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Sample records for lyle falls fish

  1. EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to modify funding to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, WA. The proposed project would help BPA meet its off-site mitigation responsibilities for anadromous fish affected by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin.

  2. Joshua Lyle | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "The team I worked with is looking to add a virtual 'envelope' of encryption so that nobody but you can see your messages by making a system that automates the encryption process for you." "The team I worked with is looking to add a virtual 'envelope' of encryption so that nobody but you can see your messages by making a system that automates the encryption process for you." Joshua Lyle By Robyn Henderson * December 8, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Joshua Lyle was a summer intern in

  3. EIS-0397: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement EIS-0397: Final Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project BPA proposes to fund modifications to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway...

  4. Determination of Swimming Speeds and Energetic Demands of Upriver Migrating Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) in the Klickitat River, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Geist, David R.; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington

    2002-08-30

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program during the fall of 2001. The objective was to study the migration and energy use of adult fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) traveling up the Klickitat River to spawn. The salmon were tagged with either surgically implanted electromyogram (EMG) transmitters or gastrically implanted coded transmitters and were monitored with mobile and stationary receivers. Swim speed and aerobic and anaerobic energy use were determined for the fish as they attempted passage of three waterfalls on the lower Klickitat River and as they traversed free-flowing stretches between, below, and above the falls. Of the 35 EMG-tagged fish released near the mouth of the Klickitat River, 40% passed the first falls, 24% passed the second falls, and 20% made it to Lyle Falls. None of the EMG-tagged fish were able to pass Lyle Falls, either over the falls or via a fishway at Lyle Falls. Mean swimming speeds ranged from as low as 52.6 centimeters per second (cm s{sup -1}) between falls to as high as 189 (cm s{sup -1}) at falls passage. Fish swam above critical swimming speeds while passing the falls more often than while swimming between the falls (58.9% versus 1.7% of the transmitter signals). However, fish expended more energy swimming the stretches between the falls than during actual falls passage (100.7 to 128.2 kilocalories [kcals] to traverse areas between or below falls versus 0.3 to 1.0 kcals to pass falls). Relationships between sex, length, and time of day on the success of falls passage were also examined. Average swimming speeds were highest during the day in all areas except at some waterfalls. There was no apparent relationship between either fish condition or length and successful passage of waterfalls in the lower Klickitat River. Female fall chinook salmon, however, had a much lower likelihood of passing

  5. EIS-0397: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Record of Decision EIS-0397: Record of Decision Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund modifications to the existing Lyle...

  6. Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall; Fortner, Allison M

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish

  7. Determination of Swimming Speeds and Energetic Demands of Upriver Migrating Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Klickitat River, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Geist, David R.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes a field study by PNNL for Bonneville Power Administration in fall 2001 to study the migration and energy use of adult fall chinook salmon traveling up the Klickitat River to spawn. The salmon were tagged with surgically implanted electromyogram transmitters or gastrically implanted coded transmitters. Swim speed and aerobic and anaerobic energy use were determined for the fish as they attempted to pass three waterfalls on the lower Klickitat and as they traversed free-flowing stretches between and below the falls. Of the 35 EMG-tagged fish released near the mouth of the Klickitat, 40% passed the first falls, 36% passed the second falls, and 20% reached Lyle Falls but were unable to leap over. Mean swimming speeds ranged from as low as 52.6 cm/sec between falls to as high as 158.1 cm/sec at falls passage. Fish exhibited a higher percentage of occurrences of burst swimming while passing the falls than while between falls (58.9% versus 1.7%). However, fish expended more energy swimming the stretches between the falls than during actual falls passage (52.3-236.2 kcals versus 0.3-1.1 kcals). Male-female and day-night differences in falls passage success were noted. PNNL also examined energy costs and swimming speeds for fish released above Lyle Falls as they migrated to upstream spawning areas. This journey averaged 15.93 days at a mean rate of 2.36 km/day to travel a mean maximum of 37.6 km upstream at a total energy cost of approx 4,492 kcals (32% anaerobic/68% aerobic). When the salmon have expended the estimated 968 kcals needed to get through Bonneville Dam and the three falls on the Lower Klickitat, plus this 4,492 kcals to reach the spawning grounds, they are left with approximately 8 to 12% (480 to 742 kcals) of their energy reserves for spawning. A delay of 4 to 7 days along the lower Klickitat River could deplete their remaining energy reserves (at a rate of about 103 kcals/day), resulting in death before spawning would occur.

  8. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Washington, Volume IIA, Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dam Fish Passage, 1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown Author

    1984-05-01

    This engineering feasibility and predesign report on the Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dam Fish Passage Project provides BPA with information for planning purposes and will serve as a discussion document for interested agencies. Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dams, both on the Wenatchee River, were built in the early 1900's as diversions for hydropower, and irrigation and hydropower, respectively. The present fishway facilities at both sites are inadequate to properly pass the anadromous fish runs in the Wenatchee River. These runs include spring and summer chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon and steelhead trout. Predesign level drawings are provided in this report that represent fishway schemes capable of adequately passing present and projected fish runs. The effects of present passage facilities on anadromous fish stocks is addressed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The quantitative treatment assesses losses of adult migrants due to the structures and places an estimated value on those fish. The dollar figure is estimated to be between $391,000 and $701,000 per year for both structures. The qualitative approach to benefits deals with the concept of stock vigor, the need for passage improvements to help ensure the health of the anadromous fish stock. 29 references, 27 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Movement of Fall Chinook Salmon Fry Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Approach Angles for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Blanton, S.L.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Daly, D.S.

    1996-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed tests to determine whether a significant difference in fish passage existed between a 6-ft screening facility built perpendicularly to canal flow and an identical screening facility with the screen mounted at a 45-degree angle to the approach channel. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fall chinook salmon fry were introduced into the test system, and their movements were monitored. A total of 14 tests (400 fish per test) that lasted 20 hours were completed during April and May, 1996. There was no significant difference in fish passage rate through the two approach configurations. Attraction flow to the bypass across the face of the screen was more evident for the angled approach, although this did not appear to play a significant role in attracting fish to the bypass. Approach velocities at the face of the screen did not exceed the 0.4 fps criteria for either approach configuration and posed not threat to fish. No fish passed over, around, or through the drum screen during any test.

  10. EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project The underlying need for the project is to improve fish passage to...

  11. EIS-0397: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project To Improve Fish Passage to Habitat in the Upper Part of the Watershed,...

  12. EIS-0397: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Falls Fishway in Klickitat County, near Lyle, Washington. The improvements would ease fish passage to upstream high quality habitat in the Klickitat Basin and improve...

  13. Impact Statements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Room / Final Environment Impact Statements Record of Decision on Bonneville Power Administration’s Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (DOE/EIS-3790, November 2008). February 2009.

  14. EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

  15. EIS-0397: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Availability of the Record of Decision Bonneville Power Administration Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This notice announces the availability of the Record of Decision to...

  16. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  17. Fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates Expand...

  18. Chippewa Falls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    years... & When did it all begin? 2 1974? 1978? 1963? CDC 6600 - 1974 NERSC started service with the first Supercomputer... 3 A well-used system - Serial Number 1 ● On its last legs... Designed and built in Chippewa Falls Launch Date: 1963 Load / Store Architecture ● First RISC Computer! First CRT Monitor Freon Cooled State-of-the-Art Remote Access at NERSC ● Via 4 acoustic modems, manually answered capable of 10 characters /sec 50 th Anniversary of the IBM / Cray Rivalry... 2/6/14

  19. AGU Fall Meeting 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Geophysical Union's 47th Annual Fall Meeting will showcase groundbreaking research in the geosciences.

  20. Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-06-12

    This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

  1. UVIG Fall Technical Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 UVIG Fall Technical Workshop will provide attendees with an expanded perspective on the status of wind and solar integration and interconnection to utility systems in the United States and...

  2. NWHA Fall Workshop & Tour

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year’s Fall Regional Workshop on October 30 will focus on extending the longevity of our legacy hydropower projects through upgrades, refurbishment and life extensions, while meeting needs of...

  3. falling-particle receiver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    falling-particle receiver - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  4. 2009, Webbers Falls Open

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southwestern and its customers, the May 27, 2009, Webbers Falls Open House hosted by the Tulsa District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) was just one more example of what can be accomplished when partners in Federal hydropower work together. The event, which was designed to publicize the upcoming rehabilitation of the project, drew staff members from several congressional offices as well as a healthy contingent of Corps, Southwestern, and customer representatives. Colonel Anthony

  5. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :i" _,, ' _~" ORISE 95/C-70 :E : i:; :' l,J : i.: RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY Op BUILDINGS 401, ' 403, AND ' m HITTMAN BUILDING $ <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I .~~ ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? j:,:i I ,.J- ;b f" /: Li _e.*. ~,, I ,,~, ,:,,;:, Prepared by T. .I. Vitkus i,c Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division ;>::; Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education .,:, "Oak Ridge, Temressee 37831-0117 .F P ., ? :_ &,d

  6. Granite Falls Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Granite Falls Energy Place: Granite Falls, Minnesota Zip: 56241 Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References: Granite Falls Energy1 This article is...

  7. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly; Olson, Jason

    2009-07-13

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other

  8. AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium gathers wind energy professionals for informal yet productive interactions with industry peers. Jose Zayas, Director, Wind & Water Power Technologies Office,...

  9. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor fall velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    velocity Fall velocity of hydrometeors (e.g. rain, snow, graupel, hail). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  10. BPA-2010-01849-FResponse.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . all contracts, bids and any other agreements signed by either William Charles Construction Company LLC, or William Charles West for the construction of the Lyle Falls and...

  11. BPA-2010-01849-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of all contracts, bids and any other agreements signed by either William Charles Construction Company, LLC, or William Charles West for the construction of the Lyle Falls and...

  12. BPA-2010-01849-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of all contracts, bids and any other agreements signed by either William Charles Construction Company, LLC, or William Charles West for the construction of the Lyle Falls and...

  13. Fall 2007 ASA Meeting Disclaimer

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files you will find unedited transcripts of EIA's fall 2007 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings can be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts. The public meeting took place October 18 and

  14. Twin Falls District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    District Jump to: navigation, search Name: BML Twin Falls District Office Address: 2536 Kimberly Road Place: Twin Falls, ID Zip: 83301 Phone Number: 208-736-2350 Website:...

  15. How Will You Save Energy This Fall?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Labor Day has come and gone and—for many Americans—the fall season has unofficially started. How will you save energy this fall?

  16. Technology Advancements for Next Generation Falling Particle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technology Advancements for Next Generation Falling Particle Receivers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Technology Advancements for Next Generation Falling Particle ...

  17. Spawning Distribution of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Aaron P.

    1999-03-01

    In 1998 data was collected on the spawning distribution of the first adult fall chinook salmon to return from releases of yearling hatchery fish upriver of Lower Granite Dam. Yearling fish were released at three locations with the intent of distributing spawning throughout the existing habitat. The project was designed to use radio-telemetry to determine if the use of multiple release sites resulted in widespread spawning.

  18. Fall

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society Convention Center, Santa Fe, NM October 28-31, 2015 http:www.lanl.govdnp2015 Conference Coordinator: Tel...

  19. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1994-03-01

    This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  20. Benton Falls Associates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Falls Associates Place: Maine Sector: Hydro Product: Owns and operates a 4.3MW hydroelectric plant in Benton. References: Benton Falls Associates1 This article is a stub....

  1. NNMCAB Newsletter: Fall 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 NNMCAB Newsletter: Fall 2014 Inside This Issue: New Officers for FY'15 Rocky Flats Tour Rad Waste Summit 2014 NNMCAB Recommendations on WIPP Words from the Chair Volume II, Issue IV - Fall 2014 (3.64 MB

  2. American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With nearly 24,000 attendees, AGU Fall Meeting is the largest Earth and space science meeting in the world. Now in its 48th year, AGU Fall Meeting is the best place to present your research; hear...

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ground Water Compliance Action Plan Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Falls City Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Falls City, Texas Please be green. ...

  4. Fish Tales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-07-06

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not

  5. Save Energy and be Festive this Fall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fall means cooler weather, changing leaves, and festive decorations, now your decorations can help save energy too!

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Texas Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site UMTRCA Title I site falls_map The Falls City Disposal Site, an Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I disposal site, is licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management. The site transferred to the Office of Legacy Management in 2003 and requires routine inspection and maintenance, records-related activities, and stakeholder support. For more information about the Falls City site, view the fact

  7. Fall 2013 Composite Data Products - Backup Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-12-01

    This report includes 28 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Fall 2013 for fuel cell backup power systems.

  8. Diesel prices continue to fall

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Diesel prices continue to fall The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to $4.09 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the New England region at 4.24 a gallon, down 5.5 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at 4.01 a gallon, down 3.7 cents

  9. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michak, Patty

    1991-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

  10. Sandia Energy - Lyle Pickett Named a Society of Automotive Engineers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the field. His contributions are providing both a new understanding of the fundamentals of fuel sprays and an international collaboration (the Engine Combustion Network)...

  11. FIA-13-0037- In the Matter of Sam Lyle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On June 27, 2013, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Privacy Act determination issued by the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Office (ORO)....

  12. HMNewsFall06 Reprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fi c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y * N a t i o n a l E n e r g y T e c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y CONTaCT Ray Boswell Technology Manager-Methane Hydrates, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 304-285-4541 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Methane Hydrate Newsletter Reprinted from the Fall 2006 1 The Gas hydraTes resource Pyramid Ray Boswell (US DOE/NETL) and Tim Collett (USGS) Over the past six years, the U.S. National Methane Hydrate R&D Program has worked to clarify the resource

  13. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Stranding on the Hanford Reach in the Columbia River, 1998 Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, John; Newsome, Todd; Nugent, Michael

    2001-07-27

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has been contracted through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) to perform an evaluation of juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stranding on the Hanford Reach. The evaluation, in the second year of a multi-year study, has been developed to assess the impacts of water fluctuations from Priest Rapids Dam on rearing juvenile fall chinook salmon, other fish species, and benthic macroinvertebrates of the Hanford Reach. This document provides the results of the 1998 field season.

  14. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Stranding on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, John

    2002-01-24

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has been contracted through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) to perform an evaluation of juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stranding on the Hanford Reach. The evaluation, in the third year of a multi-year study, has been developed to assess the impacts of water fluctuations from Priest Rapids Dam on rearing juvenile fall chinook salmon, other fishes, and benthic macroinvertebrates of the Hanford Reach. This document provides the results of the 1999 field season.

  15. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Stranding on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, John; Nugent, Michael; Brock, Wendy

    2002-05-29

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has been contracted through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) to perform an evaluation of juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stranding on the Hanford Reach. The evaluation, in the fourth year of a multi-year study, has been developed to assess the impacts of water fluctuations from Priest Rapids Dam on rearing juvenile fall chinook salmon, other fishes, and benthic macroinvertebrates of the Hanford Reach. This document provides the results of the 2000 field season.

  16. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Stranding on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, John; Nugent, Michael; Brock, Wendy

    2002-05-29

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has been contracted through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) to perform an evaluation of juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stranding on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The evaluation, in the fifth year of a multi-year study, has been developed to assess the impacts of water fluctuations from Priest Rapids Dam on rearing juvenile fall chinook salmon, other fishes, and benthic macroinvertebrates of the Hanford Reach. This document provides the results of the 2001 field season.

  17. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-22

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  18. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Connor, William P.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-09-15

    This study was initiated to provide empirical data and analyses on the dam passage timing, travel rate, survival, and life history variation of fall Chinook salmon that are produced in the Clearwater River. The area of interest for this study focuses on the lower four miles of the Clearwater River and its confluence with the Snake River because this is an area where many fish delay their seaward migration. The goal of the project is to increase our understanding of the environmental and biological factors that affect juvenile life history of fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River. The following summaries are provided for each of the individual chapters in this report.

  19. Fall Protection Can Prevent Serious Injuries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    protection requirements were not followed. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), falls from elevations, including into holes in floors, are the...

  20. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. NNMCAB Newsletter: Fall 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 NNMCAB Newsletter: Fall 2013 Inside This Issue: FY'14 Officer Election Results Farewell to Tiffany Ortiz NNMCAB Student Symposia Posters Meet the ADDFO Christina Houston Recommendation 2013-09 on LANL Clean-up The NNMACB has a New Admin Volume I, Issue IV - Fall 2013 (684.83 KB

  2. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2010-09-30

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

  3. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 SCM IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsFall 1997 SCM IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 SCM IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability The fall 1997 SCM IOP was conducted from 1500 UTC on September 15, 1997, to 0300 UTC October 6, 1997. During this time, 817 soundings were launched that reported data. This represents 99.0 percent of the potential 825 soundings flown (165

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1995 UAV IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UAV IOP Campaign Links Science Plan ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love ... Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1995 UAV IOP ...

  6. FUPWG Fall 2015 Agenda and Presentations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This page features links to the presentations given during the Fall 2015 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group meeting, which took place November 3–4 in Houston, Texas at CenterPoint Energy headquarters.

  7. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Residential customers with permanently installed electric heat who receive service from the City of Idaho Falls, are eligible for 0% weatherization loans. City Energy Service will conduct an energy...

  8. AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium provides participants with an opportunity to share successes, strategies, and lessons-learned. It is one of the only venues where AWEA’s committees, working...

  9. Fall 2012 FUPWG Meeting Welcome: Southern Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the Southern Company's retail service territory, financials, customers and sales, power generation, U.S. military projects, and more.

  10. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  11. Fall 2005 Meeting of the ASA

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files are the unedited transcripts of EIA's fall 2005 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings may be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts, here at:

  12. Fall 2005 Meeting of the ASA

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files you may find unedited transcripts of EIA's fall 2006 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings may be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts. The public meeting took place October 6 and 7,

  13. BLM Twin Falls District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Falls District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: BLM Twin Falls District Office Address: 2536 Kimberly Road Place: Twin Falls, ID Zip: 83301 Phone Number: 208-735-2060...

  14. BLM Idaho Falls District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Falls District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: BLM Idaho Falls District Office Address: 1405 Hollipark Drive Place: Idaho Falls, ID Zip: 83401 Phone Number: 208-524-7500...

  15. 2016 National Fall Prevention Campaign | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Fall Prevention Campaign 2016 National Fall Prevention Campaign March 17, 2016 - 9:07am Addthis 2016 National Fall Prevention Campaign As part of a Fall Prevention event initiated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the 3rd Annual National Fall Prevention Campaign will take place on May 2-6. This event is a nationwide voluntary effort to remind and educate employers and workers in the construction industry of the serious dangers regarding falls from elevated

  16. City of Newton Falls, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Newton Falls Place: Ohio Website: ci.newtonfalls.oh.us Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Newton-Falls...

  17. National Small Business Contracting Summit - 2015 Fall | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Business Contracting Summit - 2015 Fall National Small Business Contracting Summit - 2015 Fall November 5, 2015 9:00AM to 5:00PM EST Washington, DC...

  18. Oconto Falls Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oconto Falls Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name: Oconto Falls Water & Light Comm Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (920) 846-4507 Website: ofmu.orgaboutus Outage...

  19. NNSA Begins Recruiting for Fall Military Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Begins Recruiting for Fall Military Program November 08, 2011 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The ... its fall recruiting events for the 2012 Military Academic Collaborations (MAC) Program. ...

  20. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2011 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 Better Buildings Neighborhood View, from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. ...

  1. Tyson Research Center Tour | Fall 2014 | Photosynthetic Antenna...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Fall 2014 Tyson Research Center Tour | Fall 2014 Our Events & Topics in Bioenergy & the Environment tours takes us to the Tyson Research Center. Visit their website here: http:...

  2. Niagara Falls, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Niagara Falls, New York: Energy Resources (Redirected from Niagara Falls, NY) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0944999, -79.0567111 Show Map...

  3. Fish elevator and method of elevating fish

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Truebe, Jonathan; Drooker, Michael S.

    1984-01-01

    A means and method for transporting fish from a lower body of water to a higher body of water. The means comprises a tubular lock with a gated entrance below the level of the lower body of water through which fish may enter the lock and a discharge passage above the level of the upper body of water. The fish raising means in the lock is a crowder pulled upward by a surface float as water from the upper body of water gravitationally flows into the closed lock filling it to the level of the upper body. Water is then pumped into the lock to raise the level to the discharge passage. The crowder is then caused to float upward the remaining distance through the water to the level of the discharge passage by the introduction of air into a pocket on the underside of the crowder. The fish are then automatically discharged from the lock into the discharge passage by the out of water position of the crowder. The movement of the fish into the discharge passage is aided by the continuous overflow of water still being pumped into the lock. A pipe may be connected to the discharge passage to deliver the fish to a selected location in the upper body of water.

  4. Electronic Out-fall Inspection Application - 12007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weymouth, A Kent III; Pham, Minh; Messick, Chuck

    2012-07-01

    In early 2009 an exciting opportunity was presented to the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) team at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS maintenance group was directed to maintain all Out-falls on Site, increasing their workload from 75 to 183 out-falls with no additional resources. The existing out-fall inspection system consisted of inspections performed manually and documented via paper trail. The inspections were closed out upon completion of activities and placed in file cabinets with no central location for tracking/trending maintenance activities. A platform for meeting new improvements required for documentation by the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) out-fall permits was needed to replace this current system that had been in place since the 1980's. This was accomplished by building a geographically aware electronic application that improved reliability of site out-fall maintenance and ensured consistent standards were maintained for environmental excellence and worker efficiency. Inspections are now performed via tablet and uploaded to a central point. Work orders are completed and closed either in the field using tablets (mobile application) or in their offices (via web portal) using PCs. And finally completed work orders are now stored in a central database allowing trending of maintenance activities. (authors)

  5. REDUCTION OF THE MOMENTUM OF FALLING BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kendall, J.W.; Morrison, I.H.

    1954-09-21

    A means for catching free falling bodies that may be damaged upon impact is given. Several layers of floating gas-filled rubber balls are contained within a partially compartmented tank of liquid. The compartment extends from beneath the surface of the liquid to that height necessary to contain the desired number of layers of the balls. The balls and the liquid itself break the force of the fall by absorbing the kinetic energy of falling body. The body may then be retrieved from the floor of the tank by a rake that extends from outside of the tank through the free surface area and underneath the compartment wall. This arrangement is particularly useful in collecting irradiated atomic fuel rods that are discharged from a reactor at considerable height without damaging the thin aluminum jacket of the rods.

  6. BPA Fish Accords

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fish-Accords Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates...

  7. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Planning and Policy organization (EWP) in the Division of Environment, Fish & Wildlife, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and reports to the EWP manager....

  8. Fall 2011 Composite Data Products: National FCEV Learning Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2011-11-01

    This technical presentation describes Fall 2011 composite data products: national FCEV learning demonstration.

  9. Industrial Assessment Centers Update, Fall 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Assessment Centers Update, Fall 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers Update, Fall 2015 Read the Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update, Fall 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers Update, Fall 2015 (477.91 KB) More Documents & Publications Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update -- July 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers Quarterly Update, Spring 2014 IAC Fact Sheet Region 5

  10. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  11. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999 and years previous. In an effort to provide this information to a wider audience, the individual chapters in this report have been submitted as manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. These chapters communicate significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Abundance and timing of seaward migration of Snake River fall chinook salmon was indexed using passage data collected at Lower Granite Dam for five years. We used genetic analyses to determine the lineage of fish recaptured at Lower Granite Dam that had been previously PIT tagged. We then used discriminant analysis to determine run membership of PIT-tagged smolts that were not recaptured to enable us to calculate annual run composition and to compared early life history attributes of wild subyearling fall and spring chinook salmon. Because spring chinook salmon made up from 15.1 to 44.4% of the tagged subyearling smolts that were detected passing Lower Granite Dam, subyearling passage data at Lower Granite Dam can only be used to index fall chinook salmon smolt abundance and passage timing if genetic samples are taken to identify run membership of smolts. Otherwise, fall chinook salmon smolt abundance would be overestimated and timing of fall chinook salmon smolt passage would appear to be earlier and more protracted than is the case.

  12. Summary of the Fall Meeting of the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Summary of the Fall Meeting of the American Statistical Association (ASA) Committee on Energy Statistics October 24-25, 2002 .................with the Energy Information Administration 1. Update on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), by Dwight French, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA At the Spring, 2002 Committee meeting Dwight French gave a presentation on three major methodological issues being studied in the post-2000 redesign of EIA's Commercial Buildings

  13. DOE hosts public hearings in Idaho Falls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hosts public hearings in Idaho Falls and around the nation to gather comments on its Draft Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement To help supply consistent, large quantities of carbon-free nuclear power for the nation�s energy future, the U.S. Department of Energy prefers to recycle nuclear fuel when generating commercial electricity with reactors, instead the current practice of using nuclear fuel only once. For an opportunity to learn more about why the

  14. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    conceptual drawing illustrates a high-temperature falling-particle receiver system that will achieve greater efficiencies and lower costs. Illustration from Sandia National Laboratories Project Leader: Dr. Cliff Ho ckho@sandia.gov Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. eere.energy.gov * energy.gov/sunshot DOE/GO-102012-3672 * September 2012 MOTIVATION Conventional central receiver technologies are limited to

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM-UAV Fall 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...UAV Fall 2002 ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM-UAV Fall 2002 ...

  16. Butte Falls, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Butte Falls is a town in Jackson County, Oregon. It falls under Oregon's 2nd congressional district.12 References...

  17. Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season ... reduce standby heat losses by 25%-45% and save you around 4%-9% in water heating costs. ...

  18. Lyons Falls, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lyons Falls is a village in Lewis County, New York. It falls under New York's 23rd congressional district.12...

  19. Better Plants Progress Update Fall 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2013 Better Plants Progress Update Fall 2013 The Fall 2013 Progress Update chronicles the Better Buildings, Better Plants Program's efforts to capture these cost-effective, energy-saving opportunities and demonstrate that strong energy management practices are good for business, good for the economy, and good for the environment. Better Plants Progress Update Fall 2013 (1.11 MB) More Documents & Publications Better Plants Progress Update 2014 Better Plants Two-Page Overview Better

  20. Jefferson Lab announces Fall Science Series line up | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fall Science Series line up Jefferson Lab announces Fall Science Series line up September 5, 2003 Jefferson Lab hosts Fall and Spring Science Series to engage the public in a range of current scientific topics. Guest speakers from across the nation are invited to the Lab to present their sometimes entertaining or thought-provoking, but always informative lectures or demonstrations. The Jefferson Lab Fall Science Series kicks off on Tuesday, October 7, with Michael Henchman, a chemistry professor

  1. Letter from the Wind Program Director: Fall 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fall edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter comes at an exciting time for the Wind Program.

  2. Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline decreased for the second week in a row to $3.71 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.9 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Pump prices were highest in the West Coast region at 4.05 a gallon, down 2 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at 3.47 a gallon, down 7-tenths of a penny

  3. Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.61 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Pump prices were highest in the West Coast region at 3.93 a gallon, down 1.7 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Gulf Coast States at 3.43 a gallon, down 4.6

  4. Bioenergy Deployment Consortium (BDC) 2014 Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 BDC Fall Symposium will be held on October 21–22, 2014 in Fort Myers, Florida. The event will include a tour of the Algenol facility on Wednesday morning. The symposium will have panels for progress reports from current cellulosic bio-product companies, updates on government policy from several agencies, scale-up strategies,and lessons learned. POET-DSM will provide the after dinner success story. Neil Rossmeissl, Program Manager, Algal Program, Bioenergy Technologies Office, will be delivering the keynote address on expanding the bioeconomy.

  5. Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference will be held from November 19–20, 2014, at the Richland Community College in Decatur, Illinois. The event will focus on bioenergy and sustainable agriculture and explore topics ranging from logistics, energy conversion technologies, and markets for grass biomass. BETO Sustainability Program Technology Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking about the Energy Department’s perspective on sustainable bioenergy landscapes and will focus on BETO’s recent work with landscape design. The conference will be November 19–20 only. On November 18, participants may choose to participate in a pre-conference field tour.

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Shortwave IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shortwave IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Shortwave IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Graeme Stephens For data sets, see below. Summary The Shortwave Radiation IOP, the first in a series of three such IOPs, was devoted to exploring the measurement of broadband and spectral radiation with an array of ground-based ARM and guest instrumentation, including the RCF

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 UAV IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UAV IOP Campaign Links ARM UAV Program Science Plan ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 UAV IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Robert Ellingson For data sets, see below. Summary The UAV Program operated both the Altus UAV and the Twin Otter chase aircraft during the IOP period. As can be seen in the previous sections, the IOPs on water vapor, clouds, aerosols, and shortwave

  8. Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2014 Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network, Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014. Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls (202.93 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls -- No. 3 Better Buildings Network View | October 2014

  9. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2011 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 Better Buildings Neighborhood View, from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. BB Neighborhood View -- Fall 2011 (204.44 KB) More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- July 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- December 2013

  10. Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. This article will help you find strategies to help you save energy during the cool fall and cold winter months. Some of the tips below are

  11. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address: 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place:...

  12. Fish Habitat Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Habitat Regulations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Fish Habitat Regulations Author Alaska Department of Fish & Game Published...

  13. Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Gone Fishing...

  14. Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2009-03-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and

  15. Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall; Brandt, Craig C; Fortner, Allison M

    2012-05-01

    four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation

  16. PNNL Tests Fish Passage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison

    2015-03-13

    Scientists from PNNL are testing a fish transportation system developed by Whooshh Innovations. The Whooshh system uses a flexible tube that works a bit like a vacuum, guiding fish over hydroelectric dams or other structures. Compared to methods used today, this system could save money while granting fish quicker, safer passage through dams and hatcheries.

  17. Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fish Producers...

  18. ATNI Fall Annual Convention 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ATNI Fall Annual Convention 2016 ATNI Fall Annual Convention 2016 September 26, 2016 8:00AM PDT to September 29, 2016 5:00PM PDT Tulalip, Washington Tulalip Resort Casino 10200 Quil Ceda Blvd. Tulalip, WA 98271 The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) is hosting its Fall Annual Convention where Indian tribes convene to advance the work of our communities, with regards to developing and implementing policy and programs for the region

  19. Alaska Energy Pioneer Fall 2015 Newsletter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2015 Newsletter Alaska Energy Pioneer Fall 2015 Newsletter The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy's Alaska Energy Pioneer Fall 2015 newsletter highlights opportunities and actions to accelerate Alaska Native energy development. Read newsletter stories below or download the newsletter at the bottom of the page. Alaska Native Village Energy Challenges a Priority for DOE Image of people. Since joining the DOE Office of Indian Energy in May, new Director Chris Deschene has made

  20. Office of Indian Energy Fall 2015 Newsletter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2015 Newsletter Office of Indian Energy Fall 2015 Newsletter Fall/Winter 2015: News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country The Office of Indian Energy Indian Energy Beat newsletter highlights opportunities and actions to accelerate energy development in Indian Country. Browse stories below, view newsletter feature articles, or read past issues of the newsletter. Tribal Energy Summit Tackles Challenges, Explores Opportunities on Path to Tribal Economic Sovereignty

  1. Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2012 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 Indian Energy Beat: News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country Fall 2012 Issue: DOE Office of Indian Energy Provides Tribes with Hands-On Support to Advance Tribal Energy Projects Message from the Director Sharing Knowledge: DOE Office of Indian Energy Commissions Regional Transmission and Renewable Energy Analysis Opening Doors: Seminole Tribe to Host Grant Proposal Writing Workshop Crow Nation Students Participate

  2. Jefferson Lab Announces Two Fall Science Series Events | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announces Two Fall Science Series Events Jefferson Lab Announces Two Fall Science Series Events September 10, 2004 Oct. 4 event features discussion of the astronomical allusions of Tolkien's Middle-earth; Nov. 23 speaker examines food toxins & how to avoid them Kristine Larsen, professor of astronomy and physics from Central Connecticut State University, will discuss the astronomy of J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth at Jefferson Lab's first Fall 2004 Science Series event. The presentation will

  3. Jefferson Lab Fall Lecture: Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Jefferson Lab Fall Lecture: Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators Jefferson Lab Fall Lecture: Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Nov. 9, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's 2010 Fall Science Lecture Series concludes on Tuesday, Nov. 23, with James E. Brau, University of Oregon, presenting "The Mysterious Universe: Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators." The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined, Brau says. While

  4. Jefferson Lab adds three popular presentations to Fall Science Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    line-up | Jefferson Lab adds three popular presentations to Fall Science Series line-up Jefferson Lab adds three popular presentations to Fall Science Series line-up October 9, 2002 Three popular presentations have been added to Jefferson Lab's Fall Science Series schedule. Each one promises to be a stimulating, educational foray into scientific topics, says Linda Ware, Lab Public Affairs manager. On Wednesday Oct. 23, Sean M. Carroll from the University of Chicago's Center for Cosmological

  5. Minutes of the Fall 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fall 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Minutes of the Fall 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Minutes of the Fall 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group, November 16, 2009 htmwg_nov09_minutes.pdf (41.2 KB) More Documents & Publications GenSys Blue: Fuel Cell Heating Appliance 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report

  6. Niagara Falls, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New York's 28th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Niagara Falls, New York Canrom Photovoltaics Inc References US Census Bureau Incorporated...

  7. Little Falls-South Windham, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Little Falls-South Windham, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.7333197, -70.4270734 Show Map Loading map......

  8. Olmsted Falls, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Olmsted Falls, Ohio Nautica Windpower LLC References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division...

  9. Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Marketing Administration Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from the Dworshak-Taft 1 Transmission Tower, at the Bonneville Power Marketing ...

  10. ES&H Newsletter - Fall 2015 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weekly Highlights Brochures Fact Sheets Newsletters PPPL News Quest Princeton Journal Watch Blog PPPL Experts Research at Princeton ES&H Newsletter - Fall 2015 ES&H Newsletter - ...

  11. Falls Church, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Church, Virginia: Energy Resources (Redirected from Falls Church, VA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.882334, -77.1710914 Show Map Loading...

  12. Idaho Falls, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Registered Energy Companies in Idaho Falls, Idaho ALDACOR Intrepid Technology and Resources Inc References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division...

  13. Hampton Falls, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hampton Falls, New Hampshire: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9162011, -70.8636648 Show Map Loading map......

  14. Green Mountain Falls, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Falls, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.9349905, -105.0169263 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  15. Idaho Falls Power- Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls Power offers rebates and loans for customers meeting certain criteria. An energy audit will inspect the following measures and recommend upgrades as needed:

  16. Title: Ames Blue Alert- Wood Cabinet Falls Apart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Blue Alert- Wood Cabinet Falls Apart Lessons Learned Statement- Cumulative damage can cause a loss of structural integrity. When furnishings are repeatedly exposed to water,...

  17. Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Residential Network, Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014. Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls (202.93 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential ...

  18. Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in a Federal Employee Fatality at DOE Headquarters Germantown, Maryland Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting in a Federal Employee Fatality at DOE ...

  19. #tipsEnergy: Weatherizing Your Home for Fall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the start of colder weather, we are sharing fall energy-saving tips that will help you save money and stay comfortable.

  20. Idaho Falls Power- Commercial Energy Conservation Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls Power offers rebates and loans for customers meeting certain criteria. An energy audit will inspect the following measures and recommend upgrades as needed:

  1. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls Power's Energy Efficiency Loan Program offers rebates for qualifying customers to purchase and install efficient electric appliances and implement weatherization measures. The program...

  2. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Idaho Falls Power's Energy Efficiency Loan Program offers zero interest loans for qualifying customers to purchase and install efficient electric appliances and implement weatherization measures....

  3. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Connor, William P.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    2009-08-21

    In 2007, we used radio and acoustic telemetry to evaluate the migratory behavior, survival, mortality, and delay of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River and Lower Granite Reservoir. Monthly releases of radio-tagged fish ({approx}95/month) were made from May through October and releases of 122-149/month acoustic-tagged fish per month were made from August through October. We compared the size at release of our tagged fish to that which could have been obtained at the same time from in-river, beach seine collections made by the Nez Perce Tribe. Had we relied on in-river collections to obtain our fish, we would have obtained very few in June from the free-flowing river but by late July and August over 90% of collected fish in the transition zone were large enough for tagging. Detection probabilities of radio-tagged subyearlings were generally high ranging from 0.60 (SE=0.22) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the different study reaches and months. Lower detection probabilities were observed in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches where fewer fish were detected. Detection probabilities of acoustic-tagged subyearlings were also high and ranged from 0.86 (SE=0.09) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches during August through October. Estimates of the joint probability of migration and survival generally declined in a downstream direction for fish released from June through August. Estimates were lowest in the transition zone (the lower 7 km of the Clearwater River) for the June release and lowest in the confluence area for July and August releases. The joint probability of migration and survival in these reaches was higher for the September and October releases, and were similar to those of fish released in May. Both fish weight and length at tagging were significantly correlated with the joint probability of migrating and surviving for both radio-tagged and acoustic-tagged fish. For both tag types, fish that were heavier at tagging had a

  4. Assessment of potential impacts of major groundwater contaminants to fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, D.R.; Poston, T.M.; Dauble, D.D.

    1994-10-01

    Past operations of Hanford Site facilities have contaminated the groundwater adjacent to the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, with various chemical and radiological constituents. The groundwater is hydraulically connected to the river and contains concentrations of contaminants that sometimes exceed federal and/or state drinking water standards or standards for the protection of aquatic life. For example, concentrations of chromium in shoreline seeps and springs at most 100 Area operable units exceed concentrations found to be toxic to fish. Nitrate and tritium concentrations in shoreline seeps are generally below drinking water standards and concentrations potentially toxic to aquatic life, but nitrate concentrations may be high enough to synergistically interact with and exacerbate chromium toxicity. The Hanford Reach also supports the largest run of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Columbia River Basin. Numbers of fall chinook salmon returning to the Hanford Reach have increased relative to other mainstem populations during the last 30 years. Groundwater discharge appears to occur near some salmon spawning areas, but contaminants are generally not detectable in surface water samples. The concentration and potential toxicity of contaminants in the interstitial waters of the substrate where fall chinook salmon embryogenesis occurs are presently unknown. New tools are required to characterize the extent of groundwater contaminant discharge to the Hanford Reach and to resolve uncertainties associated with assessment of potential impacts to fall chinook salmon.

  5. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): Chum salmon. [Oncorhynchus keta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauley, G.B.; Bowers, K.L.; Thomas, G.L.

    1988-03-01

    Chum salmon are anadromous fish found throughout a large part of the North Pacific Ocean and are the most widely distributed of all the Pacific salmon. Adults return to spawn in late summer and fall. Young fish migrate downstream quickly and rear in estuaries. Chum salmon mature later in life in more northerly water: in Alaska and British Columbia at age 4 to 5, in Washington and Oregon at age 3 to age 4. Fish from larger river systems grow to the largest size. The major commercial fishery is centered in Southeast Alaska and British Columbia. Harvest has increased in Washington to 1,150,000 fish annually due to increased hatchery production, with Hood Canal rivers accounting for 25% of all Washington fish. In odd-numbered years, the adult return-to-escapement ratio in any given river system is positively statistically correlated with increased spawning escapement of chum salmon relative to that of pink salmon.

  6. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish 47fish-hkturbineinteractionseprijacobs...

  7. FUPWG Fall 2014 Agenda and Presentations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2014 Agenda and Presentations FUPWG Fall 2014 Agenda and Presentations This page features links to the presentations given during the fall 2014 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group meeting, which took place November 5-6, 2014 in Cape Canaveral, FL. Welcome: Presented by Pam Rauch (4.06 MB) DOE/FEMP Welcome and Announcements: Presented by David McAndrew (836.24 KB) Washington Update: Presented by Tim Unruh (2.14 MB) GSA Update: Presented by Mark Ewing (1.25 MB) Future of Natural Gas and

  8. AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium 2016 AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium 2016 November 15, 2016 8:00AM MST to November 17, 2016 5:00PM MST San Antonio, Texas Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort and Spa 9800 Hyatt Resort Drive San Antonio, Texas 78251 The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Wind Energy Fall Symposium sets the stage for sharing successes, strategies, and lessons-learned with wind energy industry peers. This exclusive, top-tier event is one of the only venues where AWEA's committees,

  9. Fish Passage: A New Tool to Investigate Fish Movement: JSATS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-04-20

    A new system is being used to determine fish mortality issues related to hydroelectric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. Called the juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system (JSATS), this tool allows researchers to better understand fish movement, behavior, and survival around dams and powerhouses.

  10. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the

  11. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with

  12. Great Falls, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Great Falls is a census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia.1 Registered Energy...

  13. Operating Experience Level 3, Dangers of Objects Falling into...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to the dangers of items falling from heights into spaces normally occupied by workers at Department of Energy...

  14. Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: www.fallriverelectric.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comFallRiverREC Outage Hotline: 1.866.887.8442 (After Hours) Outage Map: outage.fallriverelectric.como...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Fall 2015 Quarterly Analysis Review...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The QAR comprises a glimpse at the transportation energy ecosystem within which VTO operates. This is the Fall 2015 presentation of the QAR. VTO Analysis staff members present and ...

  16. Redwood Falls Public Util Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Comm Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 507-627-1301 Website: www.ci.redwood-falls.mn.uscit Outage Hotline: 507-627-8430 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  17. City of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: City of Cuyahoga Falls Place: Ohio Website: cfo.cityofcf.comweb Outage Hotline: 330-971-8050 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  18. Project Profile: High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    under the 2012 Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) SunShot R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA). Approach This project seeks to advance falling-particle receivers by passing ...

  19. EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

  20. National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls In Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has scheduled a National Safety Stand-Down from June 2-6 to raise awareness among employers and workers about the hazards of falls.

  1. Fall City, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Fall City is a census-designated place in King County, Washington.1 References US Census Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA...

  2. U.S. gasoline price falls under $3 (long version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    November 3, 2014 U.S. gasoline price falls under 3 (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level since December 2010 at 2.99 a gallon ...

  3. U.S. gasoline price falls under $3 (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 U.S. gasoline price falls under 3 (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level since December 2010 at 2.99 a gallon on Monday. ...

  4. Fall Tech Trends: Promising New Products from DOE's High Impact...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fall Tech Trends: Promising New Products from DOE's High Impact Technologies Catalyst Program September 13, 2016 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT Presenters: Kris Jorgensen, A.O. Smith ...

  5. Fall SULI program wraps up | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fall SULI program wraps up Four Ames Laboratory Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) students wrapped up their fall semester session with a poster session and luncheon on December 8. The students, Kaiser Aguirre, Adam Dziulko, Shannon Goes, and Kathryn White have spent the last 16 weeks working in research laboratories on projects with Ames Laboratory scientist/mentors. Speaking on behalf of scientists and staff, Deputy Director Tom Lograsso told the interns Ames Laboratory and

  6. Operating Experience Level 3, Fall Protection Can Prevent Serious Injuries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2015-05: This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to incidents at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in which fall protection requirements were not followed. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), falls from elevations, including into holes in floors, are the leading cause of worker fatalities in the U.S. construction industry.

  7. Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop - Fall Event | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall Event Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop - Fall Event The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office's (BETO's) Algae Program hosted the Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop at Arizona State University on November 19-20, 2013, to discuss the research and development (R&D) needed to achieve affordable, scalable, and sustainable algae-based biofuels. november2013_abs_proceedings_intro.pdf (74.84 KB) november2013_abs_proceedings_chapter1.pdf (124.35 KB)

  8. Fall Tech Trends: Promising New Products from DOE's High Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Catalyst Program | Department of Energy Fall Tech Trends: Promising New Products from DOE's High Impact Technologies Catalyst Program Fall Tech Trends: Promising New Products from DOE's High Impact Technologies Catalyst Program September 13, 2016 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT Presenters: Kris Jorgensen, A.O. Smith Corporation; Cynthia Regnier, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Andrew Mitchell, U.S. Department of Energy Preview the new and innovative technologies that are making

  9. Jefferson Lab announces two Fall Science Series lectures; examine evidence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of an ancient supernova, the magic of Harry Potter | Jefferson Lab lectures; examine evidence of an ancient supernova, the magic of Harry Potter Jefferson Lab announces two Fall Science Series lectures; examine evidence of an ancient supernova, the magic of Harry Potter September 26, 2006 Remains of a star going supernova and a physics discussion of the magic found in Harry Potter books are the topics of Jefferson Lab's Fall Science Series. The first presentation, "When Stars

  10. As summer turns to fall, a new school year begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As summer turns to fall, a new school year begins Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit As summer turns to fall, a new school year begins Welcome to the back-to-school issue of Community Connections August 1, 2013 Kurt Steinhaus, Director of the Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus, Director of the Community Programs Office Contact Community Programs Office Director Kurt

  11. Microsoft Word - IAC_Fall_2015_Newsletter_Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall 2015 INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTERS IAC Quarterly Update Spring 2014 INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTERS IAC Update, Fall 2015 About the IAC Program Beginning in 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) have provided small and medium-sized manufacturers with site- specific recommendations for improving energy efficiency, reducing waste, and increasing productivity through changes in processes and equipment. A typical IAC client will receive recommendations that save more than $47,000

  12. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to

  13. Nichinghsiang Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nichinghsiang Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Nichinghsiang Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  14. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name: Fish and Wildlife Service Place: Washington, DC Year Founded: 1940 Phone Number: (303) 275-2370...

  15. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's ... which environmen- tal attributes, such as entrainment survival for fish, are emphasized. ...

  16. Fish Passage Center 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2008-11-25

    and McNary dams), whereas prior to 2005 spill was terminated at these projects after the spring period. In addition, the 2007 operations agreement provided regardless of flow conditions. For the first time spill for fish passage was provided in the low flow conditions that prevailed in the Snake River throughout the spring and summer migration periods. Gas bubble trauma (GBT) monitoring continued throughout the spill period. A higher incidence of rank 1, GBT signs were observed in late arriving steelhead smolts arriving after the 95% passage date had occurred. During this time dissolved gas levels were generally below the 110% water quality standard in the forebay where fish were sampled. This occurrence was due to prolonged exposure and extended travel times due to low migration flows. The 2007 migration conditions differed from any year in the historic record. The migration conditions combined low river flows in the Snake River with spill throughout the spring and summer season. The juvenile migration characteristics observed in 2007 were unique compared to past years in that high levels of 24 hour spill for fish passage were provided in low flow conditions, and with a delayed start to the smolt transportation program a smaller proportion of the total run being transported. This resulted in relatively high spring juvenile survival despite the lower flows. The seasonal spring average flow in the Snake River was 61 Kcfs much lower than the spring time average of 120 Kcfs that occurred in 2006. However juvenile steelhead survival through the Lower Granite to McNary reach in 2007 was nearly 70% which was similar to the juvenile steelhead survival seen in 2006 under higher migration flows. The low flows in the May-July period of 2007 were similar to the 2001 low flow year, yet survival for fall chinook juveniles in this period in 2007 was much higher. In 2001 the reach survival estimate for juvenile fall Chinook from Lower Granite to McNary Dam ranged from 0

  17. Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2001-10-01

    Fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by Washington Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (WDFW) biologists in 1993 (Hymer 1997). Known spawning areas included gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and Ives Island. The size of this population from 1994 to 1996 was estimated at 1,800 to 5,200 fish (Hymer 1997), and 554 fish in 1998 (Van der Naald et al. 1999). These estimates were based on carcass surveys and visual observation of redds by boat near the shoreline. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted underwater video surveys in the fall of 1999 and 2000 to determine the extent of the fall chinook salmon spawning and to estimate the number of redds occurring in deeper water. Estimates of redds occurring in water depths exceeding 2.2 m at 143,000 cubic feet per second (kcfs) were 499 in 1999 (Mueller and Dauble 1999) and 567 redds >2.2 m at 127 kcfs in 2000 (this study). The majority of the redds found were confined near the main river channel adjacent to Pierce Island. Chum salmon (O. keta) also have been documented using the mouth of Hamilton Creek and portions of Hamilton Slough for spawning. The majority of chum salmon were found to spawn in shallow water at the mouth of Hamilton Creek adjacent to Ives Island. Estimates of the natural chum salmon spawning population for 1998 were 226 (Van der Naald et al. 1999). Chum salmon spawning near Ives Island are part of the Columbia River evolutionary significant unit (ESU), and are included in the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) listing in March 1999. Our main objective of this study was to locate deep water spawning locations of fall chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel and to collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites. The secondary objective was to map any chum salmon redds located in the deep sections of

  18. Estimated Fall Chinook Salmon Survival to Emergence in Dewatered Redds in a Shallow Side Channel of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; James, B B.; Lukas, Joe

    2005-08-01

    Fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) often spawn in the tailraces of large hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River. Redds built in shallow habitats downstream of these dams may be periodically dewatered due to hydropower operations prior to the emergence of fry. To determine whether fall Chinook salmon redds were successful in a shallow area subjected to periodic dewatering downstream of Wanapum Dam on the Columbia River, we installed 7 redd caps and monitored fry emergence. Large numbers of live fry were captured from the redds between March 9 and May 18, 2003. Estimated survival from egg to fry for these redds, which were all subjected to some degree of dewatering during the incubation and post-hatch intragravel rearing period, ranged from 16.1 to 63.2 percent and averaged 27.8 percent (assuming 4,500 eggs/redd). The peak emergence date ranged from April 1 to 29, with the average peak about April 14, 2003. Mean fork length of fall Chinook salmon emerging from individual redds ranged from 38.3 to 41.2 mm, and lengths of fish emerging from individual redds increased throughout the emergence period.

  19. Long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The need for ground water monitoring at the Falls City disposal site was evaluated in accordance with NRC regulations and guidelines established by the DOE in Guidance for Implementing the Long-term Surveillance Program for UMTRA Project Title 1 Disposal Sites (DOE, 1996). Based on evaluation of site characterization data, it has been determined that a program to monitor ground water for demonstration of disposal cell performance based on a set of concentration limits is not appropriate because ground water in the uppermost aquifer is of limited use, and a narrative supplemental standard has been applied to the site that does not include numerical concentration limits or a point of compliance. The limited use designation is based on the fact that ground water in the uppermost aquifer is not currently or potentially a source of drinking water in the area because it contains widespread ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using methods reasonably employed by public water supply systems. Background ground water quality varies by orders of magnitude since the aquifer is in an area of redistribution of uranium mineralization derived from ore bodies. The DOE plans to perform post-closure ground water monitoring in the uppermost aquifer as a best management practice (BMP) as requested by the state of Texas.

  20. Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) : Spawning Near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2002-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated studies to identify potential fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning habitat and assess the extent of spawning in deep water (>1 m) downstream of Bonneville Dam in the fall of 1999. This report provides results from 2001, the third year of our effort. The main objective of this study was to find deepwater spawning locations of fall chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel, collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites, and provide estimates of adult spawners in the area. The secondary objective was to map any chum salmon redds located in the deeper sections near Hamilton Slough. River flows during the spawning surveys in 2001 were lower than in 1999 and 2000. Peak spawning activity, based on redd counts and live fish seen near redds, was on or near November 9, 2001. The location of the spawning area was similar to that of 1999 and 2000. One difference was the majority of redds were found in deeper water (>1.5 m) and closer to the shoreline adjacent to Pierce Island. Because of the low river flows during the fall of 2001, only a handful of redds were found using the boat-deployed video system within Hamilton Slough. No chum salmon (O. keta) redds were found in areas surveyed during 2000. (Note: surveys were limited to deeper sections of Hamilton Slough and near the main river channel.) An estimated 717 fall chinook salmon redds at water depths exceeding 1.5 m ({approx} 125 kcfs) were documented in 2001. These estimates are expanded from the number of redds found within a predefined survey area. Fall chinook salmon redds were found at water depths from 1.5-4.6 m and were located in a general area of {approx} 4.9 ha. Fall chinook salmon redds were constructed in gravels ranging from 3.2-13.4 cm in diameter and water velocities of 0.29-0.70 m/s.

  1. Fall 2015 EFRC Newsletter | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Fall 2015 EFRC Newsletter Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers ... Publications History Contact BES Home 01.11.16 Fall 2015 EFRC Newsletter Print Text Size: ...

  2. The Falling Price of Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Falling Price of Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects The Falling Price of Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects Data courtesy of National Renewable Energy...

  3. Type B Accident Investigation of the July 31, 2006, Fall from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    31, 2006, Fall from Ladder Accident at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California Type B Accident Investigation of the July 31, 2006, Fall from Ladder ...

  4. New Test Facilities Opening this Fall | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Facilities Opening this Fall New Test Facilities Opening this Fall April 1, 2013 - 12:25pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. South Carolina and Colorado - Two of the world's largest state-of-the-art drivetrain test facilities will soon be open for business-the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility at the Restoration Institute in South Carolina and the 5-MW dynamometer at the U.S. Department of

  5. A Cleansing Rain Falls; a Soil-Filled Mist Arises

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Cleansing Rain Falls; a Soil-Filled Mist Arises A Cleansing Rain Falls; a Soil-Filled Mist Arises Print Wednesday, 10 August 2016 00:00 Rain's reputation for cleansing the air may come with a caveat after new findings show that they play a role in generating airborne organic particles. The surprising results show that when droplets hit the dirt, particularly in grasslands and tilled fields, they launch a mist of microscopic particles into the air. The mechanism begins as organic matter in the

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1994 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsFall 1994 Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1994 Single Column Model IOP 1994.10.01 - 1994.10.31 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Data Plots from Colorado State University Data Plots from Livermore National Laboratory Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive. For data sets, see below. Abstract

  7. Gasoline prices peak, expected to fall through end of 2016

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline prices peak, expected to fall through end of 2016 It's all downhill for U.S. drivers at least far as the outlook for gasoline prices is concerned. Gasoline prices are expected to gradually fall through the end of this year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the retail price for regular-grade gasoline averaged $2.37 per gallon in June. That's down 43 cents from the same month last year. The average monthly pump price is expected to drop to $2.01

  8. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  9. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2004-09-01

    a benefit for steelhead. Survivals for spring fish in the Lower Granite to McNary Dam and the McNary to Bonneville Dam reach were similar to recent years. Returning numbers of adult spring and summer chinook, coho and steelhead were less than observed in 2002, but far exceeded the ten-year average return numbers. Sockeye numbers were less than both the 2002 returning adults and the ten-year average number. However, fall chinook numbers surpassed all previous counts at Bonneville Dam since 1938. In 2003, about 81 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This was slightly less than the number released last year, but about average for the past several years.

  10. National Small Business Federal Contracting Summit-DC Fall Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 National Small Business Federal Contracting Summit - DC Fall Conference is presented jointly by the National Association of Small Business Contractors (the Supplier Council of The American Small Business Chamber of Commerce) and the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce in Washington DC.

  11. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-10-27

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  12. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-07-07

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  13. 2015 NHA Hydraulic Power Committee (HPC) Fall Retreat

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join us for the 2015 Hydraulic Power Committee Fall retreat October 4–7, 2015 in Birmingham, Alabama. The event is open to all NHA member companies and invited guests, including owners and...

  14. Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert

    2005-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted video-based boat surveys to identify fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas located in deep water (greater than 1 m) downstream of Bonneville Dam in fall 2004. This report documents the number and extent of Chinook salmon spawning near Ives and Pierce Islands of the Columbia River and is the sixth in a series of reports prepared since 1999. The main objectives of this study were to find deepwater spawning locations of fall Chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel, collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites, and provide estimates of adult spawners in the surveyed area. The primary search area was adjacent to the upper portion of Pierce Island, and the secondary search zone was downstream of this area near the lower portion of Pierce Island. A secondary objective was to document the occurrence of any chum salmon (O. keta) redds in the deeper sections downstream of Hamilton Creek (slough zone search area). Fall Chinook salmon redd numbers were down slightly from the record number found during 2003. The number of fall Chinook redds found in the Ives-Pierce Island complex (river km 228.5) during 2004 was 293, which does not include the number of shallow water redds found by visual observation by boat by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The redds encompassed an area of 14.6 ha occurring adjacent to the lower part of Ives Island and Pierce Island. Peak spawning activity, based on redd counts and live fish seen near redds, was on or near November 16, 2004. An expanded redd count based on percentage video coverage in the primary and secondary search zones was 3,198 fall Chinook salmon redds at water depths exceeding approximately 1.0 m (approximately 125 kcfs) with an estimated spawning population of 10,800. Fall Chinook salmon redds were found at water depths from 1.07 to 7.6 m and were constructed predominantly of medium cobbles ranging in size from 7

  15. Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawtscha) Near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert

    2003-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted video-based boat surveys to identify fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas located in deep water (>1 m) downstream of Bonneville Dam in the fall of 2002. This report documents the number and extent of chinook salmon spawning near Ives and Pierce Islands of the Columbia River, and is the fourth in a series of reports prepared since 1999. The main objective of this study was to find deepwater spawning locations of fall chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel, collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites, and provide estimates of adult spawners in the surveyed area. The secondary objective was to document the occurrence of any chum salmon (O. keta) redds located in the deeper sections near below Hamilton Creek. There was a significant increase in the number of fall chinook salmon redds found in the locations surveyed during the 2002 surveys when compared to previous surveys by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A total of 192 redds were found in two general locations adjacent to Pierce Island (river km 228.5) encompassing an area of approximately 9.31 ha. Peak spawning activity, based on redd counts and live fish seen near redds, was on or near November 15, 2002. An estimated 1,768 fall chinook salmon redds at water depths exceeding {approx}1.m ({approx} 125 kcfs) were documented in 2002. This estimate is the expanded number based on the number of redds found within the pre-defined survey area. Fall chinook salmon redds were found at water depths from 0.9 to 8.5 m and were constructed in gravel to large cobble ranging in size from 4.83 to 13.4 cm in diameter. No chum salmon redds were found in areas surveyed during 2002, although several carcasses were found at the mouth of Woodward Creek and in the deeper sections below Hamilton Creek.

  16. Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has redesigned the Sensor Fish, a small device deployed to study the conditions faced by fish swimming through hydropower installations.

  17. Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fish Lake Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1...

  18. Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Abbreviation: WDFW...

  19. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address: 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place: Salem,...

  20. Valley Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Valley Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Valley Fish...

  1. Health assessment for S-Area Landfill/Hooker, Niagara Falls, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD000000001. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The S-Area Landfill is a National Priorities List site located in Niagara Falls, New York, that was operated from 1947 to 1975 by the Occidental Chemical Corporation (OCC). From 1947 to 1975, OCC is reported to have disposed of an estimated 19,000 tons of chlorobenzenes and approximately 17,000 tons of hexachlorocyclopentadiene. Other wastes disposed of at the site include organic phosphates, hexachlorobutadiene, trichlorophenols, and chlorinated toluenes. Environmental contamination from the S-Area exists on-site and off-site in soils and ground water. Further off-site contamination potentially exists in the Niagara River. The S-Area presents a potential public health threat to the consumers of the City of Niagara Falls drinking water and an incremental increase in contamination to fish in the Niagara River.

  2. Simulated passage through a modified Kaplan turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2002-04-01

    A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the worst case pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more fish-friendly mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). These data indicate that altered operating conditions that raise the nadir (low point) of the turbine passage pressure regime could reduce the injury and mortality rates of fish during turbine passage. Fall Chinook salmon were not injured or killed when subjected to the modified pressure scenario. Bluegills were more sensitive to pressure effects than fall Chinook salmon, but injury and mortality rates were lower under the modified Kaplan pressure regime. This improvement was particularly significant among fish that were acclimated to greater water pressures (traveling at greater depth).

  3. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Lewiston, New York: geologic report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report is one of a series of engineering and environmental reports planned for the US Department of Energy's properties at Niagara Falls, New York. It describes the essential geologic features of the Niagara Falls Storage Site. It is not intended to be a definitive statement of the engineering methods and designs required to obtain desired performance features for any permanent waste disposal at the site. Results are presented of a geological investigation that consisted of two phases. Phase 1 occurred during July 1982 and included geologic mapping, geophysical surveys, and a limited drilling program in the vicinity of the R-10 Dike, planned for interim storage of radioactive materials. Phase 2, initiated in December 1982, included excavation of test pits, geophysical surveys, drilling, observation well installation, and field permeability testing in the South Dike Area, the Northern Disposal Area, and the K-65 Tower Area.

  4. Method and apparatus for reading free falling dosimeter punchcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langsted, James M.

    1992-12-22

    A punchcode reader is provided for reading data encoded in a punchcode hole array on a dosimeter. The dosimeter falls through a passage in the reader containing photosensor detectors disposed along the passage which provide output signals to a microprocessor. The signals are processed to determine the orientation of the dosimeter in the reader, the location and state of punchcode holes in a two row array thereby decoding the encoded data. Multiple rate of fall calculations are made, and if appropriate matching of the punchcode array is not obtained in three tries, an error signal is outputted to the operator. The punchcode reader also provides for storage of data from multiple dosimeters passed through the reader, and for the output of decoded data to an external display or a computer for further processing.

  5. Method and apparatus for reading free falling dosimeter punchcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langsted, J.M.

    1992-12-22

    A punchcode reader is provided for reading data encoded in a punchcode hole array on a dosimeter. The dosimeter falls through a passage in the reader containing photosensor detectors disposed along the passage which provide output signals to a microprocessor. The signals are processed to determine the orientation of the dosimeter in the reader, the location and state of punchcode holes in a two row array thereby decoding the encoded data. Multiple rate of fall calculations are made, and if appropriate matching of the punchcode array is not obtained in three tries, an error signal is output to the operator. The punchcode reader also provides for storage of data from multiple dosimeters passed through the reader, and for the output of decoded data to an external display or a computer for further processing. 8 figs.

  6. Trends in radionuclide concentrations in Hanford Reach fish, 1982 through 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M.

    1994-06-01

    Environmental monitoring has been conducted at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in southeast Washington State since 1945. Fish from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, which borders the Site, are monitored annually. The two objectives of this report were (1) to evaluate trends in the concentrations of radionuclides [e.g., {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs] in two species of Columbia River fish [smallmouth bass and mountain whitefish] sampled from the Hanford Reach from 1982 through 1992; and (2) to determine the impact of Hanford Site releases on these two species and carp and fall chinook salmon collected during this time frame. The evaluation found gradual reductions of {sup 137}Cs in bass muscle and {sup 90}Sr in bass and whitefish carcass from 1982 through 1992. Concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in bass and whitefish followed the pattern established by reported Hanford Site releases from 1982 through 1992 and was supported by significant regression analyses comparing annual releases to sample concentration. Because data for carp have been collected only since 1990, the data base was inadequate for determining trends. Moreover, fall chinook salmon were only sampled once in this 11-year period. Concentrations of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in fish samples collected from distant background locations exceeded concentrations in Hanford Reach fish. Estimates of the dose from consumption of Hanford Reach fish were less than 0.001 times the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and the US Department of Energy guideline of 100 mrem/yr.

  7. Sandia's Continuously Recirculating Falling-Particle Receiver Emplaced at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Top of Solar Tower Continuously Recirculating Falling-Particle Receiver Emplaced at Top of Solar Tower - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid

  8. Sandia's Continuously Recirculating Falling-Particle Receiver Placed Atop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Solar Tower Continuously Recirculating Falling-Particle Receiver Placed Atop the Solar Tower - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  9. Microsoft Word - DSQ Fall 2009_26oct09

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fall 2009 Comments Questions or comments regarding the Defense Science Quarterly should be directed to Terri Batuyong (Terri.Batuyong@nnsa.doe.gov). Technical Editor: Christina Coulter Defense Science Quarterly Inside This Issue 1 Message from the Director 2 Advances in Performance of Microchannel Plate Detectors for HEDP Diagnostics 3 JMP Receives DP Award of Excellence 4 Flyer Plate Accelerated to Over 100,000 mph on Z 5 A New Generation of Exploring Matter at Extreme Conditions 5 2009 Edward

  10. EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as co-lead Federal agencies, prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to operate Albeni Falls dam during the winter months (approximately December 15th to March 31st) and determine whether the existing Columbia River System Operation Review EIS (DOE/EIS-0170) is adequate or a supplemental or new EIS is required.

  11. EIS-0156: Cowlitz Falls Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of constructing and operating a proposed 70-megawatt hydroelectric dam and electrical infrastructure on the Cowlitz River near Morton and Randle, Washington. The U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration adopted this statement on 12/6/1990 to fulfil its National Environmental Policy Act requirement for its proposed action to acquire the power output from the Cowlitz Falls Hydroelectric Project.

  12. Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties in Lewiston, New York,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties in Lewiston, New York, from 7983 through 7986 Depatfment of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Field Office July 7 992 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I CONTENTS Figures .......................... Tables .......................... Abbreviations ....................... Acronyms ......................... 1.0 Introduction ..................... 2.0 Site History ..................... 3.0 Property Descriptions ................ 3.1 3.2

  13. ADDENDUM TO ACTION DESCRIPTION MEMORANDUM NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ADDENDUM TO ACTION DESCRIPTION MEMORANDUM NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE PROPOSED INTERIM REMEDIAL ACTIONS FOR FY 1983-85 ACCELERATED PROGRAM (1984 VICINITY PROPERTIES CLEANUP) Prepared by Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois July 1984 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Technical Services Division Oak Ridge, Tennessee CONTENTS Page SUMMARY OF PROPOSED ACTION AND RELATED ACTIVITIES ........... 1 HISTORY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING

  14. High-Temperature Falling Particle Receiver Reaches New Limits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Falling Particle Receiver Reaches New Limits - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management

  15. Innovation Fund Information Session, Fall 2016 | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Innovation Fund Information Session, Fall 2016 September 7, 2016 10:00AM to 11:00AM Location Building 241, Room D172 Type Meeting Among the topics that will be covered: Intellectual property protection and conflict of interest The various innovation programs available to Argonne researchers and how the Innovation Fund fits in How Technology Development and Commercialization drives commercialization at Argonne Specifics about the Innovation Fund, including tips for success To

  16. Jefferson Lab announces two Fall Science Series events -- featuring magic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and football | Jefferson Lab events -- featuring magic and football Jefferson Lab announces two Fall Science Series events - featuring magic and football October 4, 2005 Using humor, stagecraft and lighting, along with laboratory experiments disguised as magical illusion, the audience will view science from a perspective most have never seen before with Bob Friedhoffer, author, scientist and magician. He will conduct "Einstein and Beyond - The Magic Show" on Tuesday, Oct. 25 at the

  17. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Predator and Bottom-Feeding Fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti Reservoirs in North-Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Gonzales, P.R. Fresquez

    2006-03-01

    fish (walleye, northern pike, bass) ({mu} = 1.67 ng/g) and the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) charts. Similarly, bottom-feeding fish from Abiquiu Reservoir also contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-wet) than predator fish (walleye, bass) ({mu} = 0.68 ng/g-wet) and only the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in the EPA charts.

  18. Evaluation of the Whooshh Fish Transport System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last November, John Oliver highlighted during his program Last Week Tonight the Whooshh Fish Transport System (aka “salmon cannon”), a new, innovate fish transport system developed by Whooshh...

  19. Idaho Fish Screening Improvements Final Status Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    2008-11-12

    This project funds two Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) fish habitat biologists to develop, secure funding for, and implement on-the-ground fish habitat improvement projects in the lower Clearwater River drainage and the upper Salmon River drainage. This report summarizes project activity during the first year of funding. The Clearwater Region fish habitat biologist began work on January 28, 2008 and the Salmon Region habitat biologist began on February 11, 2008.

  20. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per

  1. Fish Protection: Cooperative research advances fish-friendly turbine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Foust, Jason

    2012-12-01

    Renewable hydropower is a tremendous resource within the Pacific Northwest that is managed with considerable cost and consideration for the safe migration of salmon. Recent research conducted in this region has provided results that could lower the impacts of hydro power production and make the technology more fish-friendly. This research is now being applied during a period when a huge emphasis is being made to develop clean, renewable energy sources.

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall SCM/NBL IOP in Support of CASES-99

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsFall SCMNBL IOP in Support of CASES-99 Campaign Links CASES Data from CASES ... Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall SCMNBL IOP in ...

  3. 2nd Annual National Safety Awareness Event to Prevent Falls in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Awareness Event to Prevent Falls in Construction 2nd Annual National Safety Awareness Event to Prevent Falls in Construction April 27, 2015 - 8:08am Addthis 2nd Annual ...

  4. U.S. net oil and petroleum product imports expected to fall to...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and petroleum product imports expected to fall to just 29 percent of demand in 2014 With ... oil and petroleum products is forecast to fall from 40 percent in 2012 to just 29 percent ...

  5. Investigation of the June 29, 2012, Fall from a Fixed Ladder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 29, 2012, Fall from a Fixed Ladder at Building 830, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Investigation of the June 29, 2012, Fall from a Fixed ...

  6. The Falling Price of Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Falling Price of Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects The Falling Price of Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects Data courtesy of National Renewable Energy Lab. Chart

  7. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Performance Composite Data Products: Fall 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, Jennifer; Sprik, Sam; Ainscough, Chris; Saur, Genevieve; Peters, Mike

    2015-11-01

    This publication includes 53 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Fall 2015 for fuel cell electric vehicle performance.

  8. Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall/Winter 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall/Winter 2014 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall/Winter 2014 Cover of the Indian Energy's Fall/Winter Newsletter. Fall/Winter 2014 Issue Minto Upgrades Community Lodge with START Support Message from the Director: Pilar Thomas Sharing Knowledge: Native Student Interns Make A Difference in Indian Country Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution, Cut Costs Building Bridges: Federal Agencies Join Forces to Promote Sustainable, Resilient Tribal Communities Leading the

  9. 01-02-2008 - Wood Cabinet Falls Apart | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 - Wood Cabinet Falls Apart Document Number: NA Effective Date: 012008 File (public): PDF icon 01-02-2008blue...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Mill Site - TX 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mill Site - TX 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Falls City Mill Site (TX.04 ) Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management. Designated Name: Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site Alternate Name: Falls City Mill Site Uranium Mill in Falls City Location: Karnes County, Texas Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled:

  11. The Fall Meeting of the Committee on Energy Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    * * * * * FRIDAY NOVEMBER 5, 1999 The Fall Meeting of the Committee on Energy Statistics commenced at 8:30 a.m. at the Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 8E089, Washington, D.C., Daniel Relles, presiding. PRESENT: DANIEL RELLES, Chairman JAY BREIDT LYNDA CARLSON THOMAS COWING CAROL GOTWAY CRAWFORD JAY HAKES JAMES HAMMITT PHILIP HANSER CALVIN KENT W. DAVID MONTGOMERY LARRY PETTIS SEYMOUR SUDMAN BILL WEINIG ROY WHITMORE C O N T E N T S PAGE Opening 5 Addressing Accuracy in

  12. Clean Cities Drive Vol 3 Issue 4 - Fall 1996

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fall 1996 N ot all news from Congress is bad for alternative fuels. "The more you build a constituency, the better off you are," Matthew Brown, senior policy specialist for the National Conference of State Legislatures, told Clean Cities Conference-goers last June in Atlanta. "Clean Cities is a natural constituency." Brown recommended performing the necessary education when it is not a legislative emergency; and there are at least two new groups in Washington, D.C. designed

  13. International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.71 2.03 2.00 2.33 2000's 2.77 4.85 3.01 -- -- 11.20 -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  14. International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,373 6,544 6,103 4,857 2000's 3,022 617 602 0 0 22 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S.

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1995 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1995 Single Column Model IOP 1995.09.01 - 1995.10.31 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Data Plots from Colorado State University Data Plots from Livermore National Laboratory Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive. For data sets, see below. Abstract These seasonal SCM

  16. U.S. diesel fuel price falls under $3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    diesel fuel price falls under $3 The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell 12 cents from a week ago to $2.93 a gallon on Monday. This marks the first time since September 2010 that diesel prices fell under $3 a gallon, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the Central Atlantic region at 3.13 a gallon, down 10.8 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Gulf Coast region at 2.84 a gallon, down 12.1

  17. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year

  18. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret

    2003-09-01

    The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater

  19. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  20. Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawtscha) Near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted video-based boat surveys in fall 2003 to identify spawning areas for fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in deep water (>1 m) downstream of Bonneville Dam. This report documents the number and extent of Chinook salmon spawning near Ives and Pierce islands of the Columbia River, and is the fifth in a series of reports prepared since 1999. The primary objective of this study was to find deepwater spawning locations of fall Chinook salmon in the main Columbia River channel, collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at spawning sites, and provide estimates of adult spawners in the surveyed area. The secondary objective was to document the occurrence of any chum salmon (O. keta) redds in the deeper sections near below Hamilton Creek. Results from the 2003 study show a continuing trend upward in the number of fall Chinook salmon redds found within the survey zones. The number of fall Chinook redds found in the Ives Pierce Island complex (river km 228.5) has increased by a factor of five since the surveys began in 1999. The total number of redds found during 2003 was 336, which compares to 192 in 2002, 43 in 2001, 76 in 2000, and 64 in 1999. The redds encompassed an area of 13.7 ha occurring adjacent to the lower part of Ives Island and Pierce Island. Peak spawning activity, based on redd counts and live fish seen near redds, was on or near November 24, 2003. An expanded redd count based on percentage of video coverage in the primary and secondary search zones was 3,218 fall Chinook salmon redds in water exceeding 1 m deep and flowing at about 125 kcfs. Fall Chinook salmon redds were found at water depths from 1.07 to 7.6 m and were constructed predominantly of medium cobbles ranging from 7.6 to 15.2 cm in diameter. Two chum salmon redds were found in a small location downstream from Hamilton Creek in water depths of approximately 1 m. No salmon redds were found in other areas searched, including near

  1. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring in Idaho, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, A.Douglas

    1993-12-01

    This report documents the progress of Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s fish health monitoring during the past five years and will serve as a completion report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project. Anadromous fish at twelve IDFG facilities were monitored for various pathogens and organosomatic analyses were performed to anadromous fish prior to their release. A fish disease database has been developed and data is presently being entered. Alternate funding has been secured to continue fish health monitoring.

  2. Evidence of Deepwater Spawning of Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) : Spawning Near Ives and Pierce Island of the Columbia River, 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2000-04-01

    Fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by Washington Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (WDFW) biologists in 1993 (Hymer 1997). Known spawning areas include gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and Ives island. Limited spawning ground surveys were conducted in the area around Ives and Pierce Islands during 1994-1997 and based on these surveys it was believed that fall chinook salmon successfully spawned in this area. The size of this population from 1994 to 1996 was estimated at 1,800 to 5,200 fish (Hymer 1997). Recently, chum salmon were also documented spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam. Chum salmon O. kisutch were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999. There are several ongoing investigations to define the physical habitat characteristics associated with fall chinook and chum salmon spawning areas downstream of Bonneville Dam. A major concern is to determine what flows (i.e. surface elevations) are necessary to ensure their long-term survival. Our objective was to locate deepwater spawning locations in the main Columbia River channel and to collect additional data on physical habitat parameters at the site. This objective is consistent with the high priority that the Northwest Power Planning Council's Independent Advisory Board and the salmon managers have placed on determining the importance of mainstem habitats to the production of salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

  3. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol

    2009-02-20

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality

  4. Atmospheric Mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2007-12-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over two-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran mercury analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate mercury (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize mercury air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate mercury dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 1 pg m-3). Seasonally-averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 0.032, 0.043 0.040, 0.00084 0.0017 and 0.00036 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively) and 0.50 0.39, 0.40 0.31, 0.51 0.43 and 0.76 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 3.3 g m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2 12 ng m-3) and RGM (50 - 150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicated predominant source directions from the southeast (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) through the southwest (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the northwest (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  5. Atmospheric mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2008-03-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over 2-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran Hg analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate Hg (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize Hg air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate Hg dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM, respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 1 pg m-3). Seasonally averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 0.032, 0.043 0.040, 0.00084 0.0017 and 0.00036 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall and winter, respectively) and 0.50 0.39, 0.40 0.31, 0.51 0.43 and 0.76 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 3.3 g m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.212 ng m-3) and RGM (50150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicate predominant source directions to the SE (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) and SW (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the NW (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  6. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.

    2009-09-14

    This factsheet explains studies conducted in a highly reproducible manner to examine the biological effects to fish exposed to a shear environment in the laboratory. Strain rate was used as the index of intensity to describe the hydraulic force experienced by a fish in a shear environment. It was determined that no significant injuries occurred to any fish subjected to strain rates equal to or less than 500 cm/s/cm.

  7. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2013-02-01

    This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

  8. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2005-07-01

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage

  9. Applications of the Sensor Fish Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-08-28

    The Sensor Fish is an autonomous device developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (COE) to better understand the physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro-turbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone several design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) device, has been deployed successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when they pass through several hydroelectric projects along main stem Columbia and Snake Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Just as information gathered from crash test dummies can affect automobile design with the installation of protective designs to lessen or prevent human injury, having sensor fish data to quantify accelerations, rotations, and pressure changes, helps identify fish injury mechanisms such as strike, turbulent shear, pressure, and inertial effects, including non-lethal ones such as stunning or signs of vestibular disruption that expose fish to a higher risk of predation by birds and piscivorous fish downstream following passage.

  10. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  11. Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  12. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet explains studies conducted in a highly reproducible manner to examine the biological effects to fish exposed to a shear environment in the laboratory.

  13. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report evaluated the feasibility of two types of technologies to observe fish and near neutrally buoyant drogues as they move through hydropower turbines.

  14. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  15. Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental monitoring report. Calendar year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    During 1983, an environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, a United States Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York presently used for the storage of radioactive residues, contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program at NFSS measures radon concentrations in air, uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediments, and external gamma exposure rates. Radiation doses to the public are also calculated. Environmental samples collected are analyzed to determine compliance with applicable standards. Comparison of 1983 monitoring results with 1982 results shows a significant decrease in radon levels at almost every monitoring location. External gamma exposure rates also showed a general decrease. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables

  16. AmeriFlux US-PFa Park Falls/WLEF

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Desai, Ankur [University of Wisconsin

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-PFa Park Falls/WLEF. Site Description - The flux footprint encompasses a highly heterogeneous landscape of upland forests and wetlands (forested and nonforested). The forests are mainly deciduous but also include substantial coniferous coverage. The upland/lowland variability occurs on spatial scales of a few hundred meters. This heterogeneous landscape is further complicated by a nonuniform, small scale mosaic of thinning and clearcutting of the forest. At larger scales (1 km or greater) the forest cover mosaic is quite homogeneous for many kilometers. The site was chosen not for study of a simple stand, but for upscaling experiments. The daytime fetch of flux measurements from the 396m level is on the order of 5-10 km, yielding a flux footprint roughly 100x the area of a typical stand-level flux tower. AC power (tower is a TV transmitter).

  17. Marketing the Klamath Falls Geothermal District Heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafferty, K.

    1993-06-01

    The new marketing strategy for the Klamath Falls system has concentrated on offering the customer an attractive and easy to understand rate structure, reduced retrofit cost and complexity for his building along with an attractive package of financing and tax credits. Initial retrofit costs and life-cycle cost analysis have been conducted on 22 buildings to date. For some, the retrofit costs are simply too high for the conversion to make sense at current geothermal rates. For many, however, the prospects are good. At this writing, two new customers are now connected and operating with 5 to 8 more buildings committed to connect this construction season after line extensions are completed. This represents nearly a 60% increase in the number of buildings connected to the system and a 40% increase in system revenue.

  18. What could we learn from a sharply falling positron fraction?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delahaye, Timur; Kotera, Kumiko; Silk, Joseph

    2014-10-20

    Recent results from the AMS-02 data have confirmed that the cosmic-ray positron fraction increases with energy between 10 and 200 GeV. This quantity should not exceed 50%, and it is hence expected that it will either converge toward 50% or fall. We study the possibility that future data may show the positron fraction dropping down abruptly to the level expected with only secondary production, and forecast the implications of such a feature in term of possible injection mechanisms that include both dark matter and pulsars. Were a sharp steepening to be found, rather surprisingly, we conclude that pulsar models would do at least as well as dark matter scenarios in terms of accounting for any spectral cut-off.

  19. New runners to boost peak output at Niagara Falls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reason, J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrofitted Francis turbines will improve the value of power generated from Niagara Falls by increasing the peak output of the hydroturbine units at the Robert Moses hydroelectric plant. The computer-designed runners are expected to add 330 MW to the peak capacity of the 28-yr-old plant and significantly increase the efficiency at high flow rates. Next year, the first new runner will be retrofit to the highly instrumented Unit 4. If the retrofit unit meets it increased-performance expectations, the other 12 units will be upgraded between 1993 and 1998. The work is part of an overall expansion of the Niagara Power Project designed to made better use of the power value of Niagara river water, within the constraints of a treaty with Canada and the scenic value of the falls. These constraints, together with varying flows and heads, introduced enormous complexities into the selection and design of the new runners. The alterations being made to Unit 4, in addition to replacing the turbine runner, include modifying the draft tube-liners, increasing the wicket-gate stroke, replacing the turbine discharge ring (to accommodate longer blades), making various electrical modifications to the generator, and replacing the transformer. But the key to the retrofit is the computer-designed runner. Charles Grose, senior project manager, New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY, emphasizes that such computer design techniques were not available a few years ago; neither were the computer-controlled machining techniques necessary to manufacture the new runners. Other aspects of the upgrading that were analyzed include runner stability, resonance, shaft torsional stress, and runaway speed.

  20. City of Klamath Falls, Oregon Geothermal Power Plant Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Brown, PE; Stephen Anderson, PE, Bety Riley

    2011-07-31

    The purpose of the Klamath Falls project is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a combined thermal distribution system and power generation facility. The city of Klamath Falls operates a geothermal district heating system which would appear to be an attractive opportunity to install a power generation system. Since the two wells have operated reliably and consistently over many years, no new sources or resource exploration would be necessary. It appears that it will cost more to construct, operate, maintain and amortize a proposed geothermal facility than the long?term value of the power it would produce. The success of a future project will be determined by whether utility power production costs will remain low and whether costs of construction, operations, or financing may be reduced. There are areas that it would be possible to reduce construction cost. More detailed design could enable the city to obtain more precise quotes for components and construction, resulting in reduction in contingency projections. The current level of the contingency for uncertainty of costs is between $200,000 and $300,000. Another key issue with this project appears to be operation cost. While it is expected that only minimal routine monitoring and operating expenses will occur, the cost of water supply and waste water disposal represents nearly one quarter of the value of the power. If the cost of water alone could be reduced, the project could become viable. In addition, the projected cost of insurance may be lower than estimated under a city?wide policy. No provisions have been made for utilization of federal tax incentives. If a transaction with a third-party owner/taxpayer were to be negotiated, perhaps the net cost of ownership could be reduced. It is recommended that these options be investigated to determine if the costs and benefits could be brought together. The project has good potential, but like many alternative energy projects today, they only work economically if the

  1. Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V.

    2007-11-13

    This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat

  2. Final Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Falls City uranium mill tailings site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This EA examines the short- and long-term effects of the DOE`s proposed remedial action for the Falls City tailings site. The no action alternative is also examined. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented here to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an EIS will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE will issue an official ``Finding of No Significant Impact`` and implement the proposed action.

  3. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at

  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to

  6. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release

  7. Kalispel Resident Fish Project Annual Report, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

    2004-04-01

    In 2003 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2003, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented.

  8. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

    2003-03-01

    In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

  9. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H.; Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  10. Idaho Department of Fish & Game | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish & Game Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Idaho Department of Fish and Game Name: Idaho Department of Fish and Game Address: 600 S. Walnut Place: Boise, Idaho Zip: 83712...

  11. New Mexico Department of Game and Fish | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Game and Fish Jump to: navigation, search Logo: New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Name: New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Abbreviation: NMDGF Address: 1 Wildlife Way...

  12. 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 23-25, 2014 | Department of Energy 4th Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, September 23-25, 2014 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, September 23-25, 2014 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, September 23-25, 2014 The Tritium Focus Group (TFG), is a long standing DOE Working Group, whose purpose is to promote cost-effective improvements in tritium safety, handling,

  13. Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Summer/Fall 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summer/Fall 2013 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Summer/Fall 2013 Indian Energy Beat: News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country Summer/Fall 2013 Issue Educational Curriculum Supports Tribal Energy Develolpment Efforts Message from the Director Building Bridges: Seven New Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group Members Announced Sharing Knowledge: Military Installations Offer Economic Development Opportunity for Tribes Opening Doors: 10 Tribe Selected

  14. Jefferson Lab announces Oct. 7 Fall Science Series event | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oct. 7 Fall Science Series event The Vinland Map The "Vinland Map", possibly depicting Viking exploration of North America in the 15th century, is housed in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University. Jefferson Lab announces Oct. 7 Fall Science Series event September 29, 2003 Jefferson Lab's Fall Science Series begins Tuesday, October 7 with Michael Henchman, a chemistry professor from Brandeis University, Massachusetts. "Multi-Million Dollar Forgeries

  15. Sandia Wins Funding for High-Temperature Falling-Particle Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Temperature Falling-Particle Solar-Energy Receiver - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable ...

  16. Fight Fall Allergies and Save Energy by Checking Your HVAC System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fall is a great time to do regular maintenance on your HVAC systems to ensure they're running efficiently -- and it may help your allergies as well!

  17. Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooley, Sharon

    2009-03-20

    through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the

  18. EIS-0526: Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project; near Glendive, Montana EIS-0526: Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project; near Glendive, Montana ...

  19. Pressure Temperature Log At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Pressure Temperature Log At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP)...

  20. Lunty Tropical Fish Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lunty Tropical Fish Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lunty Tropical Fish Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  1. Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  2. Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans...

  3. Paso Robles Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paso Robles Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Paso Robles Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  4. Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  5. Fish Breeders of Idaho Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Idaho Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fish Breeders of Idaho Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fish...

  6. Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  7. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  8. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  9. Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area...

  11. First Ascent Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ascent Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name First Ascent Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  12. Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley...

  13. Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  14. Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure...

  15. Coachella Valley Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coachella Valley Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Coachella Valley Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  16. Wyoming Game and Fish Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Game and Fish Department Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wyoming Game and Fish Department Abbreviation: WGFD Address: 5400 Bishop Boulevard Place: Cheyenne, Wyoming Zip: 82006...

  17. Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Published Publisher Not...

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley...

  19. Blue Aquarius Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Aquarius Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Aquarius Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  20. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  1. Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley...

  2. California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    & Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Name: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Address: 1416 9th St, 12th Floor Place:...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

  4. NAC 503 - Hunting, Fishing and Trapping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fishing and TrappingLegal Abstract These code sections outline the protective measures and restrictions on hunting, fishing, and trapping in the state of Nevada. Published...

  5. Self-charging Tracking Device Monitors Fish Migration through...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Self-charging Tracking Device Monitors Fish Migration through Hydroelectric Dams Self-charging Tracking Device Monitors Fish Migration through Hydroelectric Dams August 18, 2016 - ...

  6. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife ...

  7. Design and Implementation of a new Autonomous Sensor Fish to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design and Implementation of a new Autonomous Sensor Fish to Support Advanced Hydropower ... perform laboratory and in-field validation of turbine performance and fish passage claims. ...

  8. Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project, Montana DRAFT - Appendix E ... Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project Appendix E Monitoring and ...

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural ...

  10. Addendum: Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project, Montana Draft Environmental Impact Statement- Addendum June 2016 1 Addendum: Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish ...

  11. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, ...

  12. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies This ...

  13. Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project, Montana DRAFT - Appendix F Correspondence Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Correspondence Fish Passage Project ...

  14. EERE Success Story—Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has redesigned the Sensor Fish, a small device deployed to study the conditions faced by fish swimming through hydropower installations.

  15. Organotin intake through fish consumption in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Airaksinen, Riikka; Rantakokko, Panu; Turunen, Anu W.; Vartiainen, Terttu; Vuorinen, Pekka J.; Lappalainen, Antti; Vihervuori, Aune; Mannio, Jaakko; Hallikainen, Anja

    2010-08-15

    Background: Organotin compounds (OTCs) are a large class of synthetic chemicals with widely varying properties. Due to their potential adverse health effects, their use has been restricted in many countries. Humans are exposed to OTCs mostly through fish consumption. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe OTC exposure through fish consumption and to assess the associated potential health risks in a Finnish population. Methods: An extensive sampling of Finnish domestic fish was carried out in the Baltic Sea and freshwater areas in 2005-2007. In addition, samples of imported seafood were collected in 2008. The chemical analysis was performed in an accredited testing laboratory during 2005-2008. Average daily intake of the sum of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT) and dioctyltin (DOT) ({Sigma}OTCs) for the Finnish population was calculated on the basis of the measured concentrations and fish consumption rates. Results: The average daily intake of {Sigma}OTCs through fish consumption was 3.2 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}, which is 1.3% from the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 250 ng/kg bw day{sup -1} set by the European Food Safety Authority. In total, domestic wild fish accounted for 61% of the {Sigma}OTC intake, while the intake through domestic farmed fish was 4.0% and the intake through imported fish was 35%. The most important species were domestic perch and imported salmon and rainbow trout. Conclusions: The Finnish consumers are not likely to exceed the threshold level for adverse health effects due to OTC intake through fish consumption.

  16. Niagara Falls Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Lewiston, New York. [Niagara Falls Storage Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring at NFSS began in 1981. The site is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is assigned to the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at NFSS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and total uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, sediments, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters including seven metals are routinely measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment.

  17. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Combs, Mitch

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee

  18. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2002-07-01

    Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion

  19. Identifying the Effects on Fish of Changes in Water Pressure during Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2003-09-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation. We investigated the responses of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, singly and in combination, in the laboratory. Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation while being held at either surface or 30 ft of pressure. Some of these fish were then subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a Kaplan turbine under worst case (to 0.1 atmospheres) or more fish friendly (to 0.5 atmospheres) scenarios. Surface- and depth-acclimated Chinook salmon and bluegill, with no exposure to dissolved gas above ambient levels, were subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a bulb turbine under worst case (to 0.68 atmospheres) or more fish friendly (to 1.0 atmospheres) scenarios. Bluegill, the most pressure-sensitive among the three species, incurred injuries that ranged from mild (internal hemorrhaging) (bulb turbine) to death (Kaplan turbine). For each type of turbine passage, bluegill acclimated to 30 ft depth and subjected to the more severe pressure nadir were more susceptible to injury/death. However, even control bluegill (i.e., not subjected to simulated turbine passage) experienced mild to moderate injury from rapidly ascending from 30 ft of pressure to surface pressure. The dissolved gas level had only a small additive effect on the injury/death rate of bluegill subjected to simulated Kaplan turbine passage. Thus, while physoclistous fish, such as bluegill, appear to be susceptible to injury from any rapid pressure decrease, those that are most severe (e.g., Kaplan turbine passage) are likely to be most injurious. Chinook salmon and rainbow trout were much less susceptible

  20. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration

  1. Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2010-01-29

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

  2. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest). Chinook salmon. [Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M.A.; Hassler, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    The chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is a valuable sport and commercial fish species and accounted for over 69% of the salmon caught off the California coast from 1971 through 1983. Chinook salmon runs in the Sacramento River, the major producer of chinook salmon in California, are devided into fall, late fall, winter, and spring runs. Other coatal rivers have fall and spring runs of chinook or only a fall run. After hatching, the sac-fry live in the gravel for a month or longer before they emerge as fry. Some fry migrate immediately to saltwater, other remain 2 to 12 months in freshwater before migrating. They remain in the ocean from 1 to 7 years; most females mature and return to freshwater to spawn after 2 to 4 years at sea. Some males return to spawn after only 1 year in the ocean, but most return after 2 to 4 years. All chinook salmon die after they reenter freshwater, whether they spawn or not.

  3. OpenEI Community - Fish and Wildlife

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Wed, 05 Sep 2012 04:36:43 +0000 Kyoung 488...

  4. Simulated Passage Through A Modified Kaplan Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G. F.

    2002-03-15

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). The responses of fall Chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to these two stresses, both singly and in combination, were investigated in the laboratory. A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the ?worst case? pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more ?fish-friendly? mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas (TDG) levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa) or 30 ft (191 kPa) of pressure, then held at surface pressure at 100% saturation for a 48-hour observation period. Sensitivity of fall Chinook salmon to gas supersaturation was slightly higher than in the previous test series, with 15% mortality for surface-acclimated fish at 120% TDG, compared to 0% in the previous tests.

  5. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, James W.

    1989-08-15

    Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Contract AI79-87BP35585 was implemented on July 20, 1987. Second year activities focused on full implementation of disease surveillance activities and histopathological support services to participating state agencies. Persistent and sometimes severe disease losses were caused by infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in summer steelhead trout in Idaho and in spring chinook salmon at hatcheries on the lower Columbia River. Diagnostic capability was enhanced by the installation, for field use, of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technology at the Dworshak Fish Health Center for the detection and assay of bacterial kidney disease and by a dot-blot'' training session for virus identification at the Lower Columbia Fish Health Center. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to 13 Columbia River basin National Fish hatcheries. Case history data was fully documented in a computerized data base for storage and analysis. This report briefly describes work being done to meet contract requirements for fish disease surveillance at Service facilities in the Columbia River basin. It also summarizes the health status of fish reared at those hatcheries and provides a summary of case history data for calendar year 1988. 2 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S. ); Amidan, Brett G. ); Cada, G F.

    2003-07-31

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at

  7. Fatal accidents involving roof falls in coal mining, 1996--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving roof and rib falls that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1996 through December 1998. It includes statistics for the fatalities, as well as abstracts, best practices and illustrations. Conclusion statements have been substituted for best practices where no Title 30 Code of Regulations violations were cited during the accident investigation. From January 1996 through December 1998, 36 miners died at coal operations from accidents classified as roof falls. The information in the report is based on statistics taken from the 1996 through 1998 MSHA Fatal Illustration Programs: Roof Fall Fatalities by District.

  8. Fatal accidents involving roof falls in coal mining, 1996--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-11-01

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving roof and rib falls that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1996 through December 1998. It includes statistics for the fatalities, as well as abstracts, best practices and illustrations. Conclusion statements have been substituted for best practices where no Title 30 Code of Regulations violations were cited during the accident investigation. From January 1996 through December 1998, 36 miners died at coal operations from accidents classified as roof falls. The information in the report is based on statistics taken from the 1996 through 1998 MSHA Fatal Illustration Programs: Roof Fall Fatalities by District.

  9. Jefferson Lab announces Fall 2002 Science Series line-up | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    announces Fall 2002 Science Series line-up Jefferson Lab announces Fall 2002 Science Series line-up September 6, 2002 The Jefferson Lab Fall Science Series kicks off Wednesday, Sept. 18, with Robert Ehrlich, noted scientist and author of 19 books. The George Mason University professor will be discussing the issues he raises in his most recent book, "Nine Crazy Ideas in Science: A Few Might Even Be True." Some of possibilities he contemplates in his new book include: AIDS is not caused

  10. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not

  11. DOE Office of Indian Energy Provides Tribes with Hands-On Support to Advance Tribal Energy Projects, Fall 2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Fall 2012.

  12. High-pressure viscosity of liquid Fe and FeS revisited by falling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-pressure viscosity of liquid Fe and FeS revisited by falling sphere viscometry using ultrafast X-ray imaging Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become ...

  13. Operating Experience Level 3, Dangers of Objects Falling into Normally Occupied Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to the dangers of items falling from heights into spaces normally occupied by workers at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

  14. 2nd Annual National Safety Awareness Event to Prevent Falls in Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has scheduled an awareness event from May 4-15 to raise awareness among employers and workers about the hazards of falls.

  15. U.S. gasoline prices fall below $3.50 (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gasoline prices fall below 3.50 (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell 3.3 cents from a week ago to 3.47 a gallon on Monday. This marks the first ...

  16. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since October 2009...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5, 2014 U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since October 2009 (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 2.55 a gallon on Monday. That's down ...

  17. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level of the year (long version...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14, 2014 U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level of the year (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level of the year at 3.21 a ...

  18. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since October 2009...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gasoline prices fall to lowest level since October 2009 (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 2.55 a gallon on Monday. That's down 12 cents ...

  19. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since January 2011...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    20, 2014 U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since January 2011 (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level since January 2011 ...

  20. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since February 2010...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8, 2014 U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since February 2010 (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 2.68 a gallon on Monday. That's ...

  1. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since January 2011...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0, 2014 U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since January 2011 (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level since January 2011 ...

  2. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since February 2010...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gasoline prices fall to lowest level since February 2010 (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 2.68 a gallon on Monday. That's down 9.9 cents ...

  3. National Bioenergy Center--Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-12-01

    Fall 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: rapid analysis models for compositional analysis of intermediate process streams; engineered arabinose-fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strain.

  4. 01-05-1998 - Fall From Ladder Results in Fractured Vertebra | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Fall From Ladder Results in Fractured Vertebra Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/1998 File (public): PDF icon 01-05-1998_yellow_alert(2)

  5. EA-0907: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Sewer System Upgrade Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the Sewer System at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho.  The...

  6. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since July 2012

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    fuel price falls to lowest level since July 2012 The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to its lowest point since July 2012 at 3.80 a gallon on Monday. ...

  7. Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With Particle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files are the unedited transcripts of EIA's fall 2005 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings may be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts, here at:

  8. Jefferson Lab Announces Fall Science Series Event Nov. 23 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announces Fall Science Series Event Nov. 23 Jefferson Lab Announces Fall Science Series Event Nov. 23 Speaker examines timely Thanksgiving topic: food toxins & how to avoid them October 27, 2004 On Tuesday, Nov. 23, at Jefferson Lab - just before Thanksgiving - join Kristen Kulp, a cancer research scientist with the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as she discusses "What's for Dinner? Avoiding Toxins Lurking in Your Food." Kulp

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Uranium Ore Stockpile - TX

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    04A Falls City Uranium Ore Stockpile - TX 04A FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Falls City Uranium Ore Stockpile (TX.04A ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that

  10. Type B Accident Investigation of the July 31, 2006, Fall from Ladder

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accident at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California | Department of Energy 31, 2006, Fall from Ladder Accident at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California Type B Accident Investigation of the July 31, 2006, Fall from Ladder Accident at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California October 25, 2006 Early on the morning of July 31, 2006, an electrician in the Plant Engineering (PE) Department of the Lawrence Livermore

  11. Investigation of the July 1, 2011, Fall Injury at the Savannah River Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy July 1, 2011, Fall Injury at the Savannah River Site Investigation of the July 1, 2011, Fall Injury at the Savannah River Site August 8, 2011 On July 1, 2011, a worker fell from portable scaffolding during facility modifications in the Purification Area Vault (PAV) of Building 105-K at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The worker required hospitalization due to sustained head injury and numerous broken ribs. This accident meets Accident Investigation Criteria 2.a.2 of

  12. Investigation of the June 29, 2012, Fall from a Fixed Ladder at Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    830, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory | Department of Energy June 29, 2012, Fall from a Fixed Ladder at Building 830, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Investigation of the June 29, 2012, Fall from a Fixed Ladder at Building 830, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory August 2012 On June 29, 2012, at approximately 2:35 p.m., a Brookhaven Sciences Associates maintenance metals worker was

  13. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  14. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn

  15. The role of FISH in prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulch, P.; Crandall, B.F.; Hsi, C.

    1994-09-01

    FISH provides a cytogenetic technique which is useful in defining de novo translocations, deletions, insertions, and marker chromosomes in prenatal diagnosis. While the cytogenetic interpretation may be improved with FISH, it may not resolve questions concerning prognosis and options which are genetic counseling issues. Two recent cases illustrate this. Case 1 involved a 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype from amniocentesis. 22/50 cells had 46,X/46,X+mar; 28/50 cells had 45,X. The marker was smaller than a G. C banding did not confirm this as a Y. The father`s peripheral blood study was normal and his Y did not resemble the marker. It appeared likely that the marker was a structurally abnormal Y since male external genitalia were detected by fetal ultrasound. FISH using alpha- and classical (DYZ1/DYZ3) satellite Y-specific probes did not identify the marker as a Y. Case 2 was a fetus which had a de novo translocation 46,XX,t(3;11)(q26.3;q21) by amniocentesis and confirmed by UBS. FISH for the number 3 and 11 chromosomes confirmed this rearrangement. The parents were advised of the risk associated with a de novo balanced translocation. The possible prognosis for these two different fetuses was not changed by the FISH analysis. FISH, while helpful, is only one aspect of the studies done to provide more accurate genetic counseling to parents; the pregnancy/family history, fetal ultrasound, other possible prenatal studies and pregnancy outcome from perspective studies compose other important aspects that are not mutually exclusive.

  16. Fish passage through a simulated horizontal bulb turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the worst case pressure conditions (Abernethy et al. 2001) and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized (Abernethy et al. 2002). For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low-head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  17. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd

    2009-07-08

    In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

  18. Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, R. Dennis

    2008-01-01

    On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council

  19. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through ...

  20. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through...

  1. New Mexico Department of Fish and Game webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico Department of Fish and Game webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Department of Fish and Game webpage Author...

  2. NOAA Hydropower and Fish Passage webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NOAA Hydropower and Fish Passage webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: NOAA Hydropower and Fish Passage webpage Author National...

  3. California Fish and Game Code Section 86 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Fish and Game Code Section 86 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: California Fish and Game Code Section...

  4. New Mexico Department of Fish and Game Mining Guidelines webpage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico Department of Fish and Game Mining Guidelines webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Department of Fish and Game...

  5. US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower...

  6. Alaska Department of Fish and Game | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Game Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alaska Department of Fish and Game Name: Alaska Department of Fish and Game Address: 1255 W. 8th Street Place: Juneau, Alaska Zip: 99811-5526...

  7. Wyoming Game and Fish Department Geospatial Data | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wyoming Game and Fish Department Geospatial Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Wyoming Game and Fish Department Geospatial DataInfo...

  8. Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application Form Type ApplicationNotice...

  9. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  10. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference October 13, 2015 8:00AM MDT to October 15,...

  11. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M.

    2007-12-11

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  12. Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCaire, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a

  13. With the onset of fall and the return of school, the Bonneville...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013 CITY OF SALEM Nicole Miller, 503-540-2415 OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH & WILDLIFE Meg Kenagy, 503-947-6021 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION Kevin Wingert,...

  14. Mercury levels in muscle of some fish species from the Dique Channel, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivero, J.; Navas, V.; Perez, A.

    1997-06-01

    Gold mining is an activity that has been increasing during the last ten years in Colombia. Most mining activities are carried out using mercury for gold amalgamation. In a recent publication we stated that in the Sur de Bolivar, the main gold mining zone in Colombia, the highest mercury concentration in hair was observed in fishermen. The Magdalena River, the largest and most important river in Colombia, receives all this contamination and carries it to the Atlantic Ocean through two means: The main river course and the Dique Channel. The Dique Channel is surrounded by many marshes, which are a major source of fish for nearly two hundred thousands people in northwestern Colombia. The goal of the present study was to determine, for the first time, the content of mercury in muscle tissue of the four most popular fish species purchased in some towns along the Dique Channel, to establish whether these concentrations fall within the WHO guidelines, and to identify those species which can be consumed with less risk. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish June 4, 2014 - ...

  16. EERE Success Story-Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage EERE Success Story-Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage March 6, 2014 - 10:01am Addthis The Electric ...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting | Department of Energy Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting This presentation was given on March 29, 2013, by Kristen Johnson to the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and addresses BETO's work and sustainability efforts.

  18. Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges

  19. Environmental surveillance plan for the Department of Energy's Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), Lewiston, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englert, J.P.; Hinnefeld, S.L.

    1981-09-09

    The Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) is a United States Department of Energy owned facility used for the storage of low-level radioactive residues. The site occupies 190 acres of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works and is located in the Niagara County town of Lewiston, in western New York State. The city of Niagara Falls is approximately eight (8) miles south of the NFSS. The purpose of this report is to describe environmental monitoring programs presently operated by NLO, and to suggest programs and revisions which should be implemented as a result of NLO's remedial actions at the NFSS.

  20. Cozy Up to Colder Weather: 5 Ways to Prepare Your Home for Fall and Winter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Part 1) | Department of Energy Cozy Up to Colder Weather: 5 Ways to Prepare Your Home for Fall and Winter (Part 1) Cozy Up to Colder Weather: 5 Ways to Prepare Your Home for Fall and Winter (Part 1) September 24, 2014 - 11:49am Addthis Cleaning your gutters will help prevent ice dams that can cause leaks and water damage. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/KatarzynaBialasiewicz Cleaning your gutters will help prevent ice dams that can cause leaks and water damage. | Photo courtesy of

  1. Cozy Up to Colder Weather: 5 More Ways to Prepare Your Home for Fall and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Winter (Part 2) | Department of Energy Cozy Up to Colder Weather: 5 More Ways to Prepare Your Home for Fall and Winter (Part 2) Cozy Up to Colder Weather: 5 More Ways to Prepare Your Home for Fall and Winter (Part 2) September 26, 2014 - 11:25am Addthis Autumn means colder weather is coming, but it doesn't have to mean breaking the bank on your energy bills! | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/floridastock Autumn means colder weather is coming, but it doesn't have to mean breaking the

  2. Fall into Savings with a Tax Credit-Eligible Energy System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fall into Savings with a Tax Credit-Eligible Energy System Fall into Savings with a Tax Credit-Eligible Energy System October 10, 2014 - 10:07am Addthis Installing a renewable energy system for you home, like these solar panels, doesn't mean breaking the bank. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Labratory Installing a renewable energy system for you home, like these solar panels, doesn't mean breaking the bank. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National

  3. Both the October and November Fall Science Series Lectures Were Cancelled |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Both the October and November Fall Science Series Lectures Were Cancelled Both Lectures Cancelled: Jefferson Lab Announces Fall Science Series Lectures on Oct. 15 and Nov. 12 As of Oct. 7, the Jefferson Lab Science Series lecture scheduled for 7 p.m. on Oct. 15 has been cancelled. The Nov. 12 lecture was cancelled as of Oct. 11. Michelle Shinn On Oct. 15, Michelle Shinn, chief optics scientist for Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser, will present "Exploring the Nature of

  4. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued assessing habitat and population enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in recommendations from the 1996, 1997, and 1998 annual reports, were monitored during field season 1999, 2000, and 2001. Post assessments were used to evaluate habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations where enhancement projects were implemented.

  5. Cathode fall model and current-voltage characteristics of field emission driven direct current microplasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2013-11-15

    The post-breakdown characteristics of field emission driven microplasma are studied theoretically and numerically. A cathode fall model assuming a linearly varying electric field is used to obtain equations governing the operation of steady state field emission driven microplasmas. The results obtained from the model by solving these equations are compared with particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collisions simulation results for parameters including the plasma potential, cathode fall thickness, ion number density in the cathode fall, and current density vs voltage curves. The model shows good overall agreement with the simulations but results in slightly overpredicted values for the plasma potential and the cathode fall thickness attributed to the assumed electric field profile. The current density vs voltage curves obtained show an arc region characterized by negative slope as well as an abnormal glow discharge characterized by a positive slope in gaps as small as 10 ?m operating at atmospheric pressure. The model also retrieves the traditional macroscale current vs voltage theory in the absence of field emission.

  6. U.S. gasoline prices fall below $3.50 (long version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8, 2014 U.S. gasoline prices fall below 3.50 (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell 3.3 cents from a week ago to 3.47 a gallon on Monday. This ...

  7. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Queen

    2006-05-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

  8. U.S. gasoline price falls below $2.90 (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gasoline price falls below $2.90 (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.89 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard

  9. U.S. diesel fuel prices falls to lowest level since mid-July...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    prices falls to lowest level since mid-July 2012 The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to its lowest level since mid-July 2012 at 3.73 a gallon on Monday. ...

  10. An Analysis of Potential Stream Fish and Fish Habitat Monitoring Procedures for the Inland Northwest: Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, James T.; Wollrab, Sherry P.

    1999-09-01

    Recent concerns over the rapid declines of native stream-fish populations in the inland Northwest have prompted the USDA Forest Service to institute interim land management practices intended to stop further declines in fish habitat quality and protect existing high quality habitat. Natural resource managers in the Inland Northwest need tools for assessing the success or failure of conservation policies and the impacts of management actions on fish and fish habitats. Effectiveness monitoring is one such potential tool, but there are currently no established monitoring protocols. Since 1991, US Forest Service biologists have used the standardized R1/R4 inventory procedures to measure fish and fish habitats on agency lands throughout the Intermountain West. The widespread use and acceptance of these standardized procedures and the large amount of data collected suggest that the R1/R4 procedures might provide the basis for an effectiveness monitoring protocol. Using fish and fish habitat data collected by Forest Service biologists, the authors assessed the efficiency of the R1/R4 procedures for monitoring stream fish and fish habitats.

  11. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1987-1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, James W.

    1988-08-01

    Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Contract DE-AI79-87BP35585 was implemented on July 20, 1987. First year highlights included remodeling of the Olympia (WA) Fish Health Center to provide laboratory space for histopathological support services to participating state agencies, acquisition of gas monitoring equipment for hatchery water systems, expanded disease detection work for bacterial kidney disease and erythrocytic inclusion body syndrome in fish stocks at 13 Columbia River Basin National Fish Hatcheries and advancements in computerized case history data storage and analysis. This report summarizes the health status of fish reared at Service facilities in the Columbia River basin, briefly describes work being done to meet contract requirements for fish disease surveillance at those hatcheries and provides a summary of case history data for calendar years 1984, 1985, 1986 and 1987. 1 ref.

  12. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Monday, 25 November 2013 12:06 Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils

  13. BPA celebrates protection of Lemhi River fish and wildlife habitat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates-protection-of-Lemhi-River-fish-and-wildlife-habitat Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  14. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  15. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  16. New Mexico Department of Fish and Game Powerline Project Guidelines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico Department of Fish and Game Powerline Project Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

  17. Fish Funding 2002-2006 (hydro/fcrps)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information on Cost and Revenue Effects for Fish Funding Agreement 2002 - 2006 Capital Cost Spreadsheets Summary of All Costs (updated on July 10, 1998) Capital Cost Spreadsheets...

  18. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  19. Title 5 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 95 Protection of Fish...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Title 5 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 95 Protection of Fish and Game Habitat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  20. California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Hydroelectric Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  1. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of ... (3) performing flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size ...

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability ...

  3. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on harvest methods, forest service, and more.

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

  5. Fish behavior, migration and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H.

    1988-02-01

    Studies at the Pacific Northwst Laboratory have evaluated fish behavior and migration in response to thermal discharge, gas supersaturated water, water-soluble fractions of coal liquids, and other environmental stresses. Major findings including thermal discharges did not block upstream migration of sonic-tagged adult chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) and a rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in the Columbia River. Juvenile chinook slamon avoided thermal discharges in the laboratory when ..delta..ts exceeded 9 to 11)degree)C above ambient. However juvenile salmon were more susceptible to predation at 10 to 20% of the thermal dose causing loss of equilibrium. Radio-tagged adult chinook salmon swam deeper in supersaturated water than in normally saturated water in the Snake River and, thereby, avoided the upper, critical zone. Carp (Cyprinus carpio) and black bullhead (Ictalurus melas) did not always avoid lethal gas levels in the laboratory and some fish died in the test apparatus. Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) avoided the water soluble fraction (WSF) of a coal liquid at concentrations causing acute effects but not at those causing chronic effects. Rainbow trout did not avoid coal liquid WSFs although they reportedly avid the major constituent, phenol, tested a as pure compound. Susceptibility to predation of juvenile rainbow trout did not increase until phenol concentrations reached the acute LC/sub 50/. 67 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Sandia Wins Funding for High-Temperature Falling-Particle Solar-Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Receiver High-Temperature Falling-Particle Solar-Energy Receiver - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy

  7. NREL: Technology Deployment - Fossil Fuel Dependency Falls from 100% to 56%

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Alcatraz Island Fossil Fuel Dependency Falls from 100% to 56% on Alcatraz Island News Solar Cells Light Up Prison Cells on 'The Rock' Sponsors U.S. National Park Service American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Key Partners National Park Service Golden Gate National Recreation Area National Park Service Denver Services Center Princeton Power Inc. University of Washington Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. DOE Federal Energy Management Program Related Stories U.S. Virgin Islands

  8. Visit us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, Booth#1211 |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec 14-18th us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, Booth#1211 | Dec 14-18th - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  9. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Stranding on the Hanford Reach, 1997-1999 Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Paul; Nugent, John; Price, William

    1999-02-15

    Pilot work conducted in 1997 to aid the development of the study for the 1998 Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Stranding on The Hanford Reach. The objectives of the 1997 work were to: (1) identify juvenile chinook production and rearing areas..., (2) identify sampling sites and develop the statistical parameters necessary to complete the study, (3) develop a study plan..., (4) conduct field sampling activities...

  10. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2006-02-01

    initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope

  11. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2005-11-01

    initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope

  12. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  13. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheeler, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

  14. The Effect of Roll Waves on the Hydrodynamics of Falling Films Observed in Vertical Column Absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, W.A.

    2001-06-28

    A thin falling film is well suited to simultaneous heat and mass transfer because of the small thermal resistance through the film and because of the large contact surface achievable at low flow rates. The film enters as a smooth laminar flow and quickly transitions into small-amplitude wavy flow. The waves grown in length and amplitude and are identified as roll waves. This flow regime is termed wavy-laminar flow, and modern heat and mass transfer equipment operate in this complicated transition regime. Research published in open literature has shown the mass flow rate in the rollwaves to be about 10 to 20 times greater than that in the laminar substrate. As the film fully develops, the waves grow in mass and the film substrate thins because fluid is swept from the substrate by the secondary flows of the roll wave. Many studies have been conducted to measure and correlate the film thickness of wavy-laminar flows. Literature data show that Nusselt's theory for smooth laminar flow can over predict the film thickness by as much as 20% for certain wavy-laminar flow conditions. The hydrodynamics of falling films were therefore studied to measure the film thickness of a free-surface falling film and to better understand the parameters that affect the variations of the film thickness. A flow loop was set up for measuring the thickness, wave amplitude,and frequency of a film during hydrodynamic flow. Decreasing the pipe diameter caused the amplitude of the wavy flow to diminish. Measurements monitored from stations along the falling film showed a thinning of film thickness. Fully developed flow required large starting lengths of about 0.5 m. The film thickness increases as the Reynolds number (Re) increases. Increasing the Kapitza number (Ka) causes a decrease in the film thickness. Regression analysis showed that the Re and Ka numbers described the data trends in wavy-laminar flow. Rather than correlating the Re number in discrete ranges of the Ka number as earlier

  15. Field experiments on an intelligent towed vehicle ``Flying Fish``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koterayama, W.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nakamura, M.

    1995-12-31

    A depth, pitch and roll controllable towed vehicle, ``Flying Fish`` is being developed to measure the ocean current, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, chlorophyll and total inorganic hydrocarbon. The first field experiments on its performance were carried out in the Japan sea last summer. The motion data of the ``Flying Fish`` are compared with those of numerical simulations.

  16. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartlerode, Ray; Dabashinsky, Annette; Allen, Steve

    2003-01-28

    This project is necessary to insure that replacement of fish screening devices and fishways meet current NMFS design criteria for the protection of all salmonid life stages. The mission of the fish passage program in Northeast Oregon is to protect and enhance fish populations by assisting private landowners, public landowners, irrigation districts and others by maintaining fish screening devices and fishways. These facilities reduce or eliminate fish loss associated with irrigation withdrawals, and as a result insure fish populations are maintained for enjoyment by present and future generations. Assistance is provided through state and federal programs. This can range from basic technical advice to detailed construction, fabrication and maintenance of screening and passage facilities. John Day screens personnel identified 50 sites for fish screen replacement, and one fish passage project. These sites are located in critical spawning, rearing and migration areas for spring chinook, summer steelhead and bull trout. All projects were designed and implemented to meet current NMFS criteria. It is necessary to have a large number of sites identified due to changes in weather, landowner cooperation and access issues that come up as we try and implement our goal of 21 completed projects.

  17. Issue Backgrounder : Downstream Fish Migration : Improving the Odds of Survival.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-05-01

    Background information is given on the problems caused to anadromous fish migrations, especially salmon and steelhead trout, by the development of hydroelectric power dams on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Programs arising out of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and conservation Act of 1980 to remedy these problems and restore fish and wildlife populations are described. (ACR)

  18. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and ...

  19. EERE Success Story-Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish EERE Success Story-Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live ...

  20. Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project, Montana. Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Modification Project, Montana DRAFT APPENDIX D Lower Yellowstone Intake Fish Passage EIS Fish Passage Connectivity Index and Cost Effectiveness and Incremental Cost Analysis MAY 2016 Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project, Montana APPENDIX D Lower Yellowstone Intake Fish Passage EIS Fish Passage Connectivity Index and Cost Effectiveness and Incremental Cost Analysis Lower Yellowstone Intake Diversion Dam Fish Passage Project Draft

  1. Reflection Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  2. Field Mapping At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area...

  3. Density Log at Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Density Log at Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP)...

  5. Slim Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et...

  6. Field Mapping At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

  7. Core Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  8. Flow Test At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  9. Resistivity Log At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Resistivity Log At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  10. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley...

  11. Assessment of heavy metals in seawater and fish tissues at Pulau...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in seawater and fish tissues at Pulau Indah, Selangor, Malaysia Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessment of heavy metals in seawater and fish tissues at Pulau ...

  12. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish

  13. A review of tricaine methanesulfonate for anesthesia of fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Kathleen M.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (TMS) is the only FDA approved anesthetic for use in a select number of fish species, including salmonids. It is used widely in hatcheries and research to immobilize fish for marking or transport and to suppress sensory systems during invasive procedures. Improper use can decrease fish viability and possibly distort physiological data. Since animals may be anesthetized by junior staff or students who may have little experience in fish anesthesia, training in the proper use of TMS may decrease variability in results and increase fish survival. This document acts as a primer on the use of TMS for anesthetizing juvenile salmonids, with an emphasis on its use in surgical applications. Within, we briefly discuss many aspects TMS. We describe the legal uses for TMS, and what is currently known about the proper storage and preparation of the anesthetic. We outline methods and precautions for administration and changes in fish behavior during progressively deeper anesthesia. We also discuss the physiological effects of TMS and its potential for decreasing fish health.

  14. Spectrum of relativistic radiation from electric charges and dipoles as they fall freely into a black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shatskiy, A. A. Novikov, I. D.; Lipatova, L. N.

    2013-06-15

    The motion of electric charges and dipoles falling radially and freely into a Schwarzschild black hole is considered. The inverse effect of the electromagnetic fields on the black hole is neglected. Since the dipole is assumed to be a point particle, the deformation due to the action of tidal forces on it is neglected. According to the theorem stating that 'black holes have no hair', the multipole electromagnetic fields should be completely radiated as a multipole falls into a black hole. The electromagnetic radiation power spectrum for these multipoles (a monopole and a dipole) has been found. Differences have been found in the spectra for different orientations of the falling dipole. A general method has been developed to find the radiated multipole electromagnetic fields for multipoles (including higher-order multipoles-quadrupoles, etc.) falling freely into a black hole. The calculated electromagnetic spectra can be compared with observational data from stellar-mass and smaller black holes.

  15. Application of fall-line mix models to understand degraded yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welser-Sherrill, L; Cooley, J H; Haynes, D A; Wilson, D C; Sherrill, M E; Mancini, R C; Tommasini, R

    2008-02-28

    Mixing between fuel and shell material is an important topic in the inertial confinement fusion community, and is commonly accepted as the primary mechanism for neutron yield degradation. Typically, radiation hydrodynamic simulations that lack mixing (clean simulations) tend to considerably overestimate the neutron yield. We present here a series of yield calculations based on a variety of fall-line inspired mix models. The results are compared to a series of OMEGA experiments which provide total neutron yields and time-dependent yield rates.

  16. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level in four years

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    diesel fuel price falls to lowest level in four years The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to $3.28 a gallon on Monday. That's down 13.8 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the New England region at 3.43 a gallon, down 4.2 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Gulf Coast region at 3.18 a gallon, down 15.3 cents. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  17. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since February 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    , 2014 U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since February 2011 The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to $3.62 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the West Coast region at 3.79 a gallon, down a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Lower Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions at 3.53 a gallon, down 2.2 cents and down 3.1 cents,

  18. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since January 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since January 2011 The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to its lowest level since January 2011 at $3.42 a gallon on Monday. That's down 11.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the Rocky Mountain states at 3.50 a gallon, down 15.1 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Lower Atlantic states at 3.31 a gallon, down 7.2 cents.

  19. U.S. diesel fuel prices falls to lowest level since mid-July 2012

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4, 2014 U.S. diesel fuel prices falls to lowest level since mid-July 2012 The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to $3.70 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 1/2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the West Coast region at 3.89 a gallon, down 4.2 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Lower Atlantic, Midwest, and Gulf Coast regions at 3.64 a gallon. This is Amerine

  20. U.S. gasoline price falls below $2.90 (long version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7, 2014 U.S. gasoline price falls below $2.90 (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.89 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Pump prices were highest in the West Coast states at 3.11 a gallon, down 5.4 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Gulf Coast region at 2.67 a gallon, down a nickel

  1. U.S. gasoline price to continue falling through December on low oil prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 U.S. gasoline price to continue falling through December on low oil prices U.S. drivers will continue to see the effects of low crude oil prices as gasoline prices are expected to decline through the rest of this year. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the monthly retail price for regular-grade gasoline is expected to drop from a monthly average of $2.64 per gallon in August to $2.03 in December. The recent drop in the price of crude oil which currently

  2. SU-E-J-49: Distal Edge Activity Fall Off Of Proton Therapy Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L; Butuceanu, C; Zhu, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify the distal edge activity fall off, created in a phantom by a proton therapy beam Method and Materials: A 30x30x10cm polymethylmethacrylate phantom was irradiated with a proton therapy beam using different ranges and beams. The irradiation volume is approximated by a right circular cylinder of diameter 7.6cm and varying lengths. After irradiation, the phantom was scanned via a Philips Gemini Big Bore™ PET-CT for isotope activation. Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system as well as ImageJ™ were used to analyze the resulting PET and CT scans. The region of activity within the phantom was longitudinally measured as a function of PET slice number. Dose estimations were made via Monte Carlo (GATE) simulation. Results: For both the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and the mono-energetic pristine Bragg peak proton beams, the proximal activation rise was steep: average slope −0.735 (average intensity/slice number) ± 0.091 (standard deviation) for the pristine beams and −1.149 ± 0.117 for the SOBP beams. In contrast, the distal fall offs were dissimilar. The distal fall off in activity for the pristine beams was fit well by a linear curve: R{sup 2} (Pierson Product) was 0.9968, 0.9955 and 0.9909 for the 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm range beams respectively. The good fit allows for a slope comparison between the different ranges. The slope varied as a function of range from 1.021 for the 13.5cm beam to 0.8407 (average intensity/slice number) for the 21.0cm beam. This dependence can be characterized: −0.0234(average intensity/slice number/cm range). For the SOBP beams, the slopes were significantly less and were also less linear: average slope 0.2628 ± 0.0474, average R{sup 2}=0.9236. Conclusion: The distal activation fall off edge for pristine proton beams was linear and steep. The corresponding quantities for SOBP beams were shallower and less linear. Philips has provided support for this work.

  3. GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK W. D. Cottrell, D. J. Christian, and F. F. Haywood ,d ;v ~ !;);;J;$ '9;) -i, - 'L." ; i--j -7,) ;3 i, Work performed by Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37630 O&J. 2,7 +, / 7&y' March 1979 \ operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATIOII for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites- Remedial Action Program

  4. The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

    2004-07-31

    This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

  5. Life state response to environmental crisis: the case of the Love Canal, Niagara Falls, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis explored the differences between two life stages - young and old - in perceiving and responding to man-made environmental disaster, as well as the support resources utilized to cope with disaster - personal, familial/friendship, and organizational. Because of the characteristics of man-made environmental disaster, and because of the different conditions of life and constructions of reality of older and younger families, it was expected that definitions of the situation would vary by life stage and locus of control - authoritative and personal. The research took place in the Love Canal neighborhood of Niagara Falls, New York. Fifty-eight families were interviewed in the fall of 1978, and thirty-nine of these families were reinterviewed in the spring of 1979. Interviews were tape recorded, transcribed, and coded. The data were presented in contingency tables and interview excerpts. The interview schedules elicited information of perception of impact, responses to impact, and the utilization of support resources. In an authoritative locus of control situation, the major findings were that both older and younger families perceived impact, that older families were slightly less disrupted, that younger families relied on organizational and familial/friendship support resources, and that older families relied on familial/friendship support resources.

  6. Installation restoration program. Phase I. Records search. Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve facility, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) has developed a program to identify and evaluate past hazardous material disposal sites on DOD property, to control the migration of hazardous contaminants, and to control hazards to health or welfare that may result from these past disposal operations. This program is called the Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The IRP has four phases consisting of Phase I, Initial Assessment/Records Search; Phase II, Confirmation and Quantification; Phase III, Technology Base Development; and Phase IV, Operations/Remedial Measures. Niagara Falls AFRF is located in Niagara County, New York, approximately six miles northeast of the City of Niagara Falls and approximately fifteen miles north of Buffalo. The installation is currently comprised of 985 acres with a base population of approximately 2,560. The following areas were determined to have a sufficient potential to create environmental contamination and follow-on investigation is warranted: Bldg. 600 JP-4 Pipeline Leak; POL JP-4 Tank C; Landfill; BX MOGAS Tank Leak; NYANG Hazardous Waste Drum Storage; POL JP-4 Tank A; JP-4 Tank Truck Spill; Bldg. 202 Drum Storage Yard; Fire Training Facility No. 1, 2 and 3; Bldg. 850 Drum Storage Yard; and AFRES Hazardous Waste Drum Storage.

  7. Evidence for old crust in the provenance of the Trap Falls Formation, southwestern Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, D.K.; Sevigny, J.H.; Bock, B.; Hanson, G.N.; McLennan, S.M. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The Trap Fall Formation is a multiply deformed, amphibolite facies metasedimentary sequence in southwestern Connecticut. It contains interlayered pelitic schists and lesser quartzites, and may represent turbidites. The major element compositions of 3 schists are compatible with a shale protolith. Their aluminous nature (CIA = 68--70) suggests a weathering history in the source, but may in part be a result of metamorphic processes. High SiO[sub 2] (85--91%) and Zr (305--370 ppm) concentrations in the quartzites are consistent with a significant component of recycled sediment in the source. A single abraded detrital zircon from a quartzite gives a concordant U-Pb age of 1,009 [plus minus] 6 Ma and suggests a source in Grenville-aged crust. E[sub Nd] at 450 Ma of [minus] 9.2 for one schist sample is also consistent with older crust. REE patterns for 2 pelitic schists and a quartzite (Fig.) are parallel to PAAS (post-Archean average shale). Thus the authors suggest that recycled sediment derived from older cratonic sources dominates the source for the Trap Falls Formation. Models for the tectonic setting of deposition should be consistent with these observations.

  8. The Correlation of Coupled Heat and Mass Transfer Experimental Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyhani, M; Miller, W A

    1999-11-14

    Absorption chillers are gaining global acceptance as quality comfort cooling systems. These machines are the central chilling plants and the supply for cotnfort cooling for many large commercial buildings. Virtually all absorption chillers use lithium bromide (LiBr) and water as the absorption fluids. Water is the refrigerant. Research has shown LiBr to he one of the best absorption working fluids because it has a high affinity for water, releases water vapor at relatively low temperatures, and has a boiling point much higher than that of water. The heart of the chiller is the absorber, where a process of simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs as the refrigerant water vapor is absorbed into a falling film of aqueous LiBr. The more water vapor absorbed into the falling film, the larger the chiller's capacity for supporting comfort cooling. Improving the performance of the absorber leads directly to efficiency gains for the chiller. The design of an absorber is very empirical and requires experimental data. Yet design data and correlations are sparse in the open literature. The experimental data available to date have been derived at LiBr concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 0.60 mass fraction. No literature data are readily available for the design operating conditions of 0.62 and 0.64 mass fraction of LiBr and absorber pressures of 0.7 and 1.0 kPa.

  9. Generalized Bohms criterion and negative anode voltage fall in electric discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londer, Ya. I.; Ulyanov, K. N.

    2013-10-15

    The value of the voltage fall across the anode sheath is found as a function of the current density. Analytic solutions are obtained in a wide range of the ratio of the directed velocity of plasma electrons v{sub 0} to their thermal velocity v{sub T}. It is shown that the voltage fall in a one-dimensional collisionless anode sheath is always negative. At the small values of v{sub 0}/v{sub T}, the obtained expression asymptotically transforms into the Langmuir formula. Generalized Bohms criterion for an electric discharge with allowance for the space charge density ?(0), electric field E(0), ion velocity v{sub i}(0), and ratio v{sub 0}/v{sub T} at the plasma-sheath interface is formulated. It is shown that the minimum value of the ion velocity v{sub i}{sup *}(0) corresponds to the vanishing of the electric field at one point inside the sheath. The dependence of v{sub i}{sup *} (0) on ?(0), E(0), and v{sub 0}/v{sub T} determines the boundary of the existence domain of stationary solutions in the sheath. Using this criterion, the maximum possible degree of contraction of the electron current at the anode is determined for a short high-current vacuum arc discharge.

  10. Fully Autonomous Multiplet Event Detection: Application to Local-Distance Monitoring of Blood Falls Seismicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Joshua Daniel; Carr, Christina; Pettit, Erin C.

    2015-06-18

    We apply a fully autonomous icequake detection methodology to a single day of high-sample rate (200 Hz) seismic network data recorded from the terminus of Taylor Glacier, ANT that temporally coincided with a brine release episode near Blood Falls (May 13, 2014). We demonstrate a statistically validated procedure to assemble waveforms triggered by icequakes into populations of clusters linked by intra-event waveform similarity. Our processing methodology implements a noise-adaptive power detector coupled with a complete-linkage clustering algorithm and noise-adaptive correlation detector. This detector-chain reveals a population of 20 multiplet sequences that includes ~150 icequakes and produces zero false alarms on the concurrent, diurnally variable noise. Our results are very promising for identifying changes in background seismicity associated with the presence or absence of brine release episodes. We thereby suggest that our methodology could be applied to longer time periods to establish a brine-release monitoring program for Blood Falls that is based on icequake detections.

  11. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

    1997-06-01

    In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

  12. Hydroacoustic Estimates of Fish Density Distributions in Cougar Reservoir, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Batten, George W.; Mitchell, T. D.

    2012-09-01

    Day and night mobile hydroacoustic surveys were conducted once each month from April through December 2011 to quantify the horizontal and vertical distributions of fish throughout Cougar Reservoir, Lane County, Oregon.

  13. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Act of 1973Legal Abstract This page links to...

  14. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  15. Title 16 Alaska Statutes Chapter 20 Fish and Game Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Title 16 Alaska Statutes Chapter 20 Fish and Game Conservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 16 Alaska...

  16. FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: FSM 2600...

  17. Fish Hawk, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Fish Hawk is a census-designated place in Hillsborough County, Florida.1 References US...

  18. Meat-, fish-, and poultry-processing wastes. [Industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litchfield, J.H.

    1982-06-01

    A review of the literature dealing with the effectiveness of various waste processing methods for meat-, fish,-, and poultry-processing wastes is presented. Activated sludge processes, anaerobic digestion, filtration, screening, oxidation ponds, and aerobic digestion are discussed.

  19. EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to enter into a use permit or lease agreement with the Yakama Indian Nation or other parties who would rear fish in the 100-K Area Pools.

  20. Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs Mercury toxicity generates environmental concerns in diverse aquatic systems because methylmercury enters the water column in diverse ways then biomagnifies through food webs. At the apex of many freshwater food webs, piscivorous fish can then extend that trophic transfer and potential for neurotoxicity to wildlife and humans. Mining activities, particularly those associated with the San Francisco Bay region, can generate

  1. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  2. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  3. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  4. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  5. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  6. Vaccine to control the viral infection of fish

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    1994-10-11

    Subunit vaccines and their use for immunizing fish against infection by viruses are disclosed. In particular, plasmid pG8 is constructed by joining, with the plasmid pUC8, DNA which encodes the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). E. coli cells are transformed by pG8, whereby pure viral antigen is produced to provide a vaccine for the control of IHNV in fish.

  7. Vaccine to Control the Viral Infection of Fish.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, JoAnn Ching

    1994-10-11

    Subunit vaccines and their use for immunizing fish against infection by viruses are disclosed. In particular, plasmid pG8 is constructed by joining, with the plasmid pUC8, DNA which encodes the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). E. coli cells are transformed by pG8, whereby pure viral antigen is produced to provide a vaccine for the control of IHNV in fish. 10 figs.

  8. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  9. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  10. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  11. Surgical implantation techniques for electronic tags in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Glenn N.; Cooke, Steven J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracoelomic implantation of transmitters into fish requires making a surgical incision, incision closure, and other surgery related techniques; however, the tools and techniques used in the surgical process vary widely. We review the available literature and focus on tools and techniques used for conducting surgery on juvenile salmonids because of the large amount of research that is conducted on them. The use of sterilized surgical instruments properly selected for a given size of fish will minimize tissue damage and infection rates, and speed the wound healing of fish implanted with transmitters. For the implantation of transmitters into small fish, the optimal surgical methods include making an incision on the ventral midline along the linea alba (for studies under 1 month), protecting the viscera (by lifting the skin with forceps while creating the incision), and using absorbable monofilament suture with a small-swaged-on swaged-on tapered or reverse-cutting needle. Standardizing the implantation techniques to be used in a study involving particular species and age classes of fish will improve survival and transmitter retention while allowing for comparisons to be made among studies and across multiple years. This review should be useful for researchers working on juvenile salmonids and other sizes and species of fish.

  12. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2001-06-01

    The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this

  13. Sensor Fish Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through John Day Dam Spillbay 20 with a Modified Flow Deflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-04-29

    Fish passage conditions over a modified deflector in Spillbay 20 at John Day Dam were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objectives of the study were to describe and compare passage exposure conditions at two spill discharges, 2.4 and 4.0 thousand cubic feet per second (kcfs), identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes, and to evaluate a low-tailwater condition at the 2.4-kcfs discharge. The study was performed in April 2010 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events; 2) differences in passage conditions between treatments; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Nearly all Sensor Fish significant events were classified as collisions; the most severe occurred at the gate, on the spillbay chute, or at the deflector transition. Collisions in the gate region were observed only during the 2.4-kcfs discharge, when the tainter gate was open 1.2 ft. One shear event was observed during the evaluation, occurring at the deflector transition during passage at the 2.4-kcfs discharge at low tailwater. Flow quality, computed using the Sensor Fish turbulence index, was best for passage at the low-flow low-tailwater condition as well. The worst flow quality was observed for the 4.0-kcfs test condition. Contrasting the passage exposure conditions, the 2.4-kcfs low-tailwater treatment would be most deleterious to fish survival and well-being.

  14. Niagara Falls Storage Site, environmental monitoring report for 1979 and 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weidner, R.B.; Boback, M.W.

    1981-10-05

    The Niagara Falls Storage Site is a 190-acre facility located in Niagara County, New York. It is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is used for the storage of radioactive residues. This site is managed by NLO, Inc., contract operator of the DOE Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio. During 1979 and 1980, water and air samples were collected at and near the storage site to provide information about radionuclides in the offsite environment. Results show that uranium and radium concentrations in ground and surface water were within DOE Guide values for uncontrolled areas. Radon-222 in air at the site west boundary exceeded the DOE Guide but offsite monitoring in the general area showed radon-222 concentrations well within the Guide.

  15. Results of radiological measurements taken in the Niagara Falls, New York, area (NF002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.K.; Berven, B.A.

    1986-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of 100 elevated gamma radiation anomalies in the Niagara Falls, New York, area are presented. These radiation anomalies were identified by a mobile gamma scanning survey during the period October 3-16, 1984, and were recommended for an onsite survey to determine if the elevated levels of radiation may be related to the transportation of radioactive waste material to the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works for storage. In this survey, radiological measurements included outdoor gamma exposure rates at 1 m above the surface; outdoor gamma exposure rates at the surface, range of gamma exposure rates during scan; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in biased surface soil samples. The results show 38 anomalies (35 located along Pletcher Road and 3 associated with other unreleated locations) were found to exceed Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) remedial action guidelines and were recommended for formal characterization surveys. (Since the time of this survey, remedial actions have been conducted on the 38 anomalies identified as exceeding FUSRAP guidelines, and the radioactive material above guidelines has been removed.) The remaining 62 anomalies are associated with asphalt driveways and parking lots, which used a phosphate slag material (previously identified as cyclowollastonite, synthetic CaSiO/sub 3/). This rocky-slag waste material was used for bedding under asphalt surfaces and in general gravel applications. Most of the contaminated soil and rock samples collected at the latter anomalies had approximately equal concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 238/U and, therefore, are not related to materials connected with the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), including material that was transported to the NFSS. 13 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Fish Research Project Oregon; Aspects of Life History and Production of Juvenile Oncorhynchus Mykiss in the Grande Ronde River Basin, Northeast Oregon, 1995-1999 Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyke, Erick S.; Jonnasson, Brian C.; Carmichael, Richard W.

    2001-07-01

    Rotary screw traps, located at four sites in the Grande Ronde River basin, were used to characterize aspects of early life history exhibited by juvenile Onchorhychus mykiss during migration years 1995-99. The Lostine, Catherine Creek and upper Grande Ronde traps captured fish as they migrated out of spawning areas into valley rearing habitats. The Grande Ronde Valley trap captured fish as they left valley habitats downstream of Catherine Creek and upper Grande Ronde River rearing habitats. Dispersal downstream of spawning areas was most evident in fall and spring, but movement occurred during all seasons that the traps were fished. Seaward migration occurred primarily in spring when O. mykiss smolts left overwintering area located in both spawning area and valley habitats. Migration patterns exhibited by O. mykiss suggest that Grande Ronde Valley habitats are used for overwintering and should be considered critical rearing habitat. We were unable to positively differentiate anadromous and resident forms of O. mykiss in the Grande Ronde River basin because both forms occur in our study area. The Grande Ronde Valley trap provided the best information on steelhead production in the basin because it fished below valley habitats where O. mykiss overwinter. Length frequency histograms of O. mykiss captured below upper spawning and rearing habitats showed a bimodal distribution regardless of the season of capture. Scale analyses suggested that each mode represents a different brood year. Length frequency histograms of O. mykiss captured in the Grande Ronde Valley trap were not bimodal, and primarily represented a size range consistent with other researchers' accounts of anadromous smolts.

  17. Jet engine test stand and soil stockpile. 107th fighter-interceptor group Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve Station, New York Air National Guard, Niagara Falls, New York. Final site assessment addendum report, 9-12 February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    THis report outlines additional site assessment activities which were conducted at the Jet Engine Test Stand (JETS), Building No. 852 located at the 197th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Niagara Falls Air National Guard Station (NFANGS), Air Force Reserve Facility (AFRF) approximately 6 miles northeast of Niagara Falls, New York (Figure 1.1). The additional site assessment activities were performed in response to requests, dated February 9 and 12, 1993, by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) to further investigate contaminated soil and groundwater conditions at the JETS and at an existing soil stockpile (Appendix A).

  18. Statistical evaluation of the effects of fall and winter flows on the spring condition of rainbow and brown trout in the green river downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnusson, A. K.; LaGory, K. E.; Hayse, J. W.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-09

    same time, flow variability in the river has decreased and the abundance of total benthic macroinvertebrates at the Tailrace site has increased. The condition of trout in spring (averaged across all sampled trout) was positively correlated with fall and winter flow variability (including within-day skewness, within-season skewness and/or change in flow between days) at both locations. No negative correlations between trout condition and any measure of flow variability were detected. The length and weight of rainbow trout at the Little Hole site were negatively correlated with increasing fall and winter flow volume. The condition of brown trout at Little Hole and the condition of brown and rainbow trout at Tailrace were not correlated with flow volume. Macroinvertebrate variables during October were either positively correlated or not correlated with measures of trout condition at the Tailrace and Little Hole sites. With the exception of a positive correlation between taxa richness of macroinvertebrates in January and the relative weight of brown trout at Tailrace, the macroinvertebrate variables during January and April were either not correlated or negatively correlated with measures of trout condition. We hypothesize that high flow variability increased drift by dislodging benthic macroinvertebrates, and that the drift, in turn, resulted in mostly lower densities of benthic macroinvertebrates, which benefited the trout by giving them more feeding opportunities. This was supported by negative correlations between benthic macroinvertebrates and flow variability. Macroinvertebrate abundance (with the exception of ephemeropterans) was also negatively correlated with flow volume. The change in trout condition from fall to spring, as measured by the ratio of spring to fall relative weight, was evaluated to determine their usefulness as a standardized index to control for the initial condition of the fish as they enter the winter period. The ratio values were less

  19. Chromium Toxicity Test for Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Using Hanford Site Groundwater: Onsite Early Life-Stage Toxicity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Chamness, Michele A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2001-07-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate site-specific effects for early life-stage (eyed eggs to free swimming juveniles) fall chinook salmon that might be exposed to hexavalent chromium from Hanford groundwater sources. Our exposure conditions included hexavalent chromium obtained from Hanford groundwater wells near the Columbia River, Columbia River water as the diluent, and locally adapted populations of fall chinook salmon. This report describes both a 96-hr pretest using rainbow trout eggs and an early life-stage test beginning with chinook salmon eggs.

  20. Can Fish Morphological Characteristics be Used to Re-design Hydroelectric Turbines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2011-07-19

    Safe fish passage affects not only migratory species, but also populations of resident fish by altering biomass, biodiversity, and gene flow. Consequently, it is important to estimate turbine passage survival of a wide range of susceptible fish. Although fish-friendly turbines show promise for reducing turbine passage mortality, experimental data on their beneficial effects are limited to only a few species, mainly salmon and trout. For thousands of untested species and sizes of fish, the particular causes of turbine passage mortality and the benefits of fish-friendly turbine designs remain unknown. It is not feasible to measure the turbine-passage survival of every species of fish in every hydroelectric turbine design. We are attempting to predict fish mortality based on an improved understanding of turbine-passage stresses (pressure, shear stress, turbulence, strike) and information about the morphological, behavioral, and physiological characteristics of different fish taxa that make them susceptible to the stresses. Computational fluid dynamics and blade strike models of the turbine environment are re-examined in light of laboratory and field studies of fish passage effects. Comparisons of model-predicted stresses to measured injuries and mortalities will help identify fish survival thresholds and the aspects of turbines that are most in need of re-design. The coupled model and fish morphology evaluations will enable us to make predictions of turbine-passage survival among untested fish species, for both conventional and advanced turbines, and to guide the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

  1. Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laws, Troy S.

    1996-06-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) Flood damage assessment of project leases after the May 1995 and November 1995 floods, (2) reconstruction of 0.75 miles of riparian fence, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 14.8 miles of fence, (4) collection of approximately 55,000 native willow and cottonwood cuttings and installation of approximately 21,600 of these material, (5) implementation of two bioengineering projects and initiation of a third project, (6) installation of approximately 30 tree/rootwads for fish habitat enhancement, (7) removal of an abandoned flood irrigation dam/fish barrier, (8) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, and (9) extensive interagency coordination.

  2. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Fish Creek`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-08

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea named `Fish Creek`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 30% more woody biomass than either of its parents (`94001` and `94006`) and 20% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Fish Creek` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Fish Creek` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF NEW POWER CYCLES AND ADVANCED FALLING FILM HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arsalan Razani; Kwang J. Kim

    2001-12-01

    The final report for the DOE/UNM grant number DE-FG26-98FT40148 discusses the accomplishments of both the theoretical analysis of advanced power cycles and experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers. This final report also includes the progress report for the third year (period of October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001). Four new cycles were studied and two cycles were analyzed in detail based on the second law of thermodynamics. The first cycle uses a triple combined cycle, which consists of a topping cycle (Brayton/gas), an intermediate cycle (Rankine/steam), and a bottoming cycle (Rankine/ammonia). This cycle can produce high efficiency and reduces the irreversibility of the Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSC) of conventional combined power cycles. The effect of important system parameters on the irreversibility distribution of all components in the cycle under reasonable practical constraints was evaluated. The second cycle is a combined cycle, which consists of a topping cycle (Brayton/gas) and a bottoming cycle (Rankine/ammonia) with integrated compressor inlet air cooling. This innovative cycle can produce high power and efficiency. This cycle is also analyzed and optimized based on the second the second law to obtain the irreversibility distribution of all components in the cycle. The results of the studies have been published in peer reviewed journals and ASME conference proceeding. Experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers was conducted to find effective additives for steam condensation. Four additives have been selected and tested in a horizontal tube steam condensation facility. It has been observed that heat transfer additives have been shown to be an effective way to increase the efficiency of conventional tube bundle condenser heat exchangers. This increased condensation rate is due to the creation of a disturbance in the liquid condensate surround the film. The heat transfer through such a film has

  4. Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd

    2008-11-18

    Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public

  5. Teaching Them to Fish ... for Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Teaching Them to Fish ... for Energy Efficiency Teaching Them to Fish ... for Energy Efficiency January 7, 2010 - 3:18pm Addthis Joshua DeLung People around the country will soon tune in to watch an energy-efficient building project touch the lives of young people in the nation's capital. The popular TV show "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," recently teamed up with local leaders and builders to capture an important moment that will help Washington, D.C., children find a place to learn

  6. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (March 2012)

  7. EIS-0109: Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several alternatives for management and control of the radioactive wastes and residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on site, and two off-site management alternatives.

  8. Better Buildings Challenge Webinar- Fall Tech Trends: Promising New Products from DOE's High Impact Technologies Catalyst Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Challenge is hosting a webinar covering the new and innovative technologies that are making headlines this fall. Hear about the latest from DOE's High Impact Technology Catalyst program, including an update on micro-Combined Heat and Power demonstrations.

  9. Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring, a summary of the results, and the estimated dose to the offsite population. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. NFSS is in compliance with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) Subpart H of the Clean Air Act as well as the requirements of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) under the Clean Water Act. Located in northwestern New York, the site covers 191 acres. From 1944 to the present, the primary use of NFSS has been storage of radioactive residues that were by-products of uranium production. Most onsite areas of residual radioactivity above regulatory guidelines were remediated during the early 1980s. Additional isolated areas of onsite contamination were remediated in 1989, and the materials were consolidated into the waste containment structure in 1991. Remediation of the site has now been completed.

  10. Environmental monitoring plan for the Niagara Falls Storage Site and the Interim Waste Containment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Surplus Facility Management Program (SFMP), the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) is undergoing remedial action. Vicinity properties adjacent to and near the site are being cleaned up as part of DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These programs are a DOE effort to clean up low-level radioactive waste resulting from the early days of the nation's atomic energy program. Radioactively contaminated waste from these remedial action activities are being stored at the NFSS in an interim waste containment facility (IWCF). When the remedial actions and IWCF are completed in 1986, activities at the site will be limited to waste management. The monitoring program was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5484.1 and is designed to determine the contribution of radioactivity from the site to the environs and to demonstrate compliance with applicable criteria. Major elements of this program will also supplement other monitoring requirements including the performance monitoring system for the IWCF and the closure/post-closure plan. Emphasis will be directed toward the sampling and analysis of groundwater, surface water, air and sediment for parameters which are known to be present in the material stored at the site. The monitoring program will employ a phased approach whereby the first 5 years of data will be evaluated, and the program will be reviewed and modified as necessary. 17 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Niagara Falls Storage Site annual site environmental monitoring report. Calendar year 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    During 1985, an environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of low-level radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. Monitoring results show that the NFSS is in compliance with DOE concentration guides and radiation protection standards. Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) represent the concentrations of radionuclides in air or water that would limit the radiation dose to 100 mrem/yr. The applicable limits have been revised since the 1984 environmental monitoring report was published. The limits applied in 1984 were based on a radiation protection standard of 500 mrem/yr; the limits applied for the 1985 are based on a standard of 100 mrem/yr. To determine whether the site is in compliance with DOE standards, environmental measurements are expressed as percentages of the applicable DCG, while the calculated doses to the public are expressed as percentages of the applicable radiation protection standard. The monitoring program measured radon gas concentrations in air; uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediments; and external gamma dose rates. Environmental samples collected were analyzed to determine compliance with applicable standards. Potential radiation doses to the public were also calculated.

  12. Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental monitoring report, Lewiston, New York, calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    During 1984, an environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, a United States Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the storage of radioactive residues, contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program measured radon gas concentrations in air; uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediments; and external gamma exposure rates. Environmental samples collected were analyzed to determine compliance with applicable standards. Radiation doses to the public were also calculated. During 1984, annual average radon concentrations at the site boundary and exclusion area locations of the site were below the DOE Concentration Guide (CG) for uncontrolled areas. Annual average uranium and radium-226 concentrations in groundwater and surface water were below the DOE CG for release to uncontrolled areas. Sediment samples generally showed average concentrations of uranium and radium-226 lower than those measured in the past years. External gamma exposure rates were below the DOE Radiation Protection Standards. All radiation doses to the public were within DOE standards.

  13. Niagara Falls Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Lewiston, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring at NFSS began in 1981. The site is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is assigned to the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at NFSS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and total uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, sediments, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters including seven metals are routinely measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment.

  14. Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes: I. Niagara Falls Storage Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1984-11-01

    The Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) became radioactively contaminated as a result of wastes that were being stored from operations carried out to recover uranium from pitchblende ore in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering various remedial action options for the NFSS. This report describes the results of geochemical investigations performed to help provide a quantitative evaluation of the effects of various options. NFSS soil and groundwater samples were characterized; and uranium and radium sorption ratios, as well as apparent concentration limit values, were measured in site soil/groundwater systems by employing batch contact methodology. The results suggest that any uranium which is in solution in the groundwater at the NFSS may be poorly retarded due to the low uranium sorption ratio values and high solubility measured. Further, appreciable concentrations of uranium in groundwater could be attained from soluble wastes. Release of uranium via groundwater migration could be a significant release pathway. Solubilized radium would be expected to be effectively retarded by soil at the NFSS as a result of the very high radium sorption ratios observed. The addition of iron oxyhydroxide to NFSS soils resulted in much higher uranium sorption ratios. Additional field testing of this potential remedial action additive could be desirable. 10 references.

  15. BRIGHT HOT IMPACTS BY ERUPTED FRAGMENTS FALLING BACK ON THE SUN: UV REDSHIFTS IN STELLAR ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Testa, P.; Landi, E.; Schrijver, C. J.

    2014-12-10

    A solar eruption after a flare on 2011 June 7 produced EUV-bright impacts of fallbacks far from the eruption site, observed with the Solar Dynamics Observatory. These impacts can be taken as a template for the impact of stellar accretion flows. Broad redshifted UV lines have been commonly observed in young accreting stars. Here we study the emission from the impacts in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly's UV channels and compare the inferred velocity distribution to stellar observations. We model the impacts with two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. We find that the localized UV 1600 emission and its timing with respect to the EUV emission can be explained by the impact of a cloud of fragments. The first impacts produce strong initial upflows. The following fragments are hit and shocked by these upflows. The UV emission comes mostly from the shocked front shell of the fragments while they are still falling, and is therefore redshifted when observed from above. The EUV emission instead continues from the hot surface layer that is fed by the impacts. Fragmented accretion can therefore explain broad redshifted UV lines (e.g., C IV 1550 ) to speeds around 400km s{sup 1} observed in accreting young stellar objects.

  16. Long-run effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the US agricultural economy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bryant, Henry L.; Campiche, Jody L.; Richardson, James W.

    2010-03-09

    Renewable energy production has been expanding at a rapid pace. New advances in cellulosic ethanol technologies have the potential to displace the use of petroleum as a transportation fuel, and could have significant effects on both the agricultural economy and the environment. In this letter, the effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the mix of ethanol feedstocks employed and on the US agricultural economy are examined. Results indicate that, as expected, cellulosic ethanol production increases by a substantial amount as conversion technology improves. Corn production increases initially following the introduction of cellulosic technology, because producers enjoy new revenuemore » from sales of corn stover. After cellulosic ethanol production becomes substantially cheaper, however, acres are shifted from corn production to all other agricultural commodities. Essentially, this new technology could facilitate the exploitation of a previously under-employed resource (corn stover), resulting in an improvement in overall welfare. Thus in the most optimistic scenario considered, 68% of US ethanol is derived from cellulosic sources, coarse grain production is reduced by about 2%, and the prices of all food commodities are reduced modestly.« less

  17. Use of Aerial Photography to Monitor Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Richard H.; Dauble, Dennis D.); Geist, David R.)

    2002-11-01

    This paper compares two methods for enumerating salmon redds and their application to monitoring spawning activity. Aerial photographs of fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River were digitized and mapped using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques in 1994 and 1995 as part of an annual assessment of the population. The number of visible redds from these photographs were compared to counts obtained from visual surveys with fixed wing aircraft. The proportion of the total redds within each of five general survey areas was similar for the two monitoring techniques. However, the total number of redds based on aerial photographs was 2.2 and 3.0 times higher than those observed during visual surveys for 1994 and 1995, respectively. The divergence in redd counts was most evident near peak spawning activity when the number of redds within individual spawning clusters exceeded 500. Aerial photography improved our ability to monitor numbers of visible salmon redds and to quantify habitat use.

  18. Long-run effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the US agricultural economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Henry L.; Campiche, Jody L.; Richardson, James W.

    2010-03-09

    Renewable energy production has been expanding at a rapid pace. New advances in cellulosic ethanol technologies have the potential to displace the use of petroleum as a transportation fuel, and could have significant effects on both the agricultural economy and the environment. In this letter, the effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the mix of ethanol feedstocks employed and on the US agricultural economy are examined. Results indicate that, as expected, cellulosic ethanol production increases by a substantial amount as conversion technology improves. Corn production increases initially following the introduction of cellulosic technology, because producers enjoy new revenue from sales of corn stover. After cellulosic ethanol production becomes substantially cheaper, however, acres are shifted from corn production to all other agricultural commodities. Essentially, this new technology could facilitate the exploitation of a previously under-employed resource (corn stover), resulting in an improvement in overall welfare. Thus in the most optimistic scenario considered, 68% of US ethanol is derived from cellulosic sources, coarse grain production is reduced by about 2%, and the prices of all food commodities are reduced modestly.

  19. Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Lewiston, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1981, was continued during 1989 at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, that is currently used for interim storage of radioactive residues, contaminated soils, and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at NFSS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure equivalent to approximately 2 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during a one-way flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1989 monitoring show that NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 18 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Assessing Summer and Fall Chinook Salmon Restoration in the Upper Clearwater River and Principal Tributaries, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnsberg, Billy D.; Statler, David P.

    1995-08-01

    This is the first annual report of a five year study to assess summer and fall chinook salmon restoration potential in the upper Clearwater River and principal tributaries, Salmon, Grande Ronde, and Imnaha Rivers. During 1994, the authors focused primarily on assessing water temperatures and spawning habitat in the upper Clearwater River and principal tributaries. Water temperature analysis indicated a colder temperature regime in the upper Clearwater River above the North Fork Clearwater River confluence during the winter as compared to the lower Clearwater. This was due to warm water releases from Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork moderating temperatures in the lower Clearwater River. Thermal temperature unit analysis and available literature suggest a 75% survival threshold level may be anticipated for chinook salmon egg incubation if spawning would occur by November 1 in the upper Clearwater River. Warm water upwelling in historic summer and fall chinook spawning areas may result in increased incubation survivals and will be tested in the future. The authors observed a total of 37 fall chinook salmon redds in the Clearwater River subbasin. They observed 30 redds in the mainstem Clearwater below the North Fork Clearwater River confluence and seven redds in the North Fork Clearwater River. No redds were observed in the South Fork Clearwater, Middle Fork Clearwater, or Selway Rivers. They observed one fall chinook salmon redd in the Salmon River. They recovered 10 fall chinook salmon carcasses in the Clearwater River to obtain biological measurements and to document hatchery contribution to spawning. Unseasonably high and cold Dworshak Dam releases coinciding with early juvenile fall chinook salmon rearing in the lower Clearwater River may be influencing selective life history traits including growth, smolt development, outmigration timing, behavior, and could be directly affecting survival. During July 1994, discharges from Dworshak Dam increased from a