Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

2010sr29[M Area].doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wednesday, October 20, 2010 Wednesday, October 20, 2010 Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 Savannah River Site Marks Recovery Act Cleanup Milestone M Area cleanup work was finished nearly two years ahead of schedule AIKEN, S.C. (October 20) - Department of Energy, contractor and regulatory representatives gathered today to celebrate the completion of cleanup work at Savannah River Site's M Area, nearly two years ahead of schedule. This area

2

Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An aluminum oxide film is deposited on a heated substrate by CVD from one or more alkylaluminum alkoxide compounds having composition R.sub.n Al.sub.2 (OR').sub.6-n, wherein R and R' are alkyl groups and n is in the range of 1 to 5.

Gordon, Roy (Cambridge, MA); Kramer, Keith (Cleveland, OH); Liu, Xinye (Cambridge, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Applications of direct chemical oxidation to demilitarization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is reported concerning an aqueous process for oxidative destruction of solid- and liquid organic wastes, including ongoing work relevant to demilitarization This process uses acidified ammonium- or sodium peroxydisulfate and operates at ambient pressure and at temperatures of 80- 100 C The oxidant may be regenerated by electrolysis of the sulfate by- product at Pt anodes at roughly 80% coulombic efficiency, even in the presence of inorganic contaminants (e g , nitrate, phosphate or chloride) found in the original waste and entrained in the recycle stream Integral rate constants have been determined for the oxidation of diverse organic compounds at low concentrations (50 ppm, C), with rate constants (based on equivalents) of 0 004-O 02 miri Higher concentrations generally react at a 2-4X higher rate. The process has been carried through full- scale laboratory tests and initial pilot plant tests on chlorinated solvents, using a hydrolysis pretreatment Integral rate data indicate throughput rates of about 200 kg- C/m3-day The process may benefit the demilitarization efforts in various specialized applications destruction of solvents; destruction of trace propellants and explosives in shell casings remaining after bulk removal, destruction of red and pink waters, in situ remediation of soils at open pit burning/detonation sites; and as a regenerative filter for offgas carrying toxic or explosive substances.

Cooper, J.F., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unlined settling basin operated from 1958 until 1985, receiving waste water that contained volatile organic solvents used for metal degreasing and chemical constituents and depleted uranium from fuel fabrication process in M Area. The underground process sewer line transported M-Area process waste waters to the basin. Water periodically overflowed from the basin through the ditch to the seepage area adjacent to the ditch and to Lost Lake.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

New Chemical Systems for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New Chemical Systems for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells† ... (238) This, however, represented a significant improvement over earlier work with the use of Pt electrodes, suggesting that further improvements can be made through electrode optimization and, hence, identifying the need for more work in optimizing electrodes for use with apatite electrolytes. ... cond., the optimized compn. ...

A. Orera; P. R. Slater

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

6

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Microstructural characteristics of chemically processed manganese oxide nanofibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructured fibrous manganese oxide cryptomelane-type hollandite powders were prepared via a chemical route. Powders were obtained by the chemical reaction of the aqueous solutions of potassium permanganate and manganese sulfate in the presence of a strong acid, followed by crystalline growth at elevated temperatures. These powders were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rietveld refinement, analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with micro-micro diffraction ({mu}{mu}d), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The crystalline structure, morphology, crystallite size, fiber growth direction, and structural defects are discussed.

Xiao, T.D. [CIMAV, Chihuahua (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados] [CIMAV, Chihuahua (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados; [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Connecticut Advanced Technology Center for Precision Manufacturing; Bokhimi; Benaissa, M.; Perez, R.; Yacaman, M.J. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica] [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica; Strutt, P.R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Connecticut Advanced Technology Center for Precision Manufacturing] [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Connecticut Advanced Technology Center for Precision Manufacturing

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of Novel Ceria-Supported Metal Oxides As Oxygen Carriers for Chemical-Looping Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Novel Ceria-Supported Metal Oxides As Oxygen Carriers for Chemical-Looping Combustion and examined as oxygen carrier materials for chemical-looping combustion (CLC). Unlike conventional support agglomeration. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Chemical-Looping Combustion. Chemical-looping combustion (CLC

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

12

Report on use of excess M-area facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results of a study which investigated the feasibility of physically locating one or more functions that will be required to support the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project in M-Area facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Reynolds, R W; Driesen, G

1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

An experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modelling study of 2methyl furan oxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

platform chemical 5hydroxymethylfurfural now a possibility [4], [5], [6] and [7]. 25DMF offers significantAn experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modelling study of 2methyl furan oxidation.55­1.65, initial temperatures of 298­398 K and atmospheric pressure. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

14

Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of conductive polymers for use in novel photovoltaic device architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), (PEDOT), deposited via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) has been investigated for use in organic electronic devices. The oCVD process as well as the ...

Howden, Rachel M. (Rachel Mary)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Cerium Oxide Promoted Iron-based Oxygen Carrier for Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cerium Oxide Promoted Iron-based Oxygen Carrier for Chemical Looping Combustion ... It entails the use of an oxygen carrier (OC), usually a metal oxide, to provide oxygen for combusting fuels in a fuel reactor (FR) and then the reoxidization of the OC in a separate air reactor (AR). ... Preprints of Symposia - American Chemical Society, Division of Fuel Chemistry (2004), 49 (2), 815-816 CODEN: PSADFZ; ISSN:1521-4648. ...

Fang Liu; Liangyong Chen; James K. Neathery; Kozo Saito; Kunlei Liu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Growth of magnesium oxide thin lms using single molecular precursors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of magnesium oxide thin ®lms using single molecular precursors by metal±organic chemical precursors; Silicon; Sapphire 1. Introduction Magnesium oxide (MgO) thin ®lms have attracted much attention MgO ®lms on Si(100) above 6508C by thermal CVD. Murayama and Shionoya [12] used magnesium 2

Boo, Jin-Hyo

17

Development of Iron Oxide Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion Using Sol?Gel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of Iron Oxide Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion Using Sol?Gel ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (2008), 47 (6), 1747-1754 CODEN: IECRED; ISSN:0888-5885. ... Ishida, M.; Takeshita, K.; Suzuki, K.; Ohba, T. Application of FeO?AlO composite particles as solid looping material of the chemical-loop combustor Energy Fuels 2005, 19, 2514– 2518 ...

A. M. Kierzkowska; C. D. Bohn; S. A. Scott; J. P. Cleeton; J. S. Dennis; C. R. Müller

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

A Diode Laser Chemical Sensor Utilizing an Oxidized Lower Cladding Layer for High Sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Diode Laser Chemical Sensor Utilizing an Oxidized Lower Cladding Layer for High Sensitivity Chad@engineering.ucsb.edu Tel: 805.893.7065 Abstract: We demonstrate a novel chemical sensor incorporating a symmetrically-clad clad, and have tight optical confinement [4]. Symmetrically clad dielectric waveguides have been

Coldren, Larry A.

19

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel Olivier Herbineta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet- stirred reactor. An important to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method of forming vanadium oxide films and vanadium oxide thin-films prepared thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed of forming a vanadium oxide film on a substrate utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The method includes positioning a substrate within a plasma reaction chamber and then forming a precursor gas comprised of a vanadium-containing chloride gas in an inert carrier gas. This precursor gas is then mixed with selected amounts of hydrogen and oxygen and directed into the reaction chamber. The amounts of precursor gas, oxygen and hydrogen are selected to optimize the final properties of the vanadium oxide film An rf plasma is generated within the reaction chamber to chemically react the precursor gas with the hydrogen and the oxygen to cause deposition of a vanadium oxide film on the substrate while the chamber deposition pressure is maintained at about one torr or less. Finally, the byproduct gases are removed from the plasma reaction chamber.

Zhang, Ji-Guang (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Turner, John A. (Littleton, CO); Liu, Ping (Lakewood, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, and/or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01oxides.

White, James H; Schutte, Erick J; Rolfe, Sara L

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having one of the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01

White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Schutte, Erick J. (Thornton, CO); Rolfe, Sara L. (Loveland, CO)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

Use of amine oxide surfactants for chemical flooding EOR (enhanced oil recovery)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of amine oxides with and without alcohols as cosolvents, and in combination with other surfactants as mixed micellar formulations for enhanced oil recovery by surfactant flooding was investigated. Amine oxides are a salt-tolerant class of surfactants that produce low interfacial tension and can develop viscosity without the addition of polymers. These salt-tolerant formulations generate three-phase regions with hydrocarbons over a broad salinity range, develop moderate solubilization, and produce low interfacial tensions, however oil recovery from amine oxide-alcohol phase behavior optimized formulations was directly dependent upon the quantity of surfactant injected. The large pore volume and high concentration of surfactant required prohibits their economic use as the primary surfactant in chemical flooding EOR. Dimethylalkylamine oxides are useful as cosurfactants and viscosifiers in formulations with other surfactants for chemical flooding EOR but the use of ethoxylated and propoxylated amine oxides should be avoided due to the decomposition of these amine oxides under reservoir conditions. Phase behavior, phase inversion temperatures, and viscosity scans have been correlated with surfactant structures to provide a guide for amine oxide applications in chemical flooding. 36 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Olsen, D.K.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Atomic-scale chemical quantification of oxide interfaces using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic-scale quantification of chemical composition across oxide interfaces is important for understanding physical properties of epitaxial oxide nanostructures. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope was used to quantify chemical composition across the interface of ferromagnetic La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and antiferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} quantum structure. This research demonstrates that chemical composition at atomic columns can be quantified by Gaussian peak-fitting of EDS compositional profiles across the interface. Cation diffusion was observed at both A- and B-sublattice sites; and asymmetric chemical profiles exist across the interface, consistent with the previous studies.

Lu, Ping; Van Benthem, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1411, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1411 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1411, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1411 (United States); Xiong, Jie; Jia, Quanxi [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized Cu–Fe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are discussed.

Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Reducible Oxide Based Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion and Partial Oxidation of Methane.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a novel combustion technology that offers a highly efficient route towards clean combustion of fuel with inherent CO2 capture. In… (more)

Bhavsar, Saurabh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Electrochromic properties of iron oxide thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron oxide thin films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The source material was iron (III) acetylacetonate. The Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were produced at a substrate temperature above 200 C. The films deposited at a substrate temperature above 300 C were polycrystalline {beta}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Reduction and oxidation of the amorphous films in a 0.3 M LiClO{sub 4} propylene carbonate solution caused desirable changes in optical absorption. Coulometry indicated that the coloration efficiency was 6.0 to 6.5 cm{sup 2}/C.

Maruyama, Toshiro; Kanagawa, Tetsuya [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700 °C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900 °C.

Tian, H.; Chaudhari, K.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Liu, T.; Sanders, T.; Veser, G.; Siriwardane, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CuO/bentonite and CuO?BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction?oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation?reduction cycles above 700 °C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO?BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700?900 °C.

Tian, Hanjing; Chaudhari, K.P.; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, J.A.; Liu, Tengfei; Sanders, Tom; Veser, Goetz; Siriwardane, R.V.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A quantum chemical study of nitric oxide reduction by ammonia (SCR reaction) on V2O5 catalyst surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum chemical study of nitric oxide reduction by ammonia (SCR reaction) on V2O5 catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide by ammonia on (0 1 0) V2O5 surface represented by a V2O9/6-31G** level. The computations indicated that SCR reaction consisted of three main parts

Senkan, Selim M.

33

Two-step fuel oxidation to improve efficiency in the conversion of chemical energy into work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that in the conversion of chemical exergy into work a remarkable percentage of exergy is destroyed during the combustion process. Obviously, hypothetical reversible combustions, as proposed in some papers, are not to be taken into account. On the contrary, recent studies of a new system to increase the efficiency of the conversion of chemical exergy into work appear interesting. The proposed system includes a gas turbine system with chemical-looping combustion where a metal oxide is used as an oxygen carrier. Instead of conventional combustion, the oxidation of fuel is carried out in a two-step reaction. The first step is an endothermic reaction in which a metal oxide is reduced by fuel at low temperature and the second step an exothermic reaction in which the products of the former reaction are subjected to oxidation. The thermal energy of low exergy value in the exhaust gas is employed to drive the endothermic reaction. Various systems have been proposed and tested. The power-generation system (called CLSA), with chemical-looping combustion and air saturation seems the most convenient. When only saturated air is used, exergy destruction becomes small in the middle- and low temperature range. However, the inefficiency in the high temperature range remains. On the other hand, when only chemical-looping combustion is used, exergy destruction becomes small in the high- and middle temperature range. However, the inefficiency in the low-temperature range is now not removed. When both technologies are combined, exergy efficiency may become much greater than that obtained from each individual process. The synergistic effect of combining these two technologies is analogous to the improvement achieved when a combined system was designed as a new power-generation system by combining a gas turbine with a steam turbine. For a model system, an exergy efficiency of 53.3% is obtained when the process water is recovered and a value of about 55% is obtained when water is not recovered. A significant advantage of the CLSA system is that CO{sub 2} can be easily recovered. The CO{sub 2} produced in the reduction reactor is not diluted by air since air and fuel enter different reactors. This is quite different from a traditional combustor in which CO{sub 2} is diluted in air and hence cannot be concentrated and separated economically. In the CLSA system, since the exhaust gas from the reduction reactor is composed only of high-concentration CO{sub 2} and water vapor, CO{sub 2} can be easily recovered by cooling the exhaust gas and removing the liquid water, i.e. very little energy expenditure is required for recovering CO{sub 2} from the exhaust gas. The recovered CO{sub 2} may be utilized, e.g., in artificial photosynthesis, whereas a simple recovery without any utilization but only to reduce greenhouse effect seems questionable. Another significant characteristic of CLSA system is that the most of the water vapor in the exhaust gas can be recovered by cooling the exhaust gas from the oxidation reactor. In chemical-looping combustion, fuel is not burned directly and the gas discharged from the oxidation reactor has no impurities from the fuel. Hence, there will be no corrosion of the apparatus when the exhaust gas is cooled to a very low temperature and low cost materials can be utilized for the heat exchangers. Because of the recycling of the most part of water, the CLSA system can be used in locations with limited water resources. Chemical-looping combustion system can be also combined with an integrated coal gasification and this topic appears very interesting. Indeed, to achieve better conversion efficiencies and lower pollutant emissions in power plants, new technologies that combines coal gasification with a gas turbine based combined cycle have been extensively studied worldwide.

Bisio, G.; Rubatto, R.; Marletta, L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Chemical-vapor deposition of complex oxides: materials and process development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) part of the Advanced Materials Laboratory (AML). The demand for higher performance and lower cost in electronics is driving the need for advanced materials and consequent process integration. Ceramic thin-film technology is becoming more important in the manufacture of microelectronic devices, photovoltaics, optoelectronics, magneto-optics, sensors, microwave, and radio frequency communication devices, and high-Tc superconducting tapes. A flexible processing approach for potential large-scale manufacturing of novel electronic ceramic thin films is desirable. Current thin- film deposition technologies based on physical vapor-deposition techniques are limited in scale potential and have limited control of processing parameters. The lack of control over multiple process parameters inhibits the versatility and reproducibility of the physical vapor deposition processes applied to complex oxides. Chemical vapor deposition is emerging as a viable approach for large- scale manufacturing of electronic materials. Specifically, the ability to control more processing parameters with chemical vapor deposition than with other processing techniques provides the reliability and material property reproducibility required by manufacturing. This project sought to investigate the chemical vapor deposition of complex oxides.

Muenchausen, R.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900{degree}C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO{sub 2} from fuel gas at 800 and 900{degree}C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700{degree}C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900{degree}C. 48 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Hanjing Tian; Karuna Chaudhari; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston; Tengfei Liu; Tom Sanders; Goetz Veser; Ranjani Siriwardane [U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Chemical solution deposition of ferroelectric yttrium-doped hafnium oxide films on platinum electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferroelectric hafnium oxide films were fabricated by chemical solution deposition with a remnant polarization of >13 ?C/cm{sup 2}. The samples were prepared with 5.2?mol.?% yttrium-doping and the thickness varied from 18?nm to 70?nm. The hafnium oxide layer was integrated into a metal-insulator-metal capacitor using platinum electrodes. Due to the processing procedure, no thickness dependence of the ferroelectric properties was observed. To confirm the ferroelectric nature of the deposited samples, polarization, capacitance, and piezoelectric displacement measurements were performed. However, no evidence of the orthorhombic phase was found which has been proposed to be the non-centrosymmetric, ferroelectric phase in HfO{sub 2}.

Starschich, S.; Griesche, D.; Schneller, T.; Böttger, U. [Institut für Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik 2, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstraße 24, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Waser, R. [Institut für Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik 2, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstraße 24, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institut 7, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

38

Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Chemical-looping combustion of simulated synthesis gas using nickel oxide oxygen carrier supported on bentonite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology for clean and efficient utilization of fossil fuels for energy production. This process which produces sequestration ready CO2 systems is a promising technology to be utilized with coal gasification systems. In the present work, chemical-looping combustion has been studied with an oxygen carrier, NiO/bentonite (60 wt % NiO) for the gasification systems utilizing simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation as a function of conversion were calculated for oxidation-reduction cycles utilizing the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data on multicycle tests conducted with NiO/bentonite at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. The rate of reduction increased slightly with an increase in temperature, while the rate of oxidation decreased at 900 °C. The effect of particle size of the oxygen carrier on CLC was studied for the particle size between 20 and 200 mesh. The rates of reactions depended on the particle size of the oxygen carrier. The smaller the particle size, the higher the reaction rates. The multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for the production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. The data from a one cycle test on the effect of the pressure on the performance with NiO/bentonite utilizing the tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) showed a positive effect of the pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of the NiO phase in NiO/bentonite with the oxidized sample in the highpressure reactor and Ni phase with the reduced sample. The presence of a small amount of NiO in the reduced sample detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) may be due to its exposure to air during sample transfer from the reactor to XPS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed no significant changes in morphology of NiO/bentonite reacted in the temperature range 700-800 °C in an atmospheric TGA for 10 oxidation-reduction cycles, but some loss of surface area and porosity was observed at 900 °C. This effect was found to be greater with increase in the particle size of the oxygen carrier.

Siriwardane, R.V.; Chaudhari, K.; Poston, J.A.; Zinn, A.; Simonyi, T.; Robinson, C.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Chemical-looping combustion of coal with metal oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combustion and reoxidation properties of direct coal chemical-looping combustion (CLC) over CuO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CO{sub 3}O{sub 4}, NiO, and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor studies. When coal is heated in either nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), 50% of weight loss was observed because of partial pyrolysis, consistent with the proximate analysis. Among various metal oxides evaluated, CuO showed the best reaction properties: CuO can initiate the reduction reaction as low as 500{sup o}C and complete the full combustion at 700{sup o}C. In addition, the reduced copper can be fully reoxidized by air at 700{sup o}C. The combustion products formed during the CLC reaction of the coal/metal oxide mixture are CO{sub 2} and water, while no carbon monoxide was observed. Multicycle TGA tests and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor tests strongly supported the feasibility of CLC of coal by using CuO as an oxygen carrier. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of solid reaction products indicated some changes in the surface morphology of a CuO-coal sample after reduction/oxidation reactions at 800 {sup o}C. However, significant surface sintering was not observed. The interactions of fly ash with metal oxides were investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermodynamic analysis. Overall, the results indicated that it is feasible to develop CLC with coal by metal oxides as oxygen carriers. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Ranjani Siriwardane; Hanjing Tian; George Richards; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston [United States Department of Energy, Morgantown, WN (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluation of reaction mechanism of coal-metal oxide interactions in chemical-looping combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The knowledge of reaction mechanism is very important in designing reactors for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of coal. Recent CLC studies have considered the more technically difficult problem of reactions between abundant solid fuels (i.e. coal and waste streams) and solid metal oxides. A definitive reaction mechanism has not been reported for CLC reaction of solid fuels. It has often been assumed that the solid/solid reaction is slow and therefore requires that reactions be conducted at temperatures high enough to gasify the solid fuel, or decompose the metal oxide. In contrast, data presented in this paper demonstrates that solid/solid reactions can be completed at much lower temperatures, with rates that are technically useful as long as adequate fuel/metal oxide contact is achieved. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations as well as experimental techniques such as thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), flow reactor studies, in situ X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate how the proximal interaction between solid phases proceeds. The data indicate that carbon induces the Cu-O bond breaking process to initiate the combustion of carbon at temperatures significantly lower than the spontaneous decomposition temperature of CuO, and the type of reducing medium in the vicinity of the metal oxide influences the temperature at which the oxygen release from the metal oxide takes place. Surface melting of Cu and wetting of carbon may contribute to the solid-solid contacts necessary for the reaction. (author)

Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Poston, James [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 (United States); Tian, Hanjing; Miller, Duane; Simonyi, Thomas [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 (United States); URS, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

M-Area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report -- first quarter 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during first quarter 1994 as required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. During first quarter 1994, 42 point-of-compliance (POC) wells at the M-Area HWMF were sampled for drinking water parameters.

Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: The importance of chemical intuition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup ?2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •?}) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •?}, whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol{sup ?1} lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71–2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V.

Bushnell, Eric A. C.; Burns, Thomas D.; Boyd, Russell J., E-mail: russell.boyd@dal.ca [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Unusual Physical and Chemical Properties of Cu in Ce1-xCuxO2 Oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural and electronic properties of Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} nano systems prepared by a reverse microemulsion method were characterized with synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional calculations. The Cu atoms embedded in ceria had an oxidation state higher than those of the cations in Cu{sub 2}O or CuO. The lattice of the Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} systems still adopted a fluorite-type structure, but it was highly distorted with multiple cation-oxygen distances with respect to the single cation-oxygen bond distance seen in pure ceria. The doping of CeO{sub 2} with copper introduced a large strain into the oxide lattice and favored the formation of O vacancies, leading to a Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2-y} stoichiometry for our materials. Cu approached the planar geometry characteristic of Cu(II) oxides, but with a strongly perturbed local order. The chemical activities of the Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles were tested using the reactions with H2 and O2 as probes. During the reduction in hydrogen, an induction time was observed and became shorter after raising the reaction temperature. The fraction of copper that could be reduced in the Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} oxides also depended strongly on the reaction temperature. A comparison with data for the reduction of pure copper oxides indicated that the copper embedded in ceria was much more difficult to reduce. The reduction of the Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles was rather reversible, without the generation of a significant amount of CuO or Cu{sub 2}O phases during reoxidation. This reversible process demonstrates the unusual structural and chemical properties of the Cu-doped ceria materials.

Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Standard test methods for chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) powder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide powders to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Carbon by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion Selective Electrode C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Loss of Weight on Ignition 7-13 Sulfur by CombustionIodometric Titration Impurity Elements by a Spark-Source Mass Spectrographic C761 Test Methods for Chemical, Mass Spectrometric, Spectrochemical,Nuclear, and Radiochemical Analysis of Uranium Hexafluoride C1287 Test Method for Determination of Impurities In Uranium Dioxide By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Gadolinium Content in Gadolinium Oxid...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Studies on the chemical synthesis and characterization of lead oxide nanoparticles with different organic capping agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead oxide (PbO) nanoparticles were chemically synthesized using Lead (II) acetate as precursor. The effects of organic capping agents such as Oleic acid, Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) and Cetryl Tri Methyl Butoxide (CTAB) on the size and morphology of the nanoparticles were studied. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Photoluminescence (PL) Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to analyse the prepared nanoparticles for their physical, structural and optical properties. The characterization studies reveal that the synthesized PbO nanoparticles had well defined crystalline structure and sizes in the range of 25 nm to 36 nm for capping agents used and 40 nm for pure PbO nanoparticles.

Arulmozhi, K. T., E-mail: arulsheelphy@gmail.com [Physics Wing (DDE), Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India); Mythili, N. [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India)] [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Studies on transparent spinel magnesium indium oxide thin films prepared by chemical spray pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ternary semiconducting oxide compound magnesium indium oxide films (MgIn2O4), manifesting high transparency were prepared by metal organic chemical spray pyrolysis technique. Precursors prepared for various cationic ratios of Mg/In = 0.35, 0.40, 0.45 and 0.50 were thermally sprayed onto quartz substrates, decomposed at 450 °C and the spinel phase evolution was studied. X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have been conducted to confirm the formation of single-phase MgIn2O4 films with Mg/In ratio 0.50. From optical transmission studies, the observed optical band gaps varied from 3.18 to 3.86 eV (0.35 < Mg/In < 0.5). The electrical conductivity variations of these films were measured in the temperature range between 30 and 150 °C by four-probe technique (34.07–1.44 × 10? 5 S cm? 1) and the Hall coefficient showed n-type electrical conduction and high carrier concentration (0.16 × 1020–0.89 × 17 cm? 3).

A. Moses Ezhil Raj; V. Senthilkumar; V. Swaminathan; Joachim Wollschläger; M. Suendorf; M. Neumann; M. Jayachandran; C. Sanjeeviraja

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Groundwater monitoring program evaluation For A/M Area, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation was undertaken with the primary purpose of assessing the groundwater monitoring program within the A/M Area to identify ways in which the monitoring program could be improved. The task was difficult due to the large number of wells located within the A/M Area and the huge database of analytical data. It was recognized early in this investigation that one of the key tasks was to develop a way to gain access to the groundwater databases so that recommendations could be made. To achieve this, geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to extract pertinent groundwater quality information from the Geochemical Information Management System (GIMS) groundwater database and display the extracted information spatially. GIS technology was also used to determine the location of well screen and annular material zones within the A/M Area hydrostratigraphy and to identify wells that may breach confining units. Recommendations developed from this study address: (1) wells that may not be providing reliable data but continue to be routinely sampled (2) wells that may be inappropriately located but continue to be routinely sampled and (3) further work that should be undertaken, including well development, evaluation of wells that may be breaching confining units, and development of an automated link to GIMS using GIS so that GIMS data can easily be accessed and displayed geographically.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Bollinger, J.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hydrogen Production via Chemical Looping Redox Cycles Using Atomic Layer Deposition-Synthesized Iron Oxide and Cobalt Ferrites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production via Chemical Looping Redox Cycles Using Atomic Layer Deposition-Synthesized Iron Oxide and Cobalt Ferrites ... Unlike solution and line-of-sight methods used to synthesize metal-substituted ferrites, including solution combustion synthesis,(6) aerial oxidation of aqueous suspensions,(5) sol?gel process,(8) laser molecular beam epitaxy,(21) sputtering,(22) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD),(23) ALD can produce conformal thin films on porous materials. ... The drop in peak H2 production rate is accompanied by a ?55% decrease in the total amount of H2 produced (see Table 1) and a similar decrease in the time required to achieve 95% conversion, suggesting a loss of accessible iron in this material. ...

Jonathan R. Scheffe; Mark D. Allendorf; Eric N. Coker; Benjamin W. Jacobs; Anthony H. McDaniel; Alan W. Weimer

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

51

Comparative electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes with different chemical functionalities for quantum dot attachment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to different chemically treated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A narrow EPR signal is visible at g?=?2.0029 in both GO and CNT-Oxide from carbon-related dangling bonds. EPR signals became broader and of lower intensity after oxygen-containing functionalities were reduced and partially transformed into thiol groups to obtain thiol-functionalized reduced GO (TrGO) and thiol-functionalized CNT (CNT-SH), respectively. Additionally, EPR investigation of CdSe quantum dot-TrGO hybrid material reveals complete quenching of the TrGO EPR signal due to direct chemical attachment and electronic coupling. Our work confirms that EPR is a suitable tool to detect spin density changes in different functionalized nanocarbon materials and can contribute to improved understanding of electronic coupling effects in nanocarbon-nanoparticle hybrid nano-composites promising for various electronic and optoelectronic applications.

Pham, Chuyen V.; Krueger, Michael, E-mail: michael.krueger@fmf.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de; Eck, Michael [Freiburg Materials Research Center (FMF), University of Freiburg, Stefan-Meier-Str. 21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Weber, Stefan; Erdem, Emre, E-mail: michael.krueger@fmf.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal-oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxides - such as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxide - was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H{sub 2}S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H{sub 2}S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H{sub 2}S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H{sub 2}S for all four metal oxides.

Tian, H.J.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R. [US DOE, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Chemical interactions at polymer interfaces: poly(p-xylylene-?-tetrahydrothiophene-bromide, chloride) on indium–tin-oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical interactions, at the interface between a precursor polymer for poly(p-phenylenevinylene), namely poly(p-xylylene-?-tetrahydrothiophene-chloride), and an indium–tin-oxide transparent electrode, are identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The \\{HCl\\} eliminated in the conversion process interacts with the surface of the indium–tin-oxide substrate leading to the formation of indium chloride which then diffuses into the polymer. It appears that indium–tin-oxide, or possibly the indium chloride generated at the interface, acts as a catalyst for the thermal elimination reaction. The results show unequivocally that interfacial interactions are of major importance in understanding, and ultimately improving, the performance of polymer-based electro-luminescent devices.

A Andersson; Th Kugler; M Lögdlund; A.B Holmes; X Li; W.R Salaneck

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Effect of Carbon Deposition on the Oxidation Rate of Copper/Bentonite in the Chemical Looping Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presented work is part of the Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI) on the development of metal oxide oxygen carriers for use in the chemical looping combustion process. An oxygen carrier, CuO/bentonite (60:40%), was reacted with methane gas and then oxidized in air. The change in weight and reaction gas concentrations were measured using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) equipped with a real-time gas analyzer. The reduction–oxidation cycle was conducted within the temperature range of 750–900 °C for 10 cycles, using 20, 50, and100% CH{sub 4} concentrations in N{sub 2} for the reduction segment and dry air for the oxidation segment. Several analysis methods were evaluated to fit the oxidation of reduced CuO (i.e., Cu) data over the complete conversion range with suitable rate expressions derived from existing models for oxidation, including the shrinking core model (diffusion and reaction control), first- and second-order reaction rates, parallel and series reaction mechanisms, and Johnson–Mehl–Avrami (JMA) rate. The best agreement between the experimental data and the models of the Cu oxidation was accomplished using the JMA model. The reactivity of the oxygen carrier during the oxidation reactions was affected by the CH{sub 4} concentration as well as the temperature. The rate of fractional uptake of oxygen onto the carrier decreased as the temperature increased, contrary to expectations and indicative that the mechanism is changing during the test. Analysis of the exit gas provided evidence of carbon deposition on the reduced sorbent particle and resulted in the CO{sub 2} product upon oxidation. The oxidation of this carbon releases significant heat that is capable of changing the particle morphology (Zhu, Y.; Mimura, K.; Isshiki, M. Oxid. Met. 2004, 62, 207?222). On the basis of experimental results, the overall reaction process in the fuel reactor may be considered to consist of the decomposition of CH{sub 4} into C and H{sub 2} and reduction of CuO/bentonite by the resulting H{sub 2} and the parallel reaction of CH{sub 4} with CuO/bentonite. The extent of carbon deposition in the carrier particle increased with an increasing temperature and CH{sub 4} concentration. This deposited carbon not only leads to CO{sub 2} release from the oxidation reactor but, more importantly, causes degredation of the carrier capacity and its reactivity.

Monazam, Esmail R.; Breault, Ronald W.; Siriwardane, Ranjani

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A/M Area Groundwater Corrective Action Southern Sector Remediation Technology Alternatives Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several technologies for clean up of solvents such as trichloroethylene, from groundwater were examined to determine the most reasonable strategy for the southern Sector in A/M Area of Savannah River Site. The most promising options identified were: pump and treat technology, airlift recirculation technology, and bioremediation technology. These options range from baseline/traditional methods to more innovative technologies. The traditional methods would be straightforward to implement, while the innovative methods have the potential to improve efficiency and reduce long term costs.

Looney, B.B.; Phifer, M.A.

1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ductility and chemical reactions at the interface between nickel and magnesium oxide single crystals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An investigation was conducted on the interaction between nickel metal and single crystals of magnesium oxide. The nickel was cleaned with purified hydrogen gas at… (more)

Hasselman, Didericus Petrus Hermannus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal---oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxidesssuch as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxideswas investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H2S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H2S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H2S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H2S for all four metal oxides.

Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Regenerable MgO promoted metal oxide oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier comprised of a plurality of metal oxide particles in contact with a plurality of MgO promoter particles. The MgO promoter particles increase the reaction rate and oxygen utilization of the metal oxide when contacting with a gaseous hydrocarbon at a temperature greater than about 725.degree. C. The promoted oxide solid is generally comprised of less than about 25 wt. % MgO, and may be prepared by physical mixing, incipient wetness impregnation, or other methods known in the art. The oxygen carrier exhibits a crystalline structure of the metal oxide and a crystalline structure of MgO under XRD crystallography, and retains these crystalline structures over subsequent redox cycles. In an embodiment, the metal oxide is Fe.sub.2O.sub.3, and the gaseous hydrocarbon is comprised of methane.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Miller, Duane D.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

Implications of the toxicity of tetramethyltin, dimethyl tin dichloride, and tin tetrachloride in selecting a suitable tin precursor in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential health hazards in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide films from tetramethylin dimethylin dichloride and tin tetrachloride have to be balanced against the benefits to solar cell fabrication. Concerns regarding the toxicity costs and physical properties of and the quality of the tin oxide films produced with these tin precursors are outlined. (AIP)

Roy G. Gordon; James W. Prescia

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Gasification and Chemical-Looping Combustion of a Lignite Char in a Fluidized Bed of Iron Oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification and Chemical-Looping Combustion of a Lignite Char in a Fluidized Bed of Iron Oxide ... Taking reactions R1 and R2 together, the fuel has been combusted but resulting CO2 has been separated from N2 in the air, while the total heat evolved is the same as for the direct combustion of the fuel in air. ... The amount of carbon in the bed at the end of each feeding period could then be determined by combusting the char in air and measuring the total amount of CO2 and CO produced. ...

T. A. Brown; J. S. Dennis; S. A. Scott; J. F. Davidson; A. N. Hayhurst

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

62

Aromatic hydroxylation. 8. A radiation chemical study of the oxidation of hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substituted hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals have been generated by pulse radiolysis of N/sub 2/O-saturated aqueous solutions of monosubstituted benzene derivatives. Their rates of disproportionation/dimerization and of oxidation by Fe(CN)/sub 6//sup 3 -/ and by IrCl/sub 6//sup 2 -/ have been measured by optical and conductimetric methods. For the fluoro- and chlorohydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals disproportionation is shown to involve hydrogen atom abstraction rather than electron transfer. However, the Fe(CN)/sub 6//sup 3 -/ oxidation of the substituted hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals occurs by a rate-determining electron transfer followed by a fast proton loss rather than by hydrogen atom abstraction or synchronous removal of an electron and a proton. A plot of the log of the rate constants for oxidation against Hammett sigma/sup +/ constants gives a good linear relationship with a rho value of -3.0 +/- 0.1. With the more powerful oxidant IrCl/sub 6//sup -/, the electron-transfer oxidation of all but the least reactive hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals is diffusion controlled.

Buxton, G.V.; Langan, J.R.; Smith, J.R.L.

1986-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

63

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols III: Morphologic and Chemical Oxide Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against an armored target causes erosion and fragmentation of the penetrators, the extent of which is dependent on the thickness and material composition of the target. Vigorous oxidation of the DU particles and fragments creates an aerosol of DU oxide particles and DU particle agglomerations combined with target materials. Aerosols from the Capstone DU aerosol study, in which vehicles were perforated by DU penetrators, were evaluated for their oxidation states using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and particle morphologies using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS). The oxidation state of a DU aerosol is important as it offers a clue to its solubility in lung fluids. The XRD analysis showed that the aerosols evaluated were a combination primarily of U3O8 (insoluble) and UO3 (relatively more soluble) phases, though intermediate phases resembling U4O9 and other oxides were prominent in some samples. Analysis of particle residues in the micrometer-size range by SEM/EDS provided microstructural information such as phase composition and distribution, fracture morphology, size distribution, and material homogeneity. Observations from SEM analysis show a wide variability in the shapes of the DU particles. Some of the larger particles appear to have been fractured (perhaps as a result of abrasion and comminution); others were spherical, occasionally with dendritic or lobed surface structures. Amorphous conglomerates containing metals other than uranium were also common, especially with the smallest particle sizes. A few samples seemed to contain small chunks of nearly pure uranium metal, which were verified by EDS to have a higher uranium content exceeding that expected for uranium oxides. Results of the XRD and SEM/EDS analyses were used in other studies described in this issue of The Journal of Health Physics to interpret the results of lung solubility studies and in selecting input parameters for dose assessments.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Gold, Kenneth; Arey, Bruce W.; Jenson, Evan D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Boron by Titrimetry 7 to 13 Separation of Boron for Mass Spectrometry 14 to 19 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 20 to 23 Separation of Halides by Pyrohydrolysis 24 to 27 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 28 to 30 Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 31 to 33 Trace Elements by Emission Spectroscopy 34 to 46 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (F...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

Sallis, S.; Williams, D. S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Butler, K. T.; Walsh, A. [Center for Sustainable Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Quackenbush, N. F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Junda, M.; Podraza, N. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); White, B. E.; Piper, L. F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

66

Synthesis of graphene nanosheets via oxalic acid-induced chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preparing high-quality graphene through reduction of graphene oxide (GO) by oxalic acid is demonstrated in this paper. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry were taken to confirm the reduction of GO and the formation of graphene under these mild conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis and conductivity measurements further testify the excellent thermal stability and conductivity of the obtained graphene. A possible mechanism for the reduction process was also proposed. Furthermore, a Pt-graphene composite was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation was observed. With advantages of low toxicity, simple purification process and high quality of the product, oxalic acid provides a feasible route to prepare graphene from GO under mild conditions, thus facilitating the use of graphene-based materials for large-scale applications.

Song, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Mingxun; Cui, Xiao-Li; Lin, Yuehe

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of Novel Ceria-Supported Metal Oxides As Oxygen Carriers for Chemical-Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The equilibrium data were computed using the HSC Chemistry 6.1 software. ... Chuang, S. Y.; Dennis, J. S.; Hayhurst, A. N.; Scott, S. A.Development and performance of Cu-based oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion Combust. ...

Ali Hedayati; Abdul-Majeed Azad; Magnus Rydén; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

68

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: thermal cycle stability and chemical compatibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel (SOFC) applications. The glass containing ~17 mole% alkalis (K2O and Na2O) remains vitreous and compliant during SOFC operation, unlike conventional SOFC sealing glasses, which experience substantial devitrification after the sealing process. The non-crystallizing compliant sealing glass has lower glass transition and softening temperatures since the microstructure remains glassy without significant crystallite formation, and hence can relieve or reduce residual stresses and also has the potential for crack healing. Sealing approaches based on compliant glass will also need to satisfy all the mechanical, thermal, chemical, physical, and electrical requirements for SOFC applications, not only in bulk properties but also at sealing interfaces. In this first of a series of papers we will report the thermal cycle stability of the glass when sealed between two SOFC components, i.e., a NiO/YSZ anode supported YSZ bilayer and a coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect material. High temperature leak rates were monitored versus thermal cycles between 700-850oC using back pressures ranging from 0.2 psi to 1.0 psi. Isothermal stability was also evaluated in a dual environment consisting of flowing dilute H2 fuel versus ambient air. In addition, chemical compatibility at the alumina and YSZ interfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results shed new light on the topic of SOFC glass seal development.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Williams, Riley T.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, E.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report. Second quarter 1995, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site during second quarter 1995. Topics include: changes in sampling, analysis, and reporting; water levels; remedial action of groundwater; and hydrology of the affected aquifer zones.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Microstructural and chemical evolution near anode triple phase boundary in Ni/YSZ solid oxide fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we report the microstructural and chemical evolution of anode grain boundaries and triple phase boundary (TPB) junctions of Ni/YSZ anode supported solid oxide fuel cells. A NiO phase was found to develop along the Ni/YSZ interfaces extending to TPBs in the operated cells. The thickness of the NiO ribbon phase remains constant at ~5 nm in hydrogen for operating durations up to 540 h. When operating on synthesis gas, an increase in interphase thickness was observed from ~11 nm for 24 h of operation to ~51 nm for 550 h of operation. YSZ phases are observed to be stable in H2 over 540 h of operation. However, for the cell operated in syngas for 550 h, a 5–10 nm tetragonal YSZ (t-YSZ) interfacial layer was identified that originated from the Ni/YSZ interfaces. Yttrium species seem to segregate to the interfaces during operation, leading to the formation of t-YSZ in the Y-depleted regions.

Chen, Yun; Chen, Song; Hacket, Gregory; Finklea, Harry; Song, Zueyan; Gerdes, Kirk

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Microstructural and chemical evolution near anode triple phase boundary in Ni/YSZ solid oxide fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we report the micro-structural and chemical evolution of anode grain boundaries and triple phase boundary (TPB) junctions of Ni/YSZ anode supported solid oxide fuel cells. A NiO phase was found to develop along the Ni/YSZ interfaces extending to TPBs in the operated cells. The thickness of the NiO ribbon phase remains constant at ~ 5 nm in hydrogen for operating durations up to 540 h. When operating on synthesis gas, an increase in interphase thickness was observed from ~ 11 nm for 24 h of operation to ~ 51 nm for 550 h of operation. YSZ phases are observed to be stable in H{sub 2} over 540 h of operation. However, for the cell operated in syngas for 550 h, a 5–10 nm tetragonal YSZ (t-YSZ) interfacial layer was identified that originated from the Ni/YSZ interfaces. Yttrium species seem to segregate to the interfaces during operation, leading to the formation of t-YSZ in the Y-depleted regions.

Chen, Yun; Chen, Song; Hackett, Gregory; Finklea, Harry; Song, Xueyan; Gerdes, Kirk

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

On the bone response to oxidized titanium implants. The role of microporous structure and chemical composition of the surface oxide in enhanced osseointegration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Background: Titanium implants have been widely used clinically for various types of bone-anchored reconstructions. A thin native oxide film, naturally formed on titanium implants contacts… (more)

Sul, Young-Taeg 1960-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Synthesis of poly(1-aminonaphthalene) and poly(1-aminoanthracene) by chemical oxidative polymerization and characterization of the polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Poly(1-aminonaphthalene) and poly(1-aminoanthracene) have been synthesized in high yields (90--96%) by chemical oxidative polymerization of 1-aminonaphthalene and 1-aminoanthracene using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of Fe catalyst. The oxidative polymerization of 1-aminonaphthalene and 1-aminoanthracene proceeds via successive coupling that gives the polymer structure similar to polyaniline. The polymers are brown powders and soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and HCOOH. The obtained poly(1-aminonaphthalene) and poly(1-aminoanthracene) show electrical conductivities of 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and 1.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} S cm{sup {minus}1}, respectively, which increase to 3.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}-1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S cm{sup {minus}1} on doping with HCl or I{sub 2}. Light scattering measurements of the polymers in NMP shows a large degree of depolarization ({rho}{sub v} = 0.33), indicating that the polymers have a linear and stiff structure. The number-average molecular weights (M{sub n}) of poly(1-aminonaphthalene) and poly(1-aminoanthracene) obtained are determined as 4,300 and 4,500, respectively, with narrow molecular weight distribution by gel permeation chromatography (vs polystyrene). The weight-average molecular weight (M{sub b}) of poly(1-aminoanthracene) determined by the light scattering method is 7,000. {sup 1}H NMR spectra of PNA and PAA in DMSO-d{sub 6} give rise to the absorption of the NH hydrogen in the region of {delta} 5--6 ppm, and the NH hydrogen of PNA is exchangeable with the water hydrogen contained in DMSO-d{sub 6} on the NMR time scale with an activation energy of 27 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. PNA and PAA do not show a distinct absorption peak in the visible region.

Moon, Doo Kyung; Osakada, Kohtaro; Maruyama, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Takakazu [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Yokohama (Japan). Research Lab. of Resources Utilization; Kubota, Kenji [Gunma Univ., Kiryu (Japan). Faculty of Technology

1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

74

Water quality improvement of a lagoon containing mixed chemical industrial wastewater by micro-electrolysis-contact oxidization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lagoon in the New Binhai District, a high-speed developing area, Tianjin, China, has long been receiving the mixed chemical industrial wastewater from a chemical industrial park. This lagoon contained comple...

Ya-fei Zhou; Mao Liu; Qiong Wu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

Marcus, R. A.

1962-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

76

M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Determination of transport parameters of coincident inorganic and organic plumes in the Savannah River Plant M-Area, Aiken, South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis by TOYA. LYN CAUFFMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Geology DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN& SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis...

Cauffman, Toya Lyn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Kinetics of Magnetite (Fe3O4) Oxidation to Hematite (Fe2O3) in Air for Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rui, X.; Qilei, S.; Min, S.; Zuoji, L.; Shuai, Z.; Laihong, S.Pressurized chemical-looping combustion of coal with an iron ore-based oxygen carrier Combust. ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (2013), 52 (42), 14808-14816 CODEN: IECRED; ISSN:0888-5885. ... Application of Fe2O3-Al2O3 Composite Particles as Solid Looping Material of the Chemical-Loop Combustor ...

Esmail R. Monazam; Ronald W. Breault; Ranjani Siriwardane

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Role of gas phase reactions in subatmospheric chemical-vapor deposition ozone/TEOS processes for oxide deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-vapor deposition. Our results for oxide deposition show optimum process window around 200 Torr for producing films a po- tentially optimum process window in which film properties, deposition rates, film uniformity requires high quality dielectric films that can be deposited rapidly and conformally on high aspect ratio

Rubloff, Gary W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reduced Sulfur in Ashes and Slags from the Gasification of Coals: Availability for Chemical and Microbial Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...9 by 30 cm) ofa coal gasifier slag (1.5 kg [air-dried...rates. Ten grams of gasifier ash was suspended in...most-probable-number (MPN) medium de- scribed below except...99. Growth in the medium was scored positive if...S OXIDATION IN COAL GASIFIER SOLID WASTES 745 6 E...

Richard F. Strayer; Edward C. Davis

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical 276 (2007) 816 Oxidative carbonylation of toluene to p-toluic acid catalyzed by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the water-gas-shift reaction leading to a reduction of Rh(III) to Rh(I). A mechanism for the overall 2007 Abstract The mechanism and kinetics of the liquid phase, oxidative carbonylation of toluene. The concentration of water, produced during the reoxidation of Rh(I) to Rh(III), in the reaction system must

Bell, Alexis T.

83

Reduced Sulfur in Ashes and Slags from the Gasification of Coals: Availability for Chemical and Microbial Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the TXB-thiosulfate medium described by Brannan...replaced the sulfates. The medium con- tained the following...99. Growth in the medium was scored positive if...Ash and slag particle size distribu- tions were...S OXIDATION IN COAL GASIFIER SOLID WASTES 745 6 E...

Richard F. Strayer; Edward C. Davis

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Use of a 2-inch, dual screen well to conduct aquifer tests in the upper and lower Lost lake aquifer zones: Western sector, A/M area, SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Sector, A/M Area is located just west of the M-Area Settling Basin on an upland area. The area is adjacent to the gently inclined area where the upland drops off to the Savannah River floodplain. Water in the parts of the uppermost aquifers contains dissolved contaminants which originated at the land surface and have leached downward into the groundwater. Subsurface contamination originated in the locality of the M-Area Settling Basin and Lost Lake, which is a Carolina Bay. These locations functioned as disposal sites for industrial solvents during the early years of operation of the Savannah River Site. The primary groundwater contaminants are trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and groundwater concentrations of TCE are significantly greater than the PCE.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Novick, J.S.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluation of chemical oxygen demand (COD) based on coulometric determination of electrochemical oxygen demand (EOD) using a surface oxidized copper electrode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical oxygen demand (COD) was estimated by exhaustive electrolysis using a home-made cell with a copper working electrode in 0.1 M NaOH. The net Faradaic charge, corresponding to the number of electrons consumed in electrolyzing (oxidizing) the organic species, was correlated to the COD evaluated by the conventional methods using dichromate or permanganate. The time taken for a single measurement was about 30 min, much less than the 2–4 h required in the conventional methods. Known components of the secondary effluents from several waste water treatment plants in Japan (l-glutamate, glycine, d-glucose, phenol, lignin, tannic acid, hemicellulose, and humic acid) were chosen as standard samples, and each showed a linear response proportional to the concentration of the analytes. For real water samples from rivers and lakes, a linear relationship was observed between this method and both of the conventional methods between about 1 and 10 mg ml?1 COD, the range allowed by the Environmental Quality Standard of Japan. An artificial water sample was prepared and a calibration graph resembling the results of the real samples was obtained. NMR spectra of d-glucose, l-glutamate, glycine, phenol, quinone, hydroquinone, lignin, tannic acid, hemicellulose, and humic acid were obtained before and after electrolysis, and qualitative changes are discussed. Fluorescence measurements were also performed before and after the electrolysis of the polymeric compounds used in this experiment, allowing the oxidation ratios to be estimated.

Kyong-Hoon Lee; Tomoko Ishikawa; S.J McNiven; Yoko Nomura; Atsunori Hiratsuka; Satoshi Sasaki; Yoshiko Arikawa; Isao Karube

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Comparison of a new micaceous iron oxide and ilmenite as oxygen carrier for Chemical looping combustion with respect to syngas conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. One of the challenges is to find the most suitable oxygen carrier (OC). Using solid fuels makes it important to use cheap and natural oxygen carriers, since there will probably be some loss of bed material while discharging ash from the system. Therefore ilmenite and a new micaceous iron oxide (MIOX ME 400) are compared with respect to syngas conversion in a 10 kWth bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) reactor. The OC was alternatively reduced with either CO + H2 or CH4 + H2 and oxidized with air at 900 °C. The conversion of syngas with MIOX ME 400 is always higher (XCO, XH2 > 98%) than that with ilmenite. Conversion of CH4 is also better for MIOX ME 400, even though it is still low. It can be raised by increasing fuel reactor temperature from 900 °C to 950 °C which results in a CH4 conversion of 85–60% instead of 60–40%.

Florian Mayer; Ajay R. Bidwe; Alexander Schopf; Kamran Taheri; Mariusz Zieba; Günter Scheffknecht

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DAN damage in rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies. - Highlights: • DPAA, an environmental neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis in rats. • DPAA is an activator of AhR signaling pathway. • DPAA promoted oxidative DNA damage in rat livers. • AhR target gene CYP 1B1 might be involved in the metabolism of DPAA.

Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Chemical spray pyrolysis deposition and characterization of p-type CuCr1?xMgxO2 transparent oxide semiconductor thin films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A chemical spray pyrolysis technique for deposition of p-type Mg-doped CuCrO2 transparent oxide semiconductor thin films using metaloorganic precursors is described. As-deposited films contain mixed spinel CuCr2O4 and delafossite CuCrO2 structural phases. Reduction in spinel CuCr2O4 fraction and formation of highly crystalline films with single phase delafossite CuCrO2 structure is realized by annealing at temperatures ?700 °C in argon. A mechanism of synthesis of CuCrO2 films involving precursor decomposition, oxidation and reaction between constituent oxides in the spray deposition process is presented. Post-annealed CuCr0.93Mg0.07O2 thin films show high (?80%) visible transmittance and sharp absorption at band gap energy with direct and indirect optical band gaps 3.11 and 2.58 eV, respectively. Lower (?450 °C) substrate temperature formed films are amorphous and yield lower direct (2.96 eV) and indirect (2.23 eV) band gaps after crystallization. Electrical conductivity of CuCr0.93 Mg0.07O2 thin films ranged 0.6–1 S cm?1 and hole concentration ?2×1019 cm?3 determined from Seebeck analysis. Temperature dependence of conductivity exhibit activation energies ?0.11 eV in 300–470 K and ?0.23 eV in ?470 K region ascribed to activated conduction and grain boundary trap assisted conduction, respectively. Heterojunction diodes of the structure Au/n-(ZnO)/p-(CuCr0.93Mg0.07O2)/SnO2 (TCO) were fabricated which show potential for transparent wide band gap junction device.

S.H. Lim; Suma Desu; A.C. Rastogi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Final purification of synthetic olive oil mill wastewater treated by chemical oxidation using ion exchange: Study of operating parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research work, ion exchange (IE) is presented as a suitable option for purification of olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) previously treated by means of a secondary treatment (OMWST). This pretreatment consisted in Fenton-like oxidation process, followed by coagulation–flocculation and filtration through olive stones. The parametric requirements for drinking water production or at least for public waterways discharge were achieved using a combination of two IE columns working in series at bench scale. The IE resins used in this study were Dowex Marathon C and Amberlite IRA-67. The effect of contact time, operating temperature and flow rate on simultaneous removal of sodium, total iron, chloride and phenols (the major pollutant species in OMWST) were investigated. Removal percentages of sodium, chloride and total iron increased with incrementing the contact time. Equilibrium was obtained in about 30 min for all ions and ion concentrations values determined were lower than the maximum levels for drinking water standards. On the other hand, adsorption efficiencies of sodium, total iron and chloride ions were found to be not considerably affected by the operating temperature. The highest phenols removal percentage (around 100%) was obtained in the first minutes for 298 K and 10 L/h.

M.D. Víctor-Ortega; J.M. Ochando-Pulido; G. Hodaifa; A. Martinez-Ferez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Magnesium indium oxide (MgIn2O4) spinel thin films: Chemical spray pyrolysis (CSP) growth and materials characterizations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MgIn2O4, which has an inverse spinel structure, has been adopted as the transparent material in optoelectronic device fabrication due to its high optical transparency and electrical conductivity. Such a technologically important material was prepared by the spray pyrolysis technique. Precursors prepared for the cationic ratio Mg/In = 0.5 were thermally sprayed onto glass substrates at 400 and 450?°C. We report herein the preparation and characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive absorption X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The XRD results showed the single phase formation of the material that revealed the presence of Mg2+ and In3+ in the inverse spinel-related structure. The FTIR and EDAX results further confirmed that the nanocrystalline films were mainly composed of magnesium, indium, and oxygen, in agreement with XRD analysis. We surmised from the AFM micrographs that the atoms have enough diffusion activation energy to occupy the correct site in the crystal lattice. For the 423-nm-thick magnesium indium oxide films grown at 400?°C, the electrical conductivity was 5.63 × 10 ?6   S cm ?1 and the average optical transmittance was 63% in the visible range (400–700 nm). Similar MgIn2O4 films deposited at 450?°C have a conductivity value of 1.5 × 10 ?5   S cm ?1 and an average transmittance of 75%. Hall coefficient observations showed n-type electrical conductivity and high electron carrier concentration of 2.7 × 10 19   cm ?3 .

A. Moses Ezhil Raj; G. Selvan; C. Ravidhas; M. Jayachandran; C. Sanjeeviraja

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Comprehensive chemical kinetic modeling of the oxidation of C8 and larger n-alkanes and 2-methylalkanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed and reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for singly methylated iso-alkanes (i.e., 2-methylalkanes) ranging from C{sub 8} to C{sub 20}. The mechanism also includes an updated version of our previously published C{sub 8} to C{sub 16} n-alkanes model. The complete detailed mechanism contains approximately 7,200 species 31,400 reactions. The proposed model is validated against new experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices including premixed and nonpremixed flames, perfectly stirred reactors and shock tubes. This new model is used to show how the presence of a methyl branch affects important combustion properties such as laminar flame propagation, ignition, and species formation.

Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Togbe, C; Dagaut, P; Wang, H; Oehlschlaeger, M; NIemann, U; Seshadri, K; Veloo, P S; Ji, C; Egolfopoulos, F; Lu, T

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

EQ6 Calculation for Chemical Degradation of Shippingport LWBR (TH/U Oxide) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) (Ref. 1). The Shippingport LWBR SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. Because of the high content of fissile material in the SNF, the waste package (WP) design requires special consideration of the amount and placement of neutron absorbers and the possible loss of absorbers and SNF materials over geologic time. For some WPs, the outer shell corrosion-resistant material (CRM) and the corrosion-allowance inner shell may breach (Refs. 2 and 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing a Shippingport LWBR SNF seed assembly, and high-level waste (HLW) glass canisters arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which criticality control material, suggested for this WP design, will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (such that it can be effective in preventing criticality); (2) The extent to which fissile uranium and fertile thorium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations), of the simulations are limited to time periods up to 3.17 x 10{sup 5} years. This longer time frame is closer to the one million year time horizon recently recommended by the National Academy of Sciences to the Environmental Protection Agency for performance assessment related to a nuclear repository (Ref. 5). However, it is important to note that after 100,000 years, most of the materials of interest (fissile and absorber materials) will have either been removed from the WP, reached a steady state, or been transmuted. The calculation included elements with high neutron-absorption cross sections, notably gadolinium (Gd), as well as the fissile materials. The results of this analysis will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the WP design will prevent criticality.

S. Arthur

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

Interpretation of Geological Correlation Borings 1, 2, 3 in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geophysical Correlation Boring (GCB) Program was organized to provide a comprehensive correlation capability between geological core and advanced borehole geophysical data, surface high resolution reflection seismic information and, when available, borehole geochemical and cone penetrometer data. This report provides results and initial geological interpretations of borings one, two, and three (GCB-1, GCB-2, GCB-3) located within the Upper Three Runs Watershed (A/M Area) of the Savannah River Site.

Wyatt, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Cumbest, R.J.; Aadland, R.K.; Syms, F.H.; Stephenson, D.E.; Sherrill, J.C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Chemically graftedChemically grafted nanoparticlesnanoparticles Quantum dot Nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemically graftedChemically grafted nanoparticlesnanoparticles Quantum dot Nanoparticle (~ 5nm Pb atomic force microscope tip: tether nanoparticle to oxide dot, or H-terminated pit after HF etch Ebeam

Plotkin, Steven S.

97

Structural, chemical, and electrochemical characteristics of LaSr2Fe2CrO9--based solid oxide fuel cell anodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available online 5 March 2012 Keywords: Solid oxide fuel cell Perovskite Oxide anode Redox Sulfur tolerance Solid oxide fuel cells with LaSr2Fe2CrO9-­Gd0.1Ce0.9O2- composite anodes were tested in H2, H2S-of-the-art solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode is Ni-8-mole% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which performs very

Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

98

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

In-Situ TEM Visualization Of Vacancy Injection And Chemical Partition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract: Oxidation of alloy often involves chemical partition and injection of vacancies. Chemical partition is the consequence of selective oxidation, while injection of...

100

Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements by In Situ Raman Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements byrate enhancement is due to a photo-chemical process. Thenanocrystals can be rapidly photo-oxidized. This oxidation

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Progress Update: M Area Closure  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

Chemicals from Biomass: Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-Furaldehyde into Diformylfurane Catalyzed by Immobilized Vanadyl-Pyridine Complexes on Polymeric and Organofunctionalized Mesoporous Supports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbohydrates are currently viewed as promising feedstock for the production of chemicals with commercial interest. Among the different biomass-derived platform molecules, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), obtained...

Onofre Casanova Navarro; Avelino Corma Canós; Sara Iborra Chornet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of TiO2 coatings produced by micro-arc oxidation in a Ca–P-based electrolyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, a porous and homogeneous titanium dioxide layer was grown on commercially pure titanium substrate using a micro-arc oxidation (MAO) process and Ca–P-based...2 coatings were characterized by X-ray di...

Amanda dos Santos; Joyce R. Araujo…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Metabolic Engineering of a Glycerol-Oxidative Pathway in Lactobacillus panis PM1 for Utilization of Bioethanol Thin Stillage: Potential To Produce Platform Chemicals from Glycerol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...glycerol from biodiesel production...genetic engineering strategies...Overall, introduction of an artificial...renewable fuels and chemicals...glycerol from biodiesel preparations...metabolic engineering for the production...biorenewable fuels and chemicals...metabolic engineering. Biotechnol...glycerol from biodiesel production...

Tae Sun Kang; Darren R. Korber; Takuji Tanaka

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reduction and Oxidation Kinetics of a CaMn0.9Mg0.1O3?? Oxygen Carrier for Chemical-Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(Royal Society of Chemistry) ... Abad, A.; Adánez, J.; García-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L. F.; Gayán, P.Modeling of the chemical-looping combustion of methane using a Cu-based oxygen-carrier Combust. ...

Luis F. de Diego; Alberto Abad; Arturo Cabello; Pilar Gayán; Francisco García-Labiano; Juan Adánez

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

107

Metabolic Engineering of a Glycerol-Oxidative Pathway in Lactobacillus panis PM1 for Utilization of Bioethanol Thin Stillage: Potential To Produce Platform Chemicals from Glycerol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...utilize glycerol for the production of energy for growth and value-added chemicals...artificial pathway metabolized glycerol for energy production and converted it into lactic...condensed form for animal feed, is an energy- and cost-intensive process (1...

Tae Sun Kang; Darren R. Korber; Takuji Tanaka

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

Kinetics of Oxidation of a Reduced Form of the Cu-Based Oxygen-Carrier for Use in Chemical-Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A co-precipitated mixture of CuO and Al2O3 is a good oxygen-carrier for chemical-looping combustion. The kinetics of regeneration of this reduced...2. Care was taken to ensure these measurements were not affected...

S. Y. Chuang; J. S. Dennis; A. N. Hayhurst…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chemical Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

110

High Temperature Oxidation Resistance and Surface Electrical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plates with oxidation resistant coatings. Candidate coatings must exhibit chemical and thermal-mechanical stability and high electrical conductivity during long-term...

111

Excitation mechanism and thermal emission quenching of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition—Do we need silicon nanoclusters?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we will discuss the excitation and emission properties of Tb ions in a Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide (SRSO) matrix obtained at different technological conditions. By means of electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition, undoped and doped SRSO films have been obtained with different Si content (33, 35, 39, 50 at. %) and were annealed at different temperatures (600, 900, 1100?°C). The samples were characterized optically and structurally using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time resolved PL, absorption, cathodoluminescence, temperature dependent PL, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how the matrix modifications influence excitation and emission properties of Tb ions.

Podhorodecki, A., E-mail: artur.p.podhorodecki@pwr.wroc.pl; Golacki, L. W.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W. [School of EECS, Ohio University, Stocker Center 363, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Fedus, K. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5/7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Wojcik, J.; Wilson, P. R. J.; Mascher, P. [Department of Engineering Physics and Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L7 (Canada)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hydrogen production from the steam-iron process with direct reduction of iron oxide by chemical looping combustion of coal char  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results performed with a fluidized-bed reactor supported the feasibility of the three processes including direct reduction of iron oxide by char, H{sub 2} production by the steam-iron process, and the oxidation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} resulting from the steam-iron process to the original Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by air. Chars resulting from a Chinese lignite loaded with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were used successfully as a reducing material, leading to the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to FeO and Fe for the steam-iron process, which was confirmed by both the off-gases concentrations and X-ray diffractometer analysis. The reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by K-10-char at 1073 K is desirable from the perspective of the carbon conversion rate and high concentration of CO{sub 2}. The carbon in char was completely converted to CO{sub 2} when the mass ratio of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/K-10-char was increased to 10/0.3. The oxidation rate of K-10-char by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} without a gasifying agent was comparable to the K-10-char steam gasification rate. The fractions of FeO and Fe in the reduced residue were 43 and 57%, respectively, in the case of 3 g of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 0.5 g of K-10-char, which was verified by the total H{sub 2} yield equaling 1000 mL/g K-10-char from the steam-iron process. The time that it took to achieve complete oxidation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by air with an 8.7% O{sub 2} concentration at 1073 K was about 15 min. 53 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

Jing-biao Yang; Ning-sheng Cai; Zhen-shan Li [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory of Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mineralogical and chemical assessment of concrete damaged by the oxidation of sulfide-bearing aggregates: Importance of thaumasite formation on reaction mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Damages in concrete containing sulfide-bearing aggregates were recently observed in the Trois-Rivieres area (Quebec, Canada), characterized by rapid deterioration within 3 to 5 years after construction. A petrographic examination of concrete core samples was carried out using a combination of tools including: stereomicroscopic evaluation, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. The aggregate used to produce concrete was an intrusive igneous rock with different metamorphism degrees and various proportions of sulfide minerals. In the rock, sulfide minerals were often surrounded by a thin layer of carbonate minerals (siderite). Secondary reaction products observed in the damaged concrete include 'rust' mineral forms (e.g. ferric oxyhydroxides such as goethite, limonite (FeO (OH) nH{sub 2}O) and ferrihydrite), gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite. In the presence of water and oxygen, pyrrhotite oxidizes to form iron oxyhydroxides and sulphuric acid. The acid then reacts with the phases of the cement paste/aggregate and provokes the formation of sulfate minerals. Understanding both mechanisms, oxidation and internal sulfate attack, is important to be able to duplicate the damaging reaction in laboratory conditions, thus allowing the development of a performance test for evaluating the potential for deleterious expansion in concrete associated with sulfide-bearing aggregates.

Rodrigues, A. [Centre de Recherche sur les Infrastructures en Beton (CRIB), Universite Laval, 1065 ave de la Medecine, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6 (Canada)] [Centre de Recherche sur les Infrastructures en Beton (CRIB), Universite Laval, 1065 ave de la Medecine, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6 (Canada); Duchesne, J., E-mail: josee.duchesne@ggl.ulaval.ca [Centre de Recherche sur les Infrastructures en Beton (CRIB), Universite Laval, 1065 ave de la Medecine, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6 (Canada); Fournier, B. [Centre de Recherche sur les Infrastructures en Beton (CRIB), Universite Laval, 1065 ave de la Medecine, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6 (Canada)] [Centre de Recherche sur les Infrastructures en Beton (CRIB), Universite Laval, 1065 ave de la Medecine, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6 (Canada); Durand, B. [Institut de recherche d'Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1740 boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, QC, Canada J3X 1S1 (Canada)] [Institut de recherche d'Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1740 boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, QC, Canada J3X 1S1 (Canada); Rivard, P. [Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada J1K 2R1 (Canada)] [Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada J1K 2R1 (Canada); Shehata, M. [Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

3 - Chemically derived graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The synthesis of graphene via chemical functionalisation of graphite is reviewed, including investigations that unravelled the atomic structure of resulting graphene oxide (GO) sheets in the suspension. The fundamental properties of GO are discussed and a summary of recent advances in device applications is provided.

R.S. Sundaram

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Nanostructured Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion and Chemical Looping Hydrogen Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy-production. In CLC, an oxygen carrier is periodically oxidized with air and then reduced in… (more)

Solunke, Rahul Dushyantrao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Synthesis, crystal structure and physico-chemical properties of the new quaternary oxide Sr{sub 5}BiNi{sub 2}O{sub 9.6}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new black quaternary oxide Sr{sub 5}BiNi{sub 2}O{sub 9.6} was synthesized by solid state reaction at 1200 Degree-Sign C. Its structure was solved by electron crystallography and X-ray powder refinement, yielding a tetragonal structure with space group I4/mmm, a=5.3637 (2) A, c=17.5541(5) A, Z=4. The structure can be described as a stacking of (Bi,Sr)-O rocksalt slabs and SrNiO{sub 3-{delta}} perovskite slabs. The initial nickel valence is close to +3.1. Thermogravimetry and high-temperature oxygen coulometry showed that this compound has variable oxygen content as a function of temperature and oxygen pressure, and ultimately decomposes when heated in low oxygen pressure above 800 Degree-Sign C. It is a metallic conductor with n-type conduction. Its thermoelectric power was determined and found to be -20 and -38 {mu}V/K at 300 and 650 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Magnetic measurements confirm the nickel valence close to +3 and show evidence of magnetic ordering at 20 K. - Graphical Abstract: View of the structure of new Sr{sub 5}BiNi{sub 2}O{sub 9.6} oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discovery of a new, unreported phase in the Sr-Bi-Ni-O system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full crystal structure determination by electron and X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen stoichiometry variation determination vs. P,T. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of electrical and magnetic properties.

Novitskaya, Mariya; Makhnach, Leonid [Department of Chemistry, Belarus State University, 14 Leningradskaya Str., 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Ivashkevich, Ludmila [Institute of Physicochemical Problems, Belarus State University, 14 Leningradskaya Str., 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Pankov, Vladimir [Department of Chemistry, Belarus State University, 14 Leningradskaya Str., 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Klein, Holger; Rageau, Amelie; David, Jeremy [Institut Neel CNRS and Universite J. Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Gemmi, Mauro [Institut Neel CNRS and Universite J. Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Center for Nanotechnology Innovation, NEST Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza S.SIlvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Hadermann, Joke [Electron Microscopy for Materials Research (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020, Antwerp (Belgium); Strobel, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.strobel@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel CNRS and Universite J. Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Susan Chi Gary T. Rochelle* (gtr@che.utexas.edu, 512-471-7230) The University of Texas at Austin Department of Chemical Engineering Austin, Texas 78712 Prepared for presentation at the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Abstract Oxidative degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA) was studied under typical absorber condition of 55°C. The rate of evolution of NH 3 , which was indicative of the overall rate of degradation, was measured continuously in a batch system sparged with air. Dissolved iron from 0.0001 mM to 1 mM yields oxidation rates from 0.37 to 2 mM/hr in MEA solutions loaded with 0.4 mole CO 2 / mole MEA. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N,N-bis(2- hydroxyethyl)glycine effectively decrease the rate of oxidation in the presence of iron by 40 to

118

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

119

Chemical Storage-Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

120

Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and...

122

Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion ... Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. ...

Hanjing Tian; Ranjani Siriwardane; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Metal Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal oxides are the class of materials having the widest application in gas sensors. This chapter presents information related to the application of various metal oxides in gas sensors designed on different p...

Ghenadii Korotcenkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Structure, adhesion, and stability of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of structural, electronic, and chemical properties of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces were performed on well-defined interfaces that created by depositing ultra-thin potassium and aluminum films and their oxides onto single crystal TiO[sub 2] and NiO surfaces. Work focused on determining the structure, growth mechanisms, and morphologies of metal and oxide films as they are deposited an single crystal oxide surfaces using RHEED and atomic force microscopy probing electronic structure, bonding and chemical interactions at the interfaces using x-ray and uv photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and understanding factors affecting stability and reactivity of the interface regions including the role of defects and impurities. Results indicate that kinetic effects have an important influence on interface structure and composition, and they also show that defects in the oxide substrate induce new electronic states at the interface which play a major role in cation-anion bonding and interface interactions. The results establish a link between electronic and chemical bonding properties and the interface structure and morphology, which is required to successfully manipulate the interfacial properties of advanced ceramic materials.

Lad, R.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Selective aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons over supported gold catalysts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The selective oxidation of hydrocarbons is of vital importance for the production of valuable chemicals from crude oil and natural gas resources. Unfortunately, when using… (more)

Hereijgers, B.P.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Tritium Systems Group has developed and fabricated an Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS), which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination on various components and items. The system is configured to introduce gaseous ozone into a reaction chamber containing tritiated items that require a reduction in tritium surface contamination. Tritium surface contamination (on components and items in the reaction chamber) is removed by chemically reacting elemental tritium to tritium oxide via oxidation, while purging the reaction chamber effluent to a gas holding tank or negative pressure HVAC system. Implementing specific concentrations of ozone along with catalytic parameters, the system is able to significantly reduce surface tritium contamination on an assortment of expendable and non-expendable items. This paper will present the results of various experimentation involving employment of this system.

Charles A. Gentile; John J. Parker; Gregory L. Guttadora; Lloyd P. Ciebiera

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

127

The catalytic oxidation of propane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OP PROPANE A Thesis By Charles Frederick Sandersont * * June 1949 Approval as to style and content recommended: Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering THE CATALYTICi OXIDATTON OF PROPANE A Thesis By Charles... Frederick ;Sandersonit * June 1949 THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OP PROPANE A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Major...

Sanderson, Charles Frederick

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

128

CHEMICAL MARKETING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKETING ... The reason, I believe, is that the chemical industry has been blind (until very recently) to the need for paying attention to marketing. ... Its marketing needs are now like those of a mature—no longer a growing—industry. ...

1960-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

APPENDIX B CHEMICAL STORAGE SEGREGATION SCHEME Developing safe storage practices for laboratory chemicals is not always easy and often  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or ventilated gas storage cabinet. Methane, Acetylene, Hydrogen Oxidizing and toxic compressed gases, oxidizing68 APPENDIX B ­ CHEMICAL STORAGE SEGREGATION SCHEME Developing safe storage practices. Your ability to develop a safe storage system will depend on your knowledge of chemicals or your

130

Unfamiliar oxidation states and their stabilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ferrate formation. Oxidation of copper(II) hydroxide in alkaline solution with sodium hydroperoxide, Na.OOH, apparently gives copper (III) oxide.8 Determination of the voltage-current curve for a silver anode in sodium hydroxide solution gives breaks... of a knowledge of the chemical prop erties of the substance in question is made apparent by the following illustration: a compound containing silver and oxygen in equal atomic proportions may be made by the oxidation of unipositive silver...

Kleinberg, Jacob

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal conversion of biomass to valuable fuels, chemical feedstocks and chemicals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous process for the conversion of biomass to form a chemical feedstock is described. The biomass and an exogenous metal oxide, preferably calcium oxide, or metal oxide precursor are continuously fed into a reaction chamber that is operated at a temperature of at least 1400.degree. C. to form reaction products including metal carbide. The metal oxide or metal oxide precursor is capable of forming a hydrolizable metal carbide. The reaction products are quenched to a temperature of 800.degree. C. or less. The resulting metal carbide is separated from the reaction products or, alternatively, when quenched with water, hydolyzed to provide a recoverable hydrocarbon gas feedstock.

Peters, William A. (Lexington, MA); Howard, Jack B. (Winchester, MA); Modestino, Anthony J. (Hanson, MA); Vogel, Fredreric (Villigen PSI, CH); Steffin, Carsten R. (Herne, DE)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Decontamination of metals using chemical etching  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to chemical etching process for reclaiming contaminated equipment wherein a reduction-oxidation system is included in a solution of nitric acid to contact the metal to be decontaminated and effect reduction of the reduction-oxidation system, and includes disposing a pair of electrodes in the reduced solution to permit passage of an electrical current between said electrodes and effect oxidation of the reduction-oxidation system to thereby regenerate the solution and provide decontaminated equipment that is essentially radioactive contamination-free.

Lerch, Ronald E. (Kennewick, WA); Partridge, Jerry A. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Mechanical Engineering Manufacturing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Improved Electro-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uday Pal Mechanical Engineering Manufacturing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Improved Electro- chemical for the commercialization of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are its high manufacturing and material costs expressed in terms at 800oC with humidified hydrogen (3% H2O) as the fuel and air as the oxidant. The cells were also tested

Lin, Xi

134

Synthesis and characterizations of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide nanosheets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in graphene on its excellent mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties, it’s very high specific surface area, and our ability to influence these properties through chemical functionalization. Chemical reduction of graphene oxide is one of the main routes of preparation for large quantities of graphenes. Hydrazine hydrate used as reducing agent to prepare for the reduced graphene oxide (RGO). There are a number of methods for generating graphene and chemically modified graphene from natural graphite flakes, graphite derivative (such as graphite oxide) and graphite interaction compounds (i.e. expandable graphite). Here we review the use of colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with large scalable, and is adaptable to a wide variety of applications. The graphene oxide (GO) and the reduced material (RGO) were characterized by XRD, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and Field emission Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) etc.

Venkanna, M., E-mail: venkanna.pcu@gmail.com; Chakraborty, Amit K., E-mail: venkanna.pcu@gmail.com [Carbon Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, M.G. Avenue, Durgapur - 713209 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the destruction or transformation of hazardous chemical substances such as high-temperature incineration, amended activated sludge digestion, anaerobic digestion and conventional physicochemical treatment. Pulsed-power plasma discharge technology may have.... Current approaches to the treatment of hazardous chemical wastes include high temperature incineration, chemical oxidation with and UV light, membrane separation, activated carbon adsorption, substrate-specific biodegration, electron beam bombardment...

Hoffmann, M. R.

136

Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI)

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Chemical Looping for Combustion and Hydrogen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ChemiCal looping for Combustion and ChemiCal looping for Combustion and hydrogen produCtion Objective The objective of this project is to determine the benefits of chemical looping technology used with coal to reduce CO 2 emissions. Background Chemical looping is a new method to convert coal or gasified coal to energy. In chemical looping, there is no direct contact between air and fuel. The chemical looping process utilizes oxygen from metal oxide oxygen carrier for fuel combustion, or for making hydrogen by "reducing" water. In combustion applications, the products of chemical looping are CO 2 and H 2 O. Thus, once the steam is condensed, a relatively pure stream of CO 2 is produced ready for sequestration. The production of a sequestration ready CO 2 stream does not require any additional separation units

138

Z .Thin Solid Films 392 2001 231 235 Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electrochromic tungsten oxide films Roy G. Gordona,U , Sean Barryb , Jeffrey T. Bartona , Randy N.R. Broomhall oxide, WO , is a coloring layer commonly used in electrochromic windows and displays. Successful: Chemical vapor deposition; Tungsten; Oxides; Electrochromism 1. Introduction Tungsten oxide is a key

139

Chemical Occurrences  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

140

Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Classification of oxide glasses: A polarizability approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A classification of binary oxide glasses has been proposed taking into account the values obtained on their refractive index-based oxide ion polarizability {alpha}{sub O2-}(n{sub 0}), optical basicity {lambda}(n{sub 0}), metallization criterion M(n{sub 0}), interaction parameter A(n{sub 0}), and ion's effective charges as well as O1s and metal binding energies determined by XPS. Four groups of oxide glasses have been established: glasses formed by two glass-forming acidic oxides; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic oxide and modifier's basic oxide; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic and conditional glass-forming basic oxide; glasses formed by two basic oxides. The role of electronic ion polarizability in chemical bonding of oxide glasses has been also estimated. Good agreement has been found with the previous results concerning classification of simple oxides. The results obtained probably provide good basis for prediction of type of bonding in oxide glasses on the basis of refractive index as well as for prediction of new nonlinear optical materials.

Dimitrov, Vesselin [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki [Department of Chemistry, The Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata-ken 940-2188 (Japan)]. E-mail: komatsu@chem.nagaokaut.ac.jp

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Measuring the Kinetics of the Reduction of Iron Oxide with Carbon Monoxide in a Fluidized Bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combusting a solid fuel in the presence of a metal oxide rather than air, chemical looping combustion, generates CO2suitable for sequestration and the reduced metal. For the case of iron, the reduced oxide can be...

C. D. Bohnt; J. P. Cleeton; C. M. Miiller…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mechanism of Selective Oxidation of Propene to Acrolein on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum Mechanical Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanism of Selective Oxidation of Propene to Acrolein on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum for understanding the fundamental chemical mechanisms underlying the selective oxidation of propene to acrolein to form acrolein, and acrolein desorption. The formation of -allyl intermediate is reversible

Goddard III, William A.

144

Coumarin-conjugated cyclodextrins: remarkable enhancement of the chemical-to-light energy transfer efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fluorophore can harvest energy from chemical or bio-transformations. For example ... a fluorophore can illuminate by hosting the chemical energy of oxidation intermediates of bis(aryl)oxalates,...1] The overall...

De-Qi Yuan; Yuewei Zhao; Makoto Fukudome…

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested-volt region. Thus chemical accelerators can provide the same type of information for elemen- tary chemical

Zare, Richard N.

146

Oxidation of Propane by Doped Nickel Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... present study, however, indicate that in the absence of excess oxygen, direct oxidation of propane by the oxide lattice can occur.

D. W. McKEE

1964-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Title Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Holder, Amara L., Brietta J. Carter, Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Atmospheric Pollution Research Volume 3 Start Page 25 Issue 1 Pagination 25-31 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords health effects, ozone, soot, toxicity Abstract Combustion-generated particles released into the atmosphere undergo reactions with oxidants, which can change the particles' physiochemical characteristics. In this work, we compare the physical and chemical properties and cellular response of particles fresh from a flame with those oxidized by ozone and nitrogen dioxide. The reaction with ozone and nitrogen dioxide does not significantly modify the physical characteristics of the particles (primary particle size, fractal dimension, and surface area). However, oxidation affects the chemical characteristics of the particles, creating more oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups, and increases their hydrophilicity. In addition, oxidized soot generates more reactive oxygen species, as measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Furthermore, oxidized soot is 1.5-2 times more toxic than soot that was not reacted with ozone, but the inflammatory response, measured by interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion, is unchanged. These results imply that combustion-generated particles released into the atmosphere will have an increased toxicity on or after high ozone days.

148

Trichloroethylene biodegradation by mesophilic and psychrophilic ammonia oxidizers and methanotrophs in groundwater microcosms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Trichloroethylene metabolism Water Microbiology Water Pollutants, Chemical metabolism...hydrocarbons degradation detection ground water halogenated hydrocarbons in...compounds oxidation pollution rates remediation shallow aquifers trichloroethylene...

B N Moran; W J Hickey

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Electroreduction of carbon monoxide to liquid fuel on oxide-derived nanocrystalline copper  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... were used without further purification. Electrolyte solutions were prepared with deionized water (Ricca Chemical, ASTM Type I). Preparation of oxide-derived Cu 1

Christina W. Li; Jim Ciston; Matthew W. Kanan

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electrochemistry of chemical vapor deposited tungsten films with relevance to chemical mechanical polishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical behavior of chemically vapor deposited tungsten films in solutions of interest to tungsten chemical mechanical polishing has been investigated using dc potentiodynamic polarization, linear polarization, and Tafel methods. It was found that in the absence of an oxidizer, the tungsten surface was passivated most effectively at acidic pH values. At pH 2 or 4, a WO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} duplex oxide layer of less than 50 A thickness was detected over the tungsten layer by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The oxide layer formed at pH 2 was much thicker, and had better passivity compared to the oxide formed at pH 4. Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at pH 2 or 4 resulted in a dramatic increase in tungsten dissolution.

Kneer, E.A.; Raghunath, C.; Raghavan, S. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Jeon, J.S. [Advanced Micro Devices Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Graphene Oxide as an Electrophile for Carbon Nucleophiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The covalent, surface functionalization of graphene oxide with the malononitrile anion has been demonstrated. Once installed, these surface-bound “molecular lynchpins” can be chemically modified to increase the solubility ...

Swager, Timothy Manning

153

Arabidopsis Nonsymbiotic Hemoglobin AHb1 Modulates Nitric Oxide Bioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nitric oxide (NO) involves an array of interrelated redox forms with different chemical...is involved in diverse physiological processes, including disease resistance, growth...concentrations far below those at which anaerobic processes are activated. Thus, it is unlikely...

Michele Perazzolli; Paola Dominici; Maria C. Romero-Puertas; Elisa Zago; Jürgen Zeier; Masatoshi Sonoda; Chris Lamb; Massimo Delledonne

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Mn–Fe Oxides with Support of MgAl2O4, CeO2, ZrO2 and Y2O3–ZrO2 for Chemical-Looping Combustion and Chemical-Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

† Department of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden ... Shen, L.; Wu, J.; Gao, Z.; Xiao, J.Reactivity deterioration of NiO/Al2O3 oxygen carrier for chemical looping combustion of coal in a 10 kWth reactor Combust. ...

Golnar Azimi; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson; Magnus Rydén; Frans Snijkers; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

155

Characterization of metal oxide layers grown on CVD graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth of a fully oxidized aluminum oxide layer with low surface roughness on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is demonstrated. This is accomplished by the deposition of a 0.2 nm thick titanium seed layer on the graphene prior to the deposition of the aluminum under ultra high vacuum conditions, which was subsequently oxidized. The stoichiometry and surface roughness of the oxide layers were measured for a range of titanium and aluminum depositions utilizing ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. These fully oxidized films are expected to produce good dielectric layers for use in graphene based electronic devices.

Matsubayashi, Akitomo; Abel, Joseph; Prasad Sinha, Dhiraj; Lee, Ji Ung; LaBella, Vincent P. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Three-Fluidized Bed Reactor Cold Flow Model for Chemical Looping Hydrogen Generation: Pressure Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping hydrogen generation (CLHG) can produce pure hydrogen with inherent separation of CO2 from fossils fuel. The process involves a metal oxide, as an oxygen carrier, such as iron oxide. The CLHG syst...

Zhipeng Xue; Wenguo Xiang; Shiyi Chen…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Effect of temperature on reduction reactivity of oxygen carrier particles in a fixed bed chemical-looping combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a chemical-looping combustor (CLC), gaseous fuel is oxidized...2...is separated from the exhaust gases during the combustion. In this study, NiO/bentonite particle...x formation during oxidation. Reactivity da...

Ho-Jung Ryu; Dal-Hee Bae; Gyoung-Tae Jin

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Scalable enhancement of graphene oxide properties by thermally driven phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scalable enhancement of graphene oxide properties by thermally driven phase transformation Priyank,2,4 * and Jeffrey C. Grossman1 * Chemical functionalization of graphene is promising for a variety of next-generation technologies. Although graphene oxide (GO) is a versatile material in this direction, its use is limited

Wu, Junqiao

160

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals ACETALDEHYDE ACETAMIDE ACETIC ACID ACETIC ANHYDRIDE ACETONE ACETONItr ILE ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE, 2- ACETYLENE ACETYLENE DICHLORIDE ACETYLENE TETRABROMIDE ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID (ASPIRIN) ACROLEIN ACRYLAMIDE ACRYLIC ACID ACRYLONITRILE ACTINOMYCIN D ADRIAMYCIN AFLATOXINS ALDRIN ALLYL ALCOHOL ALLYL CHLORIDE ALLYL GLYCIDYL ETHER (AGE) ALLYL PROPYL DISULFIDE ALUMINA ALUMINUM, METAL DUST, AS AL ALUMINUM, PYRO POWDERS, AS AL ALUMINUM, SOLUBLE SALTS, AS AL ALUMINUM, WELDING FUMES, AS AL ALUMINUM, ALKYLS, NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED, AS AL ALUMINUM OXIDE, AS AL AMINOANTHRAQUINONE (AAQ), AMINOAZOTOLUENE, O- AMINOBIPHENYL, 4- AMINOETHANOL, 2- AMINO-2-METHYLANTHRAQUINONE, 1- AMINO-5-(5-NITRO-2-FURYL)- -1, 3,4-THIADIADIAZOLE, 2- AMINOPYRIDINE, 2- AMINO-1,2,4-TRIAZOLE, 3-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Olefin recovery via chemical absorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery of fight olefins in petrochemical plants has generally been accomplished through cryogenic distillation, a process which is very capital and energy intensive. In an effort to simplify the recovery process and reduce its cost, BP Chemicals has developed a chemical absorption technology based on an aqueous silver nitrate solution. Stone & Webster is now marketing, licensing, and engineering the technology. The process is commercially ready for recovering olefins from olefin derivative plant vent gases, such as vents from polyethylene, polypropylene, ethylene oxide, and synthetic ethanol units. The process can also be used to debottleneck C{sub 2} or C{sub 3} splinters, or to improve olefin product purity. This paper presents the olefin recovery imp technology, discusses its applications, and presents economics for the recovery of ethylene and propylene.

Barchas, R. [Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, Houston, TX (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

COMPARISON OF NICKEL AND IRON-BASED OXYGEN CARRIERS SUPPORTED ON ALUMINA IN SYNGAS-FUELED CHEMICAL LOOPING COMBUSTION.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical looping is considered as a novel technology capable of resolving both energy and environmental problems in combustion process. The possibility of using oxides of… (more)

Najjarpour Jabbary, Farzin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement...

Jin, Xin

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This work focused on two classes of oxygen carrier, one that merely undergoes a change in oxidation state, such as Fe3O4/Fe2O3 and one that is converted from its higher to its lower oxidation state by the release of oxygen on heating, i.e., CuO/Cu2O. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification (3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratory-scale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability (4) the identification of mechanisms and rates for the copper, cuprous oxide, and cupric oxide system using thermogravimetric analysis.

Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List Chemicals on this list are routine use chemicals in the CAMD Cleanroom and are available to users for general use. All others (*) are approved for use...

166

Semiconductive Properties of Uranium Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES Thomas Meek Materials Science Engineering Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37931 Michael Hu and M. Jonathan Haire Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6179 August 2000 For the Waste Management 2001 Symposium Tucson, Arizona February 25-March 1, 2001 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________ * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy

167

chemical analysis | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical analysis chemical analysis Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

168

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing ... BEFORE any chemical sales organization, can meet or establish new trends in marketing, it must be completely aware of the problem it faces. ...

W. M. RUSSELL

1955-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

170

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

171

Direct oxidation of hydrocarbons in a solid oxide fuel cell. I. Methane oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of Cu cermets as anodes for the direct oxidation of CH{sub 4} in solid oxide fuel cells was examined. Mixtures of Cu and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YAZ) were found to give similar performance to Ni-YSZ cermets when H{sub 2} was used as the fuel, but did not deactivate in dry CH{sub 4}. While Cu-YSZ was essentially inert to methane, the addition of ceria to the anode gave rise to reasonable power densities and stable operation over a period of at least 3 days. Proof of direct oxidation of CH{sub 4} came from chemical analysis of the products leaving the cell. The major carbon-containing product was CO{sub 2}, with only traces of CO observed, and there was excellent agreement between the actual cell current and that predicted by the methane conversion. These results demonstrate that direct, electrocatalytic oxidation of dry methane is possible, with reasonable performance.

Park, S.; Craciun, R.; Vohs, J.M.; Gorte, R.J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Chemical Safety Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Home Chemical Safety Topical Committee Library Program Contacts Related Links Site Map Tools 2013 Chemical Safety Workshop Archived Workshops Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Chemical Safety Program logo The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety web pages provide a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This page is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Noteworthy products are the Chemical Management Handbooks and the Chemical Lifecycle Cost Analysis Tool, found under the TOOLS menu. Chemical Management Handbook Vol (1) Chemical Management Handbook Vol (2)

173

Green method to produce propylene oxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search Argonne Home > Center for Nanoscale Materials > CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights News Research Highlights Newsletters CNM Images on Flickr Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Green method to produce propylene oxide conversion of propylene to polyene oxide via silver nanoclusters Simulation of propylene to propylene oxide conversion via silver nanoclusters supported on an alumina surface. Propylene oxide is an important chemical whose current industrial production is energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Attempts to solve this problem by using catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with

174

Chemical-looping combustion -- Efficient conversion of chemical energy in fuels into work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In thermal power plants, a large amount of the useful energy in the fuel is destroyed during the combustion process. This paper presents theoretical thermodynamic studies of a new system to increase the energy conversion efficiency of chemical energy in fuels into work. The system includes a gas turbine system with chemical-looping combustion where a metal oxide is used as an oxygen carrier. Instead of conventional combustion, the oxidation of the fuel is carried out in a two-step reaction. The first reaction step is an exothermic oxidation of a metal with air and the second reaction step an endothermic oxidation of the fuel with the metal oxide from the first step. The low grade heat in the exhaust gas is used to drive the endothermic reaction. This two-step reaction has proven to be one way to increase the energy utilization compared to conventional combustion. Results for a gas turbine reheat cycle with methane as a fuel and NiO as an oxygen carrier show that the gain in net power efficiency for the chemical-looping combustion system is as high as 5 percentage points compared to a similar conventional gas turbine system. An exergy analysis of the reactions shows that less irreversibilities are generated with chemical looping combustion than with conventional combustion. Another advantage with chemical-looping combustion is that the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} is separated from the other exhaust gases without decreasing the overall-system thermal efficiency. This is an important feature since future regulations of CO{sub 2} emission are likely to be strict. Today, most of the suggested CO{sub 2} separation methods are considered to reduce the thermal efficiency at least 5--10 percentage points and to require expensive equipment.

Anheden, M.; Naesholm, A.S.; Svedberg, G. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Structure, adhesion, and stability of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces. Technical progress report, August 1, 1992--July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of structural, electronic, and chemical properties of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces were performed on well-defined interfaces that created by depositing ultra-thin potassium and aluminum films and their oxides onto single crystal TiO{sub 2} and NiO surfaces. Work focused on determining the structure, growth mechanisms, and morphologies of metal and oxide films as they are deposited an single crystal oxide surfaces using RHEED and atomic force microscopy probing electronic structure, bonding and chemical interactions at the interfaces using x-ray and uv photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and understanding factors affecting stability and reactivity of the interface regions including the role of defects and impurities. Results indicate that kinetic effects have an important influence on interface structure and composition, and they also show that defects in the oxide substrate induce new electronic states at the interface which play a major role in cation-anion bonding and interface interactions. The results establish a link between electronic and chemical bonding properties and the interface structure and morphology, which is required to successfully manipulate the interfacial properties of advanced ceramic materials.

Lad, R.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Chemical Management Contacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

177

Surface oxidation of Permalloy thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical and magnetic structures of oxides on the surface of Permalloy Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} films were investigated as functions of annealing time with x-ray and polarized neutron reflectometry. For annealing times of less than one hour, the oxide consisted of a 1.5-nm-thick layer of NiO on an Fe oxide layer that was in contact with Permalloy. The Fe oxide thickness increases with annealing time with a parabolic rate constant of 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} (for an annealing temperature of 373 K). The growth of the oxide layer is limited by the rate at which oxygen appears below the NiO layer. No portion of the oxide region was found to be ferromagnetically ordered for films annealed less than one hour. The growth of the Fe oxide region is well correlated with the measured increase of the second-order magnetic susceptibility for similarly prepared samples.

Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Crawford, T. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Silva, T. J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Nanoscale Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Science Nanoscale Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. The primary goal of the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, is to understand photoconversion processes in nanoscale, excitonic photoconversion systems, such as semiconductor quantum dots, molecular dyes, conjugated molecules and polymers, nanostructured oxides, and carbon nanotubes. Closely associated with this goal are efforts to gain an understanding of how to use chemistry and physical tools to control and maximize the photoconversion process. The innovative chemistry and physics that evolve from these fundamental studies are used on a number of applied projects, maximizing the benefits from these discoveries.

179

About Chemical Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

180

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

182

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

183

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

184

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

185

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

186

Oxidation of propylene over copper oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the study of propylene oxidation. Dunlop (17) reported that small quantities of iron compounds substantially enhanced the catalytic activity of chromia-alumina catalysts with respect to propylene oxidation, Woodharn (72) has suggested that under... between 360 C and 430oC the rate of propane oxidation decreases as the teznperature is increased, and the rate of conversion to olefins, especially propylene, becomes progressively greater. Above 430 C the proportion of propane converted to ethylene in...

Billingsley, David Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

188

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

189

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

190

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is typically composed of two porous electrodes, interposed between an electrolyte made of a particular solid oxide ceramic material. The system originates from the work of Nernst...

Nigel M. Sammes; Roberto Bove; Jakub Pusz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Capacitive chemical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

Chemicals from Metabolic Pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A few basic raw materials, petroleum, natural gas, +S from oil or natural gas, and O2 + N2 from air, generate first primary (or platform) chemicals, next secondary (commodity) chemicals, then intermediates, and f...

John Villadsen; Jens Nielsen; Gunnar Lidén

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00�12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

Rohs, Remo

194

Chemicals and health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemicals and health ... I must add here that some chemicals are indeed dangerous in the environment, largely because they persist, they don't break down, and they can therefore build up in the food chain. ...

1980-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ethylene oxide and Acetaldehyde in hot cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Abridged] Ethylene oxide and its isomer acetaldehyde are important complex organic molecules because of their potential role in the formation of amino acids. Despite the fact that acetaldehyde is ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, ethylene oxide has not yet been detected in cold sources. We aim to understand the chemistry of the formation and loss of ethylene oxide in hot and cold interstellar objects (i) by including in a revised gas-grain network some recent experimental results on grain surfaces and (ii) by comparison with the chemical behaviour of its isomer, acetaldehyde. We test the code for the case of a hot core. The model allows us to predict the gaseous and solid ethylene oxide abundances during a cooling-down phase prior to star formation and during the subsequent warm-up phase. We can therefore predict at what temperatures ethylene oxide forms on grain surfaces and at what temperature it starts to desorb into the gas phase. The model reproduces the observed gaseous abundances of ethylene oxid...

Occhiogrosso, A; Herbst, E; Viti, S; Ward, M D; Price, S D; Brown, W A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

20 - Chemical looping combustion (CLC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a new combustion technology with inherent separation of the greenhouse gas CO2. The technology involves the use of a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier which transfers oxygen from combustion air to the fuel, and hence a direct contact between air and fuel is avoided. Two inter-connected fluidized beds, i.e. fuel reactor and air reactor, are used in the process. The outlet gas from the fuel reactor consists ideally of CO2 and H2O, and the latter is easily removed by condensation. This chapter presents the basic principles, gives an overview of oxygen-carrier materials and operational experiences, discusses the application to gaseous, liquid and solid fuels, and the use for combustion as well as for hydrogen production.

A. Lyngfelt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biobased Chemicals Without Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike most other companies using biology to make chemicals, LanzaTech does not rely on biomass feedstocks. ...

MELODY BOMGARDNER

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19 Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Heyden Chemical Corp. (NJ.19 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: American Cyanamid NJ.19-2 Location: Princeton , New Jersey NJ.19-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.19-1 Site Operations: Commercial chemical operation. AEC was interested in their process for keeping thorium oxide in suspension. No indication of AEC contractual relationship with Heyden. NJ.19-1 NJ.19-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication of AEC operations conducted on the site NJ.19-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium Oxide NJ.19-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

199

Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes (ICEHT) Place: Hellas, Greece Zip:...

200

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

Church, George M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Computational Chemical Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Thermal barrier coatings, wear resistance coatings, radiation resistant materials · Materials for opticalHome Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department to understand behavior and properties of materials as a function of ­ Chemical constitution ­ Composition

202

Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air ?helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

Mohamed El-Genk

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Chemical studies of the Ames oxydesulfurization process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The validity of the Ames claim of up to 40% removal of organic sulfur from coal was assessed by subjecting model compounds to the Ames Process which utilizes 0.2 M aqueous Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ at 150/sup 0/C under pressure of 300 psi O/sub 2/ for one hour. This type of oxydesulfurization has been described as a two step process involving initial oxidation at sulfur to produce sulfoxides and sulfones. This step is then thought to be followed by the thermal and, in the Ames Process, base assisted extrusion of SO/sub x/. In this concept, the initial oxidation at sulfur facilitates desulfurization by polarizing and weakening the carbon to sulfur bond. The conclusions concerning the oxydesulfurization process are: (1) thiophenols and disulfides are the only groups oxidized at sulfur; (2) sulfides, including thiophenes, are not oxidized at sulfur; (3) reactive sulfides are oxidized at reactive carbon-hydrogen bonds; (4) reactive carbon-hydrogen bonds in functions not containing sulfur also react; (5) the Ames Process is directly analogous to hydrocarbon autoxidation; and (6) more efficient sulfur removal without severe degradation of the coal is not possible under the present process conditions. The success which these model compound studies have had in defining the limits of the efficacy of the Ames oxydesulfurization process encourage one to believe that this approach will be quite valuable in the evaluation of other proposed chemical coal cleaning techniques.

Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.; Chang, L.W.; Schmidt, T.E.

1981-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Determination of chemical properties of a supported copper oxide catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$) to the theoretioal oonsiderations upon whish the derivation of the B. E. T. equation is based, have bean made, tbe &. E. T, method (8) is still aooepted as giving reliable values for the surface area of an adsorbent. Esger~agg1EL3 Ngh~g pease (41) and Homfray... area of a catalyst ar adsorbent, Emmstt (15) des- cribed an apparatus of the constantmotums type, Modifications to this apparatus were suggested by ahura and Harld. ns (26~28) ~ One method used for the investigation of catalytic surfaoes consists...

Bandyopadhyay, Asok

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Chemically Modified Metal Oxide Nanostructure for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the widespread use of hydrogen powered fuel cells is theHydrogen is an energy carrier, which combines oxygen in a fuel cell

Wang, Gongming

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

207

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

208

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

209

Biological and Chemical Scrubbings of Vented gas from hot-melting operation of recycled nylon plastics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study aimed to develop a biotrickling-biofilter process and a two-stage chemical scrubbing process to absorb and oxidize VOCs in vented gas from hot-melt granulation… (more)

Chen, Kuan-po

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

How Physical and Chemical Properties Change Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Soot and Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of laboratory experiments using an optical microscope apparatus equipped with a cooling stage to determine how chemical oxidation changes the ability of atmospheric aerosols to act as IN. Freezing temperatures are reported for aerosols composed of fresh...

Suter, Katie Ann

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

American Chemical Society-Chinese Chemical Society Alliance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Chemical Society-Chinese Chemical Society Alliance ... The American Chemical Society and the Chinese Chemical Society (CCS) formed a three-year collaborative alliance in 2010 to address shared global concerns. ...

MARINDA LI WU; YAO JIANNIAN

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparison of the Catalytic Oxidation Reaction on Graphene Oxide and Reduced Graphene Oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of the Catalytic Oxidation Reaction on Graphene Oxide and Reduced Graphene Oxide Laboratory (PAL), Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea ABSTRACT: The capacities of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) films grown on silicon substrate to cause the aniline to azobenzene oxidation

Kim, Sehun

214

Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

W. Windes; R. Smith

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Quantum Chemical Calculations of Sulfate Adsorption at the Al-and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Chemical Calculations of Sulfate Adsorption at the Al- and Fe-(Hydr)oxide-H2O Interfaces to estimate relative Gibbs free energies of sulfate adsorption on variably charged Al- and Fe on positively charged Al- and Fe- (hydr)oxides (ranging from -19 to -124 kJ mol-1). However, inner-sphere and H

Sparks, Donald L.

216

Chemical Structure and Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2154-3 2154-3 UC-400 Annual Report 2000 Chemical Structure and Dynamics Steven D. Colson, Associate Director Robin S. McDowell, Program Manager and the Staff of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program April 2001 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Contents Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report 1. Introduction Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program......................................................... 1-3 2. Reaction Mechanisms at Liquid Interfaces Structure and Reactivity of Ice Surfaces and Interfaces G. A. Kimmel, Z. Dohnálek, K. P. Stevenson, R. S. Smith,

217

The Formation of Highly Oxidized Multifunctional Products in the Ozonolysis of Cyclohexene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prompt formation of highly oxidized organic compounds in the ozonolysis of cyclohexene (C6H10) was investigated by means of laboratory experiments together with quantum chemical calculations. The experiments were performed in borosilicate glass flow ...

Matti P. Rissanen; Theo Kurtén; Mikko Sipilä; Joel A. Thornton; Juha Kangasluoma; Nina Sarnela; Heikki Junninen; Solvejg Jørgensen; Simon Schallhart; Maija K. Kajos; Risto Taipale; Monika Springer; Thomas F. Mentel; Taina Ruuskanen; Tuukka Petäjä; Douglas R. Worsnop; Henrik G. Kjaergaard; Mikael Ehn

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

218

Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900°C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

CHEMICAL UNIONS FORM ALLIANCE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL UNIONS FORM ALLIANCE ... The Paper, Allied-Industrial, Chemical & Energy "Workers International Union (PACE) and the United Steelworkers of America (USWA) are industrial unions that have similar histories and many chemical and petroleum industry members, say union officials. ... PACE has created strategic alliances with several companies, said PACE President Boydlfoung in a statement, adding that it made sense to try the same thing with other unions. ...

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Synthesis of graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: A schematic showing the overall reduction process of graphite to reduced graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route. - Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by diverse routes viz. chemical and electrochemical methods. • NaBH{sub 4} was effective for removing oxygen functional groups from graphene oxide. • Sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) showed high specific capacitance. • Electrochemical rendered a cheap route for production of graphene in powder form. - Abstract: Graphene platelets were synthesized from graphene oxide by chemical and electrochemical route. Under the chemical method, sodium borohydride and hydrazine chloride were used as reductants to produce graphene. In this paper, a novel and cost effective electrochemical method, which can simplify the process of reduction on a larger scale, is demonstrated. The electrochemical method proposed in this paper produces graphene in powder form with good yield. The atomic force microscopic images confirmed that the graphene samples prepared by all the routes have multilayers of graphene. The electrochemical process provided a new route to make relatively larger area graphene sheets, which will have interest for further patterning applications. Attempt was made to quantify the quantum of reduction using cyclic voltammetry and choronopotentiometry techniques on reduced graphene samples. As a measure in reading the specific capacitance values, a maximum specific capacitance value of 265.3 F/g was obtained in sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide.

Ramachandran, Rajendran; Felix, Sathiyanathan [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Joshi, Girish M. [Materials Physics Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Raghupathy, Bala P.C., E-mail: balapraveen2000@yahoo.com [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Research and Advanced Engineering Division (Materials), Renault Nissan Technology and Business Center India (P) Ltd., Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Jeong, Soon Kwan, E-mail: jeongsk@kier.re.kr [Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Grace, Andrews Nirmala, E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control Standard NESHAPs National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NOx oxides of nitrogen NPOC nonAir Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner

Wechsler, Risa H.

222

Oxidation of stepped Pt(111) studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this comparative density functional theory and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the interaction of oxygen with stepped Pt(111) surfaces, we show that both the initial adsorption and oxidation occur at the steps rather than terraces. An equivalent behavior was observed for the oxide formation at higher chemical potentials, where, after the formation of a one-dimensional PtO{sub 2}-type oxide at the steps, similar oxide chains form on the (111) terraces, indicating the initial stages of bulk oxide formation.

Bandlow, Jochen; Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo [Institut fuer Elektrochemie, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Papp, C.; Traenkenschuh, B.; Streber, R.; Lorenz, M. P. A.; Fuhrmann, T.; Steinrueck, H.-P. [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Denecke, R. [Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Leipzig, Linnestr. 2, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Chemicals (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

224

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weakly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

Chemical Market Prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Market Prices ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1945-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

229

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

CFD model for the simulation of chemical looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A chemical looping combustion (CLC) system uses a metal oxide solid carrier to combust a source of fuel in isolation from the source of oxygen which produces an exhaust gas of primarily carbon dioxide and water. In this work, a full three-dimensional model of a chemical looping combustion system was developed to simulate the particle–fluid hydrodynamics, thermal characteristics, and reaction efficiency of the CLC system using coal particles as a fuel source. Multiple heterogeneous and homogenous reactions are considered in the CLC model including the oxidation and reduction reactions of the metal oxide carrier and gasification reactions. Within each coal particle, the temperature-dependent devolatilization, moisture release, and particle swelling effects are included. Modeling results showing fluidization regimes, circulation rate, reactor efficiencies, and temperature profiles are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model.

James M. Parker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY ABBREVIATION CHEMICAL NAME HAZARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irritant destain Methanol,acetic acid,H2O Flammable, Corrosive - acid DI H2O Deionized water DCM Nitric acid Corrosive - acid KAc Potassium acetate Irritant KCl Potassium chloride Irritant K2H PO4 Corrosive - base LiCl Lithium chloride Harmful MeOH Methanol Flammable #12;CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY

Pawlowski, Wojtek

233

THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Reed, of the Illinois Geological Survey...Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, Richmond...Board of Health, Madison, Wis. Division...Pennsylvania. Division of Chemical Education: Chairman...the University of Illinois; on execu-tive...from 10 or more plants were macerated...

1939-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

Chemical Signals Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Signals · Types · Production · Transmission · Reception · Reading: Ch 10 except boxes 10.1 and 10.2 #12;What is chemical communication? · Movement of molecules from sender to receiver · Methods compounds are volatile. - 5-20 carbon compounds - carbon (MW=12) + hydrogen is less dense than oxygen (MW

Wilkinson, Gerald S.

235

Chemical Engineering Andrew Zydney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;ChE Employment (2003 at PSU) Merck Dow ExxonMob Air Products Amgen PPG Sunoco Kraft Foods NRC Procter, microelectronics, consumer products, biotechnology, fuels / energy, environmental engineering, etc. ·Chemical Engineers focus on the processes involved in making new products, including chemical reactions

Maranas, Costas

236

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 Risk and Safety Manager 5535 Security 7058 #12;- 3 - FOREWORD This reference manual outlines the safe

Bolch, Tobias

237

Computers and Chemical Engineering 31 (2006) 4150 New approaches for representing, analyzing and visualizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Visualization 1. The complexities of combustion Hydrocarbon oxidation, one of the leading chemical transfor and tens of thousands of reactions are currently required for the rational analysis of modern combustion the chemical transformations onto a single scalar. The temporally evolving graphs are treated as streaming data

Androulakis, Ioannis (Yannis)

238

Atomistic simulations of surface segregation of defects in solid oxide electrolytes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) are widely used electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) due to their high ionic conductivAtomistic simulations of surface segregation of defects in solid oxide electrolytes Hark B. Lee is important in fuel cell applications because it can affect the near-surface chemical reactions and ionic

Cai, Wei

239

Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine fuel cells are usually described as devices able to convert chemical energy into electrical energy. Conventional solid oxide fuel cells are separated into two compartments containing each electrode split

Boyer, Edmond

240

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process and plan 3 Chemical Cleaning * Oxalic Acid can get tanks clean - Tank 16 set a standard in 1982 - Tanks 5-6 Bulk OA cleaning results under evaluation * However, the downstream flowsheet and financial impacts of handling the spent acid were unacceptable Before After Tank 16 Tank 16 4 Oxalic Acid Flowsheet Impacts Evap Sludge Washing Evap Feed/Drop Tank 8 Wt% Oxalic Acid Neutralization Tank Solids Liquid High oxalate concentration Negligible oxalate concentration * Oxalates from chemical cleaning impact salt processing * A process change was needed Evaporator Saltstone Vaults DWPF Filled Canisters 5 Vision * Eliminate the impacts to the Tank Farm

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

Ethylene Oxide Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE occasional occurrence of ethylene oxide explosions during the fumigation of dried fruit has led us to undertake a detailed ... yielded results somewhat like those for acetaldehyde1,2.. Cool flames can be initiated in ethylene oxide – air mixtures in the neighbourhood of 330° C. at atmospheric pressure. ...

J. H. BURGOYNE; F. A. BURDEN

1948-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Molten Salt Oxidation of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) can be characterized as a simple noncombustion process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes including chemical warfare agents, combustible solids, halogenated solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls, plutonium-contaminated solids, uranium-contaminated solvents and fission product-contaminated oil. The MSO destruction efficiency of the hazardous organic constituents in the wastes exceeds 99.9999%. Radioactive species, such as actinides and rare earth fission products, are retained in the salt bath. These elements can be recovered from the spent salt using conventional chemical processes, such as ion exchange, to render the salt as nonradioactive and nonhazardous. This paper reviews the principles and capabilities of MSO, previous mixed waste studies, and a new US Department of Energy program to demonstrate the process for the treatment of mixed wastes.

Gay, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.; Newman, C. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria Jena E. Johnsona,1 , Samuel M) The emergence of oxygen-producing (oxygenic) photosynthesis fundamentally transformed our planet; however biological innovation-- the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis (3, 4). Several bio- chemical attributes

Fischer, Woodward

248

Chemical looping combustion of biomass-derived syngas using ceria-supported oxygen carriers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cu, Ni and Fe oxides supported on ceria were investigated for their performance as oxygen carriers during the chemical looping combustion of biomass-derived syngas. A complex gas mixture containing CO, H2, CO2, CH4 and other hydrocarbons was used to simulate the complex fuel gas environment derived from biomass gasification. Results show that the transfer of the stored oxygen into oxidants for the supported Cu and Ni oxides at 800 °C for the combustion of syngas was effective (>85%). The unsupported Cu oxide showed high oxygen carrying capacity but particle sintering was observed at 800 °C. A reaction temperature of 950 °C was required for the supported Fe oxides to transfer the stored oxygen into oxidants effectively. Also, for the complex fuel gas environment, the supported Ni oxide was somewhat effective in reforming CH4 and other light hydrocarbons into CO, which may have benefits for the reduction of tar produced during biomass pyrolysis.

H.B. Huang; L. Aisyah; P.J. Ashman; Y.C. Leung; C.W. Kwong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Modifications of the surface properties of metals by oxide overlayers: 1, Oxidized zirconium deposited on the Pt(100) single crystal surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic zirconium was deposited on a single crystal Pt(100) surface by thermal evaporation in UHV conditions. The deposit was oxidized by exposure to oxygen immediately after deposition. Oxidized zirconium was found to grow on the platinum ace by the layer-by-layer mechanism. The adsorption of carbon monoxide on the surface was studied as a function of the zirconium coverage. The results show that oxidized zirconium forms a chemically inert layer which blocks the adsorptive sites of the underlying platinum substrate. The properties of the free Pt surface were unaffected by the presence of the oxidized zirconium layer.

Bardi, U.; Ross, P.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Liquid-phase oxidation of components of compression process gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigated the oxidation of hydrocarbons of various classes, the principal components of straight-run gasoline, under conditions similar to those used for industrial production of carboxylic acids at the Erevan Petroleum Refinery ''Nairit''. The study was carried out in the temperature range from 155 to 195/sup 0/C at a pressure of 5 MPa on an installation whose scheme was described previously. Normal paraffinic C/sub 5/-C/sub 8/ hydrocarbons, isoparaffinic hydrocarbons such as isopentane and isooctane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane), as well as cyclohexane were subjected to oxidation. The effluent gases were analyzed chromatographically for CO, CO/sub 2/ and hydrocarbon content, the oxidate was analyzed chemically for a total content of acids and chromatographically for its content of formic, acetic, propionic and butyric acids. This study also determined the content of acetone and water (chromatographically) and dicarboxylic acids (chemically).

Dayan, V.M.; Astratsatryan, S.A.; Kushina, I.D.; Pyzh, M.I.; Pazderskii, Y.A.; Bryukhovetskii, V.A.; Levush, S.S.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Chem 220B 3 hours Physical Chemistry Chem 230 3 hours Chemical Reactor Engineering ChBE 225 3Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering Semester hours SOPHOMORE YEAR FALL SPRING Chem 219A

Bordenstein, Seth

253

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Title Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Michael E. Grass, Daniel K. Roseguo, Z. Liu, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Li Journal Electrochemical Solid-State Letters Volume 14 Start Page A61 Issue 5 Pagination A61-A63 Date Published 02/2001 Keywords Electrochemistry, elemental semiconductors, etching, lithium, nanoparticles, secondary cells, silicon, thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra Abstract This study characterizes the native oxide layer of Si nanoparticles and evaluates its effect on their performance for Li-ion batteries. x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to identify the chemical state and morphology of the native oxide layer. Elemental and thermogravimetric analysis were used to estimate the oxide content for the Si samples. Hydrofluoric acid was used to reduce the oxide layer. A correlation between etching time and oxide content was established. The initial electrochemical performances indicate that the reversible capacity of etched Si nanoparticles was enhanced significantly compared with that of the as-received Si sample.

254

Identification of defect sites on oxide surfaces by metastable impact electron spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of defect sites on oxide surfaces by metastable impact electron spectroscopy S). The electronic and chemical properties of the thin films are identical to those of the corre- sponding bulk that exhibit essentially the same electronic and chemical properties of the corresponding bulk single crystals

Goodman, Wayne

255

Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Oxidations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) offers many excellent opportunities for conducting oxidation reactions using inexpensive primary oxidants such as oxygen, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, electrooxidation...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

In situ ion exchange preparation of Pt/carbon nanotubes electrode: Effect of two-step oxidation of carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) supported Pt electrode is prepared by in-situ ion exchange method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms that compared with the only electrochemical oxidation or chemical oxidation treatment, more carboxylic acid groups are produced on the surface of MWNTs treated by dual-oxidation, which involves both electrochemical oxidation and chemical oxidation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that Pt nanoparticles deposited via in-situ ion exchange are highly dispersed on the MWNTs surface. Electrochemical measurements show that the resultant Pt/MWNTs electrode treated by dual-oxidation exhibits the largest electrochemical surface area and the highest activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) among the investigated electrodes. This can be attributed to the fact that dual-oxidation treatment produces more carboxylic acid groups at the electroactive sites on MWNTs surface, which results in loading more Pt nanoparticles in the following ion exchange process.

Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Gao, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangyu; Lin, Yuehe; Yin, Geping

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Chapter 7 - Chemical-looping processes for fuel-flexible combustion and fuel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC) is a rapidly emerging technology for clean combustion of fossil and renewable fuels. In CLC, the combustion of a fuel is broken down into two, spatially separated steps: The oxidation of fuel in contact with an ‘oxygen carrier’ (typically a metal oxide), and the subsequent reoxidation of the carrier with air. CLC thus produces sequestration-ready CO2 streams with only minor efficiency penalties for CO2 capture. While recent interest in chemical looping was almost exclusively focused on combustion, the underlying reaction engineering principle forms a flexible platform for fuel conversion with a long history in chemical engineering. This chapter gives a brief review of the status of chemical-looping processes for fuel conversion, focused predominantly on reforming and partial oxidation of fossil and renewable fuels and on the impact of fuel composition on combustion.

Saurabh Bhavsar; Michelle Najera; Amey More; Götz Veser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Regenerative catalytic oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently Regenerative Thermal Oxidizers (R.T.O.`s) are an accepted technology for the control of volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP`s). This control technology, when introduced, offered substantial reductions in operating costs, especially auxiliary fuel requirements when compared to existing control technologies such as recuperative thermal and recuperative catalytic oxidizers. While these savings still exist, there is a demand for control of new and/or hybrid technologies, one of which is Regenerative Catalytic Oxidizers (R.C.O.`s). This paper will explore the development of regenerative catalytic oxidation from the theoretical stage through pilot testing through a commercial installation. The operating cost of R.C.O.`s will be compared to R.T.O.`s to verify the savings that are achievable through the use of regenerative catalytic oxidation. In the development of this technology, which is a combination of two (2) existing technologies, R.T.O.`s and catalysis, a second hybrid technology was explored and pilot tested. This is a combination R.C.O. for VOC and HAP control and simultaneous SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) for NOx (Oxides of Nitrogen) control. Based on the pilot and full scale testing, both regenerative catalytic oxidizers and systems which combine R.C.O. with SCR for both VOC and NOx reduction are economically viable and are in fact commercially available. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Gribbon, S.T. [Engelhard Process Emission Systems, South Lyon, MI (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magma Chamber Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma Chamber Abstract...

260

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Chemicals from Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Added Chemicals from Biomass. Volume I: Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas (www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/pdfs/35523.pdf) . 6. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical...

David R. Dodds; Richard A. Gross

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

262

Chemical decontamination specification preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the first low-concentration chemical decontamination in the United States at Vermont Yankee in 1979, > 75 decontamination applications have been made at > 20 nuclear electrical generating stations. Chemical decontamination has become a common technique for reducing person-rem exposures. Two vendors are currently offering low-concentration chemical decontamination reagents for application in boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor systems. All technical aspects associated with the chemical decontamination technology have been commercially tested and are well advanced beyond the research and development stage. Extensive corrosion and material compatibility testing has been performed on the major solvent systems with satisfactory results. The material compatibility testing for the three main solvent systems, CANDECON, CITROX, and LOMI, has been documented in numerous Electric Power Research Institute reports.

Miller, M.A.; Remark, J.F.; Vandergriff, D.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Western Chemical Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Western Chemical Information ... For the most part, the units are small because production is geared to the needs of the 11 states, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona, not to the entire country. ...

FREDERICK G. SAWYER

1949-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) and looping cycles in general represent an important new ... technologies, which can be deployed for direct combustion as well as be used in gasification...2...stream suitable fo...

Edward John (Ben) Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Chemicals from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A thermally self-sustained micro-power plant with integrated micro-solid oxide fuel cells, micro-reformer and functional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermally self-sustained micro-power plant with integrated micro-solid oxide fuel cells, micro Micro-solid oxide fuel cell Thin films Butane reformation Chemical micro-reactors Thermally independent 2014 Accepted 8 February 2014 Available online xxx a b s t r a c t Low temperature micro-solid oxide

Daraio, Chiara

267

Formation and distribution of neutral vanadium, niobium, and tantalum oxide clusters: Single photon ionization at 26.5 eV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION Transition metals, as well as their oxides, carbides, ni- trides, and sulfides, are unique bonds at a surface.1 Transition metal oxides are employed extensively as catalysts in the chemical. During the ionization process the metal oxide clusters are almost free of fragmentation. The most stable

Rocca, Jorge J.

268

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

Anderson, M.A.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

SOLID OXIDE PLANAR AND TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLID OXIDE PLANAR AND TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS Dynamic Simulation Approach Modular Approach · Parallel planes: PSOFC · Other: combustor, reformer Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrochemistry Cell Reactions · Slow pressure transients #12;Fuel Cell Assumptions · H2 electrochemically oxidized only · CO consumed

Mease, Kenneth D.

270

Chemical looping combustion of high-sulfur coal with NiFe2O4-combined oxygen carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) of coal has gained increasing attention as a novel combustion technology for its attractive advantage in the...2. In relative to the single metal oxide-based oxygen carrier (OC),...

Baowen Wang; Gan Xiao; Xiaoyong Song…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING & MATERIALS SCIENCE Ph.D EXIT SEMINARS 2012-2013 (through Winter Quarter 2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING & MATERIALS SCIENCE Ph.D EXIT SEMINARS 2012-2013 (through Winter Electrical Characteristics of Grain Boundaries in Oxygen Ion and Proton-Conducting Solid Oxide Electrolytes

Woodall, Jerry M.

272

Syngas Oxidation Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive analysis of synthesis gas (syngas) oxidation kinetics in wide ranges of temperature ... on the basis of the reaction mechanism of syngas ignition and combustion in air. A vast set of experimental ...

A. M. Starik; N. S. Titova; A. S. Sharipov…

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Controlled CO preferential oxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Bimetallic Fe–Ni Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2-4) In CLC (schematic in Figure 1), a fuel is combusted in a fuel reactor (“reducer”) in contact with an oxygen carrier (typically a metal oxide). ... After combustion of the fuel, the reduced metal is then transferred to the air reactor (“oxidizer”) where it is reoxidized by air, and then circulated back to the reducer to close the material “loop”. ... Son, S. R.; Kim, S. D.Chemical-looping combustion with NiO and Fe2O3 in a thermobalance and circulating fluidized bed reactor with double loops Ind. Eng. ...

Saurabh Bhavsar; Götz Veser

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

An experimental study of steam explosions involving chemically reactive metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of molten zirconium-water explosions was conducted. A 1-kg mass of zirconium melt was dropped into a column of water. Explosions took place only when an external trigger was used. In the triggered tests, the extent of oxidation of the zirconium melt was very extensive. However, the explosion energetics estimated were found to be very small compared to the potential chemical energy available from the oxidation reaction. Zirconium is of particular interest, since it is a component of the core materials of the current nuclear power reactors. This paper describes the test apparatus and summarizes the results of four tests conducted using pure zirconium melt.

Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Basu, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering", National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2003. #12;2 B1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School faculty

Collins, Gary S.

277

Chemical Looping Reforming for H2, CO and Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that the extension of CLC onto oxidants beyond air opens new, highly efficient pathways for production of ultra-pure hydrogen, activation of CO{sub 2} via reduction to CO, and are currently working on production of syngas using nanocomposite Fe-BHA. CLR hold great potential due to fuel flexibility and CO{sub 2} capture. Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is a novel clean combustion technology which offers an elegant and highly efficient route for fossil fuel combustion. In CLC, combustion of a fuel is broken down into two spatially separated steps. In the reducer, the oxygen carrier (typically a metal) supplies the stoichiometric oxygen required for fuel combustion. In the oxidizer, the oxygen-depleted carrier is then re-oxidized with air. After condensation of steam from the effluent of the reducer, a high-pressure, high-purity sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is obtained. In the present study, we apply the CLC principle to the production of high-purity H{sub 2}, CO, and syngas streams by replacing air with steam and/or CO{sub 2} as oxidant, respectively. Using H{sub 2}O as oxidant, pure hydrogen streams can be obtained. Similarly, using CO{sub 2} as oxidant, CO is obtained, thus opening an efficient route for CO{sub 2} utilization. Using steam and CO{sub 2} mixtures for carrier oxidation should thus allow production of syngas with adjustable CO:H{sub 2} ratios. Overall, these processes result in Chemical Looping Reforming (CLR), i.e. the net overall reaction is the steam and/or dry reforming of the respective fuel.

Bhavsar,Saurabh; Najera,Michelle; Solunke,Rahul; Veser,Götz

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeling of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst ... Optimization of hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation over a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) requires consideration of (i) HC gas diffusion into the catalyst layer, (ii) HC gas adsorption and desorption from catalyst sites, and (iii) kinetics of the oxidation reaction. ... Mutagenicity of Diesel Engine Exhaust Is Eliminated in the Gas Phase by an Oxidation Catalyst but Only Slightly Reduced in the Particle Phase ...

Yasushi Tanaka; Takashi Hihara; Makoto Nagata; Naoto Azuma; Akifumi Ueno

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Use of ion conductors in the pyrochemical reduction of oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical process and electrochemical cell for reducing a metal oxide are provided. First the oxide is separated as oxygen gas using, for example, a ZrO[sub 2] oxygen ion conductor anode and the metal ions from the reduction salt are reduced and deposited on an ion conductor cathode, for example, sodium ion reduced on a [beta]-alumina sodium ion conductor cathode. The generation of and separation of oxygen gas avoids the problem with chemical back reaction of oxygen with active metals in the cell. The method also is characterized by a sequence of two steps where an inert cathode electrode is inserted into the electrochemical cell in the second step and the metallic component in the ion conductor is then used as the anode to cause electrochemical reduction of the metal ions formed in the first step from the metal oxide where oxygen gas formed at the anode. The use of ion conductors serves to isolate the active components from chemically reacting with certain chemicals in the cell. While applicable to a variety of metal oxides, the invention has special importance for reducing CaO to Ca[sup o] used for reducing UO[sub 2] and PuO[sub 2] to U and Pu. 2 figures.

Miller, W.E.; Tomczuk, Z.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic...5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), is a valuable platform chemical being considered for the production...biomass feedstocks (2–4). HMF is now being manufactured at...

Joshua J. Pacheco; Mark E. Davis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Association Behavior of Biotinylated and Non-Biotinylated PolyEthylene Oxide-b-Poly(2-(Diethylamino)Ethyl Methacrylate)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biotinylated and non-biotinylated copolymers of ethylene oxide (EO) and 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) were synthesized by the atom transfer radical polymerization technique (ATRP). The chemical compositions ...

Tan, J. F.

282

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Sc???Ce????Zr????O? ELECTROLYTE MATERIAL FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scandia doped zirconia has been considered a candidate for electrolyte material in intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) due to its high ionic conductivity, chemical stability and good electrochemical performance. The aim...

Lim, Wendy

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

284

Chemical Cleaning Program Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Program Review Neil Davis Deputy Program Manager Waste Removal & Tank Closure July 29, 2009 SRR-STI-2009-00464 2 Contents Regulatory drivers Process overview Preliminary results Lessons learned Path forward 3 Regulatory Drivers The Federal Facilities Agreement establishes milestones for the removal of bulk waste and closure of each non-compliant tank Per the Dispute Resolution: - "DOE shall complete operational closure of Tanks 19 and 18 by 12/31/2012" - "DOE shall complete operational closure of 4 tanks by 9/30/2015" SRR intention to close 4 tanks by 9/30/2010, or as soon as possible Tanks 5 & 6 will be 2 of the 4 tanks 4 Tank Closure Process Bulk Waste Removal Mechanical Heel Removal Chemical Cleaning Annulus

285

Chemical Label Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Label Information Chemical Label Information Chemical Name CAS No. NFPA 704 Label Data Hazard Information Health Fire Reactivity Other acetone 67641 1 3 0 Eye, skin and mucous membrane irritatiion. Central nervous system depression. chloroform 67663 2 0 0 CAR [1] and TERAT [2] Liver and kidney disorders. Eye and skin irritation. Central nervous system depression. Cardiac arrythmia. ethanol 64175 0 3 0 Skin and eye irritation. ethyl alcohol 64175 0 3 0 Skin and eye irritation. hydrofluoric acid 7664393 4 0 0 Acute [3] - Skin contact can lead to bone damage. Skin, eye and mucous membrane irritation. hydrogen peroxide (35 to 52%) 7722841 2 0 1 OX Very irritating to the skin, eye and respiratory tract. hydrogen peroxide (> 52%) 7722841 2 0 3 OX Extremely irritating to the skin, eye and respiratory tract.

286

Chemical profiles of switchgrass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiles profiles of switchgrass Zhoujian Hu a,b , Robert Sykes a,c , Mark F. Davis a,c , E. Charles Brummer a,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,e, * a BioEnergy Science Center, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Forest Products and Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 15 April 2009 Received in revised form 10 December 2009 Accepted 10 December 2009 Available online 13 January 2010 Keywords: Switchgrass Morphological components Chemical

287

Micromachined chemical jet dispenser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA)

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

Physical and Chemical Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

data image data image Physical and Chemical Applications Research in this area includes: Chemical analysis (femtosecond laser ablation). Advanced sensors (laser ultrasonics). Advanced materials and nanotechnology for clean energy- hydrogen storage, nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes, nanowires, and nanoparticles). Photons to fuels (biosynthetic pathways for generating hydrocarbon biofuels in photosynthetic organisms). Advanced Sensor Development Sensor-based control of industrial processes can help companies: Decrease production costs; Reduce waste of raw materials on manufacturing lines; Lower manufacturing downtime from equipment maintenance; Increase the energy efficiency of manufacturing processes; Detect equipment failure early, before it becomes a major liability;

289

Chemical Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Logging Chemical Logging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Chemical Logging Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Presence and geochemical composition of fluid producing zones Thermal: Calcium-alkalinity ratios versus depth assist in defining warm and hot water aquifers Dictionary.png Chemical Logging: Chemical logging produces a chemical profile of the formation fluid within a well based on the measurement of changes in the chemical composition of the drilling fluid during drilling operations.

290

Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

Laul, Jadish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Design for chemical recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than design. Life-cycle assessment (LCA), resource envi- ronmental profile analysis...product from cradle to grave. Although LCA is considered to be an evaluation tool and...polyol from oil. 7. The design check using LCA In order to check that chemical recycling...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Germany's Chemical Plans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THE DIRECTION OF PROPOSED PLANT investments in the German Federal Republic is on the brink of significant change, according to the 1956 picture of capital expenditure projects. Leading German chemical companies are spending less on new plants in L956 than ...

1956-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Chemical Plant Expansion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite $4 billion of capital expenditure for plant expansion over the past seven years, a high level of construction activity is expected to continue ... A marked increase in capital expenditures of t h e six largest chemical companies tooïç place in 1951 over 1950. ...

JOHN M. WEISS

1952-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

Chemicals from Coal Coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemicals from Coal Coking ... Since 2009, she has been at INCAR-CSIC, researching the preparation and characterization of carbon materials (cokes and fibers) and nanomaterials (nanotubes and graphenes) and their catalytic, environmental, and energy applications. ... He then joined the Fundamental Studies Section of the British Coke (later Carbonization) Research Association, eventually becoming Head of Fundamental Studies. ...

Marcos Granda; Clara Blanco; Patricia Alvarez; John W. Patrick; Rosa Menéndez

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Core-level spectroscopy of thin oxides and oxynitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several spectroscopic methods are discussed that use core levels, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and absorption spectroscopy with photoelectron or fluorescence detection. Measurements are presented on the desorption of a chemical oxide and the growth of oxynitrides with N{sub 2}0 on Si(100). The stoichiometry is found to change strongly with thickness, from a nitrogen-terminated Si surface to a nearly-pure oxide in the outer region of 40--60 {Angstrom} films. Using a third generation synchrotron beam line a sensitivity of better than a tenth of a monolayer is achieved by a simple photocurrent measurement.

Himpsel, F.J.; Akatsu, H. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Carlisle, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

297

Thermally Oxidized Silicon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anneli Munkholm (Lumileds Lighting) and Sean Brennan (SSRL) Anneli Munkholm (Lumileds Lighting) and Sean Brennan (SSRL) Illustration of the silicon positions near the Si-SiO2 interface for a 4° miscut projected onto the ( ) plane. The silicon atoms in the substrate are blue and those in the oxide are red. The small black spots represent the translated silicon positions in the absence of static disorder. The silicon atoms in the oxide have been randomly assigned a magnitude and direction based on the static disorder value at that position in the lattice. The outline of four silicon unit cells is shown in black, whereas the outline of four expanded lattice cells in the oxide is shown in blue One of the most studied devices of modern technology is the field-effect transistor, which is the basis for most integrated circuits. At its heart

298

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

American Chemical Society Award Winners, Chicago, III.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Chemical Society Award Winners, Chicago, III. ... Copyright © 1970 American Chemical Society ...

1970-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: A NEW PROCESS FOR CHEMICALLY CLEANING SAVANNAH RIVER WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 49 high level waste (HLW) tanks that must be emptied, cleaned, and closed as required by the Federal Facilities Agreement. The current method of chemical cleaning uses several hundred thousand gallons per tank of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to partially dissolve and suspend residual waste and corrosion products such that the waste can be pumped out of the tank. This adds a significant quantity of sodium oxalate to the tanks and, if multiple tanks are cleaned, renders the waste incompatible with the downstream processing. Tank space is also insufficient to store this stream given the large number of tanks to be cleaned. Therefore, a search for a new cleaning process was initiated utilizing the TRIZ literature search approach, and Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination--Ultraviolet (CORD-UV), a mature technology currently used for decontamination and cleaning of commercial nuclear reactor primary cooling water loops, was identified. CORD-UV utilizes oxalic acid for sludge dissolution, but then decomposes the oxalic acid to carbon dioxide and water by UV treatment outside the system being treated. This allows reprecipitation and subsequent deposition of the sludge into a selected container without adding significant volume to that container, and without adding any new chemicals that would impact downstream treatment processes. Bench top and demonstration loop measurements on SRS tank sludge stimulant demonstrated the feasibility of applying CORD-UV for enhanced chemical cleaning of SRS HLW tanks.

Ketusky, E; Neil Davis, N; Renee Spires, R

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot scale, burning bituminous coals (Gale, 2006) and blends of bituminous coals with Powder River Basin coal (Gale, 2005). The removal of mercury by fly ash and unburned carbon in the flue gas from combustion of the bituminous coals and blends was reproduced with satisfactory accuracy by the model. The enhancement of mercury capture in the presence of calcium (Gale, 2005) explained a synergistic effect of blending on mercury removal across the baghouse. The extent of mercury oxidation, on the other hand, was not so well described by the simulation, because of oversensitivity of the oxidation process in the model to the concentration of unburned carbon. Combined catalysts and sorbents for oxidation and removal of mercury from flue gas at low temperature were based on surfactant-templated silicas containing a transition metal and an organic functional group. The presence of both metal ions and organic groups within the pore structure of the materials is expected to impart to them the ability to simultaneously oxidize elemental mercury and adsorb the resulting oxidized mercury. Twelve mesoporous organosilicate catalysts/sorbents were synthesized, with and without metals (manganese, titanium, vanadium) and organic functional groups (aminopropyl, chloropropyl, mercaptopropyl). Measurement of mercury oxidation and adsorption by the candidate materials remains for future work.

Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tetraalklylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H{sub e{minus}z}[(n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sub z}(XM{sub 11}M{prime}O{sub 39}){sup {minus}e}. The M{prime} (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, P.E.; Lyons, J.E.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Shaikh, S.N.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

Tetraalykylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H.sub.e-z ›(n-C.sub.4 H.sub.9).sub.4 N!.sub.z (XM.sub.11 M'O.sub.39).sup.-e The M' (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Myers, Jr., Harry K. (Cochranville, PA); Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

An investigation of steam production in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) and chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) for solid fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) and chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) are being actively explored as solid fuel combustion technologies that have the potential to facilitate CO2 capture. While CLC and CLOU have similarities operationally, there are some key differences. In particular, the CLC process requires a coal gasification step where coal is first broken down into a syngas with the use of steam or CO2. The resulting syngas is then oxidized with the metal oxide to release energy. In the CLOU process the metal oxide releases oxygen that combusts the solid fuel, resulting in a lower residence time, as the coal gasification reactions are avoided. The CLC and CLOU systems were modeled with ASPEN Plus at a 10 \\{MWth\\} scale, and the process streams were analyzed by ASPEN Energy Analyzer to determine the amount of industrial process steam that could be generated from CLC or CLOU. Both the air and fuel reactor were analyzed as two circulating fluidized beds, with metal oxide circulating between the two reactors. The air reactor, where metal oxide is oxidized, was fluidized with air. The fuel reactor, where the metal oxide is reduced, was fluidized with steam for CLC and recirculated CO2 for CLOU. It was identified that the CLOU process had the potential to produce more steam, approximately 7920 kg/hr, as compared to CLC (6910 kg/hr).

J.K. Dansie; A.H. Sahir; M.A. Hamilton; J.S. Lighty

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nitrite–dependent nitric oxide production pathway: implications for involvement of active nitrogen species in photoinhibition in vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as a convenient method for calibration...1. Chemical NO production from nitrite and...Figure 4. Sequential production of the activated...interactions. Like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2...oxide protocols: methods in molecular biology...Nonenzymatic nitric oxide production in humans. Nitric...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mass Spectral Evidence That Small Changes in Composition Caused by Oxidative Aging Processes Alter Aerosol CCN Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass Spectral Evidence That Small Changes in Composition Caused by Oxidative Aging Processes Alter that small changes in particle chemical composition caused by oxidation could increase the CCN activity increased cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity compared to their hydro- phobic counterparts. At present

310

Electric transport, reversible wettability and chemical sensing of single-crystalline zigzag Zn2SnO4 nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

devices including solar cells, chemical sensors, photodetectors, photocatalysts, and Li-ion batteries performance sensors to detect hosts of chemicals with detection limits down to the 1 ppm level, especially oxide nano- structures have now been widely used in many areas, such as ceramics, catalysis, sensors

Zhou, Chongwu

311

CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CSD: Research: Chemical Physics CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics CSD: Research: Chemical Physics CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics LBL Logo A-Z CSD Research Highlights CSD Directory Chemical Sciences Division A-Z Index Phone Book Search Berkeley Lab INTRODUCTION TO CSD NATIONAL FACILITIES & CENTERS RESEARCH PROGRAMS Atomic, Molecular & Optical Sciences Catalytic Science Chemical Physics The Glenn T. Seaborg Center (GTSC) STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley CSD > Research Programs > Chemical Physics The Chemical Physics Program of the Chemical Science Division of LBNL is concerned with the development of both experimental and theoretical methodologies for studying molecular structure and dynamical processes at the most fundamental level, and with the application of these to specific

312

Work Practices for Chemical Fumehoods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Practices for Chemical Fumehoods Practices for Chemical Fumehoods (Reviewed May 16, 2011) Always use a chemical fumehood when working with toxic and/or volatile chemicals, not on an open bench. Chemical fumehoods are designed to provide protection for the user from chemical and radiological contaminants. However, they do not absolutely eliminate exposure, even under ideal conditions. Careless work practices can result in considerable exposure to users who may believe they are protected. To optimize the performance of the chemical hood, adhere to the following work practices: 1. Ensure that your chemical hood has a current inspection sticker (dated within the last year). The face velocity should be between 80 and 120 linear feet per minute (lfpm). 2. Verify that the chemical hood is drawing air.

313

A Porphyrin-Stabilized Iridium Oxide Water Oxidation Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Porphyrin-Stabilized Iridium Oxide Water Oxidation Catalyst Authors: Sherman, B. D., Pillai, S., Kodis, G., Bergkamp, J., Mallouk, T. E., Gust, D., Moore, T. A., and Moore, A. L....

314

Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

Dimitrov, Vesselin, E-mail: vesselin@uctm.edu [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria)] [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Preparation and oxidation resistance of mullite/SiC coating for carbon materials at 1150 °C  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To protect carbon materials from oxidation, mullite/SiC coatings were prepared on graphite by chemical vapor reaction (CVR) and slurry sintering. The XRD analyses show that the phase of the outer-layer coating is composed of SiO2 and mullite, and the inner-layer coating is mainly composed of ?-SiC. The anti-oxidation behavior of the coating and the Rockwell hardness (HRB) of the coating after oxidation were investigated. The oxidation test shows that the as-prepared multi-layer coating exhibits excellent anti-oxidation and thermal shock resistance at high temperature. After oxidation at 1150 °C for 109 h and thermal shock cycling between 1150 °C and room temperature for 12 times, the mass gain of the coated sample is 0.085%. Meanwhile, the indentation tests also demonstrate that the as-prepared coating has good bonding ability between the layers.

Xin YANG; Zhe-an SU; Qi-zhong HUANG; Li-yuan CHAI

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as potential feedstock in solid oxide fuel cells. Petroleum based fuels become scarcer daily, and biodiesel for use in solid oxide fuel cells. This cutting edge area of research continues to be important as energy prove useful for solid oxide fuel cells. METHODS Commercial molybdenum dioxide was used for all tests

Collins, Gary S.

317

Highly oxidized superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known synthesis in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed. 16 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Engineering with Fine Chemicals Processing, run jointly with the Department of Chemistry for chemical engineering graduates with formal training in synthetic chemistry and process developmentChemical Engineering and Chemical Technology 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of --Chemical

319

Chemical Sciences Division: Directory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION TO CSD NATIONAL FACILITIES & CENTERS RESEARCH STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley CSD Directory A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Rebecca Abergel CSD Project Scientist; The Glenn T. Seaborg Center. Musahid Ahmed CSD Staff Scientist, Chemical Physics Program/Chemical Dynamics Beamline Publications Richard A. Andersen Professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley; CSD Senior Faculty Scientist, The Glenn T. Seaborg Center Publications John Arnold Professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley; CSD Faculty Scientist, Catalytic Science Program Publications B Ali Belkacem CSD Deputy and Senior Staff Scientist; Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Program Leader

320

Staged membrane oxidation reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Staged membrane oxidation reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Staged membrane oxidation reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Oxidation resistant coatings for CoSb3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Doped cobalt antimonides are used as components of thermoelectric devices at temperatures not exceeding 450 °C because of poor thermal and chemical stability. In absence of oxygen they degrade by sublimation of antimony while in air they easily oxidize to form volatile antimony oxides and non-volatile thick double oxide scales [1]. In both cases protective coatings are indispensable to ensure safe performance of thermoelectric devices over extended times. The most promising solution reported so far is a thick aerogel coating which practically stops antimony loss by sublimation. The assessment of coating effectiveness is generally based on thermogravimetric tests in vacuum so permeability of oxygen and protection from oxidation cannot be evaluated. The paper presents investigations on the development of protective coatings which would prevent oxidation of CoSb3. Two types of coatings were applied: magnetron sputtered Cr-Si thin layers [2] and thick enamel layers. Testing involved interrupted oxidation in air for 20-80 h at 500 °C and 600 °C. The Cr-Si thin layers appeared oxygen-tight at 500 °C while the enamel layers - even at 600 °C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chemical composition of melanin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical composition of melanin Chemical composition of melanin Name: Peggy M Siemers Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is the chemical composition of Melanin by specific amino acids, or the DNA code for melanin? Replies: This is a good question! The answer is somewhat complex and I'm sure I don't have all the details but here goes... First, there is not a specific DNA code for melanin because like many biomolecules, it is not the result of a single gene product. People that are deficient in melanin are oculo/dermal albinos and I believe there have been seven different types of mutations. These different mutations reflect the multiple steps required to produce melanin. The original building block for melanin is tyrosine, one of the amino acids. This amino acid is modified by enzymes to produce the building block (monomer) for melanin synthesis by a process called polymerization that is also controlled by an enzyme. The polymers ,I believe, can attain diff3erent lengths and they can also form aggregates of different sizes alone and in combination with other molecules such as proteins. This is in part responsible for differences in coloration seen within and between individuals. NEWTON RULES

326

Miniature Chemical Sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

Andrew C. R. Pipino

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

327

Transient Simulations of Spouted Fluidized Bed for Coal-Direct Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transient Simulations of Spouted Fluidized Bed for Coal-Direct Chemical Looping Combustion ... Instead of having air to support the combustion process, an oxygen compound (metal or non-metal based) is used as an oxidizer in the fuel reactor; thus, the fuel is chemically combusted by the metal oxide than the oxygen present in air in case of standard power plants. ... The CFD/DEM simulation approach has been used in various applications which require the modeling of particle/fluid interaction;(19-23) however, its application in the context of close-loop spouted fluidized bed system has so far been quite limited and preliminary. ...

Zheming Zhang; Ling Zhou; Ramesh Agarwal

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOLS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relatively long lifetime of droplets in atmospheric haze and fog in comparison with similar droplets of pure water is attributed to the presence of a monolayer of surfactant film and to the accumulation Of soluble salts from chemical reactions. The lifetime of these droplets is a significant factor in the evaluation of the role of heterogeneous aqueous chemical reactions occurring in the troposphere. Several mechanisms of SO{sub 2} oxidation in the presence of liquid water are investigated. It is shown that soot-catalyzed oxidation of sulfur dioxide could be responsible for the high level of sulfate concentration observed in the coastal industrial areas.

Toossi, R.; Novakov, T.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

chemicals | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coal-to-chemicals facilities in South Africa. To put chemicals production from coalpetcoke into context, refer to Figure 1, which shows the many potential products that can be...

330

CHEMICAL MAKERS INVEST IN SOLAR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MAKERS INVEST IN SOLAR ... CAPACITY BOOST: New projects target raw materials and research ... The projects will increase capacity and advance research for chemical components of both traditional polysilicon solar cells and newer thin-film modules. ...

MELODY VOITH

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ultrafast Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrafast Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors ... Graphene oxide can be exploited in humidity and temperature sensors with a number of convenient features such as flexibility, transparency and suitability for large-scale manufacturing. ... Here we show that the two-dimensional nature of graphene oxide and its superpermeability to water combine to enable humidity sensors with unprecedented response speed (?30 ms response and recovery times). ...

Stefano Borini; Richard White; Di Wei; Michael Astley; Samiul Haque; Elisabetta Spigone; Nadine Harris; Jani Kivioja; Tapani Ryhänen

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

332

Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

Mohajeri, Nahid

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO{sub 2} capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (5.1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (5.2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification; (5.3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratoryscale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability; and (5.4) the identification of kinetic data for copper-based oxygen carriers as well as the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material. Subtask 5.1 focused on the development of kinetic expressions for the Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU) process and validating them with reported literature data. The kinetic expressions were incorporated into a process model for determination of reactor size and oxygen carrier circulation for the CLOU process using ASPEN PLUS. An ASPEN PLUS process model was also developed using literature data for the CLC process employing an iron-based oxygen carrier, and the results of the process model have been utilized to perform a relative economic comparison. In Subtask 5.2, the investigators studied the trade-off between modeling approaches and available simulations tools. They quantified uncertainty in the high-performance computing (HPC) simulation tools for CLC bed applications. Furthermore, they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Oxidation states study of nickel in solid oxide fuel cell anode using x-ray full-field spectroscopic nano-tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identifying the chemical state and coupling with morphological information in three dimensions are of great interest in energy storage materials which typically involve reduction-oxidation cycling and structural evolution. Here we apply x-ray nano-tomography with multiple x-ray energies to study oxidation states of nickel(Ni) and nickel oxide phases in Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) a typical anodematerial of solid oxide fuel cells(SOFC). We present a method to quantitatively identify the nickel-based oxides from Ni-YSZ anodecomposite and obtain chemical mapping as well as associated microstructures at nanometer scale in three dimensions. NiO particles manually placed on a Ni-YSZ compositeanode were used for validation of the method while no nickel oxides were found to be present within the electrode structure as remnants of the cell fabrication process. The application of the method can be widely applied to energy storage materials including SOFCs Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors as well as other systems for oxidation and reduction study.

Yu-chen Karen Chen-Wiegart; William M. Harris; Jeffrey J. Lombardo; Wilson K. S. Chiu; Jun Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON ... Under fire, Airborne Laser program director confronts challenges of revolutionary weapons system ...

WILLIAM G. SCHULZ

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

Naming chemical compounds: Calculator drill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

36. Bits and pieces, 13. A calculator can be programmed to drill students on chemical compound naming rules.

David Holdsworth; Evelyn Lacanienta

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Perform Tests and Document Results and Analysis of Oxide Layer Effects and Comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the initial feasibility test using actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding in FY 2012, an incubation period of 30–45 minutes was observed in the initial dry chlorination. The cladding hull used in the test had been previously oxidized in a dry air oxidation pretreatment prior to removal of the fuel. The cause of this incubation period was attributed to the resistance to chlorination of an oxide layer imparted by the dry oxidation pretreatment on the cladding. Subsequently in 2013, researchers at the Korea Atomic Energy Institute (KAERI) reported on their chlorination study [R1] on ~9-gram samples of unirradiated ZirloTM cladding tubes that had been previously oxidized in air at 500oC for various time periods to impart oxide layers of varying thickness. In early 2014, discussions with Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracted technical consultants from Westinghouse described their previous development (and patents) [R2] on methods of chemical washing to remove some or all of the hydrous oxide layer imparted on UNF cladding during irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) . Thus, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) study, described herein, was planned to extend the KAERI study on the effects of anhydrous oxide layers, but on larger ~100-gram samples of unirradiated zirconium alloy cladding tubes, and to investigate the effects of various methods of chemical pretreatment prior to chlorination with 100% chlorine on the average reaction rates and Cl2 usage efficiencies.

Collins, E. D. [ORNL; DelCul, G. D. [ORNL; Spencer, B. B. [ORNL; Hunt, R. D. [ORNL; Ausmus, C. [ORNL

2014-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The removal of CO2 from power plants is challenging because existing methods to separate CO2 from the gas mixture requires a significant fraction of the power plant output. Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel technology that utilizes a metal oxide oxygen carrier to transport oxygen to the fuel thereby avoiding direct contact between fuel and air. The use of CLC has the advantages of reducing the energy penalty while

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

342

Electro-catalytic oxidation device for removing carbon from a fuel reformate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electro-catalytic oxidation device (ECOD) for the removal of contaminates, preferably carbonaceous materials, from an influent comprising an ECOD anode, an ECOD cathode, and an ECOD electrolyte. The ECOD anode is at a temperature whereby the contaminate collects on the surface of the ECOD anode as a buildup. The ECOD anode is electrically connected to the ECOD cathode, which consumes the buildup producing electricity and carbon dioxide. The ECOD anode is porous and chemically active to the electro-catalytic oxidation of the contaminate. The ECOD cathode is exposed to oxygen, and made of a material which promotes the electro-chemical reduction of oxygen to oxidized ions. The ECOD electrolyte is non-permeable to gas, electrically insulating and a conductor to oxidized. The ECOD anode is connected to the fuel reformer and the fuel cell. The ECOD electrolyte is between and in ionic contact with the ECOD anode and the ECOD cathode.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Why sequence Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing bacteria for sulfur pollution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing Alkaliphilic sulfur oxidizing bacteria for sulfur pollution remediation? Burning sulfur-containing fuels, such as coal, oil, and natural gas, contributes significantly to global environmental problems, such as air pollution and acid rain, besides contributing to the loss of the ozone layer. One method of managing sulfur compounds released as byproducts from industrial processes is to scrub them out using chemical treatments and activated charcoal beds. A lower-cost solution relies on incorporating alkaliphic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria into biofilters to convert the volatile and toxic compounds into insoluble sulfur for easier removal. Discovered in the last decade, these bacteria have been found to thrive in habitats that span the full pH range. The bacteria could have applications

344

Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150 to 260/sup 0/C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO/sub 4/ and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect. 3 tables.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Foran, M.T.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

Graphene and Graphene Oxide: Biofunctionalization and Applications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Graphene Oxide: Biofunctionalization and Applications in Biotechnology. Graphene and Graphene Oxide: Biofunctionalization and Applications in Biotechnology. Abstract: Graphene...

346

Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it would be about $20,000/lb removed.

Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. The use of natural minerals as oxygen carriers has advantages, such as lower cost and availability. Eight materials, based on copper or iron oxides, were selected for screening tests of CLC processes using coal and methane as fuels. Thermogravimetric experiments and bench-scale fixed-bed reactor tests were conducted to investigate the oxygen transfer capacity, reaction kinetics, and stability during cyclic reduction/oxidation reaction. Most natural minerals showed lower combustion capacity than pure CuO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to low-concentrations of active oxide species in minerals. In coal CLC, chryscolla (Cu-based), magnetite, and limonite (Fe-based) demonstrated better reaction performances than other materials. The addition of steam improved the coal CLC performance when using natural ores because of the steam gasification of coal and the subsequent reaction of gaseous fuels with active oxide species in the natural ores. In methane CLC, chryscolla, hematite, and limonite demonstrated excellent reactivity and stability in 50-cycle thermogravimetric analysis tests. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ores possess greater oxygen utilization but require an activation period before achieving full performance in methane CLC. Particle agglomeration issues associated with the application of natural ores in CLC processes were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Tian, Hanjing; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Control-Based Modeling and Simulation of the Chemical-Looping Combustion Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The system consists of two fluidized-bed reactors connected through loop seals. ... Son, S. R.; Kim, S. D. Chemical-Looping Combustion with NiO and Fe2O3 in a Thermobalance and Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor with Double Loops Ind. Eng. ... Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L.; Adanez, J.; Abad, A.; Gayan, P. Temperature variations in the oxygen carrier particles Turing their reduction and oxidation in a Chemicals-looping combustión system Chem. ...

S. Balaji; Jovan Ilic; B. Erik Ydstie; Bruce H. Krogh

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Investigation of a Canadian Ilmenite as an Oxygen Carrier for Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CLC uses an oxygen carrier (OC), usually a metal oxide, to provide oxygen for combusting fuel without the presence of nitrogen from air. ... Chemical-Looping Combustion with NiO and Fe2O3 in a Thermobalance and Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor with Double Loops ... Application of Fe2O3-Al2O3 Composite Particles as Solid Looping Material of the Chemical-Loop Combustor ...

Fang Liu; Yi Zhang; Liangyong Chen; Dali Qian; James K. Neathery; Saito Kozo; Kunlei Liu

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

Fully Solar-Powered Photoelectrochemical Conversion for Simultaneous Energy Storage and Chemical Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fully Solar-Powered Photoelectrochemical Conversion for Simultaneous Energy Storage and Chemical Sensing ... (15) Nonetheless, the storage and utilization of the oxidative energy carried by the photogenerated holes at the photoanodes are generally low, due to large overpotential for water oxidation, as well as the electric energy loss when driving charge carriers through multiple material interfaces and external circuits. ... In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H2 generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. ...

Yongcheng Wang; Jing Tang; Zheng Peng; Yuhang Wang; Dingsi Jia; Biao Kong; Ahmed A. Elzatahry; Dongyuan Zhao; Gengfeng Zheng

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Metal-oxide-based energetic materials and synthesis thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing energetic metal-oxide-based energetic materials using sol-gel chemistry has been invented. The wet chemical sol-gel processing provides an improvement in both safety and performance. Essentially, a metal-oxide oxidizer skeletal structure is prepared from hydrolyzable metals (metal salts or metal alkoxides) with fuel added to the sol prior to gelation or synthesized within the porosity metal-oxide gel matrix. With metal salt precursors a proton scavenger is used to destabilize the sol and induce gelation. With metal alkoxide precursors standard well-known sol-gel hydrolysis and condensation reactions are used. Drying is done by standard sol-gel practices, either by a slow evaporation of the liquid residing within the pores to produce a high density solid nanocomposite, or by supercritical extraction to produce a lower density, high porous nanocomposite. Other ingredients may be added to this basic nanostructure to change physical and chemical properties, which include organic constituents for binders or gas generators during reactions, burn rate modifiers, or spectral emitters.

Tillotson, Thomas M. (Tracy, CA), Simpson; Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA)

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

I n s i t u thermal oxidation for surface cleaning and mask generation prior to selective area epitaxy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry thermal oxidation of GaAs and AlAs has been carried out in an organometallic chemical vapor deposition system. This i n s i t u process performed either before or after an epitaxialgrowth serves the purposes of surface cleaning and mask generation for selective area epitaxy of various III?V semiconductors.AlAsoxidized immediately after growth and patterned for the next regrowth provides better oxide?semiconductor interfaces and minimizes wafer handling. Pre?epitaxy oxidation at 435?°C on a patterned wafer with AlAs/GaAs areas resulted in a selective oxide mask. Since thermal oxides of GaAssublime at temperatures >600?°C a 700?°C pregrowth annealing thus thermally cleans the oxidizedGaAs areas while the oxides of AlAs remain as a mask for the following regrowth. Photoluminescence results indicate that high quality regrown interfaces have been obtained.

Stephen H. Jones; Kei May Lau

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Oxidative reactions and their impact on the properties of asphalt as a pavement binder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OXIDATIVE REACTIONS AND THEIR IMPACT ON THE PROPERTIES OF ASPHALT AS A PAVE~ BINDER A Thesis by CHEE KEUNG LAU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering OXIDATIVE REACTIONS AND THEIR IMPACT ON THE PROPERTIES OF ASPHALT AS A PAVEMENT BINDER A Thesis by CHEE KEUNG LAU Approved as to style and content by: Charles J. over (Chair...

Lau, Chee Keung

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Quantitative X-ray microanalysis of submicron carbide formation in chromium (III) oxide rich scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the chemical microanalysis techniques adapted to identify the precipitates that form on the surface of, or within, the oxide scale of a Fe-22Cr ferritic steel during exposure to a carbon-monoxide rich environment at 750C for 800 hours. Examination of oxidized test coupons revealed the presence of a fiber like structure at the surface, shown in figure 1. Other studies have reported that these structures are carbon precipitates.

Collins, W.K.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Danielson, P.; Hunt, A.H

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Chemical kinetics modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Chemical sensing flow probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development DOE's chemical hydrogen storage R&D is focused on developing low-cost...

358

Syngas chemical looping gasification process: oxygen carrier particle selection and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The syngas chemical looping (SCL) process coproduces hydrogen and electricity. The process involves reducing metal oxides with syngas followed by regeneration of reduced metal oxides with steam and air in a cyclic manner. Iron oxide is determined to be a desired oxygen carrier for hydrogen production considering overall properties including oxygen carrying capacity, thermodynamic properties, reaction kinetics, physical strength, melting points, and environmental effects. An iron oxide based particle can maintain good reactivity for more than 100 reduction-oxidation (redox) cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The particle exhibits a good crushing strength (>20 MPa) and low attrition rate. Fixed bed experiments are carried out which reaffirm its reactivity. More than 99.75% of syngas is converted during the reduction stage. During the regeneration stage, hydrogen with an average purity of 99.8% is produced. 23 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Fanxing Li; Hyung Ray Kim; Deepak Sridhar; Fei Wang; Liang Zeng; Joseph Chen; L.-S. Fan [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2} separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Vibrational spectra of CO adsorbed on oxide thin films: A tool to probe the surface defects and phase changes of oxide thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of iron oxide were grown on Pt(111) single crystals using cycles of physical vapor deposition of iron followed by oxidative annealing in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus. Two procedures were utilized for film growth of ?15–30 ML thick films, where both procedures involved sequential deposition+oxidation cycles. In procedure 1, the iron oxide film was fully grown via sequential deposition+oxidation cycles, and then the fully grown film was exposed to a CO flux equivalent to 8 × 10{sup ?7} millibars, and a vibrational spectrum of adsorbed CO was obtained using infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. The vibrational spectra of adsorbed CO from multiple preparations using procedure 1 show changes in the film termination structure and/or chemical nature of the surface defects—some of which are correlated with another phase that forms (“phase B”), even before enough of phase B has formed to be easily detected using low energy electron diffraction (LEED). During procedure 2, CO vibrational spectra were obtained between deposition+oxidation cycles, and these spectra show that the film termination structure and/or chemical nature of the surface defects changed as a function of sequential deposition+oxidation cycles. The authors conclude that measurement of vibrational spectra of adsorbed CO on oxide thin films provides a sensitive tool to probe chemical changes of defects on the surface and can thus complement LEED techniques by probing changes not visible by LEED. Increased use of vibrational spectra of adsorbed CO on thin films would enable better comparisons between films grown with different procedures and by different groups.

Savara, Aditya, E-mail: savaraa@ornl.gov [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Effects of Oxygen Plasma on the Chemical Composition and Morphology of the Ru Capping Layer of the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Mask Blanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P-5B-03 The effects of oxygen plasma on the chemicalRu) mask surface after oxygen plasma treatment using surfacein the subsurface oxygen concentration, Ru oxidation and

Belau, Leonid

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

363

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Chemical & EngChemical/Engineering Materials Division | Neutron Science |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Engineering Materials Division Chemical and Engineering Materials Division SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Division CEMD Director Mike Simonson The Chemical and Engineering Materials Division (CEMD) supports neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in understanding the structure and dynamics of chemical systems and novel engineering materials. The user community takes advantage of division-supported capabilities of neutron scattering for measurements over wide ranges of experimental and operating conditions, including studies of chemical and physical changes in situ. User experiments with diffraction, small-angle scattering, inelastic and quasielastic scattering, and neutron imaging instruments address a range of problems in chemistry and in engineering materials research. Current areas of research supported by the division include the structure

368

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates have no impact on the model developed in this report.

R. Jarek

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors theory of chemical recognition, electrochemical, optical, mass sensors and data reduction. Text: J. Janata, "Principles of Chemical Sensors", 2010 Springer NOTE: GT Library purchased an e

Sherrill, David

370

High-temperature oxidation of an alumina-coated Ni-base alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alumina coatings were applied to Ni-20Cr (wt%) using combustion chemical vapor deposition (combustion CVD). Combustion CVD is an open air deposition technique performed in a flame. The oxidation kinetics of coated and uncoated specimens were measured by isothermal oxidation tests carried out in pure flowing air at temperatures of 800, 900, 1,000 and 1,100 C. The alumina coatings reduced the oxidation kinetics at all temperatures. The morphologies and compositions of the alumina coatings were characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Hendrick, M.R.; Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

3-Hydroxylysine, a Potential Marker for Studying Radical-Induced Protein Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

5-Hydroxylysines are natural products formed by lysyl oxidase and are therefore not good markers of radical-mediated oxidation. ... Free radicals are known to be generated either by normal metabolic processes during electron transport chains and redox reactions of enzymes or as a result of exposure to exogenous factors such as UV light, radiation, and various chemicals. ... As 5OHLys is a naturally occuring amino acid (present in collagen as a result of lysine oxidation by the enzyme lysyl oxidase) and 4OHLys is not fully recovered after protein hydrolysis treatment, these species are probably not useful markers for protein oxidation. ...

Bénédicte Morin; William A. Bubb; Michael J. Davies; Roger T. Dean; Shanlin Fu

1998-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

372

ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: CORROSION STUDIES RESULTS: FY2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the need to close High Level Waste storage tanks, chemical cleaning methods are needed for the removal of sludge heel materials remaining at the completion of mechanical tank cleaning efforts. Oxalic acid is considered the preferred cleaning reagent for heel dissolution of iron-based sludge. However, the large quantity of chemical reagents added to the tank farm from oxalic acid based cleaning has significant downstream impacts. Optimization of the oxalic acid cleaning process can potentially reduce the downstream impacts from chemical cleaning. To optimize oxalic acid usage, a detailed understanding of the chemistry of oxalic acid based sludge dissolution is required. Additionally, other acidic systems may be required for specific waste components that have low solubility in oxalic acid, and as a means to reduce oxalic acid usage in general. Electrochemical corrosion studies were conducted with 1 wt. % oxalic acid at mineral acid concentrations above and below the optimal conditions for this oxalic acid concentration. Testing environments included pure reagents, pure iron and aluminum phases, and sludge simulants. Mineral acid concentrations greater than 0.2 M and temperatures greater than 50 C result in unacceptably high corrosion rates. Results showed that manageable corrosion rates of carbon steel can be achieved at dilute mineral acid concentrations (i.e. less than 0.2 M) and low temperatures based on the contact times involved. Therefore, it is recommended that future dissolution and corrosion testing be performed with a dilute mineral acid and a less concentrated oxalic acid (e.g., 0.5 wt.%) that still promotes optimal dissolution. This recommendation requires the processing of greater water volumes than those for the baseline process during heel dissolution, but allows for minimization of oxalic acid additions. The following conclusions can be drawn from the test results: (1) In both nitric and sulfuric acid based reagents, the low temperature and dilute concentration environment resulted in carbon steel corrosion rates that were less than 150 mpy. These rates are manageable in that chemical cleaning processes could proceed for limited time without significant wall loss. Further optimization of the Alternative Enhance Chemical Cleaning (AECC) process should focus on testing in solutions of this dilute concentration and low temperature regime. (2) In general, for the nitric acid based reagent, the aluminum oxide phase environments resulted in higher corrosion rates than the iron oxide phase environments. (3) In general, for the sulfuric acid based reagent, the iron oxide phase environments resulted in higher corrosion rates than the aluminum oxide phase environments. (4) In general, for the nitric acid based reagent, the HM sludge simulant environments resulted in higher corrosion rates than the PUREX sludge simulant environments. This result agrees with the previous observation that the aluminum oxide phases are more aggressive than the iron oxide phase environments in the nitric acid reagent. (5) Pitting was more likely to occur in the sulfuric acid based reagents than in the nitric acid based reagents. (6) Pitting occurred only in the iron based pure oxide phases and the sludge simulants. No pitting was observed in the aluminum based pure oxide phases. (7) Pitting tended to occur more frequently in tests that involved the dilute mineral acid reagent. (8) Pitting was more severe at the higher temperature for a given mineral acid concentration. (9) Pitting was more severe at a higher mineral acid concentration for a given temperature. (10) Based on the combined results of the open circuit potential and cathodic polarization testing, there was a low propensity for hydrogen evolution in solutions where sludge has been dissolved.

Wiersma, B.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Experimental characterization and chemical kinetics study of chemical looping combustion .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is one of the most promising technologies to achieve carbon capture in fossil fuel power generation plants. A novel rotary-bed reactor… (more)

Chen, Tianjiao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

Dunning, John S. (Corvallis, OR); Alman, David E. (Salem, OR)

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NO{sub x} vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180{degrees}C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200{degrees}C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time.

Pierce, R.A.; Smith, J.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Choose the best heat-recovery method for thermal oxidizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal oxidation is current the most economically favorable add-on method of controlling hydrocarbon air emissions of moderate to low concentration (below 10,000 ppm). This concentration range covers emissions from a wide variety of chemical process industries (CPI) sources, including dryers, reactor vents, tank vents, and coaters. Thermal oxidizer systems consist of three basic sub-systems--burner, combustion chamber, and primary heat recovery. Selecting the type of primary heat recovery is probably the most important decision in the design of a thermal oxidizer, and requires consideration of a wide range of factors. The two most widely used types of primary heat recovery--recuperative and regenerative--each have distinct advantages and disadvantages. In general, recuperative oxidizers are simpler and less costly to purchase, whereas regenerative oxidizers offer substantially lower operating costs. Selecting between recuperative and regenerative heat recovery requires balancing a number of factors, such as capital and operating costs, exhaust gas composition and temperature, and secondary heat demand. This article provides guidance on when, where, and how to use each.

Klobucar, J.M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A kinetics study of the atmospheric pressure CVD reaction of silane and nitrous oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mechanistic study of oxide deposition from silane and nitrous oxide between 495{sup 0}C and 690{sup 0}C was performed in a laminar flow, cool wall reactor. Results indicate the existence of two distinct chemical pathways. At high nitrous oxide concentrations, the deposition reaction is dominated by radical chain chemistry initiated by the decomposition of N/sub 2/O. At lower N/sub 2/O concentrations, the decomposition of silane to form silylene (SiH/sub 2/) initiates the deposition. Studies of the reaction of disilane and nitrous oxide confirmed the role of SiH/sub 2/ in the deposition. Reactions involving SiH/sub 2/ are used to explain the observed growth of sub-stoichiometric oxides under low N/sub 2/O conditions.

Chapple-Sokol, J.D.; Giunta, C.J.; Gordon, R.G. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning: A New Process for Chemically Cleaning Savannah River Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) there are 49 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks that eventually must be emptied, cleaned, and closed. The current method of chemically cleaning SRS HLW tanks, commonly referred to as Bulk Oxalic Acid Cleaning (BOAC), requires about a half million liters (130,000 gallons) of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to clean a single tank. During the cleaning, the oxalic acid acts as the solvent to digest sludge solids and insoluble salt solids, such that they can be suspended and pumped out of the tank. Because of the volume and concentration of acid used, a significant quantity of oxalate is added to the HLW process. This added oxalate significantly impacts downstream processing. In addition to the oxalate, the volume of liquid added competes for the limited available tank space. A search, therefore, was initiated for a new cleaning process. Using TRIZ (Teoriya Resheniya Izobretatelskikh Zadatch or roughly translated as the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving), Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination with Ultraviolet Light (CORD-UV{reg_sign}), a mature technology used in the commercial nuclear power industry was identified as an alternate technology. Similar to BOAC, CORD-UV{reg_sign} also uses oxalic acid as the solvent to dissolve the metal (hydr)oxide solids. CORD-UV{reg_sign} is different, however, since it uses photo-oxidation (via peroxide/UV or ozone/UV to form hydroxyl radicals) to decompose the spent oxalate into carbon dioxide and water. Since the oxalate is decomposed and off-gassed, CORD-UV{reg_sign} would not have the negative downstream oxalate process impacts of BOAC. With the oxalate destruction occurring physically outside the HLW tank, re-precipitation and transfer of the solids, as well as regeneration of the cleaning solution can be performed without adding additional solids, or a significant volume of liquid to the process. With a draft of the pre-conceptual Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) flowsheet, taking full advantage of the many CORD-UV{reg_sign} benefits, performance demonstration testing was initiated using available SRS sludge simulant. The demonstration testing confirmed that ECC is a viable technology, as it can dissolve greater than 90% of the sludge simulant and destroy greater than 90% of the oxalates. Additional simulant and real waste testing are planned.

Ketusky, Edward; Spires, Renee; Davis, Neil

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Organic Particles Kevin Wilson Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Studying the Chemical Transformations of for Studying the Chemical Transformations of Organic Particles Kevin Wilson Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Molecular weight growth and decomposition chemistries play important roles in the transformation of particles from soot formation to atmospheric aerosol oxidation. Understanding these complex reaction pathways requires novel methods of analyzing particle phase hydrocarbons. We are developing a suite of synchrotron-based tools to provide better insights into the molecular composition, isomer distribution, and elemental composition of complex hydrocarbon mixtures, aimed at developing simple yet realistic descriptions of molecular weight growth and decomposition that occur during a heterogeneous reaction.

382

A quantum chemical study of ZrO2 atomic layer deposition growth reactions on the SiO2 surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum chemical study of ZrO2 atomic layer deposition growth reactions on the SiO2 surface Department, Ford Research Laboratory, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121, USA c Department of Chemistry to replace silicon oxide (SiO2) as the gate dielectric for future generation metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS

Garfunkel, Eric

383

Wet Chemical Functionalization of III–V Semiconductor Surfaces: Alkylation of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Nitride by a Grignard Reaction Sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wet Chemical Functionalization of III–V Semiconductor Surfaces: Alkylation of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Nitride by a Grignard Reaction Sequence ... These observations are consistent with the known solubility of oxidized As species in water. ... Remote H plasma exposure was effective for removing halogens and hydrocarbons from the surfaces of both nitrides at 450 °C, but was not efficient for oxide removal. ...

Sabrina L. Peczonczyk; Jhindan Mukherjee; Azhar I. Carim; Stephen Maldonado

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

Recommended inorganic chemicals for calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All analytical techniques depend on the use of calibration chemicals to relate analyte concentration to an instrumental parameter. A fundamental component in the preparation of calibration solutions is the weighing of a pure chemical or metal before preparing a solution standard. The analyst must be assured that the purity, stoichiometry, and assay of the chemical are known. These terms have different meanings, and each has an important influence. This report is intended to assist the analyst in the selection and use of chemical standards for instrumental calibration. Purity, stoichiometry, and preparation of solutions for different purposes are discussed, and a critical evaluation of the best materials available for each element is presented for use in preparing solutions or calibration standards. Information on the chemical form, source, purity, drying, and appropriate precautions is given. In some cases, multiple sources or chemical forms are available. Certain radioactive elements, the transuranic elements, and the noble gases are not considered.

Moody, J.R.; Greenberg, R.R.; Pratt, K.W.; Rains, T.C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Effect of Natural Gas Fuel Addition on the Oxidation of Fuel Cell Anode Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anode exhaust gas from a fuel cell commonly has a fuel energy density between 15 and 25% that of the fuel supply, due to the incomplete oxidation of the input fuel. This exhaust gas is subsequently oxidized (catalytically or non-catalytically), and the resultant thermal energy is often used elsewhere in the fuel cell process. Alternatively, additional fuel can be added to this stream to enhance the oxidation of the stream, for improved thermal control of the power plant, or to adjust the temperature of the exhaust gas as may be required in other specialty co-generation applications. Regardless of the application, the cost of a fuel cell system can be reduced if the exhaust gas oxidation can be accomplished through direct gas phase oxidation, rather than the usual catalytic oxidation approach. Before gas phase oxidation can be relied upon however, combustor design requirements need to be understood. The work reported here examines the issue of fuel addition, primarily as related to molten-carbonate fuel cell technology. It is shown experimentally that without proper combustor design, the addition of natural gas can readily quench the anode gas oxidation. The Chemkin software routines were used to resolve the mechanisms controlling the chemical quenching. It is found that addition of natural gas to the anode exhaust increases the amount of CH3 radicals, which reduces the concentration of H and O radicals and results in decreased rates of overall fuel oxidation.

Randall S. Gemmen; Edward H. Robey, Jr.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical features of Nanoparticle Research 14, 10 (2012) 1143" DOI : 10.1007/s11051-012-1143-7 #12;2 Abstract Silicon carbide, and of the oxidation state of the surface on cellular H2O2 production. Keywords silicon carbide nanoparticles, laser

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

Chem. Mater. 1995, 7, 2269-2272 2269 Water Vapor Adsorption on Chemically Treated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chem. Mater. 1995, 7, 2269-2272 2269 Water Vapor Adsorption on Chemically Treated Activated Carbon August 25, 1995@ Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon cloth (ACCBO)which has been oxidized% Cl), and ACCBO (4% N), exhibits sigmoidal isotherms with hysteresis loops of varying magnitudes

Cal, Mark P.

389

Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involves both experimental and modeling efforts. The team is comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective is to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters to be studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. This report summarizes Year 2 results for the experimental and modeling tasks. Experiments in the mercury reactor are underway and interesting results suggested that a more comprehensive look at catalyzed surface reactions was needed. Therefore, much of the work has focused on the heterogeneous reactions. In addition, various chemical kinetic models have been explored in an attempt to explain some discrepancies between this modeling effort and others.

JoAnn S. Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Andrew Fry; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Chemical Engineering | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Engineering Materials Clean Energy Nuclear Sciences Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Engineering SHARE Engineering Engineering at ORNL is integrated with nearly all of the scientific research areas and user facilities. In particular, ORNL has core capabilities chemical engineering and systems engineering. Chemical engineering moves knowledge gained from fundamental chemical research toward applications. For example, this capability supports the development of fuel reprocessing techniques and enables radioisotope production, isotope separation, and development of isotope applications. This capacity also contributes to advances in energy efficiency, renewable

391

FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

392

Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Beauchamp, R.O. Jr. [Center for Information on Toxicology and Environment, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Light with nonzero chemical potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic states and processes involving light are discussed in which the chemical potential of light is nonzero. Light with nonzero chemical potential is produced in photochemical reactions for example in a light emitting diode. The chemical potential of black-body radiation becomes negative upon a Joule expansion. The isothermal diffusion of light which is a common phenomenon is driven by the gradient in the chemical potential. These and other examples support the idea that light can be interpreted as a gas of photons with properties similar to a material gas.

F. Herrmann; P. Würfel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

395

Anodic oxidation of zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The anodic polarization of zircaloy-2 in different electrolytic baths has been investigated in order to obtain thick oxide films with properties suitable for wear applications.

A. Conte; A. Borello; A. Cabrini

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

INCOMPATIBLE CHEMICAL LIST PRUDENT PRACTICES FOR HANDLING CHEMICALS IN LABORATORIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tetrachloride or other chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide, halogens Ammonia (anhydrous) Mercury (in oxidizing agents Carbon tetrachloride Sodium Chlorates Ammonium salts, acids, powdered metals, sulfur tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Potassium chlorate Sulfuric and other acids Potassium perchlorate (see also

Cho, Junghyun

397

ChemicalChemical StratigraphyStratigraphy Oxygen, Carbon, Strontium,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/25/2009 1 ChemicalChemical StratigraphyStratigraphy Oxygen, Carbon, Strontium, Sulphur Isotopes Change. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department evolves over time, with the geological time line running from right to left in this graph. The increased

Miami, University of

398

A Mechanistic Study of Chemically Modified Inorganic Membranes for Gas and Liquid Separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report will summarize the progress made during the period August 1, 1993 - October 31, 2010 with support from DOE grant number DE-FG03-93ER14363. The objectives of the research have been to investigate the transport mechanisms in micro- and mesoporous, metal oxide membranes and to examine the relationship between the microstructure of the membrane, the membrane surface chemistry, and the separation performance of the membrane. Examples of the membrane materials under investigation are the microporous silica hollow fiber membrane manufactured by PPG Industries, chemically modified mesoporous oxide membranes, and polymer membranes containing microporous oxides (mixed matrix membranes). Analytical techniques such as NMR, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and gas adsorption were used to investigate membrane microstructure and to probe the chemical interactions occurring at the gas-membrane interface.

Way, J Douglas

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

Repasky, John Michael

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Coal Direct Chemical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants with In-Situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005289 Ohio State chemical looping metal carrier. Ohio State chemical looping metal carrier. The Ohio State University Research Foundation will further develop coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) technology. CDCL uses a patented iron oxide-based composite oxygen carrier and can be retrofit to existing coal-fired power plants. The development of the CDCL system will be conducted through experimental testing under bench- and sub-pilot scales. Related Papers and Publications: Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture [PDF-2.43MB] (July 2013) Presented by Samuel Bayham of the Ohio State University Research Foundation at the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Salt-stone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method - 13092  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cementitious waste forms can be designed to chemically stabilize selected contaminants, such as Tc{sup +7} and Cr{sup +6}, by chemically reduction to lower valance states, Tc{sup +4} and Cr{sup +3}, respectively, and precipitation of these species in alkaline media as low solubility solid phases. Data for oxidation of this type of cementitious waste form cured under field conditions as a function of time is required for predicting the performance of the waste form and disposal facility. The rate of oxidation (oxidation front advancement) is an important parameter for predicting performance because the solubilities of some radionuclide contaminants, e.g., technetium, are a function of the oxidation state. A non-radioactive experiment was designed for quantifying the oxidation front advancement using chromium, as an approximate redox-sensitive surrogate (Cr{sup +6} / Cr{sup +3}) for technetium (Tc{sup +7} / Tc{sup +4}). Nonradioactive cementitious waste forms were prepared in the laboratory and cured under both laboratory and 'field conditions'. Laboratory conditions were ambient temperature and sealed sample containers. Field conditions were approximated by curing samples in open containers which were placed inside a plastic container stored outdoors at SRS. The container had a lid and was instrumented with temperature and humidity probes. Sub-samples as thin as 0.2 mm were taken as a function of distance from the exposed surface of the as-cast sample. The sub-samples were leached and the leachates were analyzed for chromium, nitrate, nitrite and sodium. Nitrate, nitrite, and sodium concentrations were used to provide baseline data because these species are not chemically retained in the waste form matrix to any significant extent and are not redox sensitive. 'Effective' oxidation fronts for Cr were measured for samples containing 1000, 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr added as soluble sodium chromate, Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. For a sample cured for 129 days under field conditions, leachable Cr (assumed to be the oxidized form, i.e., Cr{sup +6} was detected in the top 15 to 20 mm of the sample spiked with 1000 mg/kg Cr. Below about 20 mm, the Cr concentrations in leachates were below the detection limit (< 0.010 mg/L) which indicates that the oxidation as the result of exposure to air was limited to the top 20 mm of the sample after exposure for 129 days and that the bulk of the waste form was not affected, i.e., the Cr was stabilized and insoluble. For samples cured in the laboratory, leachable Cr was detected in the top 8 mm of the Cr 1000 sample cured in the laboratory for 37 days. Between 8 and 14 mm, the concentration Cr in the leachate dropped by a factor of about 20 to just above the detection limit. These depth of penetration results indicate that the rate of advancement of the oxidation front for samples spiked with 1000 mg/kg Cr cured under 'field conditions' for 129 days is less than that for the sample cured in the laboratory for 37 days, i.e., 0.156 and 0.216 mm/day, respectively. Additional data are presented for samples spiked with 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr. In summary, cementitious waste forms are porous solids with a network of interconnected pores ranging in diameter from 10 E-10 m to greater than a few mm. The oxidation process is assumed to occur as the result of oxygen transport through the interconnected porosity which may be filled with air, aqueous salt solution, or both. Upon oxidation, the Cr becomes soluble and can be transported in solution through aqueous pore fluid or leachate. (authors)

Langton, C.A.; Stefanko, D.B.; Burns, H.H. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Catalytic wet oxidation of phenolic wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possible catalyst deactivation problems High capital, low operating Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) Feasible only at high organic concentra- tions High Fast reaction, complete oxidation Severe reaction conditions, canosion problems... of milder reaction conditions and is much less energy intensive. Thus, catalytic wet oxidation would be an alternative to solvent extraction, supercritical water oxidation, homogeneous oxidation, and incineration. It should also be feasible at low...

Thomas, Brook James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Low Temperature Constrained Sintering of Cerium Gadolinium Oxide Films for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, In: S.C. Singhal and M.solidoxide.html, Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology,Oxide Films for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications by Jason

Nicholas, Jason.D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

November 2006 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 LABORATORY-SPECIFIC SAFETY PLANS 4.5 LABORATORY SAFETY AUDITS 4.6 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN REVIEW 5.0 LABORATORYNovember 2006 1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (November 2006) Department of Chemistry Vanderbilt University #12;November 2006 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION 2.0 THE LABORATORY STANDARD 3.0 SCOPE AND APPLICATION 4

Bordenstein, Seth

405

MATLAB Applications in Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB® Applications in Chemical Engineering James A. Carnell North Carolina State University MATLAB is a powerful code-based mathematical and engineering calculation program. It performs all introduction to MATLAB in chemical engineering, and in no way attempts to be a comprehensive MATLAB learning

Al-Juhani, Abdulhadi A.

406

Published: September 06, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 15264 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja205693t |J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 1526415267  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published: September 06, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 15264 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja205693t Graphene Oxide Network for Chemical Sensing Tae Hee Han, Yi-Kai Huang, Alvin T. L. Tan, Vinayak P. Dravid sensor platform for NO2 detection. The results underscore the efficacy of the highly distributed

Huang, Jiaxing

407

Metal oxide films on metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ethylene Oxide for Soil Sterilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , this method may be time-consuming, and in view of the physical properties of ethylene oxide (solubility in water and boiling point 12-5 C.) it was considered ... consists of making up an aqueous solution to supply 2 or 4 c.c. of ethylene oxide in a given amount of water, using pre-chilled glassware and water. The ...

R. E. ROSE; R. W. BAILEY

1952-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Chemical analysis quality assurance at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is a uranium reprocessing facility operated by Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company for the Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The chemical analysis support required for the plant processes is provided by a chemical analysis staff of 67 chemists, analysts, and support personnel. The documentation and defense of the chemical analysis data at the ICPP has evolved into a complete chemical analysis quality assurance program with training/qualification and requalification, chemical analysis procedures, records management and chemical analysis methods quality control as major elements. The quality assurance procedures are implemented on a central analytical computer system. The individual features provided by the computer system are automatic method selection for process streams, automation of method calculations, automatic assignment of bias and precision estimates at analysis levels to all method results, analyst specific daily requalification or with-method-use requalification, untrained or unqualified analyst method lockout, statistical testing of process stream results for replicate agreement, automatic testing of process results against pre-established operating, safety, or failure limits at varying confidence levels, and automatic transfer and report of analysis data plus the results of all statistical testing to the Production Department.

Hand, R.L.; Anselmo, R.W.; Black, D.B.; Jacobson, J.J.; Lewis, L.C.; Marushia, P.C.; Spraktes, F.W.; Zack, N.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ultrathin amorphous zinc-tin-oxide buffer layer for enhancing heterojunction interface quality in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-abundant, non-toxic, and air-stable materials represent a promising class of photovoltaic (PV) devices for cost-effective manufacturing. Earth- abundant metal-oxide semiconductors comprise an attractive set of materials for photovoltaic applications, given their auspicious optoelec- tronic properties and chemical

412

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Chemical composition of exhaust from aircraft turbine engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports measurement of the chemical composition of exhaust from two aircraft tubing engines. The two engines are the F101, used on the B-1B aircraft, and the F110, used on the F-16C and F-16D aircraft. Samples were collected from each engine using a probe positioned just behind the exhaust nozzle. The measurements reported her were made at four power settings from idle to intermediate power. Exhaust composition measurements included carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, total hydrocarbons, and individual organic species. The principle focus of this paper is on the detailed organic species results.

Spicer, C.W.; Holdren, M.W.; Smith, D.L. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (US)); Hughes, D.P. (Tinker AFB, Oklahoma City, OK (US)); Smith, M.D. (Environics Div., Tyndall AFB, Panama City, FL (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation.

Heath, William O. (Richland, WA); Virden, Jr., Judson W. (Richland, WA); Richardson, R. L. (West Richland, WA); Bergsman, Theresa M. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation. 4 figures.

Heath, W.O.; Virden, J.W. Jr.; Richardson, R.L.; Bergsman, T.M.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Investigation of Gasification Chemical Looping Combustion Combined Cycle Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combining CLC with a gas turbine combined cycle offers a novel power generation technique with high efficiency and CO2 separation. ... Here, we have developed looping materials based on the integration of NiO, as solid reactants, with a composite metal oxide of NiAl2O4, as a binder, leading to a significant role in improving reaction rate, conversion, and regenerability in cyclic reaction in this combustor, compared with the other materials. ... Chemical looping combustion for combined cycles with CO2 capture. ...

Wenguo Xiang; Sha Wang; Tengteng Di

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

Predicted Thermochemistry for Chemical Conversion of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermochemistry of various chemical transformations of 5-hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) were investigated using highly accurate Gaussian-4 (G4) theory. The conversion of HMF to nonane through aldol condensation, hydrogenation, and hydrogenolysis reactions was found to be thermodynamically favorable. The hydrogenation reactions involving the keto groups in the nonane reaction sequence were found to be enhanced at low temperatures and high pressures of H2. The hydrogenation, selective oxidation, and hydration of HMF were also found to be thermodynamically favorable. Gas phase enthalpies of formation of all the intermediate compounds were calculated at the G4 level of theory and compared against existing experimental data.

Assary, Rajeev S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

post-Doping of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes,? P.h.D.and V. I. Birss, in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC IX), S. C.Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes By Tal Zvi

Sholklapper, Tal Zvi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Detection of oxidation in human serum lipoproteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for the oxidation of lipoproteins in vitro was developed using the free radical initiator, 2,2?-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Following in vitro oxidation, the susceptibility to oxidation of the serum samples...

Myers, Christine Lee

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Commercialization of the Iron Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping Process for Power Production with in situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0009761 CDLC Process Concept CDLC Process Concept (click to enlarge) Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W) is developing the coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) process. The CDCL process consists of a unique moving bed reactor - the reducer - where pulverized coal is fully converted using iron-based oxygen carriers. The oxygen carrier is reduced from Fe2O3 to FeO/Fe and the flue gas is a concentrated stream of CO2 that is available for storage or beneficial use. The reduced FeO/Fe is oxidized to Fe2O3 using air in the combustor, liberating heat to produce steam for a

422

Theoretical Adiabatic Temperature and Chemical Composition of Sodium Combustion Flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium fire safety analysis requires fundamental combustion properties, e.g., heat of combustion, flame temperature, and composition. We developed the GENESYS code for a theoretical investigation of sodium combustion flame.Our principle conclusions on sodium combustion under atmospheric air conditions are (a) the maximum theoretical flame temperature is 1950 K, and it is not affected by the presence of moisture; the uppermost limiting factor is the chemical instability of the condensed sodium-oxide products under high temperature; (b) the main combustion product is liquid Na{sub 2}O in dry air condition and liquid Na{sub 2}O with gaseous NaOH in moist air; and (c) the chemical equilibrium prediction of the residual gaseous reactants in the flame is indispensable for sodium combustion modeling.

Okano, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Akira [O-arai Engineering Center (Japan)

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ternary Cobalt Spinel Oxides for Solar Driven Hydrogen Production: Theory and Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discovery of a chemically stable, light absorbing and low resistivity metal oxide with band edges aligned to the water redox potentials has been a goal of physical scientists for the past forty years. Despite an immense amount of effort, no solution has been uncovered. We present a combined theoretical and experimental exploration of a series of unconventional ternary cobalt spinel oxides, which offer chemical functionality through substitution on the octahedral spinel B site. First-principles predictions of the substitution of group 13 cations (Al, Ga, In) in Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} to form a series of homologous CoX{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel compounds are combined with experimental synthesis and photoelectrochemical characterization. Ultimately, while tunable band gaps in the visible range can be obtained, the material performance is limited by poor carrier transport properties associated with small polaron carriers. Future design pathways for metal oxide exploration are discussed.

Walsh, A.; Ahn, K. S.; Shet, S.; Huda, M. N.; Deutsch, T. G.; Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.; Wei, S. H.; Yan, Y.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

New manganese catalyst for light alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aluminophosphates containing manganese in the structural framework are employed for the oxidation of alkanes, for example the vapor phase oxidation of methane to methanol.

Durante, Vincent A. (West Chester, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Walker, Darrell W. (Visalia, CA); Marcus, Bonita K. (Radnor, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Technological Center

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heng Ban Heng Ban Principal Investigator University of Alabama at Birmingham 1150 10th Avenue South Birmingham, AL 35294-4461 205-934-0011 hban@uab.edu Environmental and Water Resources OxidatiOn Of Mercury in PrOducts Of cOal cOMbustiOn Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. A variety of mercury reduction technologies are under commercial development, but an improved understanding of the fundamental chemical mechanisms that control the transformations and capture of mercury in boilers and pollution control devices is required to achieve necessary performance and cost reduction levels. Oxidized mercury is more easily captured by pollution control devices, such as Selective

427

Apparatus and method for stabilization or oxidation of polymeric materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere at a selected temperature; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of ozone-containing gas, which decomposes at the selected temperature yielding at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at the selected temperature. The ozone may be generated by a plasma discharge or by various chemical processes. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments as well as to make flame-retardant fabrics.

Paulauskas, Felix L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Sherman, Daniel M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

Thermo Physical Properties of Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are energy conversion devices that convert chemical energy to electrical energy with high efficiency and have the added advantage of least production of pollutants during their operation. SOFCs comprise of a number of components such as the anode the electrolyte the cathode and the interconnect. Each of these components is made of a different material with different thermophysical and electrical properties. Thermal expansion coefficient is one of the most important properties of these compounds. Various components should have matching thermal expansion behaviour to avoid cracking during thermal cycling and for long term operation of SOFCs. In this article the thermophysical properties of materials for solid oxide fuel cells will be discussed with special emphasize on their thermal expansion behaviour.

S. R. Bharadwaj

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Neutron Sciences - Electrode Material for Solid-oxide Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theory meets experiment: structure-property relationships in an electrode Theory meets experiment: structure-property relationships in an electrode material for solid-oxide fuel cells Research Contact: Ana B. Munoz-Garcia December 2012, Written by Agatha Bardoel Fuel cell technology is one potentially very efficient and environmentally friendly way to convert the chemical energy of fuels into electricity. Solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) can convert a wide variety of fuels with simpler, cheaper designs than those used in liquid electrolyte cells. Using the Powder Diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, researchers experimentally characterized the promising new SOFC electrode material strontium iron molybdenum oxide─Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5O6-δ (SFMO). Combining the experimental results with insights from theory showed that the crystal structure is distorted from the ideal cubic simple perovskite

430

Thermochemical Solar Energy Storage Via Redox Oxides: Materials and Reactor/Heat Exchanger Concepts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermochemical Storage of solar heat exploits the heat effects of reversible chemical reactions for the storage of solar energy. Among the possible reversible gas-solid chemical reactions, the utilization of a pair of redox reactions of multivalent solid oxides can be directly coupled to CSP plants employing air as the heat transfer fluid bypassing the need for a separate heat exchanger. The present work concerns the development of thermochemical storage systems based on such oxide-based redox materials and in particular on cobalt oxide; in the one hand by tailoring their heat storage/release capability and on the other hand via their incorporation in proper reactor/heat exchanger devices. In this respect the first stage of the work involved parametric testing of cobalt oxide compositions via Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis to comparatively investigate the temperature range for cyclic oxidation-reduction and optimize the cycle conditions for maximum reduction and re-oxidation extent. Subsequently, two reactor concepts for the coupling of solar energy to the redox reactions have been implemented and tested. These reactor concepts include in one hand structured ceramic reactors/heat exchangers based on redox-oxide-coated honeycombs and on the other hand powder-fed, solar-heated, rotary kiln reactors. The two reactor concepts were tested within non-solar-aided lab-scale and solar- aided campaigns, respectively. The feasibility of both concepts was shown and good chemical conversions were achieved. The experiments pointed out the challenging points related to the manufacture of pilot-scale reactors/heat exchangers with enhanced heat storage capacity. A numerical model using commercial CFD software is developed to define optimal geometrical characteristics and operating conditions and refine the pilot scale design in order to achieve efficient, long-term off-sun operation.

S. Tescari; C. Agrafiotis; S. Breuer; L. de Oliveira; M. Neises-von Puttkamer; M. Roeb; C. Sattler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

New Science for Chemicals Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the State-of-the-Science of Endocrine Disruptors (WHO,461, 472 (2009). 17. NRC, Science and Decisions: AdvancingPOLICYFORUM SCIENCE AND REGULATION New Science for Chemicals

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chemical Conversions of Natural Precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many products from the flavour industry are primary products from renewable resources or secondary products obtained by chemical conversions of the primary products. In general these secondary products are key...

Peter H. van der Schaft

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Genotoxicity of complex chemical mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies, specifically on carbon monoxide. Schmiedeberg focused on liver and its detoxification mechanisms. Lewin?s work included chronic toxicity of narcotics, along with toxicity of chemicals such as methanol, glycerol, acrolein and chloroform...

Phillips, Tracie Denise

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

Jubin, R.T.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| under AEC Contract A T (30-1)-3780 " â–  ' Annual Report (1970) Principal In-vestigator: Martin Karpins Institution: Harvard University The research performed under this contract can best be sunmarized under several headings. (a) Alkali-Halideg Alkali-Halide (MX^ M*X*) Exchange Reactions. This project is being continued. A careful study of certain

436

Process for the conversion of and aqueous biomass hydrolyzate into fuels or chemicals by the selective removal of fermentation inhibitors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of making a fuel or chemical from a biomass hydrolyzate is provided which comprises the steps of providing a biomass hydrolyzate, adjusting the pH of the hydrolyzate, contacting a metal oxide having an affinity for guaiacyl or syringyl functional groups, or both and the hydrolyzate for a time sufficient to form an adsorption complex; removing the complex wherein a sugar fraction is provided, and converting the sugar fraction to fuels or chemicals using a microorganism.

Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Sluiter, Amie D. (Arvada, CO); Hayward, Tammy K. (Broomfield, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Broomfield, CO)

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fifty-Year Trends in the Chemical Industry: What Do They Mean for Chemical Education?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fifty-Year Trends in the Chemical Industry: What Do They Mean for Chemical Education? ... Environmental Chemistry ...

George W. Parshall; Chadwick A. Tolman

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Doped LaFeO3 as SOFC Catalysts: Control of Oxygen Mobility Oxidation Activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bulk structure and surface properties of Fe-based perovskite-type oxides with the formula La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-{delta}} for y = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 have been investigated. The properties were found to strongly depend upon Co content, temperature, and environment. The materials were selected due to their potential use as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The intermediate Co loading formed oxygen vacancies most easily and several other properties including oxidation activity and surface sites showed a similar non-linear trend. Trends are related to a possible transition in electronic structure. Activity for oxidation of methane, oxygen storage and chemical compatibility was shown to be superior to that of the La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3}.

N Lakshminarayanan; J Kuhn; S Rykov; J Millet; U Ozkan; T Rao; J Smedley; E Wang; E Muller; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Tantalum–tungsten oxide thermite composites prepared by sol–gel synthesis and spark plasma sintering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energetic composite powders consisting of sol–gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition-tested and the results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High-Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol–gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol–gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta–WO3) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g cm?3 or 93% relative density. In addition, those samples were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus retaining their stored chemical energy.

Joshua D. Kuntz; Octavio G. Cervantes; Alexander E. Gash; Zuhair A. Munir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Single crystal oxide and oxide/oxide eutectic fibres for high temperature composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The utilisation of fibre-reinforced metal, intermetallic and ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) in gas turbine engines offers the potential of improved fuel efficiency, higher operating temperature and greater thrust to weight ratio. The development of ceramic fibres with high strength, excellent strength retention at elevated temperatures and good creep resistance is essential to the successful implementation of composites in various high temperature components. Several single crystal oxide and oxide/oxide eutectic fibres have been developed to meet the demanding performance requirements. Recent progress made on developing these fibers will be discussed.

J.-M. Yang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ? Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ? Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ? Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer [Departamento de Química, CCE, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Campus Goiabeiras, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil)] [Departamento de Química, CCE, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Campus Goiabeiras, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Porto, Arilza de Oliveira, E-mail: arilzaporto@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Magela de Lima, Geraldo [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Paniago, Roberto [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Ardisson, José Domingos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Studies of oxidized hexagonal SiC surfaces and the  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of recent photoemission studies of oxidation of hexagonal SiC surfaces and SiO2/SiC interfaces are reviewed and discussed. These investigations have focused on two main questions thought to have a significant effect on MOS device characteristics: the existence of carbon clusters or carbon-containing by-products and the existence of sub-oxides at the SiO2/SiC interface. The presentation is focused on Si-terminated surfaces of hexagonal n-type SiC(0001) crystals since they to date have been considered the most promising for device applications. The results reviewed show that no carbon clusters or carbon-containing by-product can be detected at the interface of in situ or ex situ grown samples with an oxide layer thickness larger than about 10 Å. Since the presence of carbon clusters was suggested in a recent scanning microscopy study it appears that they may exist, possibly depending on the sample preparation method used, but in such low concentrations that they are not detectable using photoemission. The presence of sub-oxides at the SiO2/SiC interface has been revealed in recorded Si 2p core level spectra by several groups. The results were not unanimous, however. The number of sub-oxides present and the shifts reported were different. The results of a recent study including also the Si 1s core level and Si KLL Auger transitions are therefore examined. These together with earlier Si 2p data show the presence of only one sub-oxide, assigned to Si1+ oxidation states, besides the fully developed SiO2 (Si4+). Possible reasons for the differences obtained earlier are discussed. That the sub-oxide is located at the interface is concluded from the relative intensity variations observed for the different components versus electron emission angle. An oxide thickness dependence of the SiO2 chemical shift in the core levels and Auger transitions is shown, similar to but smaller in magnitude than the thickness dependence revealed earlier for SiO2/Si. On cooled SiC(0001) substrates, adsorption of metastable molecular oxygen is suggested to occur in the initial oxidation stage like on the Si(111)-7 ? 7 surface. Oxidation results from the C-terminated surface and some preliminary results for the non-polar and surfaces are included and they show distinct differences both as regards the sub-oxides present and the amount of carbon-containing by-products at the interface in the initial oxidation stage compared to the Si-terminated SiC(0001) surface.

C Virojanadara; L I Johansson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Sandia National Laboratories: MOgene Green Chemicals LLC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MOgene Green Chemicals LLC Sandia to Partner with MOgene Green Chemicals on ARPA-E REMOTE Project On October 2, 2013, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Research &...

445

Chemical Safety Program - Library | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Standard Safe Management of Mercury DOE Documents & Guidelines Chemical Management Handbook Volumes 1 -3 DOE Handbook, "Chemical Process Hazards Analysis," DOE-HDBK-1100-2004,...

446

PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Hydride Capabilities PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

447

Chemical Safety Program | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This content is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify...

448

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport of Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy for Power Generation Chemically Reactive Working Fluids SunShot CSP...

449

Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Developing chemical kinetic mechanisms and applying them to simulating engine combustion processes. deer09aceves.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on...

450

Tribo-Chemical Modeling of Copper CMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRIBO-CHEMICAL MODELING OF COPPER CMP Shantanu Tripathi 1 ,Technical Area: CMP (Copper) Abstract We are developing antribo-chemical model of copper CMP that considers abrasive

Tripathi, Shantanu; Doyle, Fiona; Dornfeld, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF TEXAS CITY CHEMICALS, INC.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1956, when the Texas City Chemicals Company went bankrupt. The plant was purchased by Smith-Douglas Company, a Division of Borden Chemical Company, Bordon, Inc. From information...

452

Correlation Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition Of Sputter-deposited Germanium Cxide (GeOx) Films . Correlation Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition Of...

453

Interfacial electrochemistry of pyrite oxidation and flotation. 1: Effect of borate on pyrite surface oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interfacial chemistry of pyrite is of great industrial importance in complex sulfide ore flotation, coal desulfurization, acid mine drainage mitigation, and conversion of solar energy to electrical or chemical energy. Sodium tetraborate (Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) has been widely used as an electrolyte and pH buffer in studying the interfacial electrochemistry of sulfide minerals in relation to sulfide mineral flotation. In all the previous studies published so far, borate was regarded as an inert electrolyte/pH buffer, and its reactions with the sulfide minerals were completely overlooked. In this first part of this series papers, the complicating effects of borate on the interfacial electrochemistry of pyrite have been studied. In the borate solutions, the surface oxidation of pyrite is strongly enhanced. The first and rate-determining step of the reaction between borate and pyrite has been shown to be the following irreversible reaction: FeS{sub 2} + B(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} {yields} FeS{sub 2} {hor_ellipsis} [B(OH){sub 4}]{sub ads} + e. This reaction appears in the voltammogram as an anodic oxidation peak at potentials of more than 0.4 V lower than the commencement of pyrite oxidation in sodium perchlorate or nitrate electrolyte solutions. As the borate concentration increases, the peak current increases linearly, while the peak potential shifts positively at 240 mV per decade. On a rotating-disc electrode, the peak becomes a plateau. The limiting current density is a linear function of the square root of the rotation speed at relatively low rotation speeds. The Tafel slope is close to 240 mV per decade and is independent of the rotation speed and borate concentration. The results indicate that charge transfer coefficient is 0.25.

Wang, X.H. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

454

DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL’s test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. This model is under continued development. It shows that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, within the electrolyte. The chemical potential within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just under the oxygen electrode (anode)/electrolyte interface, leading to electrode delamination. This theory is being further refined and tested by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. V. Virkar

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL's test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. This model is under continued development. It shows that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, within the electrolyte. The chemical potential within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just under the oxygen electrode (anode)/electrolyte interface, leading to electrode delamination. This theory is being further refined and tested by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte.

M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. Virkar

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 .mu.m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO.sub.3 ; and then indurating it at 800.degree. to 900.degree. C. for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

Gupta, Raghubir P. (Durham, NC); Gangwal, Santosh K. (Durham, NC); Jain, Suresh C. (Morgantown, WV)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Rapid thermal oxidation of silicon in mixtures of oxygen and nitrous oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation in nitrous oxide by conventional hot wall furnace processing and by rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) has been a subject of much interest in recent years. RTO is a fundamentally different process than furnace oxidation, however, and the full effects of this type of processing on the oxidation kinetics are not well understood. Oxidation of silicon by RTO at a variety of pressures, temperatures, and oxidation gas mixtures has been studied. Although at lower temperatures (< 850 C) the atmospheric pressure oxidation rate in nitrous oxide is very close to that in oxygen, at higher temperatures the oxidation rate in nitrous oxide is much lower than that in oxygen. At lower pressures in a RTO process, the oxidation rate in nitrous oxide is higher than that in oxygen. The effect of the nitrogen incorporated in the oxide acting as a diffusion barrier has been proposed as the mechanism of temperature dependence for atmospheric pressure oxidation in nitrous oxide. This does not explain the effects seen at lower pressure,s however, The authors propose that some of the intermediate species produced in the decomposition of nitrous oxide into molecular nitrogen, molecular oxygen, and nitric oxide play a role in the initial stages of oxidation by RTO in nitrous oxide.

Grant, J.M.; Karim, Z. [Sharp Microelectronics Technology, Inc., Camas, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM A. Faes1. C. Singhal, K. Kendall, High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell - Fundamentals, Design, Denmark antonin.faes@epfl.ch Keywords: In situ ETEM, nickel oxide, reduction, RedOx, SOFC Solid Oxide Fuel

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

459

Chemical degradation of fluorosulfonamide fuel cell membrane polymer model compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane, along with high proton conductivity and mechanical performance is critical to the success of these energy conversion devices. Extending our work in perfluorinated membrane stability, aromatic trifluoromethyl sulfonamide model compounds were prepared, and their oxidative degradation was examined. The chemical structures for the models were based on mono-, di- and tri-perfluorinated sulfonamide modified phenyl rings. Durability of the model compounds was evaluated by exposure to hydroxyl radicals generated using Fenton reagent and UV irradiation of hydrogen peroxide. LC–MS results for the mono-substituted model compound indicate greater stability to radical oxidation than the di-substituted species; loss of perfluorinated fonamide side chains appears to be an important pathway, along with dimerization and aromatic ring hydroxylation. The tri-substituted model compound also shows loss of side chains, with the mono-substituted compound being a major oxidation product, along with a limited amount of hydroxylation and dimerization of the starting material.

Jamela M. Alsheheri; Hossein Ghassemi; David A. Schiraldi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "m-area chemical oxidation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

462

Plasmonic transparent conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a doped oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the doped oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The doped metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.18/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at a temperature of 25.degree. C. The optical response of the doped oxide materials results from the high carrier concentration of the doped metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration. These changes in effective carrier densities of conducting metal oxide nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary doped metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Electronically conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a conducting oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the conducting oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The conducting metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.17/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.-1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at the gas stream temperature. The optical response of the conducting oxide materials is proposed to result from the high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity of the conducting metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity. These changes in effective carrier densities and electronic conductivity of conducting metal oxide films and nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary conducting metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Novel Solar Energy Conversion Materials by Design of Mn(II) Oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar energy conversion materials need to fulfill simultaneously a number of requirements in regard of their band-structure, optical properties, carrier transport, and doping. Despite their desirable chemical properties, e.g., for photo-electrocatalysis, transition-metal oxides usually do not have desirable semiconducting properties. Instead, oxides with open cation d-shells are typically Mott or charge-transfer insulators with notoriously poor transport properties, resulting from large effective electron/hole masses or from carrier self-trapping. Based on the notion that the electronic structure features (p-d interaction) supporting the p-type conductivity in d10 oxides like Cu2O and CuAlO2 occurs in a similar fashion also in the d5 (high-spin) oxides, we recently studied theoretically the band-structure and transport properties of the prototypical binary d5 oxides MnO and Fe2O3 [PRB 85, 201202(R)]. We found that MnO tends to self-trap holes by forming Mn+III, whereas Fe2O3 self-traps electrons by forming Fe+II. However, the self-trapping of holes is suppressed by when Mn is tetrahedrally coordinated, which suggests specific routes to design novel solar conversion materials by considering ternary Mn(II) oxides or oxide alloys. We are presenting theory, synthesis, and initial characterization for these novel energy materials.

Lany, S.; Peng, H.; Ndione, P.; Zakutayev, A.; Ginley, D. S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermodynamic Analysis of Syngas Production via the Solar Thermochemical Cerium Oxide Redox Cycle with Methane-Driven Reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Analysis of Syngas Production via the Solar Thermochemical Cerium Oxide Redox Cycle with Methane-Driven Reduction ... Of particular interest is the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds via the splitting of water and carbon dioxide to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide, referred to collectively as syngas. ... The coupled cycle produces high-quality syngas by the partial oxidation of methane in the ceria reduction step in addition to the carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by splitting carbon dioxide and water in the oxidation step. ...

Peter T. Krenzke; Jane H. Davidson

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

The use of HPTLC and Direct Analysis in Real Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (DART-TOF-MS) for rapid analysis of degradation by oxidation and sonication of an azo dye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-oxidation of an azo dye, methyl red sodium salt (MRSS) as a model compound. Initial and final UV-Vis spectra showed of pollutants in wastewater. These effluents may cause environmental, visual and chemical pollution. Amongst

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

467

Propagation of Uncertainty in Chemically Activated Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

represent the principal pathways of the radical conversion in many hydrocarbon oxidation and combustion processes. Low- temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons ( 800 K) is critically important in their use as fuels

Androulakis, Ioannis (Yannis)

468

Chemical Science | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Science Chemical Science Chemical Science Plant fatty acids are used in a vast range of products, from polymers to plastics and soaps to industrial feed stocks -- making up an estimated $150 billion market annually. A new discovery of inserting double bonds in the fatty acids could show the way to the designer production of plant fatty acids, and, in turn, to new industrial applications and new products. Read more. Plant fatty acids are used in a vast range of products, from polymers to plastics and soaps to industrial feed stocks -- making up an estimated $150 billion market annually. A new discovery of inserting double bonds in the fatty acids could show the way to the designer production of plant fatty

469

Chemical Looping | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Looping Looping Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Introduction 2 Process Description 3 Benefits 4 Oxygen Carriers 5 Multimedia 6 Patents 7 References 8 External Links Introduction Chemical looping or chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a novel technology that could provide the means to convert fossil fuels to electricity and provide carbon capture without significant efficiency or cost penalties. Chemical looping combustion is very similar to oxy-fuel combustion where there is no direct contact between air and fuel.[1] Oxygen is extracted from air, then the oxygen is reacted with the hydrocarbon fuel producing an exhaust gas composed of carbon dioxide and water vapor.[2] The water vapor is condensed out of the gas resulting in near 100% carbon dioxide stream that could be sequestered in the ground.

470

Chemical Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Inventory Chemical Inventory Use the following dropdown menus to filter the results for chemical records. To reset the results clear the entries and click "update". Facility - Any - SSRL LCLS Building - Any - 120 131 999 Room - Any - 109 113 209 257 Storage Area Storage Category Apply Title Facility Building Room Storage Area Storage Category Available to All Qty. Size Units Responsible Person 1,3-cyclohexadiene SSRL 131 209 CI L No 1 25 milliliters (ml) Tsu-Chien Weng 1,4- dioxane SSRL 120 257 CB1 L Yes 1 1 liters (l) Cynthia Patty 1,8-Octanedithiol SSRL 131 209 CA3 L No 1 5 grams (g) Schmidt 1-Chloronapthalene SSRL 131 209 CA3 L No 1 100 grams (g) Schmidt 1-Propanol LCLS 999 109 B1 L Yes 1 4 liters (l) Lisa Hammon

471

Chemical Sciences Division: Research: Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programs Programs The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of Berkeley Laboratory's basic research divisions. The CSD is composed of individual research groups that conduct research in the areas of chemical physics and the dynamics of chemical reactions, the structure and reactivity of transient species, electron spectroscopy, surface chemistry and catalysis, electrochemistry, chemistry of the actinide elements and their relationship to environmental issues, and atomic physics. The division's 28 principal investigators, many of whom are on the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley, direct the individual research projects and the work of 6 staff scientists, 41 postdoctoral researchers, and 75 graduate students. Our research staff continues to achieve fundamental advances in understanding the structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates and transients using both state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical methods. In addition, the division supports a strong effort in heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis.