decade, focusing on the differences across episodes. We examine four ...

Blanchard, Olivier

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) Meeting 2013 - A Federal Green Chemistry Forum. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Uncertainty quantification and validation of combined hydrological and macroeconomic analyses.  

SciTech Connect

Changes in climate can lead to instabilities in physical and economic systems, particularly in regions with marginal resources. Global climate models indicate increasing global mean temperatures over the decades to come and uncertainty in the local to national impacts means perceived risks will drive planning decisions. Agent-based models provide one of the few ways to evaluate the potential changes in behavior in coupled social-physical systems and to quantify and compare risks. The current generation of climate impact analyses provides estimates of the economic cost of climate change for a limited set of climate scenarios that account for a small subset of the dynamics and uncertainties. To better understand the risk to national security, the next generation of risk assessment models must represent global stresses, population vulnerability to those stresses, and the uncertainty in population responses and outcomes that could have a significant impact on U.S. national security.

Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Jennings, Barbara Joan; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Brown, Theresa Jean; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Annual Facility Representative Workshop Facility Representative of the Year Award Process Facility Representative of the Year Award 2012 WINNER: John C. Barnes, Savannah River Operations Office Letter from DNFSB Chairman Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D 2012 Nominees: Peter W. Kelley, Brookhaven Site Office James E. Garza, Idaho Operations Office (EM) William R. Watson, Idaho Operations Office (NE) Darlene S. Rodriguez, Los Alamos Field Office Robert R. Robb, Livermore Field Office Kenneth W. Wethington, Grand Junction Project Office's Moab site Thomas P. Denny, Nevada Field Office Michael J. Childers, NNSA Production Office Pantex Site Catherine T. Schidel, NNSA Production Office Y12 Site Chelsea D. Hubbard, Oak Ridge Operations Office (EM)

67

FAQS Reference Guide Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the October 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1151-2010, Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard.

68

Finding minimum representative pattern sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequent pattern mining often produces an enormous number of frequent patterns, which imposes a great challenge on understanding and further analysis of the generated patterns. This calls for finding a small number of representative patterns to best ... Keywords: frequent pattern summarization, representative patterns

Guimei Liu; Haojun Zhang; Limsoon Wong

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Facility Representative Program: Qualification Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Qualification Standards General Technical Base Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide -- GTB Qualification Standard (DOE-STD-1146-2007), December 2007 [PDF] -- GTB Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB "Gap" Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB Qualification Standard Reference Guide, May 2008 [PDF] Facility Representative Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide

70

Facility Representative Program: Basic Courses For Facility Representative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Basic Courses For Facility Rep Qualification (These courses may be beneficial during the initial qualification of Facility Representatives.) Course Title FR FAQS CN Point of Contact Comments Applied Engineering Fundamentals 13 days * See below Mike Schoener 803-641-8166 E-mail Course description at http://ntc.doe.gov course catalog Asbestos Awareness 2 hours 2.1 Federal employees register through the CHRIS system For course details see

71

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

72

Regret-minimizing representative databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose the k-representative regret minimization query (k-regret) as an operation to support multi-criteria decision making. Like top-k, the k-regret query assumes that users have some utility or scoring functions; however, ...

Danupon Nanongkai; Atish Das Sarma; Ashwin Lall; Richard J. Lipton; Jun Xu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Data Visualization Perceiving and Representing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Visualization Perceiving and Representing Structured Information using Objects #12;Data #12;Data Visualization Image Based vs Structure Theories s Template theories based on 2D image processing s In structural theories we extract the structure of a scene in terms of 3D primitives #12;Data

Chi, Ed Huai-hsin

74

Macroeconomic effects of accelerated implementation of renewable energy technologies in the US  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original formulation of the Brookhaven energy system models was directed toward technology assessment for new and competing energy technologies. The Hudson-Jorgenson econometric model was originally formulated to identify the economic impacts of energy futures where energy-use projections departed markedly from historical trends. The two models were married so that the feedback effects of energy and nonenergy demand levels and nonenergy prices generated by the economic model could be reflected in the technology and fuel-mix-selection solutions of the energy model. In turn, the engineering-based energy costs, energy prices, and capital requirements for energy systems characterized in the energy model are used to override the econometric estimates based on historical data in the economic model. Recently, the coupled models have been used to address questions concerning the macroeconomic impacts of accelerating the implementation of renewable energy technologies in the United States. Of particular interest were the scenarios where (1) renewables were included which cost more than conventional alternatives now and in the future, and (2) some renewables that are initially more costly are characterized by a learning curve so that in time their costs come to equal conventional alternatives. A further analysis was done for the first case (renewables always more expensive) under conditions where (1) the incremental costs were paid by the government through deficit financing, and (2) the incremental costs were paid by consumers. This paper presents the formulation of the analysis using the combined energy system - economic model and the results of the study.

Marcuse, W; Groncki, P J

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

On the construction of generalized Grassmann representatives of state vectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized $Z_k$-graded Grassmann variables are used to label coherent states related to the nilpotent representation of the q-oscillator of Biedenharn and Macfarlane when the deformation parameter is a root of unity. These states are then used to construct generalized Grassmann representatives of state vectors.

M. El Baz; Y. Hassouni

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

76

Facility Representative Program: Program Mission Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Program Information Program Mission Statement Program Directives and Guidance Facility Representative of the Year Award Program Facility Representative of the Year Award FR...

77

Three Essays on Price Dynamics and Causations among Energy Markets and Macroeconomic Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines three important issues in energy markets: price dynamics, information flow, and structural change. We discuss each issue in detail, building empirical time series models, analyzing the results, and interpreting the findings. First, we examine the contemporaneous interdependencies and information flows among crude oil, natural gas, and electricity prices in the United States (US) through the multivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (MGARCH) model, Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) for contemporaneous causal structures and Bernanke factorization for price dynamic processes. Test results show that the DAG from residuals of out-of-sample-forecast is consistent with the DAG from residuals of within-sample-fit. The result supports innovation accounting analysis based on DAGs using residuals of out-of-sample-forecast. Second, we look at the effects of the federal fund rate and/or WTI crude oil price shock on US macroeconomic and financial indicators by using a Factor Augmented Vector Autoregression (FAVAR) model and a graphical model without any deductive assumption. The results show that, in contemporaneous time, the federal fund rate shock is exogenous as the identifying assumption in the Vector Autoregression (VAR) framework of the monetary shock transmission mechanism, whereas the WTI crude oil price return is not exogenous. Third, we examine price dynamics and contemporaneous causality among the price returns of WTI crude oil, gasoline, corn, and the S&P 500. We look for structural break points and then build an econometric model to find the consistent sub-periods having stable parameters in a given VAR framework and to explain recent movements and interdependency among returns. We found strong evidence of two structural breaks and contemporaneous causal relationships among the residuals, but also significant differences between contemporaneous causal structures for each sub-period.

Hong, Sung Wook 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Facility Representative of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM OBJECTIVE The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD The Facility Representative of the Year Award is determined by a panel representing the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer and managers from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of Science (SC), and the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). The Facility Representative Program Manager in

79

European Economic Review 18 11982)243-248. Norfh-Holle,nd Publishing Company THE OIL SHOCKS AND MACROECONOMIC ADJUSTMEN'F IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/38, USA Though 'supply-side economics' is politically ascendant in the United States, the relative importance of supply versus demand factors in r,x:ent U.S. macroeconomic history remains in strong dispute the oil price increases a~d pre-ta~: profitability remained strong throughout the 1970s. Demand factors

80

Facility Representative Program: Program Performance Indicators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Performance Indicators DOE Corporate Reporting Data (ORPS, CAIRS, Others) Facility Representative Performance Indicator Guidance -- Appendix A in DOE-STD-1063-2011,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Oil Shocks and Aggregate Macroeconomic Behavior: The Role of Monetary Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the oil price variable y OIL,t in 1972:1. From these oneoil price shocks Lag with Study Hamilton (1983) Hamilton (1983) Sample period 1949:II-1972:

Herrera, Ana Maria; Hamilton, James D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Representativeness models of systems: smart grid example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the great emphasis being placed on energy efficiency in contemporary society, in which the smart grid plays a prominent role, this is an opportune time to explore methodologies for appropriately representing system attributes. We suggest this is ... Keywords: Smart grid, System representativeness

Norman Schneidewind

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives from the Facility

84

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speeds over the oceans are required for a range of applications but are difficult to obtain through in situ methods. Hence, remote sensing tools, which also offer the possibility of describing spatial variability, represent an attractive ...

R. J. Barthelmie; S. C. Pryor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Representativeness of Wind Observations at Airports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind information for use at airports can be called representative if it provides an optimal estimate of wind variations to be expected over the runway. It is shown that a single anemometer at a nonideal but reasonable location will usually ...

J. Wieringa

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Practical Pyrgeometer Using the Representative Angle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple directional pyrgeometer is tested and compared with a conventional standard pyrgeometer. The system presented in this article has a narrow directional response and points to the representative zenith angle of 52.5. Because of its ...

Satoshi Sakai; Aya Ito; Kazuhiro Umetani; Isao Iizawa; Masanori Onishi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Finding representative workloads for computer system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work explores how improved workload characterization can be used for a better selection of representative workloads within the computer system and processor design process. We find that metrics easily available in modern computer systems provide ...

Jan Lodewijk Bonebakker

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Facility Representative Program: Program Directives and Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) Program Directives and Guidance FR Program Standard, DOE STD 1063-2011,...

89

Representing aggregate works in the digital library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the challenge of representing aggregate works such as encyclopedias, collected poems and journals in heterogenous digital library collections. Reflecting on the materials used by humanities academics, we demonstrate the varied range ... Keywords: aggregate documents, architecture, digital libraries

George Buchanan; Jeremy Gow; Ann Blandford; Jon Rimmer; Claire Warwick

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protects not only the workers, but the public and the environment as well. Specifically, DOE orders say: "The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that...

91

Variable Screw Compressor, Variable Screw Compressor Suppliers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Variable Screw Compressor Suppliers & air compressor Manufacturers Directory. Source Top Quality Variable Screw Compressor Suppliers, air ...

92

Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative, was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

Sharpe, Saxon E

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

93

Performance Variability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variability Variability of Highly Parallel Architectures William T.C. Kramer 1 and Clint Ryan 2 1 Department of Computing Sciences, University of California at Berkeley and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Department of Computing Sciences, University of California at Berkeley Abstract. The design and evaluation of high performance computers has concentrated on increasing computational speed for applications. This performance is often measured on a well configured dedicated sys- tem to show the best case. In the real environment, resources are not always dedicated to a single task, and systems run tasks that may influ- ence each other, so run times vary, sometimes to an unreasonably large extent. This paper explores the amount of variation seen across four large distributed memory systems in a systematic manner. It then

94

1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone E-Mail Anderson Mike ID CFATAN (208) 526-7418 andersmr@id.doe.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 bbell@doeal.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Brown Mark RL TANKS (509) 373-9150 mark_c_brown@rl.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Daniels Rick OR HFIR (423) 574-9143 e29@ornl.gov Dennis Jack AL AAO (806) 477-3176 jdennis@pantex.com Dikeakos Maria CH BHG (516) 344-3950 dikeako@bnl.gov Duey Don AL AAO (806) 477-6987 dduey@pantex.com Earley Larry RL WRAP (509) 373-9388 larry_d_earley@rl.gov Eddy Doug OAK LLNL (925) 422-3379 doug.eddy@oak.doe.gov Edwards Robert SR NMSD (803) 208-2645 robert-e.edwards@srs.gov

95

1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone Fax E-Mail Alvord Bob OAK LLNL (925) 422-0830 (925) 422-0832 robert.alvord@oak.doe.gov Barnes John SR SRTC (803) 208-2628 (803) 208-1123 johnc.barnes@srs.gov Bell Fred AL LAAO (505) 665-4856 (505) 665-9230 fbell@doeal.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 (505) 665-9230 bbell@doeal.gov Bennett Rick RF DOE (303) 966-8155 (303) 966-7447 rick.bennett@rfets.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 (509) 376-9837 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Blanco Jose SR DWPF (803) 208-7022 (803) 557-8223 jose.blanco@srs.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 (509) 373-9839 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Christensen Debbie AL OMD (505) 845-5239 dschristensen@doeal.gov Clifton Gary OR ORNL (423) 576-6810 (423) 574-9275 g7y@ornl.gov

96

Representing Energy Price Variability in Long-and Medium-term Hydropower Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

literature focuses on electricity markets modeling and electricity price forecasting (Nogales et al., 2002. Contreras, A. J. Conejo, and R. Espínola. (2002). "Forecasting next-day electricity prices by time series capacity increases, some hydropower plants can provide base load instead. The use of an average energy

Lund, Jay R.

97

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone #  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone # Ames Laboratory Stacy Joiner joiner@ameslab.gov 515-294-5932 Argonne National Laboratory Connie Cleary ccleary@anl.gov 630-252-8111 Brookhaven National Laboratory Walter Copan wcopan@bnl.gov 631-344-3035 Fermi National Acclerator Laboratory Bruce Chrisman chrisman@fnal.gov 630-840-6657 Idaho National Laboratory Steven McMaster steven.mcmaster@inl.gov 208-526-1340 Kansas City Plant Caron O'Dower codower@kcp.com 816-997-2645 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Viviana Wolinsky viwolinsky@lbl.gov 510-486-6463 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Roger Werne werne1@llnl.gov 925-423-9353 Los Alamos National Laboratory John Mott jmott@lanl.gov 505-665-0883 National Energy Technology Laboratory Jessica Sosenko jessica.sosenko@netl.doe.gov 412-386-7417

98

Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1151-2010 October 2010 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1151-2010 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Approved DOE Technical Standards Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1151-2010 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is

99

Poverty and Social Impact AnalysisLinking Macroeconomic Policies to Poverty Outcomes: Summary of Early Experiences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. The objective of this paper is to present some early experiences of poverty and social impact analysis (PSIA) from the PRGF-supported programs in the African Department. The paper illustrates that many staff country reports have taken a first step toward PSIA by making more explicit the links between poverty and policies. Various examples highlight that even though relationships can be complex and analysis, as a result, may not be definitive, it is possible to assess some of the potential poverty effects even in countries with limited data, and therefore contribute to a more informed policy debate and design. The paper concludes that PSIA can help design policies that are more propoor, better define compensatory and complementary measures where appropriate, and support country ownership of reforms by promoting a public debate on trade-offs between policy choices. In light of this, the paper suggests that PRGF policy advice would benefit from more systematic PSIA and that staff country reports could report more on the potential policy trade-offs and poverty

Prepared Caroline; M. Robb

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Essays in Applied Macroeconomics: Asymmetric Price Adjustment, Exchange Rate and Treatment Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays. Chapter II examines the possible asymmetric response of gasoline prices to crude oil price changes using an error correction model with GARCH errors. Recent papers have looked at this issue. Some of these papers estimate a form of error correction model, but none of them accounts for autoregressive heteroskedasticity in estimation and testing for asymmetry and none of them takes the response of crude oil price into consideration. We find that time-varying volatility of gasoline price disturbances is an important feature of the data, and when we allow for asymmetric GARCH errors and investigate the system wide impulse response function, we find evidence of asymmetric adjustment to crude oil price changes in weekly retail gasoline prices Chapter III discusses the relationship between fiscal deficit and exchange rate. Economic theory predicts that fiscal deficits can significantly affect real exchange rate movements, but existing empirical evidence reports only a weak impact of fiscal deficits on exchange rates. Based on US dollar-based real exchange rates in G5 countries and a flexible varying coefficient model, we show that the previously documented weak relationship between fiscal deficits and exchange rates may be the result of additive specifications, and that the relationship is stronger if we allow fiscal deficits to impact real exchange rates non-additively as well as nonlinearly. We find that the speed of exchange rate adjustment toward equilibrium depends on the state of the fiscal deficit; a fiscal contraction in the US can lead to less persistence in the deviation of exchange rates from fundamentals, and faster mean reversion to the equilibrium. Chapter IV proposes a kernel method to deal with the nonparametric regression model with only discrete covariates as regressors. This new approach is based on recently developed least squares cross-validation kernel smoothing method. It can not only automatically smooth the irrelevant variables out of the nonparametric regression model, but also avoid the problem of loss of efficiency related to the traditional nonparametric frequency-based method and the problem of misspecification based on parametric model.

Gu, Jingping

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The underground electromagnetic pulse: Four representative models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I describe four phenomenological models by which an underground nuclear explosion may generate electromagnetic pulses: Compton current asymmetry (or ''Compton dipole''); Uphole conductor currents (or ''casing currents''); Diamagnetic cavity plasma (or ''magnetic bubble''); and Large-scale ground motion (or ''magneto-acoustic wave''). I outline the corresponding analytic exercises and summarize the principal results of the computations. I used a 10-kt contained explosion as the fiducial case. Each analytic sequence developed an equivalent source dipole and calculated signal waveforms at representative ground-surface locations. As a comparative summary, the Compton dipole generates a peak source current moment of about 12,000 A/center dot/m in the submicrosecond time domain. The casing-current source model obtains an equivalent peak moment of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 5/ A/center dot/m in the 10- to 30-/mu/s domain. The magnetic bubble produces a magnetic dipole moment of about 7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ A/center dot/m/sup 2/, characterized by a 30-ms time structure. Finally, the magneto-acoustic wave corresponds to a magnetic dipole moment of about 600 A/center dot/m/sup 2/, with a waveform showing 0.5-s periodicities. 8 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

Wouters, L.F.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling Climate Variability in the Tropical Atlantic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate variability in the tropical Atlantic sector as represented in six atmospheric general circulation models is examined. On the annual mean, most simulations overestimate wind stress away from the equator although much of the variability can ...

Jiande Wang; James A. Carton

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Three essays on macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in all cases. row presents the percent standard deviation ofThe third row indicates the percent standard deviation ofage groups. Rows 2 and 3 show that the standard deviation of

Pruitt, Seth James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Nonfarm labor productivity is expected to diminish from its current high level to a more sustainable level between 1.8 and 2.6 percent for the remainder of the forecast period...

105

Essays on international macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the impact of terms of trade shocks on commodity-exporting small, open economies. The first chapter examines whether households, firms and policymakers in these economies can distinguish between temporary ...

Rees, Daniel Morgan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Essays in macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays. The first one studies the effect of labor policy, in particular of firing costs, on financially restricted firms. It proposes and models an effect of firing costs that has not ...

Bennett, Herman Z

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2011 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

108

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standarf 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January-March 2012 More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

109

Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program ID Selects Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy recognizes the Facility Representative whose achievements during the calendar year are most exemplary. A panel of senior personnel representing the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Environmental Management (EM), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE) and at least five

110

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. 3Q CY2003, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

111

FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Representative FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-FacilityRepresentative.docx Description Facility Representative Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Facility Representative

112

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. As of December 31,2003, 93% of all Facility Representatives were fully qualified, exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal for Facility Representative

113

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. A total of 13 Facility Representatives transferred to other positions during the quarter. Five of these accepted Facility Representative positions at other sites. Of the 8 that left the Program. 1 recieved a promotion and 7 accepted lateral positions. All of

114

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. 2Q CY2006, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

115

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Title Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-322E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

116

Case Study 11 - A Collection of Homes Representing US ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A Collection of Homes Representing US Housing Stock. [Persily AK, Musser A., Leber D. (2006)]. In order to allow nationwide ...

117

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 87% Fully Qualifed ( last quarter was 85%) 86% Staffing Level ( last quarter was 88%)

119

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 76% fully qualified 41% staffing level

120

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to impove the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified 94% Staffing Level ( last quarter was

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 72% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was

122

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The percentage of Facility Representatives who are fully qualified reached 91% across DOE. In EM the percenage of 97%, in Sc the percentage is 95% and in NNSA the percentage is 78%. The DOE goal is 75%. Staffing levels for the three organizations continue to be below

123

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below." 1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

124

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representative and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

125

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data." 1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

126

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The format of the report is changed from past reports. Information will now be provided according to the major offices having field or site office Facility Representative programs: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSSA), the Office of

127

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

128

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

129

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

130

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and line management the opportunity to share lessons learned, and to discuss upcoming program improvements. There is no cost for the meeting, however, rooms reserved at the government rate are limited so if you are planning on attending, please make reservations as soon as possible. The hotel phone number is 1-800-453-8000. For more information, please contact Joe Hassenfeldt, Facility Representative Program Manager, FM-10, at 202-586-1643." Microsoft Word - Document1

131

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. Overall, the percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives increased to 80% last quarter, from 78% the previous quarter , and

132

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

133

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from October to December 2001. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data 4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications

134

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. As of June 30,2005, 97% of all FRs were fully qualified, down from 88% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications. 2Q CY2005, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

135

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This report reflects changes in DOE STD 1063-2011 that deleted one indicator and changed the way two others are calculated. The changes are discussed below. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January - March

136

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

137

October 2010, Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide OCTOBER 2010 Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................... iii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ v ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ vi PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

138

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of...

139

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012) Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012)...

140

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Water Development (March 27, 2012) Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsoft Word - 2.24 Safety Advisory Committee Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The SAC Representative is expected to: * Possess an understanding of Integrated Safety Management. * Communicate regularly with senior division management and other division...

142

Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends 181 Appendix C Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production Project

143

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small Hotel Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

144

Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Representing a robotic domain using temporal description logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A temporal logic for representing and reasoning on a robotic domain is presented. Actions are represented by describing what is true while the action itself is occurring, and plans are constructed by temporally relating actions and world states. The ... Keywords: Action Representation, Description Logic, Robotics, Temporal Logic

Alessandro Artale; Enrico Franconi

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives. and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR Program. As of March 31st, 2005, 88% of all FRs were fully qualified, up from 86% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several of the new FRs hired recently completed qualifications. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications

147

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2004, 86% of all FRs were fully qualified,down from 89% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites added new FRs or switched FRs from their exisiting facilities to new facilities, reducing the overall qualification rate.

148

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of June 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified , exceeding the DOE goal of 80%, but down slightly from the previous quarter. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR staffing is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing

149

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of September 30,2005, 84% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from 87% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites shifted fully-qualifed FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications. Although the overall percentage of fully qualified FRS

150

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of September 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified, the same as last quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR stadding is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing analysis methodology in

151

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 77% Fully Qualified (last quarter was 78%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 90%); 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%); and 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is > 65%)"

152

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data: * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). Four FRs left due to transfer,

153

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activities (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

154

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of March 31,2006 81% of all FRs were fully qualified,up from 78% the previous quarter, and just above the DOE goal of 80%. To assist site offices in continuing to meet the qualification goal, there will be two focused training sessions for FR candidates in the coming months. These

155

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

156

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This memorandum also announces that Mr. James Heffner has turned over FR Program Manager duties to Mr. Earl Huges. Mr. Heffner is assuming expanded team leader duties over several additional programs within the

157

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2005 78% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from the 84% the previous quarter, and below the DOE goal of 80%. Site offices hired 11 new FRs in the quarter and several sites moved FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications.

158

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 78% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 76%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 89%) 47% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%) 74% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is>65%)"

159

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

160

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

162

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

163

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 184 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) which is 92

164

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

165

Study of capital requirements for solar energy. Final report, Volume 1. Analysis of the macroeconomic effects of increased solar energy market penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report defines the analytical framework for, and presents the results of, a study to determine the macroeconomic effects of increased market penetration of solar energy technologies over the 1977-2000 time period. For the purposes of this document, solar technologies are defined as wind, photovoltaics, ocean thermal electric (OTEC), small-scale (non-utility) hydroelectric and all solar active and passive thermal technologies. This research has been undertaken in support of the National Plan to Accelerate Commercialization (NPAC) of Solar Energy. The capital and operating requirements for three market penetration levels are first determined; the effects of these requirements on economic performance are then estimated using the Hudson-Jorgenson Energy/Economic Model. The analytical design, computational methods, data sources, assumptions and scenario configurations for this analysis are defined in detail. The results of the analysis of the economic impact of solar energy are presented in detail, and the implications of these results are discussed. Appendix A explains the methodology for transforming investment to capital stocks. Appendix B, which is provided in a separate volume, describes the Hudson-Jorgenson Model in greater detail. (WHK)

Pleatsikas, C.J.; Hudson, E.A.; O'Connor, D.C.; Funkhouser, D.H.

1979-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Class Representative Model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finally denote zip,. ? i ? K ? K , p ? P, as a decision variable equal to 1 if the haplotype inducing the subset Si of genotypes has such a value at p-th site, and...

167

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October - December 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: ANDREW C. LAWRENCE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENVIRONMENT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October-December (Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2010) This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below:

168

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

169

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions? Part II: Quantifying Uncertainties Associated with Distribution Fitting Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing tools represent an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because, in principle, they also offer a mechanism for determining the spatial variability of flow. Presented here is the continuation of research ...

S. C. Pryor; M. Nielsen; R. J. Barthelmie; J. Mann

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

172

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles. Judy A. McLemore, who works for URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, based in Carlsbad, was honored for helping advance DOE's management and

173

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois

174

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

175

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder,

176

Representing Drag on Unresolved Terrain as a Distributed Momentum Sink  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In numerical weather prediction models, drag on unresolved terrain is usually represented by augmenting the boundary drag on the model atmosphere, in terms of an effective surface roughness length. But as is shown here, if a terrain-following ...

John D. Wilson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

178

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for...

179

2Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0,2007 0,2007 M E M 0 R A N D ; p s ' X Z FROM: M RK B. WHI DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June (2nd Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 72%) 94% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 9 1 %)

180

Quantum states representing perfectly secure bits are always distillable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proven that recently introduced states with perfectly secure bits of cryptographic key (private states representing secure bit) [K. Horodecki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160502 (2005)] as well as its multipartite and higher dimension generalizations always represent distillable entanglement. The corresponding lower bounds on distillable entanglement are provided. We also present a simple alternative proof that for any bipartite quantum state entanglement cost is an upper bound on distillable cryptographic key in bipartite scenario.

Pawel Horodecki; Remigiusz Augusiak

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Intraseasonal Variability in MERRA Energy Fluxes over the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates intraseasonal variability as represented by the recent NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) reanalysis, the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The authors examine the ...

Franklin R. Robertson; Jason B. Roberts

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Asian Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Variability in General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this report are: (1) Analyze boreal summer Asian monsoon intraseasonal variability general circulation models--How well do the models represent the eastward and northward propagating components of the convection and how well do the models represent the interactive control that the western tropical Pacific rainfall exerts on the rainfall over India and vice-versa? (2) Role of air-sea interactions--prescribed vs. interactive ocean; and (3) Mean monsoon vs. variability.

Sperber, K R; Annamalai, H

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Title Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4420E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hopkins, Asa S., Alexander B. Lekov, James D. Lutz, and Gregory J. Rosenquist Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Pagination 55 Date Published March 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-4420E Abstract This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies.

184

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

185

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for April - June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 , 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June 20 1 I This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffin~/Qualification/Oversi~ht Data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

186

4Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2008 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATNE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October - December (4th Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%)

187

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

188

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63-2011 63-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011 Familiar Level August 2011 1 DOE-STD-1063-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 2. What are the definitions of the terms listed in section 3 of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 3. What are the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of facility representatives (FRs) and other key personnel? 4. What are the requirements of the FR program? 5. What are the Department of Energy (DOE)-wide FR performance indicators (PIs)? 6. How are DOE-wide FR PIs calculated? 7. What are the FR program objectives that should be measured by an FR program

189

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 renews the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate defense nuclear facilities. Retaining highly qualified employees in critical technical skills areas is vital to the maintenance of these technical capabilities. The Department has therefore committed in the revised R? to the development of a model that offices can use to proactively manage and preserve critical technical capabilities. During the

190

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October-December 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN DIRECTOR ~ OFFICE OF :-IDC~AR AFETY OFFICE OF HEAL 'l;H, AFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October- December 20 ll This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full

191

June 21, 1999 Memo, Facility Representative Program Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June June 21, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR: Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Director, Office of Science Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FROM: John Wilcynski, Director, Office of Field Integration SUBJECT: FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities

192

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and

193

Data Assimilation as Synchronization of Truth and Model: Experiments with the Three-Variable Lorenz System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential use of chaos synchronization techniques in data assimilation for numerical weather prediction models is explored by coupling a Lorenz three-variable system that represents truth to another that represents the model. By adding ...

Shu-Chih Yang; Debra Baker; Hong Li; Katy Cordes; Morgan Huff; Geetika Nagpal; Ena Okereke; Josue Villafae; Eugenia Kalnay; Gregory S. Duane

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fuel options from microalgae with representative chemical compositions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative species of microalgae are examined with respect to their reported chemical compositions. Each species is analyzed under a variety of culture conditions, with the objective being to characterize an optimum mixture of fuel products (e.g., methane, ethanol, methylester) which should be produced by the particular species. Historically the emphasis has been on the entire algal cell mass. Using the reported chemical composition for the representative species under specific sets of growth conditions, some conclusions can be drawn about the preferred fuel product conversion routes that could be employed. 10 references, 7 figures, 12 tables.

Feinberg, D. A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

7. Appendix A: Representative Course Syllabi ASTR 601-Radiative Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Energy Generation and Transport 7. Main Sequence Lifetimes 5. Overview of Observational Data and Stellar Phase and with Dust) 3. Gas Dynamics 1. Fluid Equations of Motion 2. Self-Gravitating Hydrostatic of Evolution 4. Intrinsic Variables 5. Supernovae 6. Polytropes 6. Nuclear Energy Sources 1. The pp Chain 2. CN

Gruner, Daniel S.

196

VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

Clemensen, R.E.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Can Regional Climate Models Represent the Indian Monsoon?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of four regional climate models (RCMs) to represent the Indian monsoon was verified in a consistent framework for the period 19812000 using the 45-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40) as ...

Philippe Lucas-Picher; Jens H. Christensen; Fahad Saeed; Pankaj Kumar; Shakeel Asharaf; Bodo Ahrens; Andrew J. Wiltshire; Daniela Jacob; Stefan Hagemann

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Identifying and representing elements of local contexts in namibia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to represent local context in a 3D visualisation for rural elders in Namibia we have found major differences in the conceptualization of this context between external and local partners in the co-creation process. Through the evaluation ... Keywords: context, context-aware, indigenous knowledge, participatory design, re-contextualization

Kasper Rodil, Kasper Lvborg Jensen, Matthias Rehm, Heike Winschiers-Theophilus

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Representing digital assets usingMPEG-21 Digital Item Declaration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various XML-based approaches aimed at representing compound digital assets have emerged over the last several years. Approaches that are of specific relevance to the digital library community include the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS), ... Keywords: Digital Item, Digital asset, MPEG-21 DID, OAI-PMH, OpenURL

Jeroen Bekaert; Emiel De Kooning; Herbert de Sompel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Responses to Questions from the Texas House of Representatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Texas. However, several specific factors place the future of transportation in the state at risk. Given1 Responses to Questions from the Texas House of Representatives Select Committee on Transportation Funding Prepared for The Honorable Eddie Rodriguez Vice Chair Select Committee on Transportation Funding

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

202

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge  

SciTech Connect

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

DOE | Office of Health, Safety and Security | 2012 Facility Representative,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

204

Domain assignments for FSSP representative set using DomainParser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set The following are the domain assignments for the FSSP representative set (released on January 31, 2000, 1987 chains in total) using DomainParser. Each line shows a PDB entry (with a chain identifier if any), total number of residues, number of domains, and domain assignments. The result is obtained fully automatically without manual editing. 12asa 327 2 (33-86; 271-288) (4-32; 87-270; 289-330) 153l 185 1 16pk 415 2 (5-205; 409-419) (206-408) 16vpa 311 2 (47-130; 164-233; 324-349) (131-163; 234-323; 395-402) 1914 171 1 19hca 292 2 (45-107) (1-44; 108-292) 1a02f 53 1 1a02j 52 1 1a02n 280 2 (399-569) (570-678) 1a04a 205 2 (5-126) (127-216) 1a0aa 63 1 1a0ca 437 1 1a0fa 201 2 (1-81) (82-201) 1a0ha 159 1 1a0i 332 2 (2-239) (240-349)

205

Representative element modeling of fracture systems based on stochastic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An important task associated with reservoir simulation is the development of a technique to model a large number of fractures with a single description. Representative elements must be developed before reservoir scale simulations can adequately address the effects of intersecting fracture systems on fluid migration. An effective element model will sharply reduce the cost and complexity of large scale simulations to bring these to manageable levels. Stochastic analysis is a powerful tool which can determine the hydraulic and transport characteristics of intersecting sets of statistically defined fractures. Hydraulic and transport characteristics are required to develop representative elements. Given an assumption of fully developed laminar flow, the net fracture conductivities and hence flow velocities can be determined from descriptive statistics of fracture spacing, orientation, aperture, and extent. The distribution of physical characteristics about their mean leads to a distribution of the associated conductivities. The variance of hydraulic conductivity induces dispersion into the transport process. The simplest of fracture systems, a single set of parallel fractures, is treated to demonstrate the usefulness of stochastic analysis. Explicit equations for conductivity of an element are developed and the dispersion characteristics are shown. The analysis reveals the dependence of the representative element properties on the various parameters used to describe the fracture system. 10 refs., 3 figs.

Clemo, T.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Representative Consumer's Risk Aversion and Efficient Risk-Sharing Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumer as the sum of two components. The first one is a weighted sum of the derivatives of the individual consumers absolute cautiousness, and the second is a positive multiple of the weighted vari- 1We refer to some of these contributions in the rest... , and complete. Denote its strict part by i and symmetric part by ?i, then ?i i ?i for every ?i ? Z?i and every ?i 6? Z?i , and ?i ?i ?i for every ?i 6? Z?i and every ?i 6? Z?i . Thus the random variables ?i for which ui (?i) is not integrable are the least...

Hara, Chiaki; Kuzmics, Christoph

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Estimated Global Hydrographic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An estimate is made of the three-dimensional global oceanic temperature and salinity variability, omitting the seasonal cycle, both as a major descriptive element of the ocean circulation and for use in the error estimates of state estimation. ...

Gal Forget; Carl Wunsch

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability  

SciTech Connect

If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Consumption Externalities: A Representative Consumer Model when Agents are Heterogeneous *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We examine a growth model with consumption externalities where agents differ in their initial capital endowment and their reference group. We show under which conditions the aggregate equilibrium with heterogeneous agents replicates that obtained with a representative consumer, despite the fact that different individuals have different consumption levels. Next we consider the implications of the presence of consumption externalities for the long-run distributions of income and wealth. We find that, in a growing economy, keeping up with the Joneses results in less inequality than would prevail in an economy with no consumption externalities.

Cecilia Garca-pealosa; Stephen J. Turnovsky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Facility Representative Program: Criteria Review and Approach Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools Surveillance Guides Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Criteria Review and Approach Document This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person. Communications NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan Configuration Management Configuration Management Assessment Plan Confined Space Confined Spaces Assessment Plan Conduct of Operations Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan Electrical Assessment Electrical Safety Assessment Plan Facility Procedures Verification and Validation of Facility Procedures Assessment Plan Hoisting and Rigging

211

M.: An Ontology-Based Framework for Representing Organizational Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper describes an ontology-based organizational knowledge representation framework focused on the specification of a two kinds of ontologies: the top level ontology containing concepts characterizing the typical organizational background and COKE ontologies representing so called core organizational knowledge entities. The framework constitutes an abstract representation of organizational knowledge providing a semantic support for designing knowledge management infrastructure able to interoperate with systems already existing in an organization. Moreover, the annotation of COKE w.r.t. the top level ontology allowed by the framework facilitates their semi-automatic handling, retrieval and evolution monitoring.

Andrea Gualtieri; Massimo Ruffolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

213

Surface Wind Direction Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Common large shifts of wind direction in the weak-wind nocturnal boundary layer are poorly understood and are not adequately captured by numerical models and statistical parameterizations. The current study examines 15 datasets representing a ...

Larry Mahrt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

2Q CY2004, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment Attachment Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report September 20, 2004 Distribution: Kyle McSlarrow, S-2 Bruce Carnes, S-2 Les Novitsky, S-2 David Garman, S-3 Linton Brooks, NA-1 Tyler Przybylek, NA-1 Everet Beckner, NA-10 James Mangeno, NA-3.6 Glenn Podonsky, SP-1 Mike Kilpatrick, OA-1 Patricia Worthington, OA-40 Paul Golan, EM-1 Inés Triay, EM-3 Patty Bubar, EM-3.2 Raymond Orbach, SC-1 Milt Johnson, SC-3 William Magwood, NE-1 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office Manager, Office of River Protection

215

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

216

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

217

Facility Representative Program Assessment Criteria, Review, and Approach Document (CRAD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 Appendix B B-1 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDE The DOE has implemented its FR Program, and is looking to continuously improve the program's effectiveness DOE-wide. An effective FR Program has many elements, as described in this Standard. These elements are intended to yield a program that provides DOE facilities with well-trained FRs who spend appropriate amounts of time in their facilities and can work effectively with their contractor management counterparts. The program, to be effective, needs the functional support of management. To maintain the continued support of DOE management, the FR program needs to demonstrate its continued performance and effectiveness, which is to be assessed periodically using

218

A BRIEF REVIEW OF MODELS REPRESENTING CREEP OF ALLOY 617  

SciTech Connect

Alloy 617 is being considered for the construction of components to operate in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Service temperatures will range from 650 to 1000 C. To meet the needs of the conceptual designers of this plant, a materials handbook is being developed that will provide information on alloy 617, as well as other materials of interest. The database for alloy 617 to be incorporated into the handbook was produced in the 1970s and 1980s, while creep and damage models were developed from the database for use in the design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. In the work reported here, the US database and creep models are briefly reviewed. The work reported represents progress toward a useful model of the behavior of this material in the temperature range of 650 to 1000 C.

Swindeman, Robert W [ORNL; Swindeman, Michael [University of Dayton Research Institute; Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

DOE-STD-1063-2000 - Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-97 October 1997 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1063-2000 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The Revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of

220

SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MINOR SUBDIVISION MINOR SUBDIVISION Jeff Martus 01-903-3481 SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY See attached. National Energy Strategy The Department of Energy (DOE) was directed by President Bush on July 26, 1989 to begin the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES). Published in February 1991, the NES provides the foundation for a more efficient, less vulnerable, and environmentally sustainable energy future. The NES defines international, commercial, regulatory, and technological policy tools that diversify U.S. resources of energy supplies and offers more flexibility and efficiency in the way energy is transformed and used. This proposed schedule provides for the disposition of records that have been created or received by DOE in connection with the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Georeactor Variability and Integrity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a deep-Earth energy source, the planetocentric nuclear-fission georeactor concept is on a more secure scientific footing than the previous idea related to the assumed growth of the inner core. Unlike previously considered deep-Earth energy sources, which are essentially constant on a human time-scale, variability in nuclear fission reactors can arise from changes in composition and/or position of fuel, moderators, and neutron absorbers. Tantalizing circumstantial evidence invites inquiry into the possibility of short-term planetocentric nuclear fission reactor variability. This brief communication emphasizes the importance of scientific integrity and highlights the possibility of variable georeactor power output so that these might be borne in mind in future investigations, especially those related to the Earth's heat flux.

J. Marvin Herndon

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

Georeactor Variability and Integrity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a deep-Earth energy source, the planetocentric nuclear-fission georeactor concept is on a more secure scientific footing than the previous idea related to the assumed growth of the inner core. Unlike previously considered deep-Earth energy sources, which are essentially constant on a human time-scale, variability in nuclear fission reactors can arise from changes in composition and/or position of fuel, moderators, and neutron absorbers. Tantalizing circumstantial evidence invites inquiry into the possibility of short-term planetocentric nuclear fission reactor variability. This brief communication emphasizes the importance of scientific integrity and highlights the possibility of variable georeactor power output so that these might be borne in mind in future investigations, especially those related to the Earth's heat flux.

Herndon, J M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Essays on finance and macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies the role of the financial system in the amplification and propagation of business cycles. Chapter 1 studies the origin and propagation of balance sheet recessions. I first show that in standard models ...

Di Tella, Sebastian T. (Sebastian Tariacuri)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Essays in macroeconomics and finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first chapter proposes a model of booms and busts in housing and non-housing consumption driven by the interplay between relatively low interest rates and an expansion of credit, triggered by further decline in interest ...

Mohsenzadeh Kermani, Amir Reza

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Indonesia's Macroeconomic and Trade Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the links between Indonesia's growth, debt, and trade performances from 1970 to 1990, and it compares Indonesia's performance with countries that have similar characteristics. This descriptive analysis points to the strong influence of oil revenue fluctuations, open capital markets, and exchange rate management on Indonesia's economy. A decomposition analysis of Indonesia's uses of external debt indicates that the financing of current account deficits cannot explain large proportions of rapid debt accumulation after 1970. Finally, Indonesia's real manufactured export growth of at least 28 percent per year during the 1980s rivalled its regional neighbors. Indonesia's experience demonstrates that despite severe external shocks, sensible policy reforms can help developing countries to achieve impressive economic performances. Yana van der Meulen Rodgers is an Assistant Professor at the College of William and

Yana Van Der Meulen Rodgers; Yana Van Der Meulen Rodgers

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Modeling 18 Water Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability of 18 Water formation is investigated with an isopycnic-coordinate model of the North Atlantic. A 30-year spinup integration is used as a control experiment in which the upper water column in the Sargasso Sea is shown to be in ...

Robert Marsh; Adrian L. New

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

228

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greening the Capitol initiative was launched in March, 2007 with the threefold goals of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use by 50percent in ten years, and 3) becoming a model of sustainable operations. We report on the recommendations to meet these goals, looking at the targets of opportunity at the Capitol Power Plant, the existing buildings, and the overall operations of the complex. Our findings have shown that these goals are achievable, and that through an integrated approach the savings in carbon and energy can be met. Specific examples include the lighting retrofits in the House offices, parking areas, and the Capitol dome; the retrofits to the HVAC systems and controls, including duct sealing, improving the efficiency of the energy and water use in the food service areas; and improved operations of the steam and chilled water distribution system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy consumption. We report on the technical opportunities presented by these historic and symbolic buildings in becoming models of sustainability.

Diamond, Rick; Diamond, Rick; Payne, Christopher

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Exclusivity structures and graph representatives of local complementation orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a construction that maps any connected graph G on three or more vertices into a larger graph, H(G), whose independence number is strictly smaller than its Lov\\'asz number which is equal to its fractional packing number. The vertices of H(G) represent all possible events consistent with the stabilizer group of the graph state associated with G, and exclusive events are adjacent. Mathematically, the graph H(G) corresponds to the orbit of G under local complementation. Physically, the construction translates into graph-theoretic terms the connection between a graph state and a Bell inequality maximally violated by quantum mechanics. In the context of zero-error information theory, the construction suggests a protocol achieving the maximum rate of entanglement-assisted capacity, a quantum mechanical analogue of the Shannon capacity, for each H(G). The violation of the Bell inequality is expressed by the one-shot version of this capacity being strictly larger than the independence number. Finally, given the correspondence between graphs and exclusivity structures, we are able to compute the independence number for certain infinite families of graphs with the use of quantum non-locality, therefore highlighting an application of quantum theory in the proof of a purely combinatorial statement.

Adan Cabello; Matthew G. Parker; Giannicola Scarpa; Simone Severini

2012-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

230

Variable percentage sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remotely operable sampler is provided for obtaining variable percentage samples of nuclear fuel particles and the like for analyses. The sampler has a rotating cup for a sample collection chamber designed so that the effective size of the sample inlet opening to the cup varies with rotational speed. Samples of a desired size are withdrawn from a flowing stream of particles without a deterrent to the flow of remaining particles.

Miller, Jr., William H. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Variable laser attenuator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

Foltyn, S.R.

1987-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

Variable laser attenuator  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Solar-type Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rich acoustic oscillation spectrum in solar-type variables make these stars particularly interesting for studying fluid-dynamical aspects of the stellar interior. I present a summary of the properties of solar-like oscillations, how they are excited and damped and discuss some of the recent progress in using asteroseismic diagnostic techniques for analysing low-degree acoustic modes. Also the effects of stellar-cycle variations in low-mass main-sequence stars are addressed.

Houdek, Gunter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Errors in all variables  

SciTech Connect

We present a thorough derivation of the posterior for the straight line fit employing the hyper-plane prior. For the example of the parabola we enlarge the scope to nonlinear problems, however simplify it to be solved resembling the straight line solution. Finally we come to the problem of determining the exponents of a scaling law, where in logarithmic form the scaling exponents are linear coefficients of logarithmic variables.

Preuss, R.; Dose, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

Jets with Variable R  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new class of jet algorithms designed to return conical jets with a variable Delta R radius. A specific example, in which Delta R scales as 1/pT, proves particularly useful in capturing the kinematic features of a wide variety of hard scattering processes. We implement this Delta R scaling in a sequential recombination algorithm and test it by reconstructing resonance masses and kinematic endpoints. These test cases show 10-20% improvements in signal efficiency compared to fixed Delta R algorithms. We also comment on cuts useful in reducing continuum jet backgrounds.

David Krohn; Jesse Thaler; Lian-Tao Wang

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Solar Irradiance Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sun has long been considered a constant star, to the extent that its total irradiance was termed the solar constant. It required radiometers in space to detect the small variations in solar irradiance on timescales of the solar rotation and the solar cycle. A part of the difficulty is that there are no other constant natural daytime sources to which the Sun's brightness can be compared. The discovery of solar irradiance variability rekindled a long-running discussion on how strongly the Sun affects our climate. A non-negligible influence is suggested by correlation studies between solar variability and climate indicators. The mechanism for solar irradiance variations that fits the observations best is that magnetic features at the solar surface, i.e. sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network, are responsible for almost all variations (although on short timescales convection and p-mode oscillations also contribute). In spite of significant progress important questions are still open. Thus there is a debat...

Solanki, Sami K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Climate Variability, Fish, and Fisheries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish population variability and fisheries activities are closely linked to weather and climate dynamics. While weather at sea directly affects fishing, environmental variability determines the distribution, migration, and abundance of fish. ...

P. Lehodey; J. Alheit; M. Barange; T. Baumgartner; G. Beaugrand; K. Drinkwater; J.-M. Fromentin; S. R. Hare; G. Ottersen; R. I. Perry; C. Roy; C. D. van der Lingen; F. Werner

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Colorado River Basin Hydroclimatic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of annual hydroclimatic variability in the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) for the period of 19062006 was performed to understand the dominant modes of multidecadal variability. First, wavelet-based spectral analysis was employed ...

Kenneth Nowak; Martin Hoerling; Balaji Rajagopalan; Edith Zagona

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Scalable analysis of variable software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of variability management and generator technology enables users to derive individual variants from a variable code base based on a selection of desired configuration options. This approach gives rise to the generation of possibly billions ... Keywords: C Preprocessor, Liveness Analysis, Software Product Lines, Type Checking, Variability-aware Analysis

Jrg Liebig; Alexander von Rhein; Christian Kstner; Sven Apel; Jens Drre; Christian Lengauer

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Variability within Modeling Language Definitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a taxonomy of the variability mechanisms offered by modeling languages. The definition of a formal language encompasses a syntax and a semantic domain as well as the mapping that relates them, thus language variabilities are classified according ... Keywords: Modeling languages, UML, formal semantics, variability

Mara Victoria Cengarle; Hans Grnniger; Bernhard Rumpe

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Symmetrization Of Binary Random Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A random variable Y is called an independent symmetrizer of a given random variable X if (a) it is independent of X and (b) the distribution of X Y is symmetric about 0. In cases where the distribution of X is symmetric about its mean, it is easy to see that the constant random variable Y is a minimum-variance independent symmetrizer. Taking

Abram Kagan; Colin Mallows; Larry Shepp; Robert J. Vanderbei; Yehuda Vardi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measurement of GCM Skill in Predicting Variables Relevant for Hydroclimatological Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations from general circulation models are now being used for a variety of studies and purposes. With up to 23 different GCMs now available, it is desirable to determine whether a specific variable from a particular model is representative ...

Fiona Johnson; Ashish Sharma

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Facility Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Industry Documents ... 3 2.1.1 DOE Directives (Polices, Orders, Manuals, Guides) ... 3 2.1.2 DOE...

244

VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

Gross, J.E.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

CDIAC Climate Data: Available Variables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Variables Available in CDIAC Data Products Temperature Precipitation Cloudiness Sunshine Duration Snowfall and Snow Depth Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Moisture Surface...

246

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the...

247

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit...

248

Climatic variability within an equilibrium greenhouse simulation  

SciTech Connect

A simulation of the possible consequences of a doubling of the CO{sub 2} content of the atmosphere has been performed with a low resolution global climatic model. The model included the diurnal and seasonal computed sea ice amount and cloud cover, and used implied oceanic heat fluxes to represent transport processes in the oceans. A highly responsive 2-layer soil moisture formulation was also incorporated. Twenty year equilibrated simulations for control (1xCO{sub 2}) and greenhouse (2xCO{sub 2}) conditions were generated. The major emphasis of the analysis presented here is on the intra-annual and interannual variability of the greenhouse run with respect to the control run. This revealed considerable differences from the time-averaged results with occasions of marked positive and negative temperature deviations. Of particular interest were the periods of negative temperature departures compared to the control run which were identified, especially over the Northern Hemisphere continents. Temporal and spatial precipitation and soil moisture anomalies also occurred, some of which were related to the surface temperature changes. Substantial sea surface temperature anomalies were apparent in the greenhouse run, indicating that a source of climatic forcing existed in addition to that due to doubling of the CO{sub 2}. Comparison of the intra-annual and interannual variability of the control run with that of the greenhouse run suggests that, in many situations, it will be difficult to identify a greenhouse signal against the intrinsic natural variability of the climatic system. 35 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

Gordon, H.B.; Hunt, B.G. [CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Victoria (Austria)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

On Sub-ENSO Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multichannel singular spectrum analysis (MSSA) of surface zonal wind, sea surface temperature (SST), 20 isotherm depth, and surface zonal current observations (between 1990 and 2004) identifies three coupled oceanatmosphere modes of variability ...

Noel S. Keenlyside; Mojib Latif; Anke Drkop

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix,

251

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena,

252

Selection of a representative set of parameters for robust ordinal regression outranking methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of a representative set of parameters for multiple criteria outranking methods: ELECTRE^G^K^M^S and PROMETHEE^G^K^S which apply the principle of robust ordinal regression. We exploit the necessary and the possible results provided ... Keywords: ELECTRE-like method, Outranking relation, PROMETHEE-like method, Representative preference model, Representative set of parameters, Robust ordinal regression

Mi?osz Kadzi?ski; Salvatore Greco; Roman S?owi?ski

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most perplexing problems for industrial power plants committed to improving competitiveness is measuring variable cost performance over time. Because variable costs like fuel and electricity represent the overwhelming majority of power plant expenses, it is imperative to develop and deploy a tool that can help plants benchmark operating performance. This paper introduces a benchmarking methodology designed to meet this need. The "Energy Conversion Index" (ECI) ratios the "value" of utilities exported from the power plant to the actual cost of the fuel and electricity required to produce them, generating a single number or "index." Variable cost performance is benchmarked by comparing the index from one period of time to the index of another comparable period of time. Savings (or costs) attributable to excellent (or poor) performance can easily be calculated by using the former period's index to project the current period's cost.

Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and...

255

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and...

256

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

257

Representing Twentieth-Century SpaceTime Climate Variability. Part II: Development of 190196 Monthly Grids of Terrestrial Surface Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe the construction of a 0.5 latlong gridded dataset of monthly terrestrial surface climate for the period of 190196. The dataset comprises a suite of seven climate elements: precipitation, mean temperature, diurnal ...

Mark New; Mike Hulme; Phil Jones

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

An architecture for component-based design of representative-based clustering algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an architecture for the design of representative-based clustering algorithms based on reusable components. These components were derived from K-means-like algorithms and their extensions. With the suggested clustering design architecture, ... Keywords: Architecture, Generic algorithm, K-means, Representative-based clustering algorithms, Reusable component

Boris Delibai?; Milan Vuki?evi?; Milo Jovanovi?; Kathrin Kirchner; Johannes Ruhland; Milija Suknovi?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Regional Heat Sources and the Active and Break Phases of Boreal Summer Intraseasonal (3050 Day) Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boreal summer intraseasonal variability (BSISV) associated with the 3050-day mode is represented by the coexistence of three components: poleward propagation of convection over the Indian and tropical west Pacific longitudes and eastward ...

H. Annamalai; K. R. Sperber

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Effects of mineral aerosols on the summertime climate of southwest Asia: Incorporating subgrid variability in a dust emission scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Improvements in modeling mineral aerosols over southwest Asia are made to the dust scheme in a regional climate model by representing subgrid variability of both wind speed and surface roughness length. The new module ...

Marcella, Marc Pace

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 80% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 87%) 89% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 86%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is > 40%) 76% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is >

262

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Representatives of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations February 26, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify on the Office of Inspector General's recent inquiry concerning Los Alamos National Laboratory. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, February 26, 2003

263

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) staff on FR Program issues, including staffing, training and qualification, recruitment, and retention. The Board is clearly interested in the

264

Interannual Variability of the Global Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interannual variability of the global radiation budget, regions that contribute to its variability, and what limits albedo variability are investigated using Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) data taken from March 2000 through ...

Seiji Kato

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Variable focal length deformable mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

Headley, Daniel (Albuquerque, NM); Ramsey, Marc (Albuquerque, NM); Schwarz, Jens (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Do Global Models Properly Represent the Feedback between Land and Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment/Climate Variability and Predictability (GEWEX/CLIVAR) Global LandAtmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) has provided an estimate of the global distribution of landatmosphere coupling strength during ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Randal D. Koster; Zhichang Guo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Tropical Tropopause Transition Layer Cirrus as Represented by CALIPSO Lidar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal variability of cirrus cloud fraction within the tropical tropopause transition layer (TTL) is investigated based on three years of data from the CloudAerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) ...

Katrina S. Virts; John M. Wallace; Qiang Fu; Thomas P. Ackerman

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Operating Reserves and Variable Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report tries to first generalize the requirements of the power system as it relates to the needs of operating reserves. It also includes a survey of operating reserves and how they are managed internationally in system operations today and then how new studies and research are proposing they may be managed in the future with higher penetrations of variable generation.

Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record during big move | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for ... U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record

270

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of Representatives Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2003 Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) reviews of management practices at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In February of this year, I testified before this Subcommittee regarding our Special Inquiry report on Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/IG-0584, January 2003). That report noted a series of actions taken by

271

Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES The familiar level of this module is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011, the purpose of the FR program, and the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of FRs and other key personnel. In the second section, the requirements of the FR program are discussed. The third section covers the three appendices of this standard: FR performance indicators, an FR program assessment guide, and the process to determine FR staffing. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives

272

Selecting Representative Days for More Efficient Dynamical Climate Downscaling: Application to Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new computationally efficient and statistically robust sampling method for generating dynamically downscaled climatologies. It is based on a Monte Carlo method coupled with stratified sampling. A small yet representative set ...

Daran L. Rife; Emilie Vanvyve; James O. Pinto; Andrew J. Monaghan; Christopher A. Davis; Gregory S. Poulos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The U.S. House of Representatives The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization April 5 2005 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding recent allegations of misconduct involving documents associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Disposal of the Nation's high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is one of the most sensitive and complex challenges facing the U.S.

274

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations March 4, 2004 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Herbert Richardson, Principal Deputy Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding physical security at the Department of Energy's facilities. The Department's activities range from nuclear nonproliferation, to cutting edge research and development, to weapons programs. The sensitive and critical nature of the Department's work

275

On the Use of Multi-dimensional Dynamic Logic Programming to Represent Societal Agents' Viewpoints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the applicability of the new paradigm of Multi-dimensional Dynamic Logic Programming to represent an agent's view of the combination of societal knowledge dynamics. The representation of a dynamic society of agents is the core of ...

Joo Alexandre Leite; Jos Jlio Alferes; Lus Moniz Pereira

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

277

Weather pattern classification to represent the urban heat island in present and future climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A classification of weather patterns (WP) is derived that is tailored to best represent situations relevant for the urban heat island (UHI). Three different types of k-means-based cluster methods are conducted. The explained cluster variance is ...

Peter Hoffmann; K. Heinke Schlnzen

278

An abstract schema for representing semantic roles and modelling the syntax-semantics interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel approach to semantic role annotation implementing an entailment-based view of the concept of semantic role. I propose to represent arguments of predicates with grammatically relevant primitive properties entailed by the semantics ...

Voula Gotsoulia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends oleosin genes. Microscopy examination of Physcomitrella revealed that oil bodies (OBs) were abundant in the photosynthetic vegetative gametophyte and the reproductive spore. Chromatography illustrated the neutral lipids

Gent, Universiteit

280

Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory August 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Secretary Chu will join Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Mike Honda and Stanford University President John Hennessy at a dedication ceremony for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Recovery Act-funded LCLS produces x-ray pulses millions of times brighter than the world's most powerful synchrotron sources, capable of capturing images of atoms and molecules in motion. The LCLS is led by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). Operated by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received funding from the Department for several transformational clean energy research projects. The Secretary is visiting UTC to highlight the importance of investing in innovation and clean energy to put people back to work, grow the economy, and win the future. He will be joined by U.S. Representatives John Larson and Joe Courtney for a tour

282

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - In a speech at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for the United States, and requires a similar mobilization of America's innovation machine so that we can compete in the global race for the jobs of the future. Secretary Chu outlined efforts underway at the Department to give America's entrepreneurs and manufacturers an edge through investments in clean energy innovation.

283

SLUDGE BATCH VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) initiated processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) in the summer of 2010. In support of processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 418 to process SB6. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB6 available at the time from the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) and SRNL (using a model-based approach). To support qualification of SB6, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB6. The durability models were assessed over the expected Frit 418-SB6 composition range. Seventeen glasses were selected for the variability study based on the sludge projections used in the frit recommendation. Five of the glasses are based on the centroid of the compositional region, spanning a waste loading (WL) range of 32 to 40%. The remaining twelve glasses are extreme vertices (EVs) of the sludge region of interest for SB6 combined with Frit 418 and are all at 36% WL. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). After initiating the SB6 variability study, the measured composition of the SB6 Tank 51 qualification glass produced at the SRNL Shielded Cells Facility indicated that thorium was present in the glass at an appreciable concentration (1.03 wt%), which made it a reportable element for SB6. This concentration of ThO{sub 2} resulted in a second phase of experimental studies. Five glasses were formulated that were based on the centroid of the new sludge compositional region combined with Frit 418, spanning a WL range of 32 to 40%. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis and the PCT. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses (with and without thorium) were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass regardless of thermal history. All of the normalized boron releases were less than 1 g/L. While all of the targeted glass compositions were predictable with respect to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, a small number of the measured glass compositions were located outside of the lower prediction limit indicating poorer durability than what was actually measured. These unpredictable glasses were in the same lithium metaborate (LM) preparation block during the chemical analyses, which resulted in measured compositions that were not representative of the target compositions. A review of the data did not indicate a clear cause for the problem. Re-digestion and re-measurement of three glasses from this preparation block yielded glass compositions closer to the target values and predicted PCT responses within the PCCS model uncertainty. Therefore, it is believed that the glasses were correctly fabricated and the targeted compositions are closer representations of the true compositions. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable for the SB6/Frit 418 glass system. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable and/or acceptable with respect to the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the inclusion of ThO{sub 2} was shown to have minimal impact on the acceptability and predictability of the variability study glasses.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

284

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ? 180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community. 1.

C. D. Impey; C. E. Petry; Csar Briceo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

Briceo, C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

Cesar Briceno

2003-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

287

Lecture 2227 Continuous Random Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-x/100 dx = -e-x/100 100 0 = 1 - e-1 = .632 text typo Example 3 (Light Bulb): The lifetime X, in hours, of a certain kind of light bulb is a continuous random variable with density f(x) = 1500 x2 I(1500,) Check = 1 4 = p Let B denote the number of failures before 2000 hours among 5 light bulbs. Then P(B 1) = P

Scholz, Fritz

288

Lecture 2227 Continuous Random Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) = 100 0 1 100 e-x/100 dx = -e-x/100 100 0 = 1 - e-1 = .632 text typo Example 3 (Light Bulb): The lifetime X, in hours, of a certain kind of light bulb is a continuous random variable with density f 2000 1500 = 1 - 3 4 = 1 4 = p Let B denote the number of failures before 2000 hours among 5 light bulbs

Scholz, Fritz

289

Variable Iron K-alpha Lines in Seyfert 1 Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find that variability of the iron K-alpha line is common in Seyfert 1 galaxies. Using data from the ASCA archive for objects that have been observed more than once during the mission, we study the time-averaged spectra from individual observations, thereby probing variability on timescales that range from days to years. Since the statistics of the data do not warrant searches for line variability in terms of a complex physical model, we use a a simple Gaussian to model the gross shape of the line, and then use the centroid energy, intensity and equivalent width as robust indicators of changes in the line profile. We find that ~70% of Seyfert 1s (ten out of fifteen) show variability in at least one of these parameters: the centroid energy, intensity, and equivalent width vary in six, four, and eight sources respectively. Due to the low S/N, limited sampling and time averaging, we consider these results to represent lower limits to the rate of incidence of variability. In most cases changes in the line do not appear to track changes in the continuum. In particular, we find no evidence for variability of the line intensity in NGC 4151, suggesting an origin in a region larger than the putative accretion disk, where most of the iron line has been thought to originate. Mkn 279 is investigated on short timescales. The time-averaged effective line energy is 6.5 keV in the galaxy rest frame. As the continuum flux increases by 20% in a few hours, the Fe K line responds with the effective line energy increasing by 0.22 keV (~10,500 km s^-1). Problems with the ASCA and Rosat calibration that affect simultaneous spectral fits are discussed in an appendix.

K. A. Weaver; J. Gelbord; T. Yaqoob

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations April 5, 2005 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the results of our work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, one of the Department of Energy's most prominent facilities. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, May 5, 2005

291

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is charged under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) with modernizing the nation's electricity grid to improve its reliability and efficiency. As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a DOE-sponsored publication released in 2008 and available online at www.smartgrid.gov, this publication is one in a series of books designed to better acquaint discrete stakeholder groups with the promise and possibilities of the Smart Grid. Stakeholder groups include Utilities, Regulators, Policymakers, Technology Providers, Consumer Advocates and Environmental Groups.

292

On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organiz  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff and members of the Compressed Air and Gas Institute (CAGI) along with some compressed air experts at the offices of the Alliance to Save Energy to explore and discuss a consensus approach to advancing energy efficiency of compressed air systems within the context of the DOE's potential rulemaking on compressors. The group discussed the need to assemble the relevant data and technical content that will be valuable in identifying possible pathways to achieve a meaningful and appropriate compressor standard that maximizes energy savings potential without creating an undue burden on the market. Representing the energy efficiency advocacy organizations were Tracy Kohler of the Compressed Air

293

December 17, 1998 Memo, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

mE mE F 1325.8 (a89) EFG (U7-W) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: December 17, 1998 REPLY TO ATTN OF: FM- 10(J. Hassenfeldt, 202 586-1643) SUBJECT Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program TO:Distribution The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40 annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives

294

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? … An ISCCP Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? - An ISCCP Perspective C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia G. Tselioudis National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has established comprehensive cloud and radiation observatories in various locations across the globe with the aim of collecting measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and thermal infrared radiative transfer in clouds and at the surface. The locales of the individual ARM sites were chosen because they represent typical cloud regimes occurring in various climate regimes (Stokes and Schwartz

295

Variability of consumer impacts from energy efficiency standards  

SciTech Connect

A typical prospective analysis of the expected impact of energy efficiency standards on consumers is based on average economic conditions (e.g., energy price) and operating characteristics. In fact, different consumers face different economic conditions and exhibit different behaviors when using an appliance. A method has been developed to characterize the variability among individual households and to calculate the life-cycle cost of appliances taking into account those differences. Using survey data, this method is applied to a distribution of consumers representing the U.S. Examples of clothes washer standards are shown for which 70-90% of the population benefit, compared to 10-30% who are expected to bear increased costs due to new standards. In some cases, sufficient data exist to distinguish among demographic subgroups (for example, low income or elderly households) who are impacted differently from the general population. Rank order correlations between the sampled input distributions and the sampled output distributions are calculated to determine which variability inputs are main factors. This ''importance analysis'' identifies the key drivers contributing to the range of results. Conversely, the importance analysis identifies variables that, while uncertain, make so little difference as to be irrelevant in deciding a particular policy. Examples will be given from analysis of water heaters to illustrate the dominance of the policy implications by a few key variables.

McMahon, James E.; Liu, Xiaomin

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

A computational method to extract macroscopic variables and their dynamics in multiscale systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic method to identify and extract the slow variables from a high-dimensional complex multiscale system is developed. The slow subspace is unravelled by employing the transfer operator and the Koopman operator the eigenfunctions of which are used to define a projection onto a slow subspace. The full system is then reformulated in terms of those slow variables, and we present and effective multiscale integrator, which allows for a large macro time step to propagate forward the slow variables. We illustrate our method with several examples and show how the reduced slow dynamics faithfully represents statistical features of the full dynamics which are not coordinate dependent.

Gary Froyland; Georg A. Gottwald; Andy Hammerlindl

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Essays on Monetary Policy and International Macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stochastic general equilibrium model with search and matching frictionsstochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model with search and matching frictions

Mileva, Mariya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Macroeconomic Conditions, Firm Characteristics, and ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

rate as well as the dynamics of the asset value of the issuing firm. ..... each credit rating over a given horizon, the calibration yields a distinctive value of ..... Conference in Venice, Italy, the 2004 FMA Annual Meeting in New Orleans, and at...

299

Essays on frictions in financial macroeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stoneridge Inc. Small XOM Exxon Mobil Corp. Large Decemberof the US equity market Exxon Mobil and General Electric

Kay, Benjamin S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Macroeconomic Implications of the Zero Lower Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.4 Oil Shocks: Standard ErrorCorrection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A.5 Oil Shocks:A.6 Oil Shocks: Event

Wieland, Johannes Friedrich

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Essays in macroeconomics : information and financial markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies how information imperfections affect financial markets and the macroeconomy. Chapter 1 considers an economy where investors delegate their investment decisions to financial institutions that choose ...

Iovino, Luigi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Essays on the macroeconomics of economic development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 contains a theory of misallocation. In contrast to a recent literature where misallocation stems from imperfect input markets, I study an economy with non-competitive output markets. This change of focus has two ...

Peters, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Macroeconomic Implications of the Zero Lower Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is large. In addition the quantity of oil supplied mustequal the quantity of oil demanded, X(t) = X F (t) + X H (t)

Wieland, Johannes Friedrich

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

AGENT-BASED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING AND MACROECONOMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

published before and since the pair of essays in which Clio, the muse of History, was coupled that Schumpeter's gale of `creative destruction' is blowing continuously at full force, through every niche, nook

Tesfatsion, Leigh

305

Essays on macroeconomics and international trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the study of different aspects of income inequality across and within countries. In the first chapter, I study how the optimal provision of human capital is distorted in the presence of borrowing ...

Mestieri, Mart (Mestieri Ferre)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Quantum computation and hidden variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many physicists limit oneself to an instrumentalist description of quantum phenomena and ignore the problems of foundation and interpretation of quantum mechanics. This instrumentalist approach results to "specialization barbarism" and mass delusion concerning the problem, how a quantum computer can be made. The idea of quantum computation can be described within the limits of quantum formalism. But in order to understand how this idea can be put into practice one should realize the question: "What could the quantum formalism describe?", in spite of the absence of an universally recognized answer. Only a realization of this question and the undecided problem of quantum foundations allows to see in which quantum systems the superposition and EPR correlation could be expected. Because of the "specialization barbarism" many authors are sure that Bell proved full impossibility of any hidden-variables interpretation. Therefore it is important to emphasize that in reality Bell has restricted to validity limits of the no- hidden-variables proof and has shown that two-state quantum system can be described by hidden variables. The later means that no experimental result obtained on two-state quantum system can prove the existence of superposition and violation of the realism. One should not assume before unambiguous experimental evidence that any two-state quantum system is quantum bit. No experimental evidence of superposition of macroscopically distinct quantum states and of a quantum bit on base of superconductor structure was obtained for the present. Moreover same experimental results can not be described in the limits of the quantum formalism.

V. V. Aristov; A. V. Nikulov

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer for accurately measuring mechanical displacements in the presence of high magnetic fields is provided. The device utilizes a movable primary coil inside a fixed secondary coil that consists of two series-opposed windings. Operation is such that the secondary output voltage is maintained in phase (depending on polarity) with the primary voltage. The transducer is well-suited to long cable runs and is useful for measuring small displacements in the presence of high or alternating magnetic fields.

Ellis, James F. (Powell, TN); Walstrom, Peter L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

DETECTING VARIABILITY IN MASSIVE ASTRONOMICAL TIME-SERIES DATA. II. VARIABLE CANDIDATES IN THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present variability analysis of data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Using the clustering method, which defines variable candidates as outliers from large clusters, we cluster 16,189,040 light curves having data points at more than 15 epochs as variable and non-variable candidates in 638 NSVS fields. Variable candidates are selected depending on how strongly they are separated from the largest cluster and how rarely they are grouped together in eight-dimensional space spanned by variability indices. All NSVS light curves are also cross-correlated with IRAS, AKARI, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and GALEX objects, as well as known objects in the SIMBAD database. The variability analysis and cross-correlation results are provided in a public online database, which can be used to select interesting objects for further investigation. Adopting conservative selection criteria for variable candidates, we find about 1.8 million light curves as possible variable candidates in the NSVS data, corresponding to about 10% of our entire NSVS sample. Multi-wavelength colors help us find specific types of variability among the variable candidates. Moreover, we also use morphological classification from other surveys such as SDSS to suppress spurious cases caused by blending objects or extended sources due to the low angular resolution of the NSVS.

Shin, Min-Su [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yi, Hahn; Kim, Dae-Won; Chang, Seo-Won [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Yong-Ik, E-mail: msshin@umich.edu, E-mail: yihahn@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: dakim@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: seowony@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: ybyun@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and University Observatory, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modeling the Effect of Land Surface Evaporation Variability on Precipitation Variability. Part I: General Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first of a two-part article that investigates the impact of land surface evaporation variability on the interannual variability of precipitation and compares it with the impact caused by sea surface temperature variability. Previous ...

Oreste Reale; Paul Dirmeyer

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

311

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife Facilitator Joni E. Baker, Ph.D. Director of Equal Opportunity and Diversity The Texas A&M University System 200 Technology Way, Suite 1281 College Station, Texas 77845-3424 979-458-6203 979-458-6206 (fax

312

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

313

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas Revolution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas to use in conjunction with teaching the battles of the Texas Revolution. A large area is needed the students into two teams: the Mexican Army and the Texas Army. Line each team up, shoulder to shoulder

Wilkins, Neal

314

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

SphereAvatar: a situated display to represent a remote collaborator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An emerging form of telecollaboration utilizes situated or mobile displays at a physical destination to virtually represent remote visitors. An example is a personal telepresence robot, which acts as a physical proxy for a remote visitor, and uses cameras ... Keywords: avatars, mixed reality, remote collaboration, spherical displays, telepresence, telerobotics

Oyewole Oyekoya; William Steptoe; Anthony Steed

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

317

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

318

Variable frequency microwave furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Sources of Variability of Evapotranspiration in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability (19902002) of potential evapotranspiration estimates (ETo) and related meteorological variables from a set of stations from the California Irrigation Management System (CIMIS) is studied. Data from the National Climatic Data ...

Hugo G. Hidalgo; Daniel R. Cayan; Michael D. Dettinger

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Incremental Closure of Free Variable Tableaux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a technique for automated theorem proving with free variable tableaux that does not require backtracking. Most existing automated proof procedures using free variable tableaux require iterative deepening and backtracking over applied ...

Martin Giese

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Thermocline Variability in Different Dynamic Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of thermocline circulation to a variable wind forcing is investigated with quasigeostrophic models. The physical mechanism responsible for the different variability features in various dynamic regions has been highlighted. Special ...

Zhengye Liu

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Non-linear variable selection for artificial neural networks using partial mutual information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been widely used to model environmental processes. The ability of ANN models to accurately represent the complex, non-linear behaviour of relatively poorly understood processes makes them highly suited to this task. ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Environmental modelling, Information theory, Input variable selection, Partial mutual information

Robert J. May; Holger R. Maier; Graeme C. Dandy; T.M.K. Gayani Fernando

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Studies on selection of controlled variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies on selection of controlled variables by Vidar Alstad A Thesis Submitted for the Degree. Thus, the selection of controlled variables integrates the optimization and the control layer. Selecting the right controlled variables can be of paramount importance. Many chem­ ical processes

Skogestad, Sigurd

324

Studies on selection of controlled variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies on selection of controlled variables by Vidar Alstad A Thesis Submitted for the Degree. Thus, the selection of controlled variables integrates the optimization and the control layer. Selecting the right controlled variables can be of paramount importance. Many chem- ical processes

Skogestad, Sigurd

325

Adaptive sampling for Bayesian variable selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive sampling for Bayesian variable selection DAVID J. NOTT Department of Statistics for variable selection and for dealing with model un- certainty have become increasingly popular in recent consider adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo schemes for Bayesian variable selection in Gaussian linear

Blennerhassett, Peter

326

Variable ratio regenerative braking device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Variable residence time vortex combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

Melconian, Jerry O. (76 Beaver Rd., Reading, MA 01867)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Rapid Oscillations in Cataclysmic Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give an overview of the rich phenomenology of dwarf nova oscillations (DNOs) and Quasi-periodic Oscillations (QPOs) observed in cataclysmic variable stars (CVs). The favoured interpretation of these rapid brightness modulations (3 - >1000 s time scales) is that they are magnetic in nature - magnetically channelled accretion from the inner accretion disc for DNOs and possible magnetically excited travelling waves in the disc for QPOs. There is increasing evidence for the magnetic aspects, which extend to lower field the well known properties of strong field (polars) and intermediate strength field (intermediate polars) CVs. The result is that almost all CVs show the presence of magnetic fields on their white dwarf primaries - though for many the intrinsic field may be locally enhanced by the accretion process itself. There are many parallel behaviours with the QPOs seen in X-Ray binaries, with high and low frequency X-Ray QPOs resembling respectively the DNOs and QPOs in CVs.

Brian Warner

2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training To register for this, and any other DAU online course, you must first register in the Federal Acquisition Institute's Training Application System (FAITAS). Steps to register in FAITAS and to register for the course are below. Please note, you are required to provide your Social Security Number (SSN) to complete registration. This is the only time the SSN is required; this information is restricted and not available to unauthorized personnel. Please contact Linda Ott (linda.ott@hq.doe.gov, 202-287-5310) if you have any questions or concerns. If you encounter problems with

330

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

331

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop - Registrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop DOE Fire Safety Workshop Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) Meeting May 14 - 18, 2012, at the Alexis park Resort Hotel, Las Vegas, NV Registrants As of 5/15/2012 Total Number: 218 First Name Last Name Government /Contractor Agency Secretarial Office Site Position Training Course FTCP FS 5/15 FS 5/16 FR/SSO Plenary FR Track SSO Track Fire Safety Training Tour Ron Alderson Government Employee DOE NNSA Nevada SSO SAF-271 No No No Yes No Yes No No Josh Allen Government Employee DOE EM Richland FR No No No No Yes Yes No No No Mark Alsdorf Government Employee DOE HSS Headquarters NTC Safety Training Manager SAF-271 Yes No No Yes No No No No Xavier Aponte Government Employee

332

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid can work harder and more efficiently to respond to the needs of all consumers, contain costs and enable clean-energy solutions at scale. regulators utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Litos Strategic Communication, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information apparatus, product,

333

On October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, an  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe met with DOE to discuss the proposed rules EERE-2010 BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC38 Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Commercial Ice Makers. The meeting was held at the request of Howe Corporation at the DOE offices in Washington DC. In attendance: Ari Altman, DOE Ashley Armstrong, DOE Robert Bittner, Beecon ProfServe John Cymbalsky, DOE Mary Gade, Gade Environmental Group Mary Howe, Howe Corporation Charles Llenza, DOE Jeff Mackowiak, Howe Corporation Mark O'Malley, Gade Environmental Group Howe Corporation introduced and discussed the following concerns regarding the NOPR. For reference,

334

Representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework  

SciTech Connect

Drainage systems can be categorized into natural or geomorphological drainage systems, agricultural drainage systems and urban drainage systems. They interact closely among themselves and with climate and human society, particularly under extreme climate and hydrological events such as floods. This editorial articulates the need to holistically understand and model drainage systems in the context of climate change and human influence, and discusses the requirements and examples of feasible approaches to representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework.

Li, Hongyi; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fatigue of Composite Material Beam Elements Representative of Wind Turbine Blade Substructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The database and analysis methods used to predict wind turbine blade structural performance for stiffness, static strength, dynamic response,and fatigue lifetime are validated through the design, fabrication, and testing of substructural elements. We chose a test specimen representative of wind turbine blade primary substructure to represent the spar area of a typical wind turbine blade. We then designed an I-beam with flanges and web to represent blade structure, using materials typical of many U.S.-manufactured blades. Our study included the fabrication and fatigue testing of 52 beams and many coupons of beam material. Fatigue lifetimes were consistent with predictions based on the coupon database. The final beam specimen proved to be a very useful tool for validating strength and lifetime predictions for a variety of flange and web materials, and is serving as a test bed to ongoing studies of structural details and the interaction between manufacturing and structural performance. Th e beam test results provide a significant validation of the coupon database and the methodologies for predicting fatigue of composite material beam elements.

Mandell, J. F.; Samborsky, D. D.; Combs, D. W.; Scott, M. E.; Cairns, D. S. (Department of Chemical Engineering, Montana State University)

1998-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives

337

Hard X-ray Variability of AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: Active Galactic Nuclei are known to be variable throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. An energy domain poorly studied in this respect is the hard X-ray range above 20 keV. Methods: The first 9 months of the Swift/BAT all-sky survey are used to study the 14 - 195 keV variability of the 44 brightest AGN. The sources have been selected due to their detection significance of >10 sigma. We tested the variability using a maximum likelihood estimator and by analysing the structure function. Results: Probing different time scales, it appears that the absorbed AGN are more variable than the unabsorbed ones. The same applies for the comparison of Seyfert 2 and Seyfert 1 objects. As expected the blazars show stronger variability. 15% of the non-blazar AGN show variability of >20% compared to the average flux on time scales of 20 days, and 30% show at least 10% flux variation. All the non-blazar AGN which show strong variability are low-luminosity objects with L(14-195 keV) < 1E44 erg/sec. Conclusions: Concerning the variability pattern, there is a tendency of unabsorbed or type 1 galaxies being less variable than the absorbed or type 2 objects at hardest X-rays. A more solid anti-correlation is found between variability and luminosity, which has been previously observed in soft X-rays, in the UV, and in the optical domain.

V. Beckmann; S. D. Barthelmy; T. J. -L. Courvoisier; N. Gehrels; S. Soldi; J. Tueller; G. Wendt

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

339

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

340

Statistical description of heavy truck accidents on representative segments of interstate highway  

SciTech Connect

Any quantitative analysis of the risk of transportation accidents requires the use of many different statistical distributions. Included among these are the types of accidents which occur and the severity of these when they do occur. Several previous studies have derived this type of information for truck traffic over U. S. highways in general; these data are not necessarily applicable for the anticipated LMFBR spent fuel cask routes. This report presents data for highway segments representative of the specific LMFBR cask routes which are anticipated. These data are based upon a detailed record-by-record review of filed reports for accidents which occurred along the specified route segments.

Hartman, W.F.; Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Definition: Variable Peak Pricing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Peak Pricing Variable Peak Pricing Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Variable Peak Pricing Variable Peak Pricing (VPP) is a hybrid of time-of-use and real-time pricing where the different periods for pricing are defined in advance (e.g., on-peak=6 hours for summer weekday afternoon; off-peak= all other hours in the summer months), but the price established for the on-peak period varies by utility and market conditions.[1] Related Terms real-time pricing References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/variable_peak_pricing [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitionssmart grid,off-peak,on-peak,smart grid, |Template:BASEPAGENAME]]smart grid,off-peak,on-peak,smart grid, Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Variable_Peak_Pricing&oldid=50262

342

NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high levels of variable electricity eneration. Variable resources are types of electric power generation that rely on an uncontrolled, "variable" fuel (e.g. wind, sunlight,...

343

The use of 'race' as a variable in biomedical research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a variable in biomedical research but mainly to monitor thea Variable in Biomedical Research A dissertation submittedVariable in Biomedical Research. Manifest, Operative and

Efstathiou, Sophia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Monitoring of Photovoltaic Plant Output and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems, including variability characteristics, is of increasing interest to utilities as they integrate more solar energy onto the electric grid. This study is part of a multi-year research series to investigate influencing factors that affect PV plant output, variability, and approaches to system management. It explores PV variability both from a grid perspective and through examination of project design aspects that can affect annual power production. ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper  

SciTech Connect

Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

Dupont, Virginie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative  Safety System Oversight  Fire Safety Facility Representative  Safety System Oversight  Fire Safety Overall Workshop Agenda May 14-18, 2012  Alexis Park Hotel  Las Vegas, Nevada Monday, May 14, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 1) Zeus B Quality Assurance Overview for FR/SSO Personnel Zeus A 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Fire Safety Workshop Track Begins (see track agenda) Parthenon 4 SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 2) Zeus B . Safety Culture Workshop Zeus A Federal Technical Capability Panel Parthenon 2 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Wednesday, May 16, 2012 6:30 a.m. - 7:45 a.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer 8:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. FR/SSO Tracks Begin; Plenary session with Fire Safety Track Parthenon 2 & 4

347

Census Bureau. Field Experiences 2 Field Representative Experiences with the Current Population Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2007, U.S. Census Bureau researchers completed a third pilot study on factors that contribute to gaining cooperation and successfully completing survey interviews. This pilot study was part of a larger effort to systematically study interview dynamics and how they affect respondent cooperation with Census Bureau surveys. The results of this study will add to extant data on two previous pilot studies on gaining cooperation behavior (Beck, Wright, & Petkunas, 2007). In 2006, we collected data from Program Coordinators, Program Supervisors, and Senior Field Representatives (SFRs) working on (Beck, Wright, & Petkunas, 2007). The current pilot study involved collecting information from a sample of Census Bureau survey interviewers, called Field Representatives (FRs), throughout the United States. Like these other field employees, FRs work from one of the twelve Census Bureau Regional Offices, which are responsible for the management of field data collection. The FRs filled out a brief questionnaire asking them to list practices, techniques, and recommendations they felt were either successful or unsuccessful at gaining respondent cooperation with Current Population Survey (CPS) interviews. The CPS is a panel survey involving eight monthly interviews with each sampled household. Respondents complete four consecutive monthly interviews, rotate out

Jennifer Beck; Jennifer Beck

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changes (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

349

Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low the compression ratio can be raised (to as much as 18:1) providing high engine efficiency. It is important to recognize that for a well designed VCR engine cylinder pressure does not need to be higher than found in current production turbocharged engines. As such, there is no need for a stronger crankcase, bearings and other load bearing parts within the VCR engine. The Envera VCR mechanism uses an eccentric carrier approach to adjust engine compression ratio. The crankshaft main bearings are mounted in this eccentric carrier or 'crankshaft cradle' and pivoting the eccentric carrier 30 degrees adjusts compression ratio from 9:1 to 18:1. The eccentric carrier is made up of a casting that provides rigid support for the main bearings, and removable upper bearing caps. Oil feed to the main bearings transits through the bearing cap fastener sockets. The eccentric carrier design was chosen for its low cost and rigid support of the main bearings. A control shaft and connecting links are used to pivot the eccentric carrier. The control shaft mechanism features compression ratio lock-up at minimum and maximum compression ratio settings. The control shaft method of pivoting the eccentric carrier was selected due to its lock-up capability. The control shaft can be rotated by a hydraulic actuator or an electric motor. The engine shown in Figures 3 and 4 has a hydraulic actuator that was developed under the current program. In-line 4-cylinder engines are significantly less expensive than V engines because an entire cylinder head can be eliminated. The cost savings from eliminating cylinders and an entire cylinder head will notably offset the added cost of the VCR and supercharging. Replacing V6 and V8 engines with in-line VCR 4-cylinder engines will provide high fuel economy at low cost. Numerous enabling technologies exist which have the potential to increase engine efficiency. The greatest efficiency gains are realized when the right combination of advanced and new technologies are packaged together to provide the greatest gains at the least cost. Aggressive engine downsiz

Charles Mendler

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance, Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range Title Natural Gas...

351

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Variability of Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as variable generation sources because their electricity production varies based on the availability of wind and sun. However, they are not the only source of variation in a...

352

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

Spatial and Temporal Variability of Aerosol Particles in Arctic Spring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to investigate the variability in the particle number concentration that may affect climate change assessment for Arctic regions. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) was conducted in April 2008, in the vicinities of Fairbanks and Barrow, Alaska. Measurements of particle number concentrations and size distributions were conducted using a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-100X) mounted under the Convair-580 aircraft wing. Total number concentration of particles (Na) with diameters in the range 0.12-3 ?m was determined for polluted and clean air masses during times when the air was free of clouds and/or precipitation. Variability in Na was considered for both vertical profiles and constant altitude (horizontal) flight legs. This variability can have important implications for estimates of particle properties used in global climate model (GCM) simulations. When aerosol particle layers were encountered, Na rapidly increased from 25 cm-3 up to 550 cm-3 within relatively clean air masses, and reached up to 2200 cm-3 within polluted air masses, dominated by biomass burning pollution. When averaging Na over different distance scales, it was found that Na=140 cm-3 represent an average value for the majority of the encountered clean cases; while Na=720 cm-3 is a mean for polluted cases dominated by biomass burning plumes. These estimates, however, would not capture the details of particle layers encountered during most of the flights. Average aerosol particle characteristics can be difficult to interpret, especially during polluted cases, due to small-scale spatial and temporal variability.

Shantz, Nicole C.; Gultepe, Ismail; Liu, Peter; Earle, Michael; Zelenyuk, Alla

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Variable-speed blower motors gaining ground in residential HVAC market  

SciTech Connect

Variable-speed blowers with electronically commutated permanent-magnet motors are gaining ground in the residential forced-air HVAC market. Variable-speed blower motors offer better comfort, better air mixing, lower noise, and tighter temperature and humidity control, as well as higher efficiency and lower peak demand than the constant-speed blower motors installed in most standard systems. Although these benefits cost considerably more up front, some homeowners think the extra cost is justified. Sales are increasing dramatically, and although variable-speed units made up less than three percent of the market in 1993, industry representatives predict that variable-speed blower motors may become the standard within ten to twenty years. The benefits of variable-speed gas furnaces also open up the potential for collaboration between gas and electric utilities. The best way for an electric utility to encourage customers to consider variable-speed gas furnaces may be through the gas utility, since homeowners look to the gas utility when it`s time to make a decision about a gas furnace purchase. Gas utilities can also benefit from variable speed by providing their customers better comfort, and possibly by reducing the customer`s gas bill (due to zoning or better control).

Gregerson, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2003 December 2003 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and implemented. The M&O contractor and other NTS Users management actively participate in the ES program. An implemented Work Control process is in place that ensures

356

Confined Spaces Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFINED SPACES CONFINED SPACES Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the safety effectiveness of the contractor's confined or enclosed spaces procedure, and for establishing compliance with DOE and OSHA requirements. Specifically, this assessment is to verify the information and findings of the BN Management Self Assessment Report on "Confined Space", ES&H-MSA-03-13, dated December 31, 2003. Criteria: Practices and procedures are in place to protect employees in general industry from the hazards of entry into permit-required confined spaces. 29 CFR 1910.146 (a) Each employee is instructed in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to

357

NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAFETY FUNCTIONS SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing safety-related issues. Management should have an established system to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. Criteria: A system is in place to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. (DOE/EH-0135) Procedures clearly define management's responsibility for safety- related decisions and provide for the escalation of matters in an appropriate time frame. (DOE/EH-0135) Management promotes safety programs and the organization's safety culture through sponsoring and attending safety meetings. (DOE/EH- 0135) Management encourages and supports effective programs for reporting

358

DOE-STD-1151-2002; Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1151-2002 1151-2002 April 2002 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1151-2002 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior Department of Energy managers

359

NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Lines of authority are clearly defined with clear and open communications existing between all departments and all levels. Criteria: Dialogue exists between personnel involved in engineering/design, operations, maintenance, safety issues, and remedial actions. Personnel within the departments are promptly informed on issues as they occur on a need-to-know basis. Lessons Learned and feedback is encouraged inter-departmentally regarding safety, adequate resources, and processes to enable prompt and effective corrective actions and resolutions for mission accomplishment. Management has an effective and specified chain of communication in both directions between corporate and facility management. (DOE/EH-0135)

360

NASA Benchmarks Lessons Learned Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Facility Representatives, DOE-STD-1063-2011, Change Notice 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 February 2011 Change Notice 1 March 2012 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Change Notice No. 1 March 2012 Table of Changes Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ Page/Section Change Foreword Update contact information and internet address. Page 20/ Section 5.4.8 Edited the discussion of Interim Qualification to match the language in the Definition section and deleted a redundant word. Page 20/ Section 5.4.10 Clarified qualification requirements for

362

Selection of respirator test panels representative of U.S. adult facial sizes  

SciTech Connect

As requested by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Respirator Research and Development Section, Industrial Hygiene Group, has prepared anthropometric specifications for subjects to test the fit of half-mask, quarter-mask, and full- facepiece respirators. A facial survey of 200 males was conducted, with results similar to those of a recent survey of some 4000 U. S. airmen. Subjects were selected on the basis of face length and face width to wear full-face masks in tests. For testing halfand quarter-masks, face length and lip length were used. Test panels containing 25 male-and-female subjects were used to represent a majority of the working population. A sequential sampling scheme was developed to reduce the amount of testing required to determine if a mask provides adequate protection for diffurent facial sizes. Examples of man test results are given. (auth)

Hack, A.; Hyatt, E.C.; Held, B.J.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; McConville, J.T.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Grassmann Variables in Jordan Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we demonstrate the emergence of Grassmann variables in matrix models based on the exceptional Jordan algebra. The Grassmann algebras are built naturally using the octonion algebra. We argue the appearance of Grassmann variables solidifies the relationship between supersymmetry and triality.

Michael Rios

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

364

THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS. DO NOT USE FOR: · Heating gas engines · Heating car batteries · Thawing refrigerator equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212° F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

Kleinfeld, David

365

THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS. DO NOT USE FOR: · Heating gas engines · Heating car batteries · Thawing refrigerator equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212" F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

Kleinfeld, David

366

Internal Variability of Indian Ocean SST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 40-yr integration of an eddy-resolving numerical model of the tropical Indian Ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability that is caused by the internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the equator in the ...

Markus Jochum; Raghu Murtugudde

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gradient based variable forgetting factor RLS algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate new variable forgetting factor recursive least-square adaptive algorithm is derived. An improved mean square behaviour analysis is presented, which shows that the theoretical analysis and the simulation results are close to each other. The ... Keywords: RLS algorithm, adaptive filters, variable forgetting factor

C. F. So; S. C. Ng; S. H. Leung

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Variable orifice using an iris shutter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable orifice forming mechanism utilizing an iris shutter arrangement adapted to control gas flow, conductance in vacuum systems, as a heat shield for furnace windows, as a beam shutter in sputtering operations, and in any other application requiring periodic or continuously-variable control of material, gas, or fluid flow.

Beeman, Raymond (El Cerrito, CA); Brajkovich, Steven J. (Fremont, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Bond Graph Modeling Of Variable Structure Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of describing variable structure models in a compact, object--oriented fashion is revisited and analyzed from the perspective of bond graph modeling. Traditionally, bond graphs have always been used to describe continuous-- time physical processes with a fixed structure. Yet, this paper shall demonstrate that bond graphs are equally suitable to describe variable structure models as fixed structure models. Moreover, a bond graph description of variable structure models can teach us a lot about the essential properties of variable structure models, properties that are not easily visible when other modeling approaches are taken. The paper discusses issues related to causality reassignment and conditional index changes as a consequence of switching in a physical system. Keywords: Bond graphs, variable structure system, computational causality, conditional index change, switching, object--oriented modeling, Dymola. INTRODUCTION When the causality strokes were added to the forme...

Franois E. Cellier; Martin Otter; Hilding Elmqvist

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy Savings of Variable Speed Motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the energy savings available by utilizing variable speed motors on pump and fan applications. Conventional control of flow or pressure in process plants is normally accomplished by throttling the various streams with control valves. Depending on the system and the actual operating conditions, this throttling may consume a considerable amount of energy. The hydraulics of different systems are investigated to generalize high energy saving applications. Typical pump characteristics at varying speeds are investigated since most performance curves are only available at a constant speed. The various types of variable speed electric motors are discussed. However, the primary variable speed system recommended is a variable frequency speed system which utilizes standard induction motors. Specific cases of centrifugal pump applications and cooling tower fan service are presented. Turndown frequencies, stream factors, and electric rates are included in the evaluation. The energy savings of a variable speed system becomes significant when flow rates vary widely and the electrical rates are high.

Fishel, F. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

372

MASe UCRL-15037 CONTINUOUSLY VARIABLE TRANSMISSIONS: THEORY AND PRACTICE  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

^ . S7l MASe UCRL-15037 CONTINUOUSLY VARIABLE TRANSMISSIONS: THEORY AND PRACTICE August 1979 Norman H. Beachley Andrew A. Frank College of Engineering University of Wisconsin, Madison n LAWRENCE UVERMORE LABORATORY vmrnm IP T H I S 8ocu«arr ii mmm NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, or any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal Uability or responsibility for any third party's use, or the results of such use, of any information, ap- paratus, product or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use by such third party would not infringe privately owned rights.

373

Heart Rate Variability Analysis Using Threshold of Wavelet Package Coefficients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a new efficient feature extraction method based on the adaptive threshold of wavelet package coefficients is presented. This paper especially deals with the assessment of autonomic nervous system using the background variation of the signal Heart Rate Variability HRV extracted from the wavelet package coefficients. The application of a wavelet package transform allows us to obtain a time-frequency representation of the signal, which provides better insight in the frequency distribution of the signal with time. A 6 level decomposition of HRV was achieved with db4 as mother wavelet, and the above two bands LF and HF were combined in 12 specialized frequencies sub-bands obtained in wavelet package transform. Features extracted from these coefficients can efficiently represent the characteristics of the original signal. ANOVA statistical test is used for the evaluation of proposed algorithm.

Kheder, G; Massoued, M Ben; Samet, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

VARIABLE MODERATOR REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Quarterly Progress Report No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Development of the boiling water UO/sub 2/ fueled Variable Moderator Reactor (VMR) is conducted under contract for the USAEC. The initiation and progress of work under Phase I of the contract, Physics and Kinetic Analysis and Initial Evaluation,'' and the preparation for Phase II, Critical Experiment and Analysis of Results,'' are reported. A hydrodynamic flow sheet representing the sequence of calculations for the BOCH program was prepared. A preliminary block diagram of the kinetics model of the VMR was prepared. Work is reported on the PUREE code which is designed to give an accurate representation of the physics of the VMR core. A fuel element fabrication speciftcation was prepared and released for quotations. A study was made to select the most appropriate material for void simulation throughout the range of interest in the VMR. (W.D.M.)

1959-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 27, 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to discuss the President's FY13 budget for the...

376

Nine New Variable Stars in Camelopardalis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nine new short period variable stars have been discovered in the direction of the open cluster Cr464 in Camelopardalis. The field was observed using Tzec Maun Observatory's telescope AP180. Two new variable stars were classified as pulsating stars (RRab and RRc types). The other seven stars are binary systems. One of them is of ELL-type, four binaries were recognized as EW-type, and two systems are rather short period EA-type binaries. All new variables were registered in the VSX catalogue.

Virnina, Natalia A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Facility Representative Program: 2009 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Address Shane Johnson, Acting Assistant Secretary Office of Nuclear Energy 9:00 a.m. ORPS Causal Analysis Tree Training Ed Sierra Quality Management Office Brookhaven National...

378

Facility Representative Program: 2011 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 DOE Safety Links ORPS Info Operating Experience DOE Lessons Learned Accident Investigation...

379

Facility Representative Program: DOE Facility Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP PADU PORTS ANL WVDP MOAB SFO LFO LAFO NFO SRFO RL PNSO ORP ID NPO-PX FSO NBL NPO-Y12 ORO OSO SPRU BHSO PSO SR SR NA26 DOE Facility Site Map Please help keep this...

380

Facility Representative Program: 2002 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

McLaughlin, LANL Root Cause Analysis Course - Marke LaneKen Albers Honeywell Kansas City Plant 10:30 a.m. Leadership Development Panel Moderator: Emil Morrow, Senior Technical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead to Electrical Shock, Michael Hanson, BHSO Lessons and Recommendations from the Fukushima Daiichi Event, Kevin Gray, SSO References Separations Process Research Unit Spill,...

382

Facility Representative Program: 2008 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sherman Chao, LSO Conduct of Operations Improvements at K Basins Dennis Humphreys, RL Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility lessons learned Charlie Wright, ORO...

383

Facility Representative Program: 2005 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharing of Good Practices and Lessons Learned (4) Inadvertent Startup of Electric Centrifuge at the Weapon Evaluation Test Lab Joyce Arviso-Benally, SSO Facility Rep...

384

Temporal and spatial variability of surface temperature over Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface temperature is one of the most fundamental aspects of the climate system, and its study has been the focus of extensive research in the field of climatology for years. Examination of its temporal and spatial fluctuations can provide scientists with information on the behavior of the atmospheric circulation. Many researchers have also been interested in the physical processes and mechanisms at work in producing the observed distribution of the surface temperature field over the globe. Various analytical methods are used in the study of temperature variability on the Earth. White and Wallace (1978) documented the annual march of surface temperature by mapping amplitudes and phases of the seasonal cycle. The latter were obtained through Fourier analysis of the data. Kim and North (1991, 1992) routinely use second-moment statistics such as variance and spatial correlation to study the fluctuations of temperature in energy balance models as compared with observations. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis has become a popular and convenient method for representing the variability of climatic parameters since the groundbreaking work of Lorenz (1956). The first several EOFS, or patterns of covariability in a meteorological field, can sometimes be explained in a physical sense based on their shapes. While most previous efforts have concentrated on the global or hemispheric scale, this research examines the fluctuations of surface temperature on a regional scale, namely the state of Texas. Texas is an ideal location for a study of this type due to its vast areal extent, diverse topography, and expanse across different climatic regimes. Some of the methods used in the study of temperature variability are applied to the state of Texas.

Moninski, Anthony David

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Variability of EGRET Gamma-Ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The variability of the high-energy gamma ray sources in the Third EGRET catalog is analyzed by a new method. We re-analyze the EGRET data to calculate a likelihood function for the flux of each source in each observation, both for detections and upper limits. These functions can be combined in a uniform manner with a simple model of the flux distribution to characterize the flux variation by a confidence interval for the relative standard deviation of the flux. The main result is a table of these values for almost all the cataloged sources. As expected, the identified pulsars are steady emitters and the blazars are mostly highly variable. The unidentified sources are heterogeneous, with greater variation at higher Galactic latitude. There is an indication that pulsar wind nebulae are associated with variable sources. There is a population of variable sources along the Galactic plane, concentrated in the inner spiral arms.

P. L. Nolan; W. F. Tompkins; I. A. Grenier; P. F. Michelson

2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Interannual Variability of Northwest Australian Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the southeast Indian Ocean has been studied far less than other TC basins, such as the North Atlantic and northwest Pacific. The authors examine the interannual TC variability of the northwest Australian (NWAUS)...

Kevin H. Goebbert; Lance M. Leslie

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Variability of Southern Ocean Jets Near Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of jets with topography in the Southern Ocean is investigated using 19 years of altimetry data. In particular, the jet jumping mode of variability, by which two or more jets passing close to the same topographic feature show ...

Christopher C. Chapman; Rosemary Morrow

388

Weather Noise Forcing of Surface Climate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model-based method to evaluate the role of weather noise forcing of low-frequency variability of surface properties, including SST, surface currents, land surface temperature, and soil moisture, is presented. In this procedure, an interactive ...

Edwin K. Schneider; Meizhu Fan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Experiments Concerning Variability among Subjective Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of subjective (hand) analyses is explored by examining the results of two synoptic laboratory experiments. Two groups of analysts participated in the first experiment, one consisting of 13 senior meteorology students (1977), the ...

Dayton G. Vincent; Herbert Borenstein

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Tropical Convective Variability as 1/f Noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that the tropical convective variability behaves as 1/f noise for a 130-day period. This behavior is shown by analyzing the time series of convective available potential energy, which measures the degree of convective ...

Jun-Ichi Yano; Klaus Fraedrich; Richard Blender

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optimizing Crop Insurance under Climate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the selection of optimal crop insurance under climate variability and fluctuating market prices. A model was designed to minimize farmers expected losses (including insurance costs) while using the conditional-value-at-risk ...

Juan Liu; Chunhua Men; Victor E. Cabrera; Stan Uryasev; Clyde W. Fraisse

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Variable volume architecture : expanding the boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research into the creation of a Variable Volume Architecture is explored through a series of proposals and projects. An argument is established to develop the means and methods of achieving an architecture of transformation. ...

Saheba, Asheshh (Asheshh Mohit), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Backscatter Differential PhaseEstimation and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the basis of simulations and observations made with polarimetric radars operating at X, C, and S bands, the backscatter differential phase ? has been explored; ? has been identified as an important polarimetric variable that should not be ...

Silke Trmel; Matthew R. Kumjian; Alexander V. Ryzhkov; Clemens Simmer; Malte Diederich

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Spatial Variability of Outgoing Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanning radiometer aboard the NOAA-9 operational meteorological satellite are used to investigate the spatial variability of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). Daily and monthly radiation maps at ...

G. Louis Smith; David Rutan

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Climate Variability and Sugarcane Yield in Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper seeks to understand the role that climate variability has on annual yield of sugarcane in Louisiana. Unique features of sugarcane growth in Louisiana and nonclimatic, yield-influencing factors make this goal an interesting and ...

David Greenland

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy: Challenges and Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.govpublications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Integrating Variable...

397

Statistical issues in Mendelian randomization: use of genetic instrumental variables for assessing causal associations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); covariate for Y (Chapters 4 and 6) G instrumental variable ? parameter of genetic association: regression parameter in the G-X re- gression ? regression parameter in the X-Y regression ?1 causal effect of X on Y : the main parameter of interest ? parameter... of genetic association for haplotypes: regression parameter in the G-X regression where G represents a haplotype or diplotype ? correlation parameter ?2 variance parameter ? 2 between-study heterogeneity variance parameter ?2 genetic between...

Burgess, Stephen

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

398

The MACHO Project LMC Variable Star Inventory Classical Cepheids, AGB Variables, and the 9 Million Star Color-Magnitude Diagram  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the ratio of ~5 M_solar blue and red LMC supergiants (representative of classical Cepheids) using the MACHO Project's 9 million star color-magnitude diagram (9M CMD) of the LMC bar. We find b/r = 0.39, which favors the z=0.008, 5 M_solar theoretical model of Schaerer et al.(1993) over that of Fagatto et al. (1994). Next, we examine the low mass (old) and low metallicity LMC field population (Pop. II). Features in the 9M CMD and properties of LMC field RRab are consistent with a mean iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -1.5 dex for this population. Newly discovered post-HB/early-AGB Pop. II variables are identified in order to delineate the instability strip (IS). Good agreement with the theoretical IS of Bono et al. (1997) is found. We then compare the field RRab with newly identified RRab variables in the LMC clusters NGC 1898 and NGC 1835. We find the mean colors of these cluster RRab lie near the red and blue edges of the IS, respectively, which is similar to their respective (overall) red and blue HB mo...

Alves, D R; Cook, K H; Welch, D L; Alcock, C B; Marshall, S; Axelrod, T S; Drake, A; Freeman, K C; Peterson, B M; Allsman, R A; Becker, A; Tomaney, A B; Griest, K; Vandehei, T; Lehner, M; Bennett, D; Minniti, D; Pratt, M; Sutherland, W; Quinn, P

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Life Cycle Assessment Applied to 95 Representative U.S. Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since World War II, concern for the environmental impacts of human activities has grown. Agriculture plays a significant role in several impact categories including global warming. Governments, including the U.S., have recently begun or are considering the regulation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission to mitigate the global warming effect. Because agriculture accounts for a large portion of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, it is necessary to establish a baseline measure of the GHG emission of U.S. agriculture at the farm level. The objective of this research is to estimate the GHG emission levels for multicrop farms in the U.S. and identify the major sources of GHG emissions in their supply chains. To accomplish the objective, a partial life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used to establish a GHG baseline for the representative farms. LCA as defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) includes four phases: goal and scope definition, inventory, impact assessment, and interpretation. It is a holistic approach that catalogues environmental impacts of all relevant processes at all stages of production, from raw material extraction to disposal. However, this study only catalogues impacts up to the farm gate. Partial LCAs are common in agriculture. Emissions of three GHGs, CO2, CH4, and N2O, are inventoried for 95 U.S. farms. The results are characterized using their 100-year global warming potentials into CO2 equivalents. The CO2 equivalents are then normalized over four functional units: enterprises, acres or head, harvest units, and pounds of production. The variation of GHG intensity between crops and farms is very large. However, it is clear that GHG intensity is affected by three characteristics: location, size, and irrigation practice. Crops grown in their associated regions tend to be more GHG efficient than those grown outside their associated regions. Also, crops grown on large farms tend to be more GHG efficient than the same crop grown on a small farm in the same area. Lastly, with the exceptions of cotton and soybeans, irrigated crops tend to be more GHG intensive than non-irrigated crops. These results combine to suggest that there may be a correlation between production efficiency and carbon efficiency.

Rutland, Christopher T.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Physical Mechanisms of the Wintertime Surface Air Temperature Variability in South Korea and the near-7-Day Oscillations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first three principal modes of wintertime surface temperature variability in Seoul, South Korea (37.33N, 126.59E), are extracted from the 19792008 observed records via cyclostationary EOF (CSEOF) analysis. The first mode represents the ...

Kwang-Yul Kim; Joon-Woo Roh

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fuzzy Inductive Reasoning for Variable Selection Analysis and Modeling of Biological Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy Inductive Reasoning (FIR) is a qualitative inductive modeling and simulation methodology for dealing with dynamical systems. It has proven to be a powerful tool for qualitative model identification and prediction of future behavior of various kinds of dynamical systems, especially from the soft sciences, such as biology, biomedicine, and ecology. This paper focuses on modeling aspects of the FIR methodology. It is shown that the FIR variable selection analysis is a useful tool not only for FIR but also for other classical quantitative methodologies such as NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Average modeling with eXternal inputs). The tool allows to obtain models that interpret a system under study in optimal ways, in the sense that these models are well suited for predicting the future behavior of the system they represent. The FIR variable selection analysis turns out to work well even in those applications where standard statistical variable selection analysis does not pro...

Angela Nebot; Francois E. Cellier; Ra' ul Carvajal V

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

Dirac equation in terms of hydrodynamic variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distributed system $\\mathcal{S}_D$ described by the Dirac equation is investigated simply as a dynamic system, i.e. without usage of quantum principles. The Dirac equation is described in terms of hydrodynamic variables: 4-flux $j^{i}$, pseudo-vector of the spin $S^{i}$, an action $\\hbar \\phi $ and a pseudo-scalar $\\kappa $. In the quasi-uniform approximation, when all transversal derivatives (orthogonal to the flux vector $j^i$) are small, the system $\\mathcal{S}_D$ turns to a statistical ensemble of classical concentrated systems $\\mathcal{S}_{dc}$. Under some conditions the classical system $\\mathcal{S}_{dc}$ describes a classical pointlike particle moving in a given electromagnetic field. In general, the world line of the particle is a helix, even if the electromagnetic field is absent. Both dynamic systems $\\mathcal{S}_D$ and $\\mathcal{S}_{dc}$ appear to be non-relativistic in the sense that the dynamic equations written in terms of hydrodynamic variables are not relativistically covariant with respect to them, although all dynamic variables are tensors or pseudo-tensors. They becomes relativistically covariant only after addition of a constant unit timelike vector $f^{i}$ which should be considered as a dynamic variable describing a space-time property. This "constant" variable arises instead of $\\gamma $-matrices which are removed by means of zero divizors in the course of the transformation to hydrodynamic variables. It is possible to separate out dynamic variables $\\kappa $, $\\kappa ^i$ responsible for quantum effects. It means that, setting $\\kappa ,\\kappa ^i\\equiv 0$, the dynamic system $\\mathcal{S}_D$ described by the Dirac equation turns to a statistical ensemble $\\mathcal{E}_{Dqu}$ of classical dynamic systems $\\mathcal{S}_{dc}$.

Yuri A. Rylov

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus parameterization. Part I: Comparison with observation and reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by the Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus parameterization in an atmospheric general circulation model is compared with observations and reanalyses. The scheme is characterized by state-...

Minoru Chikira; Masahiro Sugiyama

405

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Variables et categories grammaticales dans un modele ariane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toutes tes catgories grammaticales utilises dans un modle de traduction ariane sont formalises et codes de fa mnmonique en tant que variables et valeurs de variables. L'ensemble des variables d'un ...

Jean-Phillippe Guilbaud

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reversible Record Breaking and Variability: Temperature Distributions across the Globe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on counts of record highs and lows, and employing reversibility in time, an approach to examining natural variability is proposed. The focus is on intrinsic variability; that is, variance separated from the trend in the mean. A variability ...

Amalia Anderson; Alexander Kostinski

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

U.S. Economic Sensitivity to Weather Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To estimate the economic effects of weather variability in the United States, the authors define and measure weather sensitivity as the variability in economic output that is attributable to weather variability, accounting for changes in technology and ...

Jeffrey K. Lazo; Megan Lawson; Peter H. Larsen; Donald M. Waldman

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Variable pressure power cycle and control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable pressure power cycle and control system that is adjustable to a variable heat source is disclosed. The power cycle adjusts itself to the heat source so that a minimal temperature difference is maintained between the heat source fluid and the power cycle working fluid, thereby substantially matching the thermodynamic envelope of the power cycle to the thermodynamic envelope of the heat source. Adjustments are made by sensing the inlet temperature of the heat source fluid and then setting a superheated vapor temperature and pressure to achieve a minimum temperature difference between the heat source fluid and the working fluid.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy: Challenges and Solutions  

SciTech Connect

In the U.S., a number of utilities are adopting higher penetrations of renewables, driven in part by state policies. While power systems have been designed to handle the variable nature of loads, the additional supply-side variability and uncertainty can pose new challenges for utilities and system operators. However, a variety of operational and technical solutions exist to help integrate higher penetrations of wind and solar generation. This paper explores renewable energy integration challenges and mitigation strategies that have been implemented in the U.S. and internationally, including forecasting, demand response, flexible generation, larger balancing areas or balancing area cooperation, and operational practices such as fast scheduling and dispatch.

Bird, L.; Milligan, M.; Lew, D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Adaptive variable structure control law for a variable speed wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of the wind power conversions systems can be greatly improved using an appropriate control algorithm. In this work, an adaptive robust control for a doubly feed induction generator drive for variable speed wind power generation is described. ... Keywords: modeling and simulation, variable structure control, wind turbine control

Oscar Barambones; Jose Maria Gonzalez De Durana; Patxi Alkorta; Jose Antonio Ramos; Manuel De La Sen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Coordinated Variable Structure Switching Attacks for Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effective modeling and analysis of large-scale power system disturbances especially those stemming from intentional attack represents an open engineering and research problem. Challenges stem from the need to develop intelligent models of cyber-physical attacks that produce salient disruptions and appropriately describe meaningful cyber-physical interdependencies such that they balance precision, scale and complexity. In our research, we present a foundation for the development of a class of intelligent cyber-physical attacks termed coordinated variable structure switching attacks whereby opponents aim to destabilize the power grid through con- trolled switching sequence. Such switching is facilitated by cyber-attack and corruption of communication channels and control signals of the associated switch(es). We provide methods and theorems to construct such attack models and demonstrate their utility in the simulation of extensive system disturbances. Our proposed class of cyber-physical switching attacks for smart grid systems has the potential to disrupt large-scale power system operation within a short interval of time. Through successful cyber intrusion, an opponent can remotely apply a state- dependent coordinated switching sequence on one or more relays and circuit breakers of a power system to disrupt operation. Existence of this switching vulnerability is dependent on the local structure of the power grid. Variable structure systems theory is employed to effectively model the cyber-physical aspects of a smart grid and determine the existence of the vulnerability and construct the destabilizing switching attack sequence. We illustrate the utility of the attack approach assess its impact on the different power system test cases including the single machine infinite bus power system model and the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) 3-machine 9-bus system through MATLAB/Simulink and PSCAD simulation environment. The results demonstrate the potential of our approach for practical attack. Moreover, we build on our work in several ways. First, we extend the research to demonstrate an approach to mitigation within the variable structure system frame- work. We demonstrate via small signal analysis how through persistent switching a stable sliding mode can be used to disrupt a dynamical system that seems stable. We also design an approach to vulnerability analysis to assess the feasibility of co-ordinated variable structure switching attacks. Moreover, we study the performance of our attack construction approach when the opponent has imperfect knowledge of the local system dynamics and partial knowledge of the generator state. Based on the system with modeling errors, we study the performance of coordinated variable structure switching attacks in the presence of state estimation. Finally, we illustrate the concepts of attack model within the multiple switching framework, the cascading failure analysis is employed in the New-England 10-machine, 39-bus power system using MATLAB/Simulink and DSATools simulation environment. Our results demonstrate the potential for coordinated variable structure switching attacks to enable large-scale power system disturbances.

Liu, Shan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Flight Control Design for Rotorcraft with Variable Rotor Speed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Flight control design issues for rotorcraft with variable rotor speed are investigated, and new design methodologies are developed to deal with the challenges of variable (more)

Guo, Wei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual for Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Adaptation to Climate Variability and...

415

2005 RECS Variable Response Code Labels - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

7 concrete or concrete block 8 glass 9 other 10 indescribable : 1 . 2005 recs variable response code labels . variable response code label file number* cnfrmhuq .

416

Interannual Variability of Indian Ocean Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work in this paper builds upon the relatively well-studied seasonal cycle of the Indian Ocean heat transport by investigating its interannual variability over a 41-yr period (195898). An intermediate, two-and-a-half-layer thermodynamically ...

Galina Chirokova; Peter J. Webster

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Variables optimization of building air conditioning system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heating and climatizer system based on selective absorption of solar energy by a selective collector. The experimental study shows that the performance of this system depends on several variables: the nature of the colporteur fluid, the flow of the ... Keywords: heating and climatisation, modelation and optimization, solar energy

Marius-Constantin Popescu; Cornelia Aida Bulucea; Gheorghe Manolea; Cristian Vladu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Interannual Variability of Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the interannual variability of tropical cyclones in each of the earths cyclone basins using data from 1985 to 2003. The data are first analyzed using a Monte Carlo technique to investigate the long-standing myth that the ...

William M. Frank; George S. Young

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Reuse and variability in large software applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reuse has always been a major goal in software engineering, since it promises large gains in productivity, quality and time to market reduction. Practical experience has shown that substantial reuse has only successfully happened in two cases: libraries, ... Keywords: AOP, COTS, EAI, MDA, interoperability, model driven software engineering, process driven application, product families, product line, reuse, variability, workflow

Jacky Estublier; German Vega

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cloud service selection based on variability modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection among Cloud services is a recent problem in research and practice. The diversity of decision-relevant criteria, configurability of Cloud services and the need to involve human decision-makers require holistic support through models, methodologies ... Keywords: cloud service selection, decision-making, feature modeling, variability modeling

Erik Wittern; Jrn Kuhlenkamp; Michael Menzel

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mesoscale Time and Space Wind Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a program to study the time and space variability of the wind field below 5 km are presented. Wind data were collected using pilot balloons tracked with the METRAC positioning system. Balloons were launched at 10-30 min intervals ...

W. H. Jasperson

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Anatomy of North Pacific Decadal Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic analysis of North Pacific decadal variability in a full-physics coupled oceanatmosphere model is executed. The model is an updated and improved version of the coupled model studied by Latif and Barnett. Evidence is sought for ...

Niklas Schneider; Arthur J. Miller; David W. Pierce

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Galactic Variable Sky with EGRET and GLAST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of the largely-unidentified Galactic sources of gamma rays that were detected by EGRET are reviewed. Proposed source populations that may have the correct spatial, spectral, luminosity, and variability properties to be the origins of the EGRET sources are also presented. Finally, the prospects for studying Galactic gamma-ray sources with the GLAST LAT are reviewed.

Digel, S.W.; /SLAC

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

424

A strain gage?variable area flowmeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a unique hybrid flowmeter that combines the turndown ratio/low resistance benefits of a variable area differential pressure flowmeter with the low component simplicity of a target flowmeter. The design attaches a single element strain gage to the flexural membrane suspended in a fluid flow passage

D. W. Guillaume; D. DeVries

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Variation of Area Variables in Regge Calculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the possibility to use the areas of two-simplexes, instead of lengths of edges, as the dynamical variables of Regge calculus. We show that if the action of Regge calculus is varied with respect to the areas of two-simplexes, and appropriate constraints are imposed between the variations, the Einstein-Regge equations are recovered.

Jarmo Makela

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

426

10 X-rays from Cataclysmic Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cataclysmic Variables ? (CVs) are a distinct class of interacting binaries, transferring mass from a donor star to a degenerate accretor, a white dwarf (WD). In all observational determinations, and as is required by theory for stable mass transfer, the donor star is of lower mass than the accretor.

Erik Kuulkers; Andrew Norton; Axel Schwope; Brian Warner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Investigation of determinism in heart rate variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article searches for the possible presence of determinism in heart rate variability (HRV) signals by using a new approach based on NARMA (nonlinear autoregressive moving average) modeling and free-run prediction. Thirty-three 256-point HRV time series obtained from Wistar rats submitted to different autonomic blockade protocols are considered

M. E. D. Gomes; A. V. P. Souza; H. N. Guimares; L. A. Aguirre

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Performance of twist-coupled blades on variable speed rotors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The load mitigation and energy capture characteristics of twist-coupled HAWT blades that are mounted on a variable speed rotor are investigated in this paper. These blades are designed to twist toward feather as they bend with pretwist set to achieve a desirable twist distribution at rated power. For this investigation, the ADAMS-WT software has been modified to include blade models with bending-twist coupling. Using twist-coupled and uncoupled models, the ADAMS software is exercised for steady wind environments to generate C{sub p} curves at a number of operating speeds to compare the efficiencies of the two models. The ADAMS software is also used to generate the response of a twist-coupled variable speed rotor to a spectrum of stochastic wind time series. This spectrum contains time series with two mean wind speeds at two turbulence levels. Power control is achieved by imposing a reactive torque on the low speed shaft proportional to the RPM squared with the coefficient specified so that the rotor operates at peak efficiency in the linear aerodynamic range, and by limiting the maximum RPM to take advantage of the stall controlled nature of the rotor. Fatigue calculations are done for the generated load histories using a range of material exponents that represent materials from welded steel to aluminum to composites, and results are compared with the damage computed for the rotor without twist-coupling. Results indicate that significant reductions in damage are achieved across the spectrum of applied wind loading without any degradation in power production.

Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.; Laino, D.J.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

CHARACTERIZING THE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT BLAZARS: VARIABILITY-BASED SELECTION OF FERMI ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the use of optical photometric variability to select and identify blazars in large-scale time-domain surveys, in part to aid in the identification of blazar counterparts to the {approx}30% of {gamma}-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog still lacking reliable associations. Using data from the optical LINEAR asteroid survey, we characterize the optical variability of blazars by fitting a damped random walk model to individual light curves with two main model parameters, the characteristic timescales of variability {tau}, and driving amplitudes on short timescales {sigma}-circumflex. Imposing cuts on minimum {tau} and {sigma}-circumflex allows for blazar selection with high efficiency E and completeness C. To test the efficacy of this approach, we apply this method to optically variable LINEAR objects that fall within the several-arcminute error ellipses of {gamma}-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog. Despite the extreme stellar contamination at the shallow depth of the LINEAR survey, we are able to recover previously associated optical counterparts to Fermi active galactic nuclei with E {>=} 88% and C = 88% in Fermi 95% confidence error ellipses having semimajor axis r < 8'. We find that the suggested radio counterpart to Fermi source 2FGL J1649.6+5238 has optical variability consistent with other {gamma}-ray blazars and is likely to be the {gamma}-ray source. Our results suggest that the variability of the non-thermal jet emission in blazars is stochastic in nature, with unique variability properties due to the effects of relativistic beaming. After correcting for beaming, we estimate that the characteristic timescale of blazar variability is {approx}3 years in the rest frame of the jet, in contrast with the {approx}320 day disk flux timescale observed in quasars. The variability-based selection method presented will be useful for blazar identification in time-domain optical surveys and is also a probe of jet physics.

Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Becker, Andrew C.; Davenport, James R. A.; Ivezic, Zeljko [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Burnett, T. H. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1560 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Plotkin, Richard M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stuart, J. Scott, E-mail: jruan@astro.washington.edu [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

Systems Engineering-Energy Systems Technical Electives The following courses represent some of the content currently available university-wide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to analyzing energy distribution networks; smart grid systems. MATH 519 Complex Variables I 3 MATH 317 Analytic and Inverters. ENGR 567 Systems Engineering Architecture 3 ENGR/ECE501 This course provides a toolset for observing and classifying systems architecture, and its practical application through design studies. ENGR

431

A Bayesian decision theory approach to variable selection for discrimination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by examples in spectroscopy, we study variable selection for discrimination in problems with very many predictor variables. Assuming multivariate normal distributions with common variance for the predictor variables within groups, we develop ... Keywords: Bayes, decision theory, discriminant analysis, near infrared spectroscopy, simulated annealing, variable selection

T. Fearn; P. J. Brown; P. Besbeas

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Variable selection and ranking for analyzing automobile traffic accident data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable ranking and feature selection are important concepts in data mining and machine learning. This paper introduces a new variable ranking technique named Sum Max Gain Ratio (SMGR). The new technique is evaluated within the domain of traffic accident ... Keywords: decision tree, traffic accident data, variable and feature selection, variable ranking

Huanjing Wang; Allen Parrish; Randy K. Smith; Susan Vrbsky

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Technology R&D Needs for Integrating High Penetrations of Variable Utility-Scale Renewable Power Sources into the Electric Power Inf rastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the North American electric energy resource portfolio continues to evolve, integrating large-scale renewable resources into the electric power infrastructure presents significant challenges. This is particularly true of variable renewable resources, such as wind and solar, which represent two of the most rapidly growing renewable resources being deployed. The root of this challenge lies in the inherent variability of wind and solar resources, which differentiates these from other renewable resource...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Accounting for Unresolved Spatial Variability in Large Scale Models: Development and Evaluation of a Statistical Cloud Parameterization with Prognostic Higher Order Moments  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on the variability of clouds that is present across a wide range of scales ranging from the synoptic to the millimeter. In particular, there is substantial variability in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid spacing of models used to make climate projections (GCMs) and weather forecasts. These models represent clouds and other small-scale processes with parameterizations that describe how those processes respond to and feed back on the largescale state of the atmosphere.

Robert Pincus

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

435

Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variables Affecting Economic Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy E. Lantz and S. Tegen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at WINDPOWER 2008 Houston, Texas June 1-4, 2008 Conference Paper NREL/CP-500-43506 July 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

436

Thermodynamics in variable speed of light theories  

SciTech Connect

The perfect fluid in the context of a covariant variable speed of light theory proposed by J. Magueijo is studied. On the one hand the modified first law of thermodynamics together with a recipe to obtain equations of state are obtained. On the other hand the Newtonian limit is performed to obtain the nonrelativistic hydrostatic equilibrium equation for the theory. The results obtained are used to determine the time variation of the radius of Mercury induced by the variability of the speed of light (c), and the scalar contribution to the luminosity of white dwarfs. Using a bound for the change of that radius and combining it with an upper limit for the variation of the fine structure constant, a bound on the time variation of c is set. An independent bound is obtained from luminosity estimates for Stein 2015B.

Racker, Juan [CONICET, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Avenida Bustillo 9500 (8400), San Carlos De Bariloche (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900), La Plata (Argentina); Sisterna, Pablo [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350 (7600), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Vucetich, Hector [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900), La Plata (Argentina)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Discrete variable theory of triatomic photodissociation  

SciTech Connect

The coupled equations describing the photodissociation process are expressed in the discrete variable representation (DVR) in which the coupled equations are labeled by quadrature points rather than by internal basis functions. A large reduction in the dimensionality of the coupled equations can be realized since the spatially localized bound state nuclear wave function vanishes at most of the quadrature points, making only certain orientations of the fragments important in the region of strong interaction (small separation). The discrete variable theory of photodissociation is applied to the model dissociation of bent HCN in which the CN fragment is treated as a rigid rotor. The truncated DVR rotational distributions are compared with the exact close coupled rotational distributions, and excellent agreement with greatly reduced dimensionality of the equations is found.

Heather, R.W.; Light, J.C.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Solar energy: some variables influencing increased utilization  

SciTech Connect

The mid 1970s energy crisis encouraged the growth of alternative fuels. Through the late 1970s and 1980s, solar energy was the primary alternative fuel. Federal and state programs encouraged the growth of residential solar installations through the use of tax credits. This dissertation used data from the eleven western states to assess tax credits' influence on residential solar installations. A Spearman's r was used to evaluate the role of tax credits on the percent increase in solar systems from 1980 to 1984. The r/sub s/ was .93. The second portion of the analysis used contingency tables to see if variables other than tax credits influence solar installations; the results showed tax credits + solar radiation and fuel mix are the significant variables. The final chapter looks at municipal solar utilities, tax on excessive energy use, a public/private solar research lab, and building rating system as means to supplement solar energy tax credits.

Born, B.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Thermodynamics in variable speed of light theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The perfect fluid in the context of a covariant variable speed of light theory proposed by J. Magueijo is studied. On the one hand the modified first law of thermodynamics together with a recipe to obtain equations of state are obtained. On the other hand the Newtonian limit is performed to obtain the nonrelativistic hydrostatic equilibrium equation for the theory. The results obtained are used to determine the time variation of the radius of Mercury induced by the variability of the speed of light ($c$), and the scalar contribution to the luminosity of white dwarfs. Using a bound for the change of that radius and combining it with an upper limit for the variation of the fine structure constant, a bound on the time variation of $c$ is set. An independent bound is obtained from luminosity estimates for Stein 2015B.

Juan Racker; Pablo Sisterna; Hector Vucetich

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

440

Review of Variable Generation Integration Charges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth of wind and solar generation in the United States, and the expectation of continued growth of these technologies, dictates that the future power system will be operated in a somewhat different manner because of increased variability and uncertainty. A small number of balancing authorities have attempted to determine an 'integration cost' to account for these changes to their current operating practices. Some balancing authorities directly charge wind and solar generators for integration charges, whereas others add integration charges to projected costs of wind and solar in integrated resource plans or in competitive solicitations for generation. This report reviews the balancing authorities that have calculated variable generation integration charges and broadly compares and contrasts the methodologies they used to determine their specific integration charges. The report also profiles each balancing authority and how they derived wind and solar integration charges.

Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Buckley, M.; Rogers, J.; Hodge, B. M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Introduction to Solar Energy Conversion Solar energy represents the largest energy input into the terrestrial system. Despite its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the resource to allow supply to meet demand at all times. Photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency hasIntroduction to Solar Energy Conversion Solar energy represents the largest energy input the global energy demand on its own. The challenges that need to be addressed to make solar energy viable

Nur, Amos

442

INTRODUCTION In 1997,The Louisiana House of Representatives passed Bill Number 1698, which addresses warranties in state contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for state highway infrastructure construction projects that are in compliance with FHWA requirements with DOTD archives being utilized to establish distress thresholds. At least five representative projects from each of the eight warranty areas that shared similar characteristics (age, construction type

Harms, Kyle E.

443

Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State, Brazil M.E. Alves, A. Lavorenti* Departamento de Cie^ncias Exatas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ``Luiz de Queiroz''--ESALQ/USP, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba (SP), Brazil Received 27 August, electrochemical and mineralogical properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil, were

Sparks, Donald L.

444

CVcat: an interactive database on cataclysmic variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CVcat is a database that contains published data on cataclysmic variables and related objects. Unlike in the existing online sources, the users are allowed to add data to the catalogue. The concept of an ``open catalogue'' approach is reviewed together with the experience from one year of public usage of CVcat. New concepts to be included in the upcoming AstroCat framework and the next CVcat implementation are presented. CVcat can be found at http://www.cvcat.org.

J. Kube; B. T. Gaensicke; F. Euchner; B. Hoffmann

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

445

Bessel-Zernike Discrete Variable Representation Basis  

SciTech Connect

The connection between the Bessel discrete variable basis expansion and a specific form of an orthogonal set of Jacobi polynomials is demonstrated. These so-called Zernike polynomials provide alternative series expansions of suitable functions over the unit interval. Expressing a Bessel function in a Zernike expansion provides a straightforward method of generating series identities. Furthermore, the Zernike polynomials may also be used to efficiently evaluate the Hankel transform for rapidly decaying functions or functions with finite support.

Cerjan, C J

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

447

Variability of PV on Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2010, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) along with several utilities began collecting high-resolution monitoring data on distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) systems throughout the United States. Included in these monitoring data are single-module PV systems distributed along selected feeders as well as several larger PV systems (up to 1.4 MW). Utilizing data from these sites, this report focuses specifically on examining the measured variability of solar PV distributed throughout a ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

448

Changes in heart rate variability during fainting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of heart rate variability in people who faint may yield insights into normal physiologic mechanisms which probably are dynamic. These insights might be gained because fainting appears to be due to a breakdown of these mechanisms. Tilt table testing reliably induces fainting in patients with a history of fainting and can be used to study these mechanisms. During tilt tests ending in fainting heart rate changes markedly

Robert Sheldon; Kenneth Riff

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

VARIABILITY OF THE INFRARED EXCESS OF EXTREME DEBRIS DISKS  

SciTech Connect

Debris disks with extremely large infrared excesses (fractional luminosities >10{sup -2}) are rare. Those with ages between 30 and 130 Myr are of interest because their evolution has progressed well beyond that of protoplanetary disks (which dissipate with a timescale of order 3 Myr), yet they represent a period when dynamical models suggest that terrestrial planet building may still be progressing through large, violent collisions that could yield large amounts of debris and large infrared excesses. For example, our Moon was formed through a violent collision of two large protoplanets during this age range. We report two disks around the solar-like stars ID8 and HD 23514 in this age range where the 24 {mu}m infrared excesses vary on timescales of a few years, even though the stars are not variable in the optical. Variations this rapid are difficult to understand if the debris is produced by collisional cascades, as it is for most debris disks. It is possible that the debris in these two systems arises in part from condensates from silicate-rich vapor produced in a series of violent collisions among relatively large bodies. If their evolution is rapid, the rate of detection of extreme excesses would indicate that major collisions may be relatively common in this age range.

Meng, Huan Y. A.; Rieke, George H. [Department of Planetary Sciences, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Su, Kate Y. L.; Rujopakarn, Wiphu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ivanov, Valentin D. [European Southern Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago, 19001 (Chile); Vanzi, Leonardo [Department of Electrical Engineering and Center of Astro Engineering, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Ave. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

450

Variability in daily, zonal mean lower-stratospheric temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite data from the microwave sounding unit (MSU) channel 4, when carefully merged, provide daily zonal anomalies of lower-stratosphere temperature with a level of precision between 0.01[degrees] and 0.08[degrees]C per 2.5[degrees] latitude band. Global averages of these daily zonal anomalies reveal the prominent warming events due to volcanic aerosol in 1982 (El Chichon) and 1991 (Mt. Pinatubo), which are on the order of 1[degrees]C. The quasibiennel oscillation (QBO) may be extracted from these zonal data by applying a spatial filter between 15[degrees]N and 15[degrees]S latitude, which resembles the meridional curvature. Previously published relationships between the QBO and the north polar stratospheric temperatures during northern winter are examined but were not found to be reproduced in the MSU4 data. Sudden stratospheric warmings in the north polar region are represented in the MSU4 data for latitudes poleward of 70[degrees]N. In the Southern Hemisphere, there appears to be a moderate relationship between total ozone concentration and MSU4 temperatures, though it has been less apparent in 1991 and 1992. In terms of empirical modes of variability revealed significant power in the 15-20 day period band.

Christy, J.R. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States)); Drouilhet, S.J. Jr. (Moorhead State Univ., MN (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Prediction of Boiler Output Variables Through the PLS Linear Regression Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this work, we propose to use the linear regression partial least square method to predict the output variables of the RA1G boiler. This method consists in finding the regression of an output block regarding an input block. These two blocks represent the outputs and inputs of the process. A criteria of cross validation, based on the calculation of the predicted residual sum of squares, is used to select the components of the model in the partial least square regression. The obtained results illustrate the effectiveness of this method for prediction purposes.

Abdelmalek Kouadri; Mimoun Zelmat; Alhussein Albarbar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iea.org/g8/2008/Empowering_Variable_Renewables.pdf Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Screenshot References: Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems[1] Summary "Increasing the share of renewables in energy portfolios is a key tool in the drive to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, as well as

454

Allocating Variability and Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes how you could conceivably allocate variability and reserve requirements, including how to allocate aggregation benefits. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Aggregation provides benefits because individual requirements are not 100% correlated; (2) Method needed to allocate reduced requirement among participants; (3) Differences between allocation results are subtle - (a) Not immediately obvious which method is 'better'; (b) Many are numerically 'correct', they sum to the physical requirement; (c) Many are not 'fair', Results depend on sub-aggregation and/or the order individuals are included; and (4) Vector allocation method is simple and fair.

Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Long-Term Wind Power Variability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

Wan, Y. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Allocating Variability and Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes how you could conceivably allocate variability and reserve requirements, including how to allocate aggregation benefits. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Aggregation provides benefits because individual requirements are not 100% correlated; (2) Method needed to allocate reduced requirement among participants; (3) Differences between allocation results are subtle - (a) Not immediately obvious which method is 'better'; (b) Many are numerically 'correct', they sum to the physical requirement; (c) Many are not 'fair', Results depend on sub-aggregation and/or the order individuals are included; and (4) Vector allocation method is simple and fair.

Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Constraints on Area Variables in Regge Calculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a general method of obtaining the constraints between area variables in one approach to area Regge calculus, and illustrate it with a simple example. The simplicial complex is the simplest tessellation of the 4-sphere. The number of independent constraints on the variations of the triangle areas is shown to equal the difference between the numbers of triangles and edges, and a general method of choosing independent constraints is described. The constraints chosen by using our method are shown to imply the Regge equations of motion in our example.

Jarmo Makela; Ruth M. Williams

2000-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

458

Constraints on Area Variables in Regge Calculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a general method of obtaining the constraints between area variables in one approach to area Regge calculus, and illustrate it with a simple example. The simplicial complex is the simplest tessellation of the 4-sphere. The number of independent constraints on the variations of the triangle areas is shown to equal the difference between the numbers of triangles and edges, and a general method of choosing independent constraints is described. The constraints chosen by using our method are shown to imply the Regge equations of motion in our example.

Mkel, J M; Makela, Jarmo; Williams, Ruth M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Variably insulating portable heater/cooler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

Potter, T.F.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

460

IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Variable temperature seat climate control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

Karunasiri, Tissa R. (Van Nuys, CA); Gallup, David F. (Pasadena, CA); Noles, David R. (Glendale, CA); Gregory, Christian T. (Alhambra, CA)

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

462

Variably insulating portable heater/cooler  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Results of the ROTOR-program. I. The long-term photometric variability of classical T Tauri stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a unique, homogeneous database of photometric measurements for Classical T Tauri stars extending up to 20 years. The database contains more than 21,000 UBVR observations of 72 CTTs. All the data were collected within the framework of the ROTOR-program at Mount Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan) and together they constitute the longest homogeneous, accurate record of TTS variability ever assembled. We characterize the long term photometric variations of 49 CTTs with sufficient data to allow a robust statistical analysis and propose an empirical classification scheme. Several patterns of long term photometric variability are identified. The most common pattern, exhibited by a group of 15 stars which includes T Tau itself, consists of low level variability (Delta(V)<=0.4mag) with no significant changes occurring from season to season over many years. A related subgroup of 22 stars exhibits a similar stable long term variability pattern, though with larger amplitudes (up to Delta(V)~1.6 mag). Besides these representative groups, we identify three smaller groups of 3-5 stars each which have distinctive photometric properties. The long term variability of most CTTs is fairly stable and merely reflects shorter term variability due to cold and hot surface spots. Only a small fraction of CTTs undergo significant brightness changes on the long term (months, years), which probably arise from slowly varying circumstellar extinction.

K. N. Grankin; S. Yu. Melnikov; J. Bouvier; W. Herbst; V. S. Shevchenko

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Variable Speed Drive Volumetric Tracking (VSDVT) for Airflow Control in Variable Air Volume (VAV) Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An airflow control method has been developed for variable air volume (VAV) systems. This airflow control method is named VSD volumetric tracking (VSDVT) since both the supply and return airflows are determined using signals of the variable speed drives (VSD) instead of the flow stations. Its performance is studied and compared with the fan tracking (FT) method using model simulations. The VSDVT maintains a constant building pressure and the required outside airflow under all load conditions, reduces the annual return air fan energy by up to 50%, and the annual supply air fan energy by up to 30%. This paper presents the VSDVT method, the system models, and the simulation results.

Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Variability of the Somali Current as Observed from Seasat Altimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three methods of extraction of mesoscale variability from altimetry are compared in the Somali current area: crossover residuals after minimization to reduce orbit errors, along-track variability using quasi-repetitive tracks, and difference ...

C. Perigaud; J. F. Minster

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

U-090: RSA enVision Discloses Environment Variable Information...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: RSA enVision Discloses Environment Variable Information to Remote Users U-090: RSA enVision Discloses Environment Variable Information to Remote Users January 27, 2012 - 6:00am...

467

Stochastic Forcing of Ocean Variability by the North Atlantic Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At middle and high latitudes, the magnitude of stochastic wind stress forcing of the ocean by atmospheric variability on synoptic time scales (i.e., weather related variability) is comparable to that of the seasonal cycle. Stochastic forcing ...

Kettyah C. Chhak; Andrew M. Moore; Ralph F. Milliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Spatial Variability of Shortwave Irradiance for Snowmelt in Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial variation of melt energy can influence snow cover depletion rates and in turn be influenced by the spatial variability of shortwave irradiance to snow. The spatial variability of shortwave irradiance during melt under uniform and ...

John Pomeroy; Chad Ellis; Aled Rowlands; Richard Essery; Janet Hardy; Tim Link; Danny Marks; Jean Emmanuel Sicart

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

West African Monsoon Intraseasonal Variability: A Precipitable Water Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

West African monsoon intraseasonal variability has important implications for food security and drought early warnings. In the present study, intraseasonal variability over the Sahel is assessed from the perspective of precipitable water, as ...

D. Emmanuel Poan; Romain Roehrig; Fleur Couvreux; Jean-Philippe Lafore

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Temporal Variability of Diapycnal Mixing in Shag Rocks Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diapycnal mixing rates in the oceans have been shown to have a great deal of spatial variability, but the temporal variability has been little studied. Here results are presented from a method developed to calculate diapycnal diffusivity from ...

Gillian M. Damerell; Karen J. Heywood; David P. Stevens; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Modeling the Variability of Sydney Harbor Wind Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent behavior in the variability of wind measurements is investigated using bivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic models. These models express the current level of short-timescale wind variability in terms ...

Edward Cripps; William T. M. Dunsmuir

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

LPB Hydro-Climate Variability as Simulated by GCM Experiments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LPB Hydro-Climate Variability as Simulated by GCM Experiments: Role of Remote SST Forcing Title LPB Hydro-Climate Variability as Simulated by GCM Experiments: Role of Remote SST...

473

Snowpack spatial variability: towards understanding its effect on remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snowpack spatial variability: towards understanding its effect on remote sensing measurements spatial variability: towards understanding its effect on remote sensing mea- surements and snow slope large errors in these basin estimates. Remote sensing measurements offer a promising alternative, due

Marshall, Hans-Peter

474

Jet Jumping: Low-Frequency Variability in the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study intrinsic variability in the position of jets in a ?-plane channel ocean with simple topography using a quasigeostrophic numerical model. This study links the variability in jet position with abyssal anticyclones that form as a ...

Christopher C. Chapman; Andrew McC. Hogg

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Intraseasonal Variability over Tropical Africa during Northern Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intraseasonal variability over Africa during northern summer was analyzed, using 25 years of NCEP NCAR reanalysis and satellite data. The dominant pattern of variability was one of enhanced deep convection over the whole African monsoon ...

Adrian J. Matthews

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Tropical Cloud Feedbacks and Natural Variability of Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of natural variability by two GCMs are examined. One GCM is a sector model, allowing relatively rapid integration without simplification of the model physics, which would potentially exclude mechanisms of variability. Two mechanisms ...

R. L. Miller; A. D. Del Genio

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

A search for chaotic behavior in Northern Hemisphere stratospheric variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern Hemisphere stratospheric variability is investigated with respect to chaotic behavior using time series from three different variables extracted from four different re-analysis products and two numerical model runs with different forcing. ...

Gualtiero Badin; Daniela I.V. Domeisen

478

Role of Smarter Grids in Variable Renewable Resource Integration (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the role of smarter grids in variable renewable resource integration and references material from a forthcoming ISGAN issue paper: Smart Grid Contributions to Variable Renewable Resource Integration, co-written by the presenter and currently in review.

Miller, M.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Holographic Dark Energy Scenario and Variable Modified Chaplygin Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, we have considered that the universe is filled with normal matter and variable modified Chaplygin gas. Also we have considered the interaction between normal matter and variable modified Chaplygin gas in FRW universe. Then we have considered a correspondence between the holographic dark energy density and interacting variable modified Chaplygin gas energy density. Then we have reconstructed the potential of the scalar field which describes the variable modified Chaplygin cosmology.

Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Physical Properties of the Atmosphere in the New Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1). Part II: Aspects of Variability and Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the atmospheric component of the new Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1) is assessed in terms of its ability to represent a selection of key aspects of variability in the Tropics and extratropics. These include ...

M. A. Ringer; G. M. Martin; C. Z. Greeves; T. J. Hinton; P. M. James; V. D. Pope; A. A. Scaife; R. A. Stratton; P. M. Inness; J. M. Slingo; G.-Y. Yang

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "macroeconomic variables representing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Bayesian Variable Selection and the Swendsen-Wang Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian Variable Selection and the Swendsen-Wang Algorithm David J. NOTT and Peter J. GREEN improvements in Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithms for Bayesian variable selection. Currently used, this excludes the ith predictor from the model. The problem of variable selection is to decide which predictors

Green, Peter

482

Bayesian variable selection and the Swendsen-Wang algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian variable selection and the Swendsen-Wang algorithm David J. Nott1 and Peter J. Green2 1 motivated improvements in Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithms for Bayesian variable selection. Traditional sampling al- gorithms for Bayesian variable selection may perform poorly when there are severe

Barber, Stuart

483

Work Controls Assessment Plan Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WORK CONTROLS WORK CONTROLS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established work control process in place with authorized, controlled and documented methods that provide an accurate status of the work to be performed. Criteria: Work planning addresses applicable laws, codes and regulations. Work planning includes operational configuration constraints; material, tool, and manpower requirements; inter-organizational coordination; operational history; special training; safety considerations; hazards protection requirements; post-maintenance testing; quality control requirements; and other considerations as necessary. The work to be accomplished is defined by identifying the existing

484

This paper represent the views of the author and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of Statistics Canada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: In the current economic context, all partners in health care delivery systems, be they public or private, are obliged to identify the factors that influence the utilization of health care services. To improve our understanding of the phenomena that underlie these relationships, Statistics Canada and the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation have just set up a new database. For a representative sample of the population of the province of Manitoba, cross-sectional microdata on individuals health and socio-economic characteristics were

Christian Houle; Jean-marie Berthelot; Pierre David; Cam Mustard; D. Sc; Roos L; M. C. Wolfson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

The TAOS Project Stellar Variability II. Detection of 15 Variable Stars  

SciTech Connect

The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) project has collected more than a billion photometric measurements since 2005 January. These sky survey data - covering timescales from a fraction of a second to a few hundred days - are a useful source to study stellar variability. A total of 167 star fields, mostly along the ecliptic plane, have been selected for photometric monitoring with the TAOS telescopes. This paper presents our initial analysis of a search for periodic variable stars from the time-series TAOS data on one particular TAOS field, No. 151 (RA = 17{sup h} 30{sup m} 6.67{sup s}, Dec = 27 degrees, 17 minutes, 30 seconds, J2000), which had been observed over 47 epochs in 2005. A total of 81 candidate variables are identified in the 3 square degree field, with magnitudes in the range 8 < R < 16. On the basis of the periodicity and shape of the lightcurves, 32 variables, 18 of which were previously unknown, are classified as RR Lyrae, Cepheid, {delta} Scuti, SX Phonencis, semi-regular and eclipsing binaries.

Mondal, S; Lin, C C; Zhang, Z W; Alcock, C; Axelrod, T; Bianco, F B; Byun, Y I; Coehlo, N K; Cook, K H; Dave, R; Kim, D W; King, S K; Lee, T; Lehner, M J; Lin, H C; Marshall, S L; Protopapas, P; Rice, J A; Schwamb, M E; Wang, J H; Wang, S Y; Wen, C Y

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

486

Stochastic variability of effective properties via the generalized variability response function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homogenization of randomly heterogeneous material properties into effective properties is an essential procedure in facilitating the analysis of a wide range of mechanics problems. Although formulas exist to calculate deterministic effective properties ... Keywords: Effective properties, Random fields, Uncertainty quantification, Variability response functions

Kirubel Teferra; Sanjay R. Arwade; George Deodatis

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Characterisation of soil texture variability using the apparent soil electrical conductivity at a highly variable site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterisation of the spatial distribution of clay, silt, and sand/gravel is one of the main objectives of soil surveys. Researchers as well as producers have an interest in characterising soil texture variability. The objective of our study was ... Keywords: Clay, EM38, Residual kriging, Sand/gravel, Silt, Spatial heterogeneity

K. Heil; U. Schmidhalter

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Continuous variable tangle, monogamy inequality, and entanglement sharing in Gaussian states of continuous variable systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For continuous-variable systems, we introduce a measure of entanglement, the continuous variable tangle ({\\em contangle}), with the purpose of quantifying the distributed (shared) entanglement in multimode, multipartite Gaussian states. This is achieved by a proper convex roof extension of the squared logarithmic negativity. We prove that the contangle satisfies the Coffman-Kundu-Wootters monogamy inequality in all three--mode Gaussian states, and in all fully symmetric $N$--mode Gaussian states, for arbitrary $N$. For three--mode pure states we prove that the residual entanglement is a genuine tripartite entanglement monotone under Gaussian local operations and classical communication. We show that pure, symmetric three--mode Gaussian states allow a promiscuous entanglement sharing, having both maximum tripartite residual entanglement and maximum couplewise entanglement between any pair of modes. These states are thus simultaneous continuous-variable analogs of both the GHZ and the $W$ states of three qubits: in continuous-variable systems monogamy does not prevent promiscuity, and the inequivalence between different classes of maximally entangled states, holding for systems of three or more qubits, is removed.

Gerardo Adesso; Fabrizio Illuminati

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

489

Quantifying decoherence in continuous variable systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed report on the decoherence of quantum states of continuous variable systems under the action of a quantum optical master equation resulting from the interaction with general Gaussian uncorrelated environments. The rate of decoherence is quantified by relating it to the decay rates of various, complementary measures of the quantum nature of a state, such as the purity, some nonclassicality indicators in phase space and, for two-mode states, entanglement measures and total correlations between the modes. Different sets of physically relevant initial configurations are considered, including one- and two-mode Gaussian states, number states, and coherent superpositions. Our analysis shows that, generally, the use of initially squeezed configurations does not help to preserve the coherence of Gaussian states, whereas it can be effective in protecting coherent superpositions of both number states and Gaussian wave packets. 1

A. Serafini; M. G. A. Paris; F. Illuminati; S. De Siena

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Variational estimates using a discrete variable representation  

SciTech Connect

The advantage of using a discrete variable representation (DVR) is that the Hamiltonian of two interacting particles can be constructed in a very simple form. However, the DVR Hamiltonian is approximate and, as a consequence, the results cannot be considered as variational ones. We will show that the variational character of the results can be restored by performing a reduced number of integrals. In practice, for a variational description of the lowest n bound states only n(n+1)/2 integrals are necessary whereas D(D+1)/2 integrals are enough for the scattering states (D is the dimension of the S matrix). Applications of the method to the study of dimers of He, Ne and Ar, for both bound and scattering states, are presented.

Lombardi, M.; Barletta, P.; Kievsky, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Buonarroti 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, 56100 Pisa (Italy)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z