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1

LY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

! "..- - ; ! "..- - ; : : LY /b J:,;' "Environmental Impact Evaluation and Engineering Plan" for the Remedial Action at the Former Kellex Laboratory, Jersey City, New Jersey , Robert 3. Stem, Acting Director NEPA Affairs Division ECT is initiating the necessary activities required to accomplish the remedial action to co-t conditions of radiological contamination at the former Kellex site. The proposed action entails the excavation of some spotty areas of radiological contaminated soil. The details and findings of the Environmental Impact Evaluation of the proposed remedial action were discussed at a rseeting on June 22, 1979, that was attended by Hr. C. Kouts of your stuff. In addition, Plr. Kouts was given a copy of the subject report.

2

High energy imploding liner experiment HEL-1: Experimental results  

SciTech Connect

Magnetically driven imploding liner systems can be used as a source of shock energy for materials equation of state studies, implosion driven magnetized plasma fusion experiments, and other similar applications. The imploding liner is a cylinder of conducting material through which a current is passed in the longitudinal direction. Interaction of the current with its own magnetic field causes the liner to implode. Sources of electrical energy for imploding liner systems are capacitor banks or explosive pulse power systems seeded by capacitor banks. In August, 1996, a high energy liner experiment (HEL-1) was conducted at the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia. A 5 tier 1 meter diameter explosive disk generator provided electrical energy to drive a 48 cm outside diameter, 4 mm thick, aluminum alloy liner having a mass of about 11kg onto an 11 cm diameter diagnostic package. The purpose of the experiment was to measure performance of the explosive pulse power generator and the heavy imploding liner. Electrical performance diagnostics included inductive (B-dot) probes, Faraday Rotation current measurement, Rogowski total current measurement, and voltage probes. Flux loss and conductor motion diagnostics included current-joint voltage measurements and motion sensing contact pins. Optical and electrical impact pins, inductive (B-dot) probes, manganin pressure probes, and continuously recording resistance probes in the Central Measuring Unit (CMU) and Piezo and manganin pressure probes, optical beam breakers, and inductive probes located in the glide planes were used as liner symmetry and velocity diagnostics. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that a peak current of more than 100 MA was attained and the liner velocity was between 6.7 km/sec and 7.5 km/sec. Liner kinetic energy was between 22 MJ and 35 MJ. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Clark, D.A.; Anderson, B.G.; Ekdahl, C.A. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BE$T  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BET BET logo. Multi-project energy savings and calculation tool for electric motors. The BET software can analyze the energy saving between three motors even if the motors...

4

HEl'lORANDUtl TO: FILE DATE& ALTERNATE Ya NAnE~---  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

^I ,, ".. , ,' a . . _- HEl'lORANDUtl TO: FILE DATE& ALTERNATE Ya NAnE~--- Owner ccntacted TYPE OF OPERATION ----------_--____ 0 Research 81 Development 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 81 Analysis -'* x Production 0 Disposal/Storage Ivp_E~EJx!!IEecI 0 Prim0 0 Subcontract& )rq Purchase Oider J4 .~ Facility Type M Manuiacturi 0 University 0 Research Or 0 Government 0 Other ----- cl Other informat + fixed fer, u f b%wm!s 6, -_---_-------- co --------- Q anitation ponsored Facility -------_---_--_ on (i.e., cost it price, . et=) __---__ -----__---__ CONTRACTING PERIOD: ----------------_- --dLzk~ --------------------------- OWNERSHIP: AEC/r.?XD FIECfMED GCSJT GOVT CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR

5

PROBING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS USING Ly{alpha} CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

From previous studies of the effect of primordial magnetic fields on early structure formation, we know that the presence of primordial magnetic fields during early structure formation could induce more perturbations at small scales (at present 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc) as compared to the usual {Lambda}CDM theory. Matter power spectra over these scales are effectively probed by cosmological observables such as shear correlation and Ly{alpha} clouds. In this paper we discuss the implications of primordial magnetic fields on the distribution of Ly{alpha} clouds. We simulate the line-of-sight density fluctuation including the contribution coming from the primordial magnetic fields. We compute the evolution of Ly{alpha} opacity for this case and compare our theoretical estimates of Ly{alpha} opacity with the existing data to constrain the parameters of the primordial magnetic fields. We also discuss the case when the two density fields are correlated. Our analysis yields an upper bound of roughly 0.3-0.6 nG on the magnetic field strength for a range of nearly scale-invariant models, corresponding to a magnetic field power spectrum index n {approx_equal} -3.

Pandey, Kanhaiya L.; Sethi, Shiv K. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India)] [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Existing Facilities''' T-8 Lamps: $2 - $7/lamp T-8/T-5 High Bay Replacement for HID: $0.30/watt reduced Delamping of T-12: $4 - $9

7

NV Energy (Northern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Northern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NV Energy (Northern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Existing Facilities''' T-8 Lamps: $2 - $7/lamp New T8/T5 Fixture: $0.30/watt reduced T-8/T-5 High Bay Replacement for HID: $0.30/watt reduced

8

Transcript: I bet you didn't know this about searching! | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

I bet you didn't know this about searching! I bet you didn't know this about searching! July 2009 I bet you didn't know this about searching! Listen Now The first thing you need to know is you can't find everything on Google! In fact, most science is what we call "non-Googleable" that's because it's in databases that Google simply cannot reach. OSTI helps you find this non-Googleable science using our unique form of federated searching. We help you view the most relevant search results, download them and share them with whomever you like. We help you create alerts for your science topics of interest, we help you find Wikipedia definitions for your science of interest, we help you link to science news related to it. Our videos here on YouTube will tell you much more about our innovative technologies and our rich history since 1947. We hope that you

9

NV Energy (Northern Nevada Gas) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NV Energy (Northern Nevada Gas) - SureBet Business Energy NV Energy (Northern Nevada Gas) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Nevada) NV Energy (Northern Nevada Gas) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Nevada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount High Efficiency Boilers Input MBH $1.25 Boiler Reset Control Boiler $500 Boiler Tune-up Boiler $300 High Efficiency Furnaces Input MBH $1 Commercial Water Heaters Unit $150

10

HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE NARROWBAND SEARCH FOR EXTENDED Ly{alpha} EMISSION AROUND TWO z > 6 QUASARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We search for extended Ly{alpha} emission around two z > 6 quasars, SDSS J1030+0524 (z = 6.309) and SDSS J1148+5251 (z = 6.419) using Wide Field Camera 3 narrowband filters on board the Hubble Space Telescope. For each quasar, we collected two deep, narrowband images, one sampling the Ly{alpha} line+continuum at the quasar redshifts and one of the continuum emission redward of the line. After carefully modeling the point-spread function, we find no evidence for extended Ly{alpha} emission. These observations set 2{sigma} limits of L(Ly{alpha}, extended) rates typically inferred from (rest-frame) far-infrared measurements of z {approx} 6 quasars, these limits are well below the intrinsic bright Ly{alpha} emission expected from the recombination of gas photoionized by the quasars or by the star formation in the host galaxies, and point toward significant Ly{alpha} suppression or dust attenuation. However, small extinction values have been observed along the line of sight to the nuclei, thus reddening has to be coupled with other mechanisms for Ly{alpha} suppression (e.g., resonance scattering). No Ly{alpha} emitting companions are found, down to a 5{sigma} sensitivity of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2} (surface brightness) and {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (assuming point sources).

Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Yang Yujin; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Venemans, Bram P. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Carilli, Chris L. [NRAO, Pete V. Domenici Array Science Center, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Fan Xiahoui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kurk, Jaron [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riechers, Dominik [Astronomy Department, Caltech, 1200 East California boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Strauss, Michael A., E-mail: decarli@mpia.de [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Regulation of expression of two Ly-6 family genes by intron retention and transcription induced chimerism.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in increasing proteome complexity, [1-3]. In relation to this, alterations of splic- ing patterns or mis-splicing of genes are involved in sev- eral pathologies, [4-6] including several genetic diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), myotonic dystro- phy... and for LY6G5B were PR_1 and PR_5. Real-time RT-PCR for LY6G5B was performed by using SYBR® green PCR master mix and the ABI PRISM® 7700 sequence detection system (Applied Biosystems). Primers for real-time RT-PCR were designed for the differential...

Calvanese, Vincenzo; Mallya, Meera; Campbell, R Duncan; Aguado, Begona

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

J U LY 2 0 0 9 Managing beyond Web 2.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 J U LY 2 0 0 9 Managing beyond Web 2.0 Companies should prepare now for the day when Web 2.0 morphs into Web 3.0. Donna L. Hoffman #12;2 It's hardly news that the Internet has evolved their online experiences. This trend, which goes far beyond Web buzz, is catching some executives by surprise

13

Cosmological constraints from the CMB and Ly-alpha forest revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The WMAP team has recently highlighted the usefulness of combining the Ly-alpha forest constraints with those from the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This combination is particularly powerful as a probe of the primordial shape of the power spectrum. Converting between the Ly-alpha forest observations and the linear mass power spectrum requires a careful treatment of nuisance parameters and modeling with cosmological simulations. We point out several issues which lead to an expansion of the errors, the two most important being the range of cosmological parameters explored in simulations and the treatment of the mean transmitted flux constraints. We employ a likelihood calculator for the current Ly-alpha data set based on an extensive 6-dimensional grid of simulations. We show that the current uncertainties in the mean transmission and the flux power spectrum define a degeneracy line in the amplitude-slope plane. The CMB degeneracy due to the primordial power spectrum shape follows a similar relation in this plane. This weakens the statistical significance of the primordial power spectrum shape constraints based on combined CMB+Ly-alpha forest analysis. Using the current data the simplest n=1 scale invariant model with dn/dln k=0 and no tensors has a Delta chi^2=4 compared to the best fitting model in which these 3 parameters are free. Current data therefore do not require relaxing these parameters to improve the fit.

Uros Seljak; Patrick McDonald; Alexey Makarov

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

COMPLETING THE CENSUS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT THE REIONIZATION EPOCH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carried out extended spectroscopic confirmations of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 6.5 and 5.7 in the Subaru Deep Field. Now, the total number of spectroscopically confirmed LAEs is 45 and 54 at z = 6.5 and 5.7, respectively, and at least 81% (70%) of our photometric candidates at z = 6.5 (5.7) have been spectroscopically identified as real LAEs. We made careful measurements of the Ly{alpha} luminosity, both photometrically and spectroscopically, to accurately determine the Ly{alpha} and rest-UV luminosity functions (LFs). The substantially improved evaluation of the Ly{alpha} LF at z = 6.5 shows an apparent deficit from z = 5.7 at least at the bright end, and a possible decline even at the faint end, though small uncertainties remain. The rest-UV LFs at z = 6.5 and 5.7 are in good agreement, at least at the bright end, in clear contrast to the differences seen in the Ly{alpha} LF. These results imply an increase in the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium from z = 5.7 to 6.5. The rest-frame equivalent width (EW{sub 0}) distribution at z = 6.5 seems to be systematically smaller than z = 5.7, and it shows an extended tail toward larger EW{sub 0}. The bright end of the rest-UV LF can be reproduced from the observed Ly{alpha} LF and a reasonable EW{sub 0}-UV luminosity relation. Integrating this rest-UV LF provides the first measurement of the contribution of LAEs to the photon budget required for reionization. The derived UV LF suggests that the fractional contribution of LAEs to the photon budget among Lyman break galaxies significantly increases toward faint magnitudes. Low-luminosity LAEs could dominate the ionizing photon budget, though this inference depends strongly on the uncertain faint-end slope of the Ly{alpha} LF.

Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Sadanori [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Matsuda, Yuichi [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Egami, Eiichi; Jiang, Linhua [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Nagao, Tohru; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Shioya, Yasuhiro [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami; Ota, Kazuaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 77-8582 (Japan); Malkan, Matthew A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Hattori, Takashi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Ly, Chun [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Furusawa, Hisanori [Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Toshikawa, Jun, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mapping Neutral Hydrogen During Reionization with the Ly-alpha Emission from Quasar Ionization Fronts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new method to directly map the neutral-hydrogen distribution during the reionization epoch and to constrain the emission properties of the highest-redshift quasars (QSOs). As a tracer of HI, we propose to use the Ly-alpha radiation produced by quasar ionization fronts (I-fronts) that expand in the partially ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) before reionization is complete. These Ly-alpha photons are mainly generated by collisional excitations of hydrogen atoms in the boundary of the rapidly expanding HII region. The observable signal is produced by the part of the I-front that lies behind the QSO with respect to the observer. Combining two radiative transfer models (one for the QSO ionizing radiation and one for the Ly-alpha photons), we estimate the expected Ly-alpha spectral shape and surface brightness (SB) for a large number of configurations where we varied both the properties of the ionizing QSO and of the surrounding medium. We find that the expected signal is observable as a single (broad) emission line with a characteristic width of 100-200 km/s. The expected SB produced at redshift z~6.5 within a fully neutral region (at mean density) by a typical QSO I-front lies in the range $10^{-21}-10^{-20}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ and decreases proportionally to $(1+z)^2$ for a given QSO age. QSOs with harder spectra may produce a significantly brighter emission at early phases. The signal may cover up to a few hundred square arcmin on the sky and should be already detectable with current facilities by means of moderate/high resolution spectroscopy. The detection of this Ly-alpha emission can shed new light on the reionization history, the age and the emission properties of the highest-redshift QSOs. (abridged)

Sebastiano Cantalupo; Cristiano Porciani; Simon J. Lilly

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cosmological constraints from the CMB and Ly-alpha forest revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The WMAP team has recently highlighted the usefulness of combining the Ly-alpha forest constraints with those from the cosmic microwave background. This combination is particularly powerful as a probe of the primordial shape of the power spectrum. Converting between the Ly-alpha forest observations and the linear mass power spectrum requires a careful treatment of nuisance parameters and modeling with cosmological simulations. We point out several errors and inconsistencies in the previous treatments that propagate into the estimations and associated errors of cosmological parameters, including those reported by the WMAP team. The two most important are the insufficient range of cosmological parameters explored in simulations used to date and an incorrect treatment of the mean transmitted flux constraints. We employ a likelihood calculator for the current data set based on an extensive 6-dimensional grid of simulations. We show that the current uncertainties in the mean transmission and the flux power spectru...

Seljak, U; Makarov, A; Seljak, Uros; Donald, Patrick Mc; Makarov, Alexey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

White dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$?$ opacity in the analysis of the white dwarf cooling sequence of NGC 6397  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the importance of pure hydrogen white dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ far red wing opacity in the analysis of the white dwarf cooling sequence of the globular cluster NGC 6397. Our recently improved atmosphere models account for the previously missing opacity from the Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ hydrogen line broadened by collisions of the absorbing hydrogen atoms with molecular and atomic hydrogen. These models are the first that well reproduce the UV colors and spectral energy distributions of cool white dwarfs with $T_{\\rm eff}age of NGC 6397 derived from the white dwarf cooling sequence using atmosphere models that do not include the correct Ly-$\\alpha$ opacity is underestimated by $\\sim 0.5$ Gyr. Our analysis shows that it is essential to use white dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ opacity for precise dating of old stellar populations from white dwarf cooling sequences.

Piotr M. Kowalski

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

EFFECT OF DUST ON Ly{alpha} PHOTON TRANSFER IN AN OPTICALLY THICK HALO  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the effects of dust on Ly{alpha} photons emergent from an optically thick medium by solving the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer of resonant photons. To solve the differential equations numerically, we use the weighted essentially non-oscillatory method. Although the effects of dust on radiative transfer are well known, the resonant scattering of Ly{alpha} photons makes the problem non-trivial. For instance, if the medium has an optical depth of dust absorption and scattering of {tau}{sub a} >> 1, {tau} >> 1, and {tau} >> {tau}{sub a}, the effective absorption optical depth in a random walk scenario would be equal to {radical}({tau}{sub a}({tau}{sub a}+{tau})). We show, however, that for a resonant scattering at frequency {nu}{sub 0}, the effective absorption optical depth would be even larger than {tau}({nu}{sub 0}). If the cross section of dust scattering and absorption is frequency-independent, the double-peaked structure of the frequency profile given by the resonant scattering is basically dust-independent. That is, dust causes neither narrowing nor widening of the width of the double-peaked profile. One more result is that the timescales of the Ly{alpha} photon transfer in an optically thick halo are also basically independent of the dust scattering, even when the scattering is anisotropic. This is because those timescales are mainly determined by the transfer in the frequency space, while dust scattering, either isotropic or anisotropic, does not affect the behavior of the transfer in the frequency space when the cross section of scattering is wavelength-independent. This result does not support the speculation that dust will lead to the smoothing of the brightness distribution of a Ly{alpha} photon source with an optically thick halo.

Yang Yang; Shu Chiwang [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Roy, Ishani [Computing Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3QD (United Kingdom); Fang Lizhi [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

ON THE (NON-)ENHANCEMENT OF THE Ly{alpha} EQUIVALENT WIDTH BY A MULTIPHASE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been suggested that radiative transfer effects may explain the unusually high equivalent widths (EWs) of the Ly{alpha} line, observed occasionally from starburst galaxies, especially at high redshifts. If the dust is locked up inside high-density clouds dispersed in an empty intercloud medium, the Ly{alpha} photons could scatter off of the surfaces of the clouds, effectively having their journey confined to the dustless medium. The continuum radiation, on the other hand, does not scatter, and would thus be subject to absorption inside the clouds. This scenario is routinely invoked when Ly{alpha} EWs higher than what is expected theoretically are observed, although the ideal conditions under which the results are derived usually are not considered. Here we systematically examine the relevant physical parameters in this idealized framework, testing whether any astrophysically realistic scenarios may lead to such an effect. It is found that although clumpiness indeed facilitates the escape of Ly{alpha}, it is highly unlikely that any real interstellar media should result in a preferential escape of Ly{alpha} over continuum radiation. Other possible causes are discussed, and it is concluded that the observed high EWs are more likely to be caused by cooling radiation from cold accretion and/or anisotropic escape of the Ly{alpha} radiation.

Laursen, Peter; Duval, Florent; Oestlin, Goeran, E-mail: pela@dark-cosmology.dk [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)] [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF [O III] EMISSION FROM Ly{alpha} SELECTED FIELD GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3.1  

SciTech Connect

We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] 5007 A line in two z {approx} 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) using the new near-infrared instrument LUCIFER1 on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope. We also describe the optical imaging and spectroscopic observations used to identify these LAEs. Using the [O III] line we have measured accurate systemic redshifts for these two galaxies, and discovered a velocity offset between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} lines in both, with the Ly{alpha} line peaking 342 and 125 km s{sup -1} redward of the systemic velocity. These velocity offsets imply that there are powerful outflows in high-redshift LAEs. They also ease the transmission of Ly{alpha} photons through the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium around the galaxies. By measuring these offsets directly, we can refine both Ly{alpha}-based tests for reionization, and Ly{alpha} luminosity function measurements where the Ly{alpha} forest affects the blue wing of the line. Our work also provides the first direct constraints on the strength of the [O III] line in high-redshift LAEs. We find [O III] fluxes of 7 and 36 x10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in two z {approx} 3.1 LAEs. These lines are strong enough to dominate broadband flux measurements that include the line (in this case, K{sub s} -band photometry). Spectral energy distribution fits that do not account for the lines would therefore overestimate the 4000 A (and/or Balmer) break strength in such galaxies, and hence also the ages and stellar masses of such high-z galaxies.

McLinden, Emily M.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hibon, Pascale; Richardson, Mark L. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cresci, Giovanni [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Quirrenbach, Andreas [ZAH, Landessternwarte, Universitaet Heidelberg, Koenigstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pasquali, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Woodward, Charles E. [Department of Astronomy, 351 Tate Laboratory of Physics, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

THRESHOLD PROBABILITY FUNCTIONS AND THERMAL INHOMOGENEITIES IN THE Ly{alpha} FOREST  

SciTech Connect

We introduce to astrophysics the threshold probability functions S{sub 2}, C{sub 2}, and D{sub 2} first derived by Torquato et al., which effectively samples the flux probability distribution function (PDF) of the Ly{alpha} forest at different spatial scales. These statistics are tested on mock Ly{alpha} forest spectra based on various toy models for He II reionization, with homogeneous models with various temperature-density relations as well as models with temperature inhomogeneities. These mock samples have systematics and noise added to simulate the latest Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) data. We find that the flux PDF from SDSS DR7 can be used to constrain the temperature-density relation {gamma} (where T{proportional_to}(1 + {Delta}){sup {gamma}-1}) of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z = 2.5 to a precision of {Delta}{gamma} = 0.2 at {approx}4{sigma} confidence. The flux PDF is degenerate to temperature inhomogeneities in the IGM arising from He II reionization, but we find S{sub 2} can detect these inhomogeneities at {approx}3{sigma}, with the assumption that the flux continuum of the Ly{alpha} forest can be determined to 9% accuracy, approximately the error from current fitting methods. If the flux continuum can be determined to 3% accuracy, then S{sub 2} is capable of constraining the characteristic scale of temperature inhomogeneities, with {approx}4{sigma} differentiation between toy models with hot bubble radii of 50 h{sup -1} Mpc and 25 h{sup -1} Mpc.

Lee, Khee-Gan; Spergel, David N., E-mail: lee@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Non-Gaussian Features of Transmitted Flux of QSO's Ly$\\alpha$ Absorption Intermittent Exponent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the structure function and intermittent exponent of the 1.) Keck data, which consists of 29 high resolution, high signal to noise ratio (S/N) QSO Ly$\\alpha$ absorption spectra, and 2.)the Ly$\\alpha$ forest simulation samples produced via the pseudo hydro scheme for the low density cold dark matter (LCDM) model and warm dark matter (WDM) model with particle mass $m_W=300, 600, 800$ and 1000 eV. These two measures detect not only non-gaussianities, but also the type of non-gaussianty in the the field. We find that, 1.) the structure functions of the simulation samples are significantly larger than that of Keck data on scales less than about 100 h$^{-1}$ kpc, 2.) the intermittent exponent of the simulation samples is more negative than that of Keck data on all redshifts considered, 3.) the order-dependence of the structure functions of simulation samples are closer to the intermittency of hierarchical clustering on all scales, while the Keck data are closer to a lognormal field on small scales. Thes...

Pando, J; Jamkhedkar, P; Zheng, W; Kirkman, D A; Tytler, D; Fang, L Z; Pando, Jesus; Feng, Long-Long; Jamkhedkar, Priya; Zheng, Wei; Kirkman, David; Tytler, David; Fang, Li-Zhi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Non-Gaussian Features of Transmitted Flux of QSO's Ly$?$ Absorption: Intermittent Exponent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the structure function and intermittent exponent of the 1.) Keck data, which consists of 29 high resolution, high signal to noise ratio (S/N) QSO Ly$\\alpha$ absorption spectra, and 2.)the Ly$\\alpha$ forest simulation samples produced via the pseudo hydro scheme for the low density cold dark matter (LCDM) model and warm dark matter (WDM) model with particle mass $m_W=300, 600, 800$ and 1000 eV. These two measures detect not only non-gaussianities, but also the type of non-gaussianty in the the field. We find that, 1.) the structure functions of the simulation samples are significantly larger than that of Keck data on scales less than about 100 h$^{-1}$ kpc, 2.) the intermittent exponent of the simulation samples is more negative than that of Keck data on all redshifts considered, 3.) the order-dependence of the structure functions of simulation samples are closer to the intermittency of hierarchical clustering on all scales, while the Keck data are closer to a lognormal field on small scales. These differences are independent of noise and show that the intermittent evolution modeled by the pseudo-hydro simulation is substantially different from observations, even though they are in good agreement in terms of second and lower order statistics. (Abridged)

Jesus Pando; Long-Long Feng; Priya Jamkhedkar; Wei Zheng; David Kirkman; David Tytler; Li-Zhi Fang

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

24

SYSTEMATIC CONTINUUM ERRORS IN THE Ly{alpha} FOREST AND THE MEASURED TEMPERATURE-DENSITY RELATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuum fitting uncertainties are a major source of error in estimates of the temperature-density relation (usually parameterized as a power-law, T {proportional_to} {Delta}{sup {gamma}-1}) of the intergalactic medium through the flux probability distribution function (PDF) of the Ly{alpha} forest. Using a simple order-of-magnitude calculation, we show that few percent-level systematic errors in the placement of the quasar continuum due to, e.g., a uniform low-absorption Gunn-Peterson component could lead to errors in {gamma} of the order of unity. This is quantified further using a simple semi-analytic model of the Ly{alpha} forest flux PDF. We find that under(over)estimates in the continuum level can lead to a lower (higher) measured value of {gamma}. By fitting models to mock data realizations generated with current observational errors, we find that continuum errors can cause a systematic bias in the estimated temperature-density relation of ({delta}({gamma})) Almost-Equal-To -0.1, while the error is increased to {sigma}{sub {gamma}} Almost-Equal-To 0.2 compared to {sigma}{sub {gamma}} Almost-Equal-To 0.1 in the absence of continuum errors.

Lee, Khee-Gan, E-mail: lee@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

A FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH ,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for obtaining a flux-limited sample of Ly{alpha} emitters from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data. We show that the multiple GALEX grism images can be converted into a three-dimensional (two spatial axes and one wavelength axis) data cube. The wavelength slices may then be treated as narrowband images and searched for emission-line galaxies. For the GALEX NUV grism data, the method provides a Ly{alpha} flux-limited sample over the redshift range z = 0.67-1.16. We test the method on the Chandra Deep Field South field, where we find 28 Ly{alpha} emitters with faint continuum magnitudes (NUV > 22) that are not present in the GALEX pipeline sample. We measure the completeness by adding artificial emitters and measuring the fraction recovered. We find that we have an 80% completeness above a Ly{alpha} flux of 10{sup -15} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We use the UV spectra and the available X-ray data and optical spectra to estimate the fraction of active galactic nuclei in the selection. We report the first detection of a giant Ly{alpha} blob at z < 1, though we find that these objects are much less common at z = 1 than at z = 3. Finally, we compute limits on the z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} luminosity function and confirm that there is a dramatic evolution in the luminosity function over the redshift range z = 0-1.

Barger, A. J.; Wold, I. G. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cowie, L. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

LyMAS: Predicting Large-Scale Lyman-alpha Forest Statistics from the Dark Matter Density Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[abridged] We describe LyMAS (Ly-alpha Mass Association Scheme), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Ly-alpha forest on large scales from moderate resolution simulations of the dark matter distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the "Horizon MareNostrum" simulation, a 50 Mpc/h comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(F_s|delta_s) of the transmitted flux F_s, smoothed (1-dimensionally) over the spectral resolution scale, on the dark matter density contrast delta_s, smoothed (3-dimensionally) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III BOSS at z=2.5, and we find optimal results for a dark matter smoothing length sigma=0.3 Mpc/h (comoving). In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1-dimensional power spectrum and 1-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum ...

Peirani, Sébastien; Colombi, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Molecular hydrogen in damped Ly-alpha systems: clues to interstellar physics at high-redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to interpret H2 (molecular hydrogen) quasar absorption line observations of damped Ly-alpha systems (DLAs) and sub-DLAs, we model their H2 abundance as a function of dust-to-gas ratio, including H2 self-shielding and dust extinction against dissociating photons. Then, we constrain the physical state of gas by using H2 data. Using H2 excitation data for DLA with H2 detections, we derive a gas density 1.5 gas ratio of the sample is naturally explained by the above conditions. However, it is still possible that H2 deficient DLAs and sub-DLAs with H2 fractions less than ~ 10^-6 are in a more diffuse and warmer state. The efficient photodissociation by the internal UV radiation field explains the extremely small H2 fraction (gas ratio in units of the Galactic value); H2 self-shielding causes a rapid increase and the large variations of H2 abundance for \\kappa > 1/30. We finally propose an independent method to estimate the star formation rates of DLAs from H2 abundances; such rates are then critically compared with those derived from other proposed methods. The implications for the contribution of DLAs to the cosmic star formation history are briefly discussed.

H. Hirashita; A. Ferrara

2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

PHOTODESORPTION OF SOLID CO{sub 2} BY LY{alpha}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We measured desorption of atoms and molecules from films of solid carbon dioxide in an ultrahigh vacuum from 6 to 60 K under irradiation with Ly{alpha} (121.6 nm, 10.2 eV) photons, an important process in the balance between gas phase and condensed molecules in the interstellar medium. The measurements use microgravimetry and mass spectrometry during irradiation and temperature programmed desorption after irradiation. At low photon fluences, the desorption flux consists mainly of O atoms and, after {approx}10{sup 17} photons cm{sup -2}, it is dominated by CO with smaller amount of O{sub 2}, C, and CO{sub 2}, with the presence of O{sub 2} indicating solid-state chemical reactions. At high fluences (up to 10{sup 18} photons cm{sup -2}){sub ,} the desorption yields saturate at values much higher than in previous studies. The yields (molecules/photon), derived assuming stoichiometric desorption, reach 0.014 at 6 K, growing to {approx}0.2 at 50 and 60 K. Warming the films during irradiation gives rise to pressure spikes that suggest desorption of trapped species in pores or at defects, possibly assisted by radical-induced reactions. Such an effect could be significant for radiation-processed CO{sub 2}-coated interstellar grains that are heated by, i.e., cosmic ray impacts or grain-grain collisions. We discuss the experiments considering photochemical mechanisms and compare them to the results of ion irradiation.

Bahr, D. A.; Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, University of Virginia, Thornton Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)] [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, University of Virginia, Thornton Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

THE ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION OF Ly{alpha} RESONANT PHOTONS EMERGING FROM AN OPTICALLY THICK MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the angular distribution of Ly{alpha} photons scattering or emerging from an optically thick medium. Since the evolution of specific intensity I in frequency space and angular space are coupled with each other, we first develop the WENO numerical solver to find the time-dependent solutions of the integro-differential equation of I in frequency and angular space simultaneously. We first show that the solutions with the Eddington approximation, which assume that I is linearly dependent on the angular variable {mu}, yield similar frequency profiles of the photon flux as those without the Eddington approximation. However, the solutions of the {mu} distribution evolution are significantly different from those given by the Eddington approximation. First, the angular distribution of I is found to be substantially dependent on the frequency of the photons. For photons with the resonant frequency {nu}{sub 0}, I contains only a linear term of {mu}. For photons with frequencies at the double peaks of the flux, the {mu}-distribution is highly anisotropic; most photons are emitted radially forward. Moreover, either at {nu}{sub 0} or at the double peaks, the {mu} distributions actually are independent of the initial {mu} distribution of photons of the source. This is because the photons with frequencies either at {nu}{sub 0} or the double peaks undergo the process of forgetting their initial conditions due to resonant scattering. We also show that the optically thick medium is a collimator of photons at the double peaks. Photons from the double peaks form a forward beam with a very small opening angle.

Yang Yang; Shu Chiwang [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Roy, Ishani [Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering Division, St Thomas Hospital, Kings College London, SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Fang Lizhi [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Evolution of the Ly-alpha luminosity function from z = 6.5 to z = 7.7: evidence for the epoch of reionization ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) can be detected out to very high redshifts, during the epoch of reionization. The evolution of the LAE luminosity function with redshift is a direct probe of the Ly-alpha transmission of the intergalactic medium (IGM), and therefore of the IGM neutral-hydrogen fraction. Measuring the Ly-alpha luminosity function (LF) of Ly-alpha emitters at redshift z = 7.7 therefore allows us to constrain the ionizing state of the Universe at this redshift. Methods. We observe three 7.5'x7.5' fields with the HAWK-I instrument at the VLT with a narrowband filter centered at 1.06 $\\mu$m, targeting Ly-alpha emitters at redshift z ~ 7.7. The fields are chosen for the availability of multi-wavelength data. One field is a galaxy cluster, the Bullet Cluster, allowing us to use gravitational amplification to probe luminosities fainter than in the field. The two other fields are sub-areas of the GOODS Chandra Deep Field South and CFHTLS-D4 deep field. We select z = 7.7 LAE candidates from a variety of c...

Clément, B; Courbin, F; Fontana, A; Freudling, W; Fynbo, J; Gallego, J; Hibon, P; Kneib, J -P; Fèvre, O Le; Lidman, C; McMahon, R; Milvang-Jensen, B; Moller, P; Moorwood, A; Nilsson, K K; Pentericci, L; Venemans, B; Villar, V; Willis, J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

White dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$\\alpha$ opacity in the analysis of the white dwarf cooling sequence of NGC 6397  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the importance of pure hydrogen white dwarf atmosphere models with Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ far red wing opacity in the analysis of the white dwarf cooling sequence of the globular cluster NGC 6397. Our recently improved atmosphere models account for the previously missing opacity from the Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ hydrogen line broadened by collisions of the absorbing hydrogen atoms with molecular and atomic hydrogen. These models are the first that well reproduce the UV colors and spectral energy distributions of cool white dwarfs with $T_{\\rm eff}age of NGC 6397 derived from the white dwarf cooling sequence using ...

Kowalski, Piotr M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Parimutuel Betting on Permutations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

||?g(Y )||2 ? ng(Y ) ?. ? n||?g(Y )||2. Proof. See the appendix. Now, we can obtain an approximate separat- ing oracle for the ellipsoid method. Lemma 5.6.

33

Betting Big on Baseload  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some risks are unavoidable. Rather than pretending to forecast the future, successful companies will need to learn from other cyclical, capital-intensive industries: investing wisely, learning to build asset portfolios consonant with their owners' appetite for risk, and relentlessly seeking opportunities to improve efficiency. (author)

Gabaldon, Daniel; Spiegel, Eric; Van den Berg, Joe

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Betting on ideas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced computational models are enabling researchers to create increasingly sophisticated prediction markets.

Gregory Goth

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

THE EVOLUTION OF Ly{alpha}-EMITTING GALAXIES BETWEEN z = 2.1 AND z = 3.1  

SciTech Connect

We describe the results of a new, wide-field survey for z = 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S). By using a nearly top-hat 5010 A filter and complementary broadband photometry from the MUSYC survey, we identify a complete sample of 141 objects with monochromatic fluxes brighter than 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and observers-frame equivalent widths (EWs) greater than {approx}80 A (i.e., 20 A in the rest frame of Ly{alpha}). The bright end of this data set is dominated by X-ray sources and foreground objects with Galaxy Evolution Explorer detections, but when these interlopers are removed, we are still left with a sample of 130 LAE candidates, 39 of which have spectroscopic confirmations. This sample overlaps the set of objects found in an earlier ECDF-S survey, but due to our filter's redder bandpass, it also includes 68 previously uncataloged sources. We confirm earlier measurements of the z = 3.1 LAE emission-line luminosity function and show that an apparent anticorrelation between EW and continuum brightness is likely due to the effect of correlated errors in our heteroskedastic data set. Finally, we compare the properties of z = 3.1 LAEs to LAEs found at z = 2.1. We show that in the {approx}1 Gyr after z {approx} 3, the LAE luminosity function evolved significantly, with L* fading by {approx}0.4 mag, the number density of sources with L > 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} declining by {approx}50%, and the EW scale length contracting from 70{sup +7}{sub -5} A to 50{sup +9}{sub -6} A. When combined with literature results, our observations demonstrate that over the redshift range z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 4, LAEs contain less than {approx}10% of the star formation rate density of the universe.

Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Wolf, Christopher; McCathran, Emily; Matkovic, Ana [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); and others

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

36

THE CURIOUS CASE OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS: GROWING YOUNGER FROM z {approx} 3 to z {approx} 2?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ly{alpha} emitting (LAE) galaxies are thought to be progenitors of present-day L* galaxies. Clustering analyses have suggested that LAEs at z {approx} 3 might evolve into LAEs at z {approx} 2, but it is unclear whether the physical nature of these galaxies is compatible with this hypothesis. Several groups have investigated the properties of LAEs using spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, but direct comparison of their results is complicated by inconsistencies in the treatment of the data and in the assumptions made in modeling the stellar populations, which are degenerate with the effects of galaxy evolution. By using the same data analysis pipeline and SED fitting software on two stacked samples of LAEs at z = 3.1 and z = 2.1, and by eliminating several systematic uncertainties that might cause a discrepancy, we determine that the physical properties of these two samples of galaxies are dramatically different. LAEs at z = 3.1 are found to be old (age {approx}1 Gyr) and metal-poor (Z Z{sub Sun }). The difference in the observed stellar ages makes it very unlikely that z 3.1 LAEs evolve directly into z = 2.1 LAEs. Larger samples of galaxies, studies of individual objects, and spectroscopic measurements of metallicity at these redshifts are needed to confirm this picture, which is difficult to reconcile with the effects of 1 Gyr of cosmological evolution.

Acquaviva, Viviana; Vargas, Carlos; Gawiser, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Guaita, Lucia [Institutionen foer Astronomi, Stockholms Universitet, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The $z=0.558$ absorption system towards PKS 0118-272: A candidate Damped Ly $?$ system at low redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a spectroscopic and imaging study of the z=0.558 MgII absorption system towards the BL Lac PKS 0118-272. At the absorber redshift we detect lines of the low ionization species MgI, MgII, CaII, TiII, MnII, and FeII. The column densities of these species are typical of the interstellar gas in the disk of the Galaxy. By assuming dust-free gas with solar abundances we infer N(HI) > 2.5 x 10^19 cm^-2. The high value of this conservative lower limit indicates that the absorber is a Damped Ly alpha system. We find [Ti/Fe] = +0.3, in agreement with [Ti/Fe] measurements in DLA absorbers, but [Mn/Fe] = +0.4, at variance with the values [Mn/Fe]2), the z=0.558 absorber seems to originate in a galaxy that has already attained the abundances and dust content of present-day disk galaxies. The analysis of our imaging data lends support to the presence of an intervening galaxy. After careful subtraction of the BL Lac image, an object at 1.6 arcsec from PKS 0118-272 is detected. At the absorber redshift the projected distance (14 h_50^-1 kpc) and the absolute magnitude (M_R ~ -22.3) of this companion are consistent with those found for galaxies associated with low-redshift DLA systems.

G. Vladilo; M. Centurion; R. Falomo; P. Molaro

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

Yahoo! My Yahoo! Mail --Home News Home Hel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlight World Monday April 18, 10:52 PM EU stresses nuclear fusion reactor to be in Europe By Huw Jones LUXEMBOURG (Reuters) - The world' first nuclear fusion reactor will be in Europe, European Union member state.5 billion euros will go directly on building the reactor. The hope is the reactor will help make nuclear

39

Distributed Learning in Hierarchical Networks Hel`ene Le Cadre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curves for energy services requirements in a building microgrid (µgrid), fuel costs and other economic Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, under Work for Others Contract No. 500. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark

40

The $z=0.558$ absorption system towards PKS 0118-272 A candidate Damped Ly $\\alpha$ system at low redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a spectroscopic and imaging study of the z=0.558 MgII absorption system towards the BL Lac PKS 0118-272. At the absorber redshift we detect lines of the low ionization species MgI, MgII, CaII, TiII, MnII, and FeII. The column densities of these species are typical of the interstellar gas in the disk of the Galaxy. By assuming dust-free gas with solar abundances we infer N(HI) > 2.5 x 10^19 cm^-2. The high value of this conservative lower limit indicates that the absorber is a Damped Ly alpha system. We find [Ti/Fe] = +0.3, in agreement with [Ti/Fe] measurements in DLA absorbers, but [Mn/Fe] = +0.4, at variance with the values [Mn/Fe]2), the z=0.558 absorber seems to originate in a galaxy that has already attained the abundances and dust content of present-day disk galaxies. The analysis of our imaging data lends support to the presence of an intervening galaxy. After careful subtraction of the BL Lac image, an object at 1.6 arcsec from PKS 0118-272 is detected. At the absorber redshift the projecte...

Vladilo, G; Falomo, R; Molaro, P

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL D EGAS CALEDONIA ABERD EEN HOL T COAL D EGAS MULDON ELD RIDGE MCKINLEY CREEK TREBLOC HEARTLIN E SH ANNON TROY_MS_D BOXES CREEK WISE GAP NOR THSID E TREMONT VAN VLEET HOL LY BET HEL CHU RCH ABERD EEN S ST RONG BAN KST ON MOLLOY WR EN COR INTH WELLS THORN REID REID HOU STON ST AR DEERLICK CREEK COAL D EGAS OAK GROVE COAL D EGAS BIG SANDY CREEK COAL D EGAS MABEN LITT LE SAND Y CREEK COAL D

42

Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COAL DEGAS COAL DEGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL DEGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL DEGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL DEGAS CALEDONIA ABERD EEN HOL T COAL DEGAS MULDON ELD RIDGE MCKINLEY CREEK TREBLOC HEARTLIN E SH ANNON TROY_MS_D BOXES CREEK WISE GAP NOR THSID E TREMONT VAN VLEET HOL LY BET HEL CHU RCH ABERD EEN S ST RONG BAN KST ON MOLLOY WR EN COR INT H WELLS THORN REID REID HOU STON ST AR DEERLICK CR EEK C OAL DEGAS OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS BIG SANDY C REEK COAL D EGAS MABEN LITT LE SAND Y CREEK COAL DEGAS

43

Application of lasers to ultracold atoms and molecules Hel`ene Perrin1,6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and their applications. After a brief historical review of laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation, we present vector k. Light is coupled to atoms by the interaction between the electric light field and the atomic the photon scattering rate and is maximum on resonance. On the other hand, a redistribution of photons

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

Spoke cavity power coupler conceptual design work for the HEL-JTO beam exp.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report was to create a low-cost, modest-power RF coupler for a SRF spoke cavity beam test of electrons test to be done at LANL. Developing the design for this magnetically-coupled SRF spoke cavity testing coupler was basically straightforward since the cavity coupling port needed to be one of the 1.22-inch ID ports, and the power level was limited by the available RF to less than 400 W TW power. In addition, the coupler would be immersed in bath cryostat filled with liquid helium, and ultimately used in a pulsed mode to accelerate beam, thereby significantly relaxing the thermal loads on the coupler. Combining the above considerations with the level of resources available for this task, emphasis was placed on rapidly developing a robust, reliable design that would use commercially-available components as available to save design, engineering, and fabrication costs. Analysis was also kept to a minimum. As such, the design incorporates the following features: (1) Use of a commercially-available Type-N ceramic feedthrough. For the power and frequency range of the test, with the feedthrough immersed in LHe, it was felt the Type-N feedthrough would provide a robust, low-cost vacuum window solution. (2) The coupler outer conductors would be solid OFE copper that is brazed into two 2.75-inch CFF, with the cavity-sde flange being rotatable to allow minor Qx adjustments by rotating the coupler. The braze joint shown has the copper brazed into a groove in the SST to ensure maximum strength for successive thermal cyclings. The outer wall of the copper between the two flanges serves as the heat sink for depositing coupler heat to the liquid helium. (3) The inner conductor would be solid OFE copper brazed to the outer conductor at the top to ensure maximum thermal conductivity from the outer thermal sink area to the base of the feedthrough. A mass-reducing hole is placed down the center of the inner conductor to decrease thermal mass and weight. (4) This assembly would be mated to the Type-N feedthrough by pushing the pin from the feedthrough into a spring-loaded connector on the base of the inner conductor, then bolting the flanges together. (5) If the coupling needs to be greatly reduced, an additional 1/2-inch CFF can be inserted between the coupler and cavity flanges. Increasing the coupling can be done with a 3 stub tuner.

Rusnak, B

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

45

DOE_EE0003592_HEL-SR-PR-0027 Rev 1 20130227 Final Report_Public Release  

SciTech Connect

To develop a high temperature Thermal Storage System (TES) based on graphite and able to provide both economical and technical advantages with respect to existing solutions contributing to increase the share of Concentrated Solar Plants (CSP).

Eduardo Villarroel, Carlos Fernandez-Pello, Jeff Lenartz, Karen Parysek

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Computable randomness and betting for computable probability spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike Martin-L\\"of randomness and Schnorr randomness, computable randomness has not been defined, except for a few ad hoc cases, outside of Cantor space. This paper offers such a definition (actually, many equivalent definitions), and further, provides a general method for abstracting "bit-wise" definitions of randomness from Cantor space to arbitrary computable probability spaces. This same method is also applied to give machine characterizations of computable and Schnorr randomness for computable probability spaces, extending the previous known results. This paper also addresses "Schnorr's Critique" that gambling characterizations of Martin-L\\"of randomness are not computable enough. The paper contains a new type of randomness---endomorphism randomness---which the author hopes will shed light on the open question of whether Kolmogorov-Loveland randomness is equivalent to Martin-L\\"of randomness. It ends with other possible applications of the methods presented, including a possible definition of computable...

Rute, Jason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Betting on Las Vegas: Designing Popular Slot Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physicist Olaf Vancura, author of several acclaimed books on gaming and holder of over 70 game-related patents, will take us on a tour of game ...

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Betting on Science Disruptive Technologies in Transport Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, they still face two other problems common to all electrified vehicles: battery cost and battery durability. At current fuel costs in most nations, batteries add more to the vehicle cost than they eventually save and over the decade-or-more lifetime of a vehicle. Many companies are working on battery weight and cost

Kammen, Daniel M.

49

NV Energy (Northern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Equipment: 4 - 200 Ice Machines: 50 - 500 Commercial Custom Retrofit: 0.10kWh on peak; 0.05kWh off peak Air Cooled Units: 8 - 15ton, plus bonus efficiency...

50

NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Equipment: 4 - 1,000 Ice Machines: 50 - 500 Commercial Custom Retrofit: 0.10kWh on peak; 0.05kWh off peak Air Cooled Units: 12 - 18ton, plus bonus efficiency...

51

National Initiative For Cybersecurity Education (NICE)ly ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The focus is on the science, technology, engineering and math disciplines, with the aim of creating a pipeline of skilled workers for private and ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

MI ROFA RI ATED FIELD ALI RATION ASSEM LY  

Remote sensing Gas chromatography Chemical sensing TE HNOLOGI AL ENEFITS Small and portable No monitoring needed High accuracy with as low as

53

MI ROFA RI ATED FIELD ALI RATION ASSEM LY  

Remote sensing Gas chromatography ... remote sensors. The Field Calibration Assembly is designed at a small scale for incorporation into the intake

54

Tru-ly Clean - What Does It Mean?  

SciTech Connect

The evolution and genesis of the definition of transuranic waste (known as TRU) and its application to the cleanup criteria applied to soils contaminated with transuranics, specifically plutonium, has been a matter of discussion at contaminated sites in the United States and elsewhere. Cleanup decisions and the processes that led up to those decisions have varied at several plutonium contaminated sites within the United States and without the pacific region. The sites with radionuclide soil action levels include Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, Republic of the Marshall Islands; Johnston Atoll, Hawaii; the Hanford Site in Washington State; the Nevada Test Site; the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado; the Chariot Site in north Alaska; and the Maralinga Site in Australia. The soil-action level developed for Rocky Flats by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment for plutonium is one of the higher soil-action levels approved by regulatory agencies that is considered protective for future use of land at a cleanup site. The Republic of the Marshall Islands has adopted a relatively conservative cleanup standard to accommodate the subsistence lifestyle of the islanders, while the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has been transferred to the U.S. Department of the Interior to be used as a fish and wildlife refuge, a land use that resulted in a less conservative plutonium soil cleanup level. (authors)

Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

NV Energy (Northern Nevada Gas) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trap 50 Pipe Wrap-Hot Water or Steam Boiler Linear Foot 4 Domestic Hot Water Pipe Wrap Linear Foot 2 Roof Insulation SF-Roof Area 0.10 Demand Controlled Ventilation...

56

High-energy electron observations by PPB-BETS flight in Antarctica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed cosmic-ray electrons from 10 GeV to 800 GeV by a long duration balloon flight using Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) in Antarctica. The observation was carried out for 13 days at an average altitude of 35 km in January 2004. The detector is an imaging calorimeter composed of scintillating-fiber belts and plastic scintillators inserted between lead plates with 9 radiation lengths. The performance of the detector has been confirmed by the CERN-SPS beam test and also investigated by Monte-Carlo simulations. New telemetry system using a commercial satellite of Iridium, power supply by solar batteries, and automatic level control using CPU have successfully been developed and operated during the flight. From the long duration balloon observations, we derived the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons in the energy range from 100 GeV to 800 GeV. In addition, for the first time we derived the electron arrival directions above 100 GeV, which is consistent with the isotropic distribution.

S. Torii; T. Yamagami; T. Tamura; K. Yoshida; H. Kitamura; K. Anraku; J. Chang; M. Ejiri; I. Iijima; A. Kadokura; K. Kasahara; Y. Katayose; T. Kobayashi; Y. Komori; Y. Matsuzaka; K. Mizutani; H. Murakami; M. Namiki; J. Nishimura; S. Ohta; Y. Saito; M. Shibata; N. Tateyama; H. Yamagishi; T. Yamashita; T. Yuda

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I?%7 STGTE m rtExm ICmFIED cm&B fi re3xf.H ROJECT TIM % HER M JWDlCTICd Cf M W.&f&t ff NIF, Ml TtE FKILIIY If0 LICWSES TO WRE ffiDliXClIVE tt%iML. IVJ R&w mm IS h-m. STTE SW...

58

Whoo.ly: facilitating information seeking for hyperlocal communities using social media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Social media systems promise powerful opportunities for people to connect to timely, relevant information at the hyper local level. Yet, finding the meaningful signal in noisy social media streams can be quite daunting to users. In this paper, we present ... Keywords: civic engagement, event detection, hyperlocal community, location-based social networks, social media, twitter

Yuheng Hu; Shelly D. Farnham; Andrés Monroy-Hernández

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Ly-\\alpha\\ forest of BOSS quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a detection of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the three-dimensional correlation function of the transmitted flux fraction in the \\Lya forest of high-redshift quasars. The study uses 48,640 quasars in the redshift range $2.1\\le z \\le 3.5$ from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III). At a mean redshift $z=2.3$, we measure the monopole and quadrupole components of the correlation function for separations in the range $20\\hMpc

Busca, Nicolás G; Rich, James; Bailey, Stephen; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Kirkby, David; Goff, J -M Le; Pieri, Matthew M; Slosar, Anze; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Borde, Arnaud; Brinkmann, J; Carithers, Bill; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle S; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Honscheid, Klaus; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lundgren, Britt; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Margala, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Mehta, Kushal; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D; Nichol, Robert C; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pâris, Isabelle; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Roe, N A; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Shelden, Alaina; Sheldon, Erin S; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Tinker, Jeremy L; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G; Zhao, Gong-Bo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Study of Molecular and Biological Properties of Citrus exocortis viroid and Dweet mottle virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxygenase, endo-peptidase, helicase, and RNA-dependent RNAOxygenase protein; Hel: Helicase; RdRP: RNA-dependent RNAOxygenase protein; Hel: Helicase; RdRP: RNA-dependent RNA

Hajeri, Subhas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A putative new ampelovirus associated with grapevine leafroll disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01660) [26], and viral helicase superfamily 1 (HEL, pfamencoded by GLRaV-Pr and -9. Helicase was the most conservedmethyltrans- ferase; HEL helicase; RdRp RNA-dependent RNA

Abou Ghanem-Sabanadzovic, N.; Sabanadzovic, S.; Uyemoto, J. K.; Golino, D.; Rowhani, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

`Capture ready' regulation of fossil fuel power plants Betting the UK's carbon emissions on promises of future technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

preparation. In contrast, the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant in Seal Sands licensed in 2008 has not been CCGT Centrica Yes 05/02/09 Pembroke, South West Wales CCGT RWE npower Yes 28/08/08 Seal Sands, Teesside-leakage to boiler Design air ducts and fans for re-use for flue gas recycle FGD design that copes with different gas

Haszeldine, Stuart

63

HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS NEAR THE He II Ly{alpha} BREAK: IMPLICATIONS FOR He II REIONIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Quasars that allow the study of intergalactic medium (IGM) He II are very rare, since they must be at high redshift along sightlines free of substantial hydrogen absorption, but recent work has dramatically expanded the number of such quasars known. We analyze two dozen higher-redshift (z = 3.1-3.9) low-resolution He II quasar spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope and find that their He II Gunn-Peterson troughs suggest exclusion of very early and very late reionization models, favoring a reionization redshift of z {approx} 3. Although the data quality is not sufficient to reveal details such as the expected redshift evolution of helium opacity, we obtain the first ensemble measure of helium opacity at high redshift averaged over many sightlines: {tau} = 4.90 at z {approx} 3.3. We also find that it would be very difficult to observe the IGM red wing of absorption from the beginning of He II reionization, but depending on the redshift of reionization and the size of ionization zones, it might be possible to do so in some objects with the current generation of UV spectrographs.

Syphers, David [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Haggard, Daryl [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Zheng Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Meiksin, Avery [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); York, Donald G., E-mail: David.Syphers@colorado.edu, E-mail: anderson@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: zheng@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Damped Ly-alpha Systems in Semi-Analytic Models: Sensitivity to dynamics, disk properties, and cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previously we have shown that it is possible to account for the kinematic properties of damped Lyman alpha systems (DLAS) in the context of semi-analytic models. In these models, hierarchical structure formation is approximated by constructing a merger tree for each dark matter halo. A natural consequence is that every virialized halo may contain not only a central galaxy, but also a number of satellite galaxies as determined by its merging history. Thus the kinematics of the DLAS arise from the combined effects of the internal rotation of gas disks and the motions between gas disks within a common halo. Here we investigate the sensitivity of this model to some of the assumptions made previously, including the modeling of satellite dynamics, the scale height of the gas, and the cosmology.

Ariyeh H. Maller; Rachel S. Somerville; Jason X. Prochaska; Joel R. Primack

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

j u ly 2 0 0 9 i n a u g u r a t i o n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and inside them, potential future planets that could be candidates for housing some form of life. Whatisit a telephoto lens in a camera, a telescope's power depends on its capacity for collecting light. The GTC Telescopio CANARIAS will be able to "see" planetary discs like the ones that gave rise to our Solar System

66

The afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 090205: evidence for a Ly?? emitter at z?=?4.65  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gamma?ray bursts have been proved to be detectable up to distances much larger than any other astrophysical object

P. D’Avanzo; On behalf of a larger collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Transcription Factors T-bet and GATA-3 Control Alternative Pathways of T-cell Differentiation Through a Shared Set of Target Genes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upon detection of antigen, CD4+ T helper (Th) cells can differentiate into a number of effector types that tailor the immune response to different pathogens. Alternative Th1 and Th2 cell fates are specified by the transcription ...

Young, Richard A.

68

‘‘I’ll bet I’m having more fun than you are.” A critical case study on pornography 2.0.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??*contains explicit images* Contrary to claims made in the popular discourse on Porn 2.0, non-profit amateur pornography is not the antonym of mainstream pornography, of… (more)

Boersma, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Southeastern Aerosol and Visibility Study (SEAVS): Concentration and Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols at Look Rock, Tennessee, Ju ly-August 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine airborne particles with diameters below about 2.5 mm (PM-2.5), contribute to inhalation exposure, deposit on lakes and vegetation, form hazes, and influence the earth's radiative balance. This report describes the results of the Southeastern Aerosol and Visibility Study (SEAVS), which characterizes the concentration and chemical composition of fine particulate matter measured in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park during July-August, 1995. These results provide new insights into the influence of...

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Citation: C. Amsler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACHASOV 84 ZPHY C22 53 N.N. Achasov, S.A. Devyanin, G.N. Shestakov (NOVM) GASSER 84 ANP 158 142 J. Gasser, H. Leutwyler TORNQVIST 82 PRL 49 624 N.A. Tornqvist (HELS) COSTA 80...

71

Climate Change: Anticipated Effects on High-Energy Laser Weapon Systems in Maritime Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study quantifies the potential impacts on ship-defense high-energy-laser (HEL) performance due to atmospheric effects in the marine boundary layer driven by recent observations and analysis of worldwide sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The ...

Steven T. Fiorino; Robb M. Randall; Richard J. Bartell; Adam D. Downs; Peter C. Chu; C. W. Fan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Show Business: Deixis in Fifth-Century Athenian Drama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detail in §II.3. See esp. Hel. 1627 (discussed below), withplay Proteus (Griffith 2002, esp. 249-50). On the socially113. Himmelmann 1996: 230-9, esp. 233: “Recognitional use of

Jacobson, David Julius

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Khesbn no. 83-84 - April 1976 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rf IJNIJ,ID -p)1.tD ly)'t ;rti '.ly . -tlt NtyU'? .ty! 2 toyll ll'35n llD lyl 'lyur'"rti ''ly'l .rrtt Pr3DlD '1 lDrtD]19:T,Dylyblyt Eyl p$ rti! lyllyr lxt D')FED. 'lyENlt, .

Admin, LAYCC

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

Christie, David, E-mail: david.christie@premion.com.au [Premion and Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia); Dear, Keith [Department of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, New South Wales (Australia); Le, Thai [BHB, Premion, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Barton, Michael [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes and Research (CCORE) and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wirth, Andrew [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Porter, David [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Roos, Daniel [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Pratt, Gary [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

REGULATORY GUIDE 8.18 liNJFORMATIOiN RELEVANT TO EiNSURING THAT OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURES AT MEL)ICAL INSTITUTIONS,rILL BE AS LOW AS,IEASONAdLY ACHIEVABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paragraph 20.1(c) of 10 CFR Part 20, "Standards for Protection Against Radiation, " states that licensees should make every reasonable effort to keep radiation exposures, as well as releases of radioactive material to unrestricted

unknown authors

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by RIG-I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, including RIG-I, MDA-5, and LGP2) recognize viral RNAs as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate an antiviral immune response. To understand the molecular basis of this process, we determined the crystal structure of RIG-I in complex with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The dsRNA is sheathed within a network of protein domains that include a conserved 'helicase' domain (regions HEL1 and HEL2), a specialized insertion domain (HEL2i), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTD). A V-shaped pincer connects HEL2 and the CTD by gripping an {alpha}-helical shaft that extends from HEL1. In this way, the pincer coordinates functions of all the domains and couples RNA binding with ATP hydrolysis. RIG-I falls within the Dicer-RIG-I clade of the superfamily 2 helicases, and this structure reveals complex interplay between motor domains, accessory mechanical domains, and RNA that has implications for understanding the nanomechanical function of this protein family and other ATPases more broadly.

Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C.; Vela, Adriana; Kohlway, Andrew; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Pyle, Anna Marie (Yale)

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Welsh Government's Action Plan for wild deer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCW CCW WG via FCW WG (SF-SEED) WG (BETS- FDD) To be completed by Dec 2011 Ongoing from 2012 Priority Government BETS Business, Enterprise, Technology and Science FDD Farm Development Division FFMDD Food, Fish

78

Khesbn no. 87-88 - April 1977 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR? ;..1::_: ,u/ 'Y l. ! > ,)'ttl:Nt nub ,tytitJD D)'tt::l*l[D llttu[t rR t]l Dtl Dy ttl| 'r'bgtt 1:g JtrtDlN r Df lyloybynx DXt Pi2 lyDti2yr ix"ttl-u ly Nl ]tl lyD:yB trllt y'

Admin, LAYCC

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Session III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... University of Alabama; Edward Gorzkowski, Naval Research Laboratory; Sanjay ... Microscopy (FESEM), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) techniques.

80

High Energy Laser Diagnostic Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advancements in high energy laser (HEL) sources have outpaced diagnostic tools capable of accurately quantifying system performance. Diagnostic tools are needed that allow system developers to measure the parameters that define HEL effectiveness. The two critical parameters for quantifying HEL effectiveness are the irradiance on target and resultant rise in target temperature. Off-board sensing has its limitations, including unpredictable changes in the reflectivity of the target, smoke and outgassing, and atmospheric distortion. On-board sensors overcome the limitations of off-board techniques but must survive high irradiance levels and extreme temperatures.We have developed sensors for on-target diagnostics of high energy laser beams and for the measurement of the thermal response of the target. The conformal sensors consist of an array of quantum dot photodetectors and resistive temperature detectors. The sensor arrays are lithographically fabricated on flexible substrates and can be attached to a variety of laser targets. We have developed a nanoparticle adhesive process that provides good thermal contact with the target and that ensures the sensor remains attached to the target for as long as the target survives. We have calibrated the temperature and irradiance sensors and demonstrated them in a HEL environment.

Luke, James R.; Goddard, Douglas N.; Thomas, David [AEgis Technologies Group, 10501 Research Rd SE, Suite D, Albuquerque, NM 87123, 505-938-9221 (United States); Lewis, Jay [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mercury Control Research: Effects of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Parameters on Mercury Speciation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of HgOin simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (Hel-combustion region are unknown, and the major reaction pathways for Hg oxidation in combustion flue gases remain in the oxidation ofHgo in flue gases containingHC!. Thus, an important parameter that influences the oxidation of

Columbia University

82

Phase-Field Simulation of Line Edge Roughness in Block ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... we'd expect. • We used an external “pinning field” at y = 0 and y = Ly to help orient the microdomains. (a) (b) (c) FIG 8: f ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

George Ban-Weiss  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson. "Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an...

84

Craig Wray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson. "Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an...

85

Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth's Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recent- ly, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density...

86

"Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth's Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recent- ly, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density...

87

The Spectrally Resolved Lyman-alpha Emission of Three Lyman-alpha Selected Field Galaxies at z~2.4 from the HETDEX Pilot Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new results on the spectrally resolved Lyman-alpha (LyA) emission of three LyA emitting field galaxies at z~2.4 with high LyA equivalent width (>100 Angstroms) and LyA luminosity (~10^43 erg/s). At 120 km/s (FWHM) spectral resolution, the prominent double-peaked LyA profile straddles the systemic velocity, where the velocity zero-point is determined from spectroscopy of the galaxies' rest-frame optical nebular emission lines. The average velocity offset from systemic of the stronger redshifted emission component for our sample is 176 km/s while the average total separation between the redshifted and main blueshifted emission components is 380 km/s. These measurements are a factor of ~2 smaller than for UV continuum-selected galaxies that show LyA in emission with lower LyA equivalent width. We compare our LyA spectra to the predicted line profiles of a spherical "expanding shell" LyA radiative transfer grid that models large-scale galaxy outflows. Specifically blueward of the systemic velocity wher...

Chonis, Taylor S; Hill, Gary J; Adams, Joshua J; Finkelstein, Steven L; Gebhardt, Karl; Kollmeier, Juna A; Ciardullo, Robin; Drory, Niv; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Overzier, Roderik A; Song, Mimi; Zeimann, Gregory R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

CHEMICAL BIODYNAMICS DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supp ·ly came from wood combustion whereas the present U.S.combustion of photo- synthetic products (e.g. , wood and

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Electric Vehicle Charging Levels and Requirements Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and certification Safety standards and certification * Charging definitions * EVSE ( (electric vehicle supp pp y ly eq quip pment) ) examp ples * Installation requirements * Siting...

90

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy: Policy & Programs Clear All Filters 2013 Ly, Peter, George Ban-Weiss, Nathan Finch, Craig Wray, Mark de Ogburn, Woody Delp, Hashem Akbari, Scott Smaby,...

91

Commercialization-Analysis-&-Roadmap-  

Industrial!Heating!Ventilation!Air!Conditioning!(HVAC),!own!meltgblown!technology! http://bit.ly/KDU3P5!! Filtration(Group(Inc.((USA)(

92

High Temperature Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2010 ... Protective Coatings for Corrosion Resistance at High Temperatures: Vilupanur Ravi1; Thuan Nguyen1; Alexander Ly1; Kameron Harmon1; ...

93

T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A V O L U M E 4 8 | N U M B E R 9 | J U LY 4 , 2 0 0 2 UBC REPORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- activated cell sorter analysis (annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D and sub-G1-analysis), Western blotting [poly and Rhodococ- cus, are largely soil inhabitants and possess complex wax-like cell walls (4) enriched) analyzed more than 200 soil and sand samples from more than 200 locations in Japan for the presence of R

Farrell, Anthony P.

94

RESPONSE TRACKING INFORMATION BEH W.Wagner BPM M. Redmon BPM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RESPONSE RESPONSE TRACKING INFORMATION BEH W.Wagner BPM M. Redmon BPM . Palau BPM P. Huber BPM S. Priest BPM BCR BFC ENVIR TECH/DATA BET ENGINEERING BET GEOTE~ BET DEPUTY PROGRAM MGR.: P. Crotwell BPM PROGRAM MANAGER: R. Harbert BPM PROJECT MANAGER: COMMUNITY RELATIONS CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY BET ENVIRON SAFETY & HEALTH F~~-~~~~-~-~---+-r~-~ W/A W/O K. Renfro SAIC J. Waddell SAIC S. Heptinstall SAIC DEPUTY PROGRAM MGR: T. Patlerson SAIC PROGRAM MANAGER: MGMT. SYSTEMS: SECRETARY: AFFECTED DOCUMENT _ ""')::~ 119033 ,..,::.().: CCN: ..t.:;,;;..:.=..:..:..;:.,.;;.;.:.;~;.;:....c",-,-~~~~ lli::JSRAP COMMUNICATIONS DISTRIBUTION FSRD CÂ¥J COMM TYPE ,-,,-1e<~..::........L---J DOE/ORO FORMER SITES RESTORATION

95

Genizah MS T-S AS 145.94  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recto: letter from Ephraim b. Shemariah to the Nasi; mentions the elder Ab? Sa??d. Verso: Hebrew legal document (power of attorney); mentions ?adoq Av Bet Din....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mechanin?s aktyvacijos ir pried? poveikis ekstrakcinio pushidra?io fosfogipso ir jo gamini? savyb?ms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fosfogipso perdirbimas tampa vis aktualesn? problema ne tik Lietuvoje, bet ir visame pasaulyje. Tiek Lietuvos, tiek ir pasaulio mokslininkai jau seniai bando spr?sti fosfogipso perdirbimo… (more)

Gaidu?is, Sergejus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

BOEKBESPREKING, - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ordening kiest mede omdat bet grootste deel van het volk de terug- keer tot de vrije verkeershuishouding niet zou nemen -- een onbe- wezen stelling- dan ...

98

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EE BET 2010 Amy Tomer 7122010 - 7112012 Milwaukee, Wisconsin Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Develop a proof of concept Integrated Predictive Demand...

99

La rivoluzione è dal sole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The great bet is the CSP technology, solar thermodynamics and concentration. It can produce great quantities of electrical energy with competitive price and without pollution. (2 pages)

Rubbia, Carlo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jenerette. 2010. Box 11: Two paths towards solar energy:Photovoltaic vs Solar Thermal. In: Planetary Stewardship.government betting on the wrong solar horse. Natural Gas &

Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

Previous Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... average particle size) of single phase, multiphase, and multicomponent materials. ... 80 m2/g), and is non-agglomerated (TEM and BET pore size distribution).

102

Before the Department of Commerce In the Matter of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 6 Bloomberg Business Week, Jeff Bazos' Risky Bet, November 13, 2006 (available at: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/06_46 ...

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ESDD EE 0500 EE-BET ORD 2011 Don Ferguson 10012010 - 09302014 NETL-Morgantown, WV, B-17 High Bay Appliance Technology Evaluation Center (ATEC)- Modification Expansion of...

104

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ESDD EE 0500 EE-BET ORD 2011 Don Ferguson 10012010 - 09302014 NETL Morgantown, WV, B-17 Mezzanine Appliance Technology Evaluation Center-Modification Measuring infiltration...

105

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Technical College EE CDP 248.10 BET 2010 Amy Tomer 22 months Randolph, Vermont Vermont State College's Statewide Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Initiative - Allen...

106

NIST r ecommended practice guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gas Absorption Surface Area Analysis (E) [BET Absorption] ... where, ? is the angular velocity of the centrifuge, r0 and rt are the radial positions of the ...

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

X&h  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HEL!ORANDUM OF AGREEhlENT made this 1st day of HEL!ORANDUM OF AGREEhlENT made this 1st day of X&h effective as of: the m day Of h&q&y 19&$, between THE Di%& STATE OF AMERICA (hereinafter called "the GovernmenW), represented by the Executive Secretary (hereinafter called "the Contracting Officer"), Gffice' of Scientific Research and Development in the Office for Emergency L(mage- ment, Executive Office of,the President, and lm m ckrllrglrs, m, ]Icrao, ~1.*I)o~~~J~~~'~~~L~c-*~"~~~-.."~~'---*~-~~ rrrrrrrrr,r-rr~'-rrrrrr--rrrrrrrrrrrr-r -I-LIII"I"--*"II*IIL-*-------*----~~-- --*---QIILIIIOL-IIII*~--------------~- (hereinafter called "the Contractor"). ' . ' !!JHEREAS, the Contractor conducts and. maintains sn experimental testing snd research laboratory or laboratories and the Government desires

108

Proceedings from EPRI IEC 61850 2011 Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61850 standard, identified by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as one of the Smart Grid foundational standards, created a new vision of protection, automation, and control for power utility companies. In North America, many utilities have been actively engaged in pilot projects or laboratory evaluation of the new IEC 61850 technologies. The experiences, success stories, and lessons learned from such early deployment can possibly hel...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

109

Structure of the nucleon and nuclei studied by HERMES H. E. Jackson a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of quark hel- city distributions in the nucleon, as well as results pertaining to transverse spin physics is routinely about 0.55. The polarized target gases, atomic H or D are generated by an atomic-beam source based on Stern-Gerlach separation which provides an areal density of about 2 #2; 10 14 atoms/cm 2 for H and 7 #2

110

Khesbn no. 47 - June 1967 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r ,lJllls ID r''lhlN Ey'r l'lN 'rtD l''tll llylr i'I lylN'IlDy)ri2y) ,JUJllS- "tyt! )"rtD lJ'"l x ls] ly})I]ly'l'TNf

Admin, LAYCC

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Improving PbS Quantum Dot Solar Cell Power Conversion Efficiency to an NREL-Certified 4.4% (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transition metal oxide improves overall efficiency and maintains performance with inexpensive metals. A research team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has demonstrated that inserting a transition metal oxide (TMO) between the lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dot (QD) layer and the metal electrode eliminates the Schottky barrier that impedes efficient hole extraction and thereby improves the overall conversion efficiency. This allows for inexpensive metals such as Al to be employed without loss of performance. n-type TMOs consisting of molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}) and vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub x}) were used as an efficient hole extraction layer (HEL) in heterojunction ZnO/PbS QD solar cells. A 4.4% NREL-certified device was reported based on the MoO{sub x} HEL with Al as the back contact material, representing a more than 65% efficiency improvement compared with the case of Au contacting the PbS QD layer directly. The team finds the acting mechanism of the HEL to be a dipole formed at the MoO{sub x} and PbS interface, which enhances band bending to allow efficient hole extraction from the valence band of the PbS layer by MoO{sub x}. The carrier transport to the metal anode is likely enhanced through shallow gap states in the MoO{sub x} layer.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

SGP-TR-32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to estimate the number of adsorption layers, the BET cell shown in Fig. 4 has already been used to determine \\ % SAMPLE HOLDER SAS CYLINDER FIGURE 4, BET CELL USED TO DETERMINE ROCK SURFACE AREA 6 #12;.-c 0- c? a =' m by hydraulic fracturing by LASL in the hot, dry rock experiment in New Mexico. The results of this first 75-day

Stanford University

113

2006 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; July 2006; v. 34; no. 7; p. 581584; doi: 10.1130/G22367.1; 3 figures. 581  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is colliding oblique- ly with the Aleutian arc (Nakamura et al., 1977) and where the eastern portion., Jacob, K.H., and Davies, J.N., 1977, Volcanoes as possible indicators of tectonic stress orientation--Aleutians

Engelder, Terry

114

Ir Zuns Bar-Mitsve/ Her Son’s Bar-Mitzvah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ö'Ö oisyys o^na pnx yrx .o^oio •p^a pmownyi x oy ? oo ny oyly^mav» iyp ly px tt>i&8 ^wn in oio oy 0811 >vw yp wrr .01 8

Samson Apter, Shimshen Apter/

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Transportation Solutions Using Carbon Fiber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

most common- ly used precursor, is petroleum-based and its price fluctuates with crude oil prices. To drive down costs, ORNL is investigating textile PAN and polyolefin-based...

116

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Environment 68 (2013): 170-178. Ly, Peter, George Ban-Weiss, Nathan Finch, Craig Wray, Mark de Ogburn, William W. Delp, Hashem Akbari, Scott Smaby, Ronnen Levinson,...

117

Microsoft Word - RPSEA_FractureArea_FinalReport_DRAFT2_8Apr2013...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trock poin r failure of t ure 7.4 sho ant embedm at will be e conductiv content from testing of p es, provides r-wellbore f ction due to that contro of the pro ly productio...

118

Fuzzy-probabilistic calculations of evapotranspiration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evapotranspiration from solar radiation. J. Irrig. DrainageFMF Temperature (oC) Solar radiation (Ly/ d) Wind (km/d) mindaily global (total) solar radiation (kJ m -2 day -1 ); and

Faybishenko, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Assessment of Distributed Generation Potential in Japanese Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC) uses an al- ternative de?nitionherein referred to as the FERC ef?ciency, which is de?ned inare signi?cant- ly higher. FERC Efficiency = Equation 1 [

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

D.Ficenec2,J.Knapp5,D.M.Lowder6,S.McKee4,D.Muller5,J.A.Musser3,S.L.Nutter4, CosmicRayPositronsatHighEnergies:ANewMeasurement S.W.Barwick1,J.J.Beatty2,C.R.Bower3,C.Chaput4,S.Coutu4,G.deNolfo2, E.Schneider1,S.P.Swordy5,K.K.Tang7,G.Tarle4,A.D.Tomasch4,E.Torb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

etercombinedwithatransitionradiationdetector,anelectromag EnergyAntimatterTelescope(HEAT).Usingamagnetspectrom- highdegreeofbackgroundrejection.Ourresultsdonotindicatea neticcalorimeter,andtime-of-ightcounterswehaveachieveda majorcontributiontothepositronuxfromprimarysources.In particular,weseenoevidenceforthesignicantriseinthepositron 198.70.S,14.80.Ly fractionatenergiesabove10GeVpreviouslyreported. 2

unknown authors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Clear All Filters 2013 Ly, Peter, George Ban-Weiss, Nathan Finch, Craig Wray, Mark de Ogburn, Woody Delp, Hashem Akbari, Scott Smaby, Ronnen Levinson, and Bret Gean....

122

An analytically solvable, axially non-homogeneous reactor model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approximation has been investigated numerically (Yasinski and Henry, 1965; Ott and Meneley, 1969; Bell and Glasstone,1970) and analytically in 1-D noise problems (KosaÃ? ly et al., 1977). The general conclusion

Pázsit, Imre

123

Rhyolite magma degassing: an experimental study of melt vesiculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

quires studying the separation of gas from melt in high- ly viscous liquids ..... been measured as a function of temperature on a natural rhyolite sample ( cylindrical ..... In general, bubble loss at constant foam volume has two sources: ( a) coal-.

124

TY RPRT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building integrated photovoltaic BIPV roofs for sustainability and energy efficiency A1 Peter Ly A1 George Ban Weiss A1 Finch Nathan A1 Wray Craig A1 de Ogburn Mark A1 Delp Woody...

125

Asymptotics of instability zones of the Hill operator with a two term potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\gamma_n $ denote the length of the $n$-th zone of instability of the Hill operator $Ly= -y^{\\prime \\prime} - [4t\\alpha \\cos2x + 2 \\alpha^2 \\cos 4x ] y,$ where $\\alpha \

Plamen Djakov; Boris Mityagin

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

126

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PU Kenya KE Lesotho LT Liberia LI Libya LY Madagascar MA Malawi MI Mali ML Mauritania MR Mauritius MP Morocco MO Mozambique MZ Namibia WA Niger NG Nigeria NI Reunion ...

127

A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expanding capabilities with new partnerships In line with the vision outlined in its strategic plan, "Forging the Future - A Ten-Year Strategic Vision" (http:bit.lyJGI-Vision)...

128

Haynt Iz Eybik (Lider Fun Malke Khayfets Tuzman) / Today is Forever (Poems of Malka Heifetz Tussman)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mya yxaga n aanaito ïP^sng ly'nyan ps yxgp^ipx "amyayayT//a**rt nga ogn ]yo nyag ,o**sng* agn a m /'nxnn,, px px .ay-

Dr. Israel Stern, Dokter Yisroel Shtern /

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

PDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

where Dn & Rn¢n is the dou˜ly nonneg—tive ™oneD iFeF the ™one of n ¢ n symmetri™ positive semidefinite m—tri™es th—t —re —lso entrywise nonneg—

130

Microstructural Development Under the Influence of Elastic Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

misfit and hence smaller elastic energy (e.g. Ni-Cr-Al or Ni-Si-Al), the yt particles coarsen steadi- ly and the mean particle size r at an ageing time t is proportional.

131

LANL's Top-secret super-secure vault declassified | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

LANL declassified the vault this week. BLOG: 1.usa.gov18CVf6K VIDEO: bit.ly169ebnB Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Oct 22, 2013 Workshop Focuses on Combating Illicit...

132

Saskia Sassen and the Sociology of Globalization: A Critical Appraisal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discontents: Essays on the New Mobility of People and Money.has created new conditions for the international mobility ofnew role for major urban centers, particularly in the high- ly developed countries. In The Mobility

Robinson, William I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L'Y Ii:I UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA r ITl1I Lawrence BerkeleyGroup Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of CaliforniaBerkeley, California 94720 ABSTRACT Computer programs have

Gadgil, Ashok; Bauman, Fred; Kammerud, Ronald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Khesbn no. 44 - April 1966 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EttP:y? ::Li:lSD 1tt1'3 "'rtD ,ll! )tsi-lsD ''l"t ?! 2y? D!jtN P''ri) ,D'''ly:"'tt yl''rtD Dt'11{ , lt: ll-:" l] Ly ,Elli'T lrtg oyt! tt llyl"rtD Eyt''N ii2'li2t''! '1N plbf

Admin, LAYCC

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

J. Mol. Biol. (1996) 264, 11641179 How to Derive a Protein Folding Potential? A New  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fna 1mol 1stf 1gmp 1frd 1hsb 1ida 1plc 1aya 1onc 1sha 1fus 1psp 1fdd 256b 1acx 1bet 1fkb 1pal 2sic 1

Mirny, Leonid

136

Genizah MS T-S AS 152.170  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Legal document written for a woman and signed by Hillel b. Zadok Av of the Bet Din and Mevorakh b. Nathan he-?aver, both known from other documents from the middle of the 12th century....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

137

Reading Comprehension - Internet Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet Safety Twenty hours days weeks years ago, kids in school had never even heard of the internet. Now, I'll bet you can't find a single person in your school who...

138

The dissolution rates of natural glasses as a function of their composition at pH 4 and 10.6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

age. 3.2. Experimental Methods Dissolution experiments weredissolution experiments was measured by the three-point BET methodmethod used to de?ne the speci?c surface area. Dissolution

Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A testing methodology for side-channel resistance validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Round 7, S Round Round 7 Round 7 hows a typical e figure shows nts. T ... bits te yte Table 4: Summa e testing, show c remained bet ary of test result ...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

time, they looked up. October 6, 2010 DuPont is betting on major growth in the market for solar energy -- and therefore for its Tedlar film, a durable backing for silicon solar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

How to Determine the Probability of the Higgs Boson Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the most important, though yet undiscovered ingredient of the standard model of particle physics. Its detection is therefore one of the most important goals of high energy physics that can guide future research in theoretical physics. Enormous efforts have been undertaken to prove the existence of the Higgs boson, and the physics community is excitedly awaiting the restart of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. But how sure can we be that the Higgs exits at all? The German philosopher Immanuel Kant recommended betting at such controversial questions, and Stephen Hawking announced a $100 bet against the Higgs. But seriously, online prediction markets, which are a generalized form of betting, do provide the best possible probability estimates for future events. It is proposed that the scientific community uses this platforms for evaluation. See also an online description www.Bet-On-The-Higgs.com.

Alexander Unzicker

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

Generation of test data structures using constraint logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of Bounded-Exhaustive Testing (BET) is the automatic generation of all the test cases satisfying a given invariant, within a given bound. When the input has a complex structure, the development of correct and efficient generators becomes ...

Valerio Senni; Fabio Fioravanti

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Animal Noise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why do animals make sounds, are they trying to talk to us? Replies: You bet. When the dog barks loud and nasty, he's trying to tell you to stay out of his yard, and when he...

144

Report of the Event Tag Review and Recommendation Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to knowing which triggers an event satisfied, it might beT P Decisions Level 2 Trigger Masks Event F i l t e r Masksexpected' trigger item rejected the event and the offline

Assamagan, K.A.; ATLAS Group

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

164.10 BET Fy2010 Amy Tomer 6 months Cranford, NJ Municipal Building Energy Efficient Window Replacement Replace old & inefficient windows in the municipal building. 09 09 2010...

146

Development of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Work continued on the development of catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Six catalysts were synthesised. The effects of a calcium oxide promoter were evaluated. Catalysts were characterized for pore size and BET surface area.

Bukur, D.B.; Lang, X.; Wei, G.; Xiao, S.

1995-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

Published in Biotechniques, Vol. 32, No. 6, June 2002, pp 1296-1302  

Reagent/Stock Preparation BET Solution (processes twenty 384-well plates) Ethanol(100%) 64.0 mls Deionized Water 7.0 mls Tetra Ethylene Glycol 6.4 mls ...

148

PHYSICAL CHANGES IN THE PORE STRUCTURE OF COAL WITH CHEMICAL PROCESSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structure of Coal and Coke, BCRUA, 80 (1943). F. P.Structure of Coal and Coke, BCRUA, 95 (1943). R. L. Bond andOOC on several coals and cokes. Lahiri obtained BET surface

Harris Jr, E.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

MODEL STORAGE RING FOR 6 GEV OPERATION AS A SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advance per half cell (degree.) Vertical phaae advance per half cell (degrees) Maximum horizontal bet.a {m} Maximum vertical bet.a (m) Maximum dispersion {m} Momentum compact.ion Synchrotron damping t.ime (milliV) Est.imat.ed total power demand (MW) 'Ie 1.0 (6.6 GeV) QUADRUPOLES Number 320 Lengths (m) 0.5 (256) 0

Kemner, Ken

150

C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C om pact S uperconducting F F Q uadrupole M agnet O utline. S uperconducting M agnets for the H E R A -II L um inosity U pgrade. NLC -The NextLi nearCol l i derPr oj ect I P Cur r entLead & Hel i um Feed Poi nt Det ect orCom ponent s + Sol enoi d GO ( Lef t ) GG ( Ri ght ) Cur r entLead & Hel i um Feed Poi nt Minicryostat * Superconducting magnets installed into existing ZEUS and H1 detectors (solenoid, so no iron yoke). * Coils for separating beams and reducing e-ring β* (dipole, quad, skew-quad, skew-dipole & sextupole). * Met extremely tight radial budget for cryostat. * Met demanding field harmonic requirements. * Technology now will be used for BEPC-II Upgrade and possibly the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory Upgrade. Endcan GO Endcan S uperconducting M agnets for the H E R A -II L um inosity U pgrade. He Cont ai nm ent Coi lSuppor tTube 102 m m I D 5 m m W al l Vacuum Flange Connection to Experimental Beam Pipe Warm-to-Cold

151

GRB 130606A AS A PROBE OF THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN A STAR-FORMING GALAXY IN THE FIRST Gyr AFTER THE BIG BANG  

SciTech Connect

We present high signal-to-noise ratio Gemini and MMT spectroscopy of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130606A at redshift z = 5.913, discovered by Swift. This is the first high-redshift GRB afterglow to have spectra of comparable quality to those of z Almost-Equal-To 6 quasars. The data exhibit a smooth continuum at near-infrared wavelengths that is sharply cut off blueward of 8410 A due to absorption from Ly{alpha} at redshift z Almost-Equal-To 5.91, with some flux transmitted through the Ly{alpha} forest between 7000 and 7800 A. We use column densities inferred from metal absorption lines to constrain the metallicity of the host galaxy between a lower limit of [Si/H] {approx}> -1.7 and an upper limit of [S/H] {approx}< -0.5 set by the non-detection of S II absorption. We demonstrate consistency between the dramatic evolution in the transmission fraction of Ly{alpha} seen in this spectrum over the redshift range z = 4.9-5.85 with that previously measured from observations of high-redshift quasars. There is an extended redshift interval of {Delta}z = 0.12 in the Ly{alpha} forest at z = 5.77 with no detected transmission, leading to a 3{sigma} upper limit on the mean Ly{alpha} transmission fraction of {approx}<0.2% (or {tau}{sub GP}{sup eff} (Ly{alpha}) > 6.4). This is comparable to the lowest-redshift Gunn-Peterson troughs found in quasar spectra. Some Ly{beta} and Ly{gamma} transmission is detected in this redshift window, indicating that it is not completely opaque, and hence that the intergalactic medium (IGM) is nonetheless mostly ionized at these redshifts. We set a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.11 on the neutral fraction of the IGM at the redshift of the GRB from the lack of a Ly{alpha} red damping wing, assuming a model with a constant neutral density. GRB 130606A thus for the first time realizes the promise of GRBs as probes of the first galaxies and cosmic reionization.

Chornock, Ryan; Berger, Edo; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Drout, Maria R.; Fong Wenfai; Laskar, Tanmoy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fox, Derek B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Roth, Katherine C., E-mail: rchornock@cfa.harvard.edu [Gemini Observatory, 670 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Lyman-alpha Heating of Inhomogeneous High-redshift Intergalactic Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intergalactic medium (IGM) prior to the epoch of reionization consists mostly of neutral hydrogen gas. Ly-alpha photons produced by early stars resonantly scatter off hydrogen atoms, causing energy exchange between the radiation field and the gas. This interaction results in moderate heating of the gas due to the recoil of the atoms upon scattering, which is of great interest for future studies of the pre-reionization IGM in the HI 21 cm line. We investigate the effect of this Ly-alpha heating in the IGM with linear density, temperature and velocity perturbations. Perturbations smaller than the diffusion length of photons could be damped due to heat conduction by Ly-alpha photons. The scale at which damping occurs and the strength of this effect depend on various properties of the gas, the flux of Ly-alpha photons and the way in which photon frequencies are redistributed upon scattering. To find the relevant length scale and the extent to which Ly-alpha heating affects perturbations, we calculate the gas ...

Oklopcic, Antonija

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

Matsunuma, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-matsunuma@nifty.com [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Fujikane, Tomoko [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuura, Masaaki [Bioinformatics Group, Genome Center of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and Division of Cancer Genomics, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Gomi, Naoya [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Horii, Rie [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Futoshi [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Iwase, Takuji [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Mechanism of G1 arrest in the Drosophilaeye imaginal disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Drosophila PCNA gene function. Curr Biol 2003, 13:53-58. 22. Jarman AP, Grau Y, Jan LY, Jan YN: atonal is a proneural gene that directs chordotonal organ formation in the Drosophila peripheral nervous system. Cell 1993, 73:1307-1321. 23. Jarman AP, Grell EH... , Ackerman L, Jan LY, Jan YN: atonal is the proneural gene for Drosophila photoreceptors. Nature 1994, 369:398-400. 24. Gibson MC, Schubiger G: Drosophila peripodial cells, more than meets the eye? Bioessays 2001, 23:691-697. 25. Knoblich JA, Sauer K, Jones...

Escudero, Luis M; Freeman, Matthew

2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

155

QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick H I gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly{alpha} emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly{alpha} scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive search (1{sigma} surface-brightness limits of SB{sub Ly{alpha}}{approx_equal}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2}) for diffuse Ly{alpha} emission in the environments of the foreground (predominantly radio-quiet) quasars is conducted using Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS slit spectroscopy. We fail to detect large-scale {approx}100 kpc Ly{alpha} emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, which are frequently invoked in unified models of active galactic nuclei. Small-scale R {approx} 50 A) Ly{alpha}-emitter with luminosity L{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.1 {+-} 0.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} at small impact parameter R = 134 kpc from one foreground quasar, and argue that it is more likely to result from quasar-powered fluorescence, than simply be a star-forming galaxy clustered around the quasar. Our observations imply that much deeper integrations with upcoming integral-field spectrometers such as MUSE and KCWI will be able to routinely detect a diffuse Ly{alpha} glow around bright quasars on scales R {approx} 100 kpc and thus directly image the CGM.

Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: xavier@ucolick.org [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Shock response of 5083-0 aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum alloy (5083-0) is used as lightweight armor in armored vehicles. Data on the shock response of this material is useful to simulate ballistic penetration of different nose-shaped penetrators. In this paper we present the dynamic response of 5083-0 aluminum to shock wave loading to 22 GPa. Manganin stress gauges were used to measure the stress wave profiles. Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) and spall strength were 0.28 GPa and 1.6 GPa, respectively. Shock Hugoniot to stress levels of 10 GPa was determined by embedded in-material gauges and above 10 GPa by measuring shock velocities by embedding manganin gauges at the back surface of stepped targets.

Laber, M. W.; Brar, N. S.; Rosenberg, Z. [Impact Physics Laboratory, University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio 45469-0182 (United States); RAFAEL, P.O. Box 2250 (24), Haifa (Israel)

1998-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

In Silico Investigation of Conformational Motions in Superfamily 2 Helicase Proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helicases are motor proteins that play a central role in the metabolism of DNA and RNA in biological cells. Using the energy of ATP molecules, they are able to translocate along the nucleic acids and unwind their duplex structure. They have been extensively characterized in the past and grouped into superfamilies based on structural similarities and sequential motifs. However, their functional aspects and the mechanism of their operation are not yet well understood. Here, we consider three helicases from the major superfamily 2- Hef, Hel308 and XPD- and study their conformational dynamics by using coarse-grained relaxational elastic network models. Specifically, their responses to mechanical perturbations are analyzed. This enables us to identify robust and ordered conformational motions which may underlie the functional activity of these proteins. As we show, such motions are well-organized and have large amplitudes. Their possible roles in the processing of nucleic substrate are discussed.

Holger Flechsig; Er S. Mikhailov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Incorporating Heterogeneity Correction and 4DCT in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): The Effect on Target Coverage, Organ-At-Risk Doses, and Dose Conformity  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the dosimetric impact of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) target volumes and heterogeneity correction (HC) on target coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) doses, and dose conformity in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Twelve patients with lung cancer, scanned using both helical CT and 4DCT, were treated with SBRT (60 Gy in 3 fractions). The clinical plans were calculated without HC and based on targets from the free-breathing helical CT scan (PTV{sub HEL}). Retrospectively, the clinical plans were recalculated with HC and were evaluated based on targets from 4DCT datasets (PTV{sub 4D}) accounting for patient-specific target motion. The PTV{sub 4D} was greater than PTV{sub HEL} when tumor motion exceeded 7.5 mm (vector). There were significant decreases in target coverage (V100) for the recalculated vs. clinical plans (0.84 vs. 0.94, p < 0.02) for the same monitor units. When the recalculated plans were optimized for equivalent V100 of the clinical plans, there were significant increases in the 60-Gy dose spillage (1.27 vs. 1.13, p < 0.001) and 30-Gy dose spillage (5.20 vs. 3.73, p < 0.001) vs. the clinical plans. There was a significant increase (p < 0.04) in the mean OAR doses between the optimized re-calculated and the clinical plan. Tumor motion is an important consideration for target volumes defined using helical CT. Lower prescription doses may be required when prospectively planning with HC to achieve a similar level of toxicity and dose spillage as expected when planning based on homogeneous dose calculations.

Franks, Kevin N. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Tom.Purdie@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Dawson, Laura A.; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Confinement and Stability of Alternate Fusion Concepts Varenna, Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

¥ Axisymmetric ideal MHD ¥ Accurate geometry ¥ Fit to experiment yields magnetic fields, currents, etc. NIMROD o Flux from injector coils Injector flux (private) Divertor Injector flux = 14 mWb Toroidal current The vacuum (bias) field allows operation at l(y) = j||/B ~ lFC (Flux conserver eigenmode). Vacuum Field

160

Television and the Child in Nepal: An Assessment of Viewing Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·Team8 and *1 Spy: Furthermore, other Engllsh serials (which used to be shown prior to the two above) like -Street Hawk,­ ~Ight RJder: and "MI-S" were also found to have been extTeme:ly well-liked by the children. In comparing -nIe A-Team" and "I Spy...

Baral, Dyutt

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ORIGINAL ARTICLE doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01214.x  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simple gasteroid genera Ly- coperdon, Bovista, Calvatia, and Discisdea (Larsson and Jeppson 2008 sequences from GenBank and is largely based on the Lycoperdaceae sensu Larsson and Jeppson (2008). We with previous analyses in these groups (Binder and Hibbett 2006; Hosaka et al. 2006; Larsson and Jeppson 2008

Hibbett, David S.

162

Let's start with a "his-torical fact": "People  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Henry Ford put his cars on rollers and made his work- ers adopt the speed of the assembly line. At first twentieth century. Now, let's flash forward to the early twenty-first century. "America?" "We lived,asAbrahamVerghese tells it, doctors could "train in a decent, ten-story hospi- tal, where the lifts are actual- ly working

163

Fir Lider / Four Poems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

roiK pe T8* yw lyT &gn onp-anp —p^nyao^ JPIK ya"! yoann»a noyan 08ii ,*n ix oita p8T0 8 anp pi-joisn Tin oy ütaw pK .pn»

Khosid / Chasid, M

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Kheshbn No. 105- Spring 1985 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tsrm rar*» lyT up .mraö: is: anp ö ^ » t ö "T8B t^x poix pxppjna ypnayaKfo] pPa n px Isa pt ni anp Dsn ps Bjni pm nan ,ya yi"s yta p">a oyna pnx ig anp PK pp g ps p^pmi px pnapgty

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Kheshbn No. 130- Fall 1997 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

¥ >P"* yVx pa Ya «px a»a ly / anp pyiw x ip'a^x ix YB YX anoa^n^ ]xyr ava -pr ayn nyp^anp . ^Trnyapxixa ix in aa^Vp iyypnypyaVa^a n yaya DRH anp ,RHD OU aRn aaRtya aRn 7R .

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Issues in Ground-Truthing Graphic Documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the nature of ground-truth: whether it is always well-defined fora given task, oron ly relative and approximate. In the conventional scenario, reference data is produced by recording the interpretation of each test document using a chosen ...

Daniel P. Lopresti; George Nagy

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

CSR Press Release Submitted by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and the Environmental Markets Association (EMA). Bloomberg New Energy Finance will provide content resources and has://bit.ly/CTA201SpeakerList. A sampling of speakers includes David Sandalow - U.S. Department of Energy, Abyd ­ Barclays, Kyle Danish ­ Van Ness Feldman, Miles Austin ­ Carbon Markets & Investors Association, Milo

168

Experiments with remote entanglement using single barium ions Nathan Kurz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metabolite in blood plasma using tandem UV photodiode-array and fluorescence detection. J Chromatogr B Analyt: mezidruhové rozdíly v konjugaci s glukuronovou kyselinou (clovk vs miniprase). Ceskoslovenská fyziologie 2004 kyselinou (clovk vs. miniprase). Folia Phoenix 2005, Suppl. 1, p. 33. · Kunes M., Svoboda Z., Maláková J

Blinov, Boris

169

The Reionization History in the Lognormal Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the evolution of baryonic gas before the reionization in the lognormal (LN) model of cosmic clustering. We show that the thermal history of the universe around the reionization can roughly be divided into three epochs: 1) cold dark age $z>z_r$, in which baryon gas is neutral, and opaque to Ly$\\alpha$ photons; 2) hot dark age $z_r > z> z_{gp}$, in which a predominant part of baryon gas is ionized and hot, but it is still opaque to Ly$\\alpha$ photons; 3) bright age $zhistory naturally yields a high optical depth to the CMB $\\tau_e \\simeq 0.12 - 0.19$ observed by the TE polarization of the WMAP, and a low redshift $z_{gp}$ of the appearance of the Ly$\\alpha$ Gunn-Peterson trough $z_{gp} \\simeq 6 - 8$ in QSO's absorption spectra. The reason why the universe stays long in an ionized, yet Ly$\\alpha$ opaque, stage is because the first photo-ionization heats the intergalactic gas effectively and has balanced the gravitational clustering a long period of time. Therefore, the result of a high $\\tau_e$ and low $z_{gp}$ is a common feature of all the models considered. Besides the cosmological parameters, the only free parameter we used in the calculation is $N_{ion}$, the mean ionization photons produced by each baryon in collapsed objects. We take it to be 40 - 80 in the calculation.

Ji-Ren Liu; Li-Zhi Fang; Long-Long Feng; Hong-Guang Bi

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Khesbn no. 85-86 - September 1976 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 l! 'tbl 'js]'l llynD"]fl ttl lyDlP ''lyil$ .ttrD lirtl'rtlytll'lbt ltrl 'rtO? li: ill)ttl'1v''1S! yJttl irN ']yl! yr-s "::*' =:ii$ :':,:-;)? )'i ttl"ti .j-t"l'T itlS'ilAt$D -J$

Admin, LAYCC

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Khesbn no. 51 - April-June 1968 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

f tf{ - ltr*tlt/.1''f ,ly:l"ttl? s /,r'rl l? ytt ? $t lyn .liill,i! '1't) )-1 ! llN ..Ttl -bpyrru llD l:"r-lyi2 'l'N T.N llBtl ,-1rD? ll9-i? ttl llrj? Dnt

Admin, LAYCC

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Khesbn no. 9 - January 1957 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trbstyJjt,,,\\ )gn 1153 lJ$? ttl .11$1 lyl t)]D 1tg tl] My''x Jrsnyr $'r lt]N ,y'I)t: ttl Jy}T ,''lllJNl "lyur"'t''ly ''$ blg'lt! ; IISE ylyltltvr*l l)ttl !? tr 7t$ 1tlDtf, P'rl! )

Admin, LAYCC

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Phosphoinositide 3-kinase: a critical signalling event in pulmonary cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 3-D-phosphorylated phos- phoinositides in C5a-stimulated eosinophils. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2000, 269:816–821. 18. Pan ZK, Chen LY, Cochrane CG, Zuraw BL: fMet-leu-phe stimulates proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in human peripheral blood...

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Business Operations and Facilities -Utilities Indicator or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in your home and business. The course includes 5 modules: Intro to Sustainability, Wa- ter, Waste, Energy techniques at home and in a business. Final- ly, you will learn how to conduct a water audit. Objectives to understand HOW to improve energy efficiency and conservation techniques at home and in a business. Finally

Wood, James B.

175

Visual Search Jeremy M. Wolfe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 Visual Search Jeremy M. Wolfe Abstract This chapter considers the range of visual search tasks, from those involving very brief- ly presented stimuli to those involving search processes that extend over many days. Most of the discussion centers on "classic" visual search tasks, as studied in the lab

176

Analytic calculation of certain scattering parameters from a mode conversion analysis of X-mode-O-mode coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ in Eqs. (9), dCw$~[~(1)-~,+z01) cu= C,cu,( 1-k$r(iLY2) ' 45 ~~p~~~~~~o~-~,+~ozol} c,= C"cY,kO( 1 -k

Ng, Chung-Sang

177

RIS-N-2244 AN INTRODUCTION TO PROTON CONDUCTION IN SOLIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

separators in efficient fuel cells for electricity generation. This report describes fuel cell - and other is converted to electrical energy. The fuel gasses (H, and 0- in the simplest case) are continous ly fed-descriptors: ELECTROLYTES, FUEL CELLS, IONIC CONDUCTIVITY, PROTON TRANSPORT, PROTONS, REVIEWS, SOLIDS, USES. UDC 539

178

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN ON A ALBANY CAT RON CREEK DALEY BU LL CREEK LEE C HAPEL AR Y ROT HWELL MEAD OW CR EEK HOL LY CREEK CON CORD TAU LBEE KH...

179

Campath, calcineurin inhibitor reduction and chronic allograft nephropathy (3C) study: background, rationale, and study protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hospital, Cosham, Portsmouth PO6 3LY, UK. 9Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot Street, Liverpool L7 8XN, UK. 10Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK. 11University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Clifford Bridge Road...

Haynes, Richard; Baigent, Colin; Harden, Paul; Landray, Martin; Akyol, Murat; Asderakis, Argiris; Baxter, Alex; Bhandari, Sunil; Chowdhury, Paramit; Clancy, Marc; Emberson, Jonathan; Gibbs, Paul; Hammad, Abdul; Herrington, Will; Jayne, Kathy; Jones, Gareth; Krishnan, Nithya; Lay, Michael; Lewis, David; Macdougall, Iain; Nathan, Chidambaram; Neuberger, James; Newstead, Chas; Pararajasingam, Ravi; Puliatti, Carmelo; Rigg, Keith; Rowe, Peter; Sharif, Adnan; Sheerin, Neil; Sinha, Sanjay; Watson, Chris; Friend, Peter; The 3C Study Collaborative Group

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

An exercise in forecasting loop current and eddy frontal positions in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exercise in forecasting loop current and eddy frontal positions in the Gulf of Mexico L.-Y. Oey to forecast Loop Current and Loop Current eddy frontal positions in the Gulf of Mexico, the Princeton Regional (2005), An exercise in forecasting loop current and eddy frontal positions in the Gulf of Mexico

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

????????? © " !#?? %$& ??% ('0)2 13¡4 § © (?? %$5 ¡067 ??8 9 ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??????n0 ? u??? ?iup?t? ?d??l gsiqpg?f??rY }?g q??frY m?r lY ???? l gsi?}o?f?? thp l {g?frs?? mY?jl {k?&ª rona i ??f}dl tepgr7 p?mY?jg t?} ...

182

COMMUNICATIONS Ecological Applications, 13(6), 2003, pp. 15031507  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their native ranges. Sapium sebiferum (Chinese tallow tree) is a major invader of habitats in the southern; biological invasions; Chinese tallow tree; evolution of increased competitive ability; Hawaii, USA; Sapium.S. ecosystems, Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum L., Euphorbiaceae) aggressive- ly displaces native plants

Siemann, Evan

183

Type II Seesaw and the PAMELA/ATIC Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss how the cosmic ray signals reported by the PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS experiments may be understood in a Standard Model (SM) framework supplemented by type II seesaw and a stable SM singlet scalar boson as dark matter. A particle physics explanation of the 'boost' factor can be provided by including an additional SM singlet scalar field.

Ilia Gogoladze; Nobuchika Okada; Qaisar Shafi

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Industry News Alert HOUSTON--July 20, 2005--Written by Richard Finlayson, International Correspondent for Industrialinfo.com (Industrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) project to create the world's first sustainable nuclear fusion reactor would be built on a site and some heavy place bets on clean coal and nuclear power companies may be necessary to allow you to sit a $5 billion investment in a nuclear power station project, but having the approval for the budget

185

From here to human-level AI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human-level AI will be achieved, but new ideas are almost certainly needed, so a date cannot be reliably predicted-maybe five years, maybe five hundred years. I'd be inclined to bet on this 21st century. It is not surprising that human-level AI has proved ... Keywords: Elaboration tolerance, Human-level AI

John McCarthy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Soybean Oil-based Biodiesel Production Catalyzed with Na2O/Al2O3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid alkali catalyst was prepared with CH3COONa immobilized on alumina by impregnation method. Represented with SEM, IR and BET techniques, the catalysts indicated relatively uniform particle size distribution with perfect particle surface area, pore ... Keywords: biodiesel, impregnation method, representation, catalyst, transesterification

Yingming Chen; Xiaodong Chen; Junhua Peng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Implementing Virtual Reality Interfaces for the Geosciences June 11, 1996 LBL Report Number 38618 12 9.0 Acknowledgment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, N., ``Virtual Reality: Oxymoron or Pleonasm?,'' Wired, Volume 1, Number 6, December 1993. [MCC87] McImplementing Virtual Reality Interfaces for the Geosciences June 11, 1996 LBL Report Number 38618­Hall, 1982. [BET95] W. Bethel, `Modular Virtual Reality Visualization Tools,'' LBL Technical Report Number

188

Synthesizing stochasticity in biochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Randomness is inherent to biochemistry: at each instant, the sequence of reactions that fires is a matter of chance. Some biological systems exploit such randomness, choosing between different outcomes stochastically - in effect, hedging their bets with ... Keywords: biochemical reactions, computational biology, markov processes, random processes, stochasticity, synthesis, synthetic biology

Brian Fett; Jehoshua Bruck; Marc D. Riedel

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Water bathing synthesis of high-surface-area nanocrystal-assembled SnO{sub 2} particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles were synthesized in aqueous solutions. The particles showed high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g. It was much higher than that of our previous studies. BJH analyses indicated that the particles had pores of about 2-5 nm. The particles included two kinds of morphologies. The first particles were about 300-1000 nm in diameter, which were assemblies of acicular crystals of 5-10 nm in width and 100-200 nm in length. They contributed high BET surface area. The second particles were about 10,000-3000 nm in diameter, which were assemblies of ellipse crystals of 100-200 in width and 200-400 nm in length. The ellipse crystals consisted of sheet crystals. They connected with a certain angle and arranged their long direction parallel. - Graphical abstract: Acicular crystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles and ellipse crystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles were synthesized in the aqueous solutions. They showed high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unique SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized in an aqueous solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They were acicular crystals and ellipse crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They had high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g.

Masuda, Yoshitake, E-mail: masuda-y@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan); Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

The relativistic velocity addition law optimizes a forecast gambler's profit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the projective covariant bookmaker's bets model to the forecasting gamblers case. The probability of correctness of forecasts shifts probabilities of branching. The formula for the shift of probabilities leads to the velocity addition rule of the special theory of relativity. In the absence of information about bookmaker's wagers the stochastic logarithmic rates completely determines the optimal stakes of forecast gambler.

Piotrowski, Edward W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Subscriber access provided by DUKE UNIV Langmuir is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W.,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quartz BET measurement tube which is also used for annealing. The 270 cm3 O3 treatment chamber tube and vacuum- annealed for 1 h at 523 K. An isotherm at 77.3 K was then measured using N2, the volume of the standard measurement tube (24) Peigney, A.; Laurent, Ch.; Flahaut, E.; Bacsa, R. R

Liu, Jie

192

Notes From the Chair 2 Fish and Wildlife Amendment 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, some companies are betting on thin film or nano solar tech- nology to advance photovoltaic cells hot weather--an office build- ing, for example, that would just get too hot. So the decision cell phone? Is the internet going to be the communication medium for pricing, is pricing going to go

193

Engaging viewers through social TV games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IPTV platforms have revealed a great potential for the viewers' involvement by allowing the development of services and applications related with the TV content. Taking advantage of both the potentialities of these platforms and game related dynamics ... Keywords: bets, evaluation, field trial, interactive television, quizzes, social games

Pedro Almeida; Jorge Ferraz; Ana Pinho; Diogo Costa

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

NEUTRAL HYDROGEN OPTICAL DEPTH NEAR STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z Almost-Equal-To 2.4 IN THE KECK BARYONIC STRUCTURE SURVEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the interface between galaxies and the intergalactic medium by measuring the absorption by neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2.4. Our sample consists of 679 rest-frame UV-selected galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts that have impact parameters fall within the redshift range of its Ly{alpha} forest. We present the first two-dimensional maps of the absorption around galaxies, plotting the median Ly{alpha} pixel optical depth as a function of transverse and line-of-sight separation from galaxies. The Ly{alpha} optical depths are measured using an automatic algorithm that takes advantage of all available Lyman series lines. The median optical depth, and hence the median density of atomic hydrogen, drops by more than an order of magnitude around 100 kpc, which is similar to the virial radius of the halos thought to host the galaxies. The median remains enhanced, at the >3{sigma} level, out to at least 2.8 Mpc (i.e., >9 comoving Mpc), but the scatter at a given distance is large compared with the median excess optical depth, suggesting that the gas is clumpy. Within 100 (200) kpc, and over {+-}165 km s{sup -1}, the covering fraction of gas with Ly{alpha} optical depth greater than unity is 100{sup +0}{sub -32}% (66% {+-} 16%). Absorbers with {tau}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 0.1 are typically closer to galaxies than random. The mean galaxy overdensity around absorbers increases with the optical depth and also as the length scale over which the galaxy overdensity is evaluated is decreased. Absorbers with {tau}{sub Ly{alpha}} {approx} 1 reside in regions where the galaxy number density is close to the cosmic mean on scales {>=}0.25 Mpc. We clearly detect two types of redshift space anisotropies. On scales 3{sigma} significance), an effect that we attribute to large-scale infall (i.e., the Kaiser effect).

Rakic, Olivera; Schaye, Joop [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C. [California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.55 LyEnfant Plaro. S.W., Washingzon, D.C. 20024.2174, Telephone: (202) 488-6000 .55 LyEnfant Plaro. S.W., Washingzon, D.C. 20024.2174, Telephone: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.27 27 May 1987 Mr. 'Andrew Wallo, III, NE:23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland: 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: I STATUS OF ACTIONS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently completed .a comprehensive review of sites listed in the FUSRAP Site Investigation and Remedial Action Summary Report, dated Uecember 31, 1986. The primary objectives of this review were to examine the status of each site identified in Sections II and III of the Reportwith respect to actions required to complete the Identification and Characterization Process; to provide,DFSD a current-status of these actions; and to identify

196

MEMORANDUM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

distribution is unlimited; September 2013. distribution is unlimited; September 2013. Other requests shall be referred to NAVFAC EXWC or ESTCP. TECHNICAL REPORT TR-NAVFAC-EXWC-PW-1303 SEPTEMBER 2013 BUILDING INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAIC (PV) ROOFS FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY Peter Ly, NAVFAC EXWC George Ban-Weiss, LBNL Nathan Finch, NAVFAC EXWC Craig Wray, LBNL Mark de Ogburn, NAVFAC Atlantic Woody Delp, LBNL Hashem Akbari, LBNL Scott Smaby, NAVFAC EXWC Ronnen Levinson, LBNL Bret Gean, NAVFAC EXWC SEI Group, Inc. 1 BUILDING INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAIC (BIPV) ROOFS FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY Energy and Water ESTCP Number: EW-200813 September 2013 Peter Ly, NAVFAC EXWC George Ban-Weiss, LBNL Nathan Finch, NAVFAC EXWC Craig Wray, LBNL Mark de Ogburn, NAVFAC Atlantic

197

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 results: 8 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is George Ban-Weiss [Clear All Filters] 2013 Ly, Peter, George Ban-Weiss, Nathan Finch, Craig Wray, Mark de Ogburn, William W. Delp, Hashem Akbari, Scott Smaby, Ronnen Levinson, and Bret Gean. Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roofs for sustainability and energy efficiency. Naval Facilities Engineering Command - Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center, 2013. Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson. "Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building." Energy and Buildings 56 (2013): 210-220. 2011 Sleiman, Mohamad, George Ban-Weiss, Haley E. Gilbert, David François, Paul

198

Direct Determination of the Magnetic Quadrupole Contribution to the Lyman-{alpha}{sub 1} Transition in a Hydrogenlike Ion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the observation of an interference between the electric dipole (E1) and the magnetic quadrupole (M2) amplitudes for the linear polarization of the Ly-{alpha}{sub 1} (2p{sub 3/2}{yields}1s{sub 1/2}) radiation of hydrogenlike uranium. This multipole mixing arises from the coupling of the ion to different multipole components of the radiation field. Our observation indicates a significant depolarization of the Ly-{alpha}{sub 1} radiation due to the E1-M2 amplitude mixing. It proves that a combined measurement of the linear polarization and of the angular distribution enables a very precise determination of the ratio of the E1 and the M2 transition amplitudes and the corresponding transition rates without any assumptions concerning the population mechanism for the 2p{sub 3/2} state.

Weber, G.; Stoehlker, Th. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Braeuning, H.; Hess, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Spillmann, U. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Surzhykov, A.; Maertin, R.; Winters, D. F. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandau, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Fritzsche, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Geyer, S. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hagmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Petridis, N. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Reuschl, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Trotsenko, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Two-tracer spectroscopy diagnostics of temperature profile in the conduction layer of a laser-ablated plastic foil  

SciTech Connect

A technique that combines the diagnostics of electron temperature history and the measurements of ablation velocity with two-tracer x-ray spectroscopy has been developed for diagnosing the temperature profiles in the thermal conduction layers of laser-ablated plastic foils. The electron temperature in the plastic ablator was diagnosed using the isoelectronic line ratios of Al Ly{alpha} line to Mg Ly{alpha} line, emitted from a tracer layer of Al/Mg mixture buried under the ablator. The ablation velocity was inferred from the time delay between the onset time of x-ray line emissions from Al and Mg tracer layers buried at two depths in the ablator, respectively. From the measured electron temperatures and ablation velocity, the electron temperature profile in the conduction layer was inferred. The measured temperature profile was compared with the simulated one and reasonable agreement was found.

Zhang Jiyan; Yang Guohong; Hu Xin; Yang Jiamin; Ding Yaonan; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu Yan; Yan Jun; Pei Wenbin [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

A glance at the host galaxy of high-redshift quasars using strong damped Lyman-alpha systems as coronagraphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We searched quasar spectra from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) for the rare occurrences where a strong damped Lyman-alpha absorber (DLA) blocks the Broad Line Region emission from the quasar and acts as a natural coronagraph to reveal narrow Ly\\alpha\\ emission from the host galaxy. We define a statistical sample of 31 DLAs in Data Release 9 (DR9) with log N(HI) > 21.3 cm^-2 located at less than 1500 km s^-1 from the quasar redshift. In 25% (8) of these DLAs, a strong narrow Ly\\alpha\\ emission line is observed with flux ~25 x 10^-17 erg s^-1 cm^-2 on average. For DLAs without this feature in their troughs, the average 3-\\sigma\\ upper limit is 75%) of these DLAs, with only a minority (< 25%) arising from HI clouds located in the AGN host galaxy.

Finley, Hayley; Pâris, Isabelle; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Myers, Adam D; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-{alpha} to He-{alpha} emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Kheshbn No. 119- Spring 1992 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n inn'oaKOKn lyVn^onKsoiK oio pnap nyn W w F w nyn .orxyp'T y^K Ü'D -|yVoaa"K oy oio Ty .ip'O'jsoapmKs .wumüKQK-npN yo ,f]'o :aNT N pyaiy ny oio ON .paaiToyis-iyoa'N ya"T ps

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Khesbn no. 104 - Autumn 1984 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sn l! 1 rrN PIDD:': lr! ttl': t! rl)$ r1 l'l ltltr DI)t IDttltD@DettP t! i+l ! 1,t ,t1p-ttl tr! bstEr!! ly! b iDlrtD'IUI lP'ir9E :n! u ttl'}: * ,':'t! r .1yty).rd! t*! p,l B

Admin, LAYCC

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Khesbn no. 63 - Spring 1971 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

llN ryE'1D? -lyD ,y'r)ttl ,? i;-i"]f, o'N:? -l{EDBiz .b;yr)r: Jf,'r.tiJ-tND "r ? ) ttl ,JD! r'E,-fDy'-,'t,tiZ r? JytyblbElyn yi2''t*l ''1 ts ,lEsn ttl! 'tllJll, Ey'I Jbbyniltt$

Admin, LAYCC

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Khesbn no.109 - Spring 1987 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t'r .t'iltN trrD DSlNUylt ttl ! l']N tl:,Vrb'}yD lrp'tbyl ''I'N D"D 'l'rN 1! rpu oy .ly)ttl lyl 11 ,lE! t3 y.1ylty E::'lx 'yr yl$ J:Sit t''l ,t''ttl! il pr1 p:71 r1);1 ? lNil )

Admin, LAYCC

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Refine your search Select options from the menu on the left hand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://psu.summon.serialssolutions.comhttp://psu.summon.serialssolutions.com F I N A L LY : RESEARCH AS EASYAS 1-2-3 #12;1 Enter search term into search box. 2 Refine results relevant articles were published in that year. Include or Exclude subject terms from your searchRefine your search Select options from the menu on the left hand side of the results screen

Yener, Aylin

207

Khesbn no. 98 - Autumn 1981 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1I ]l:l)I l'ry]:lxNl lrytE 'rtD .nlv'lEn rl l'10 -ytbN 'tylEt|n t! t] 'ly:rN D,:rtD"lit ''r lr$"lizyr trln ''lyb! :lI "n:! ui'l n.lnDD,, lr:rtD D$,ll ? nt? , lto on. )V! 'D'l

Admin, LAYCC

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Khesbn no. 99 - Spring 1982 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r.t .D yljlln ']y:ls J,rtD i2ti,lll .Drl'1t l! i11lit T'Ntill ..lgltyl . 'l'x Jrt ttj)rtD''tN ! iuhrurrlf E! nl'Tll/JrR )lt )lrlt ilrfg "ly:rtD ,UU'l ..1'N )'1 ,E'.tyD [r'i2

Admin, LAYCC

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Khesbn no. 83-84 - April 1976 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tr OlrujytJ Ir lir.l llr} Jt'r.r rtD liN lJ,rlrr,$! rynyi$Dln-l: N lynyr r'1): t ru'J 'rtD N JrlN ]I'ly'r JSt ,'t:: "]ItN rtg ltg Etrpl.l llg rtD ,lly:. ,1? r1 lynyt ttN ot]"ll .

Admin, LAYCC

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Khesbn no. 108 - Autumn 1986 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ll$r'lyl IES[ry: U'l ;l]rTD "'ly9 Eil ,|l'lj"lD ! -r! t'tlNIJ$l19tJl1N J! ']N .tyizrb'"11! rtD trlI lrEIlD''IN! lyt, 'InllnlUt 1! )yn,EDNlril)'rtD,B''';i)r:)1,611*,;1 lyi2rtynyr

Admin, LAYCC

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

VP 100: Growth in solar means growth in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Growth in solar means growth in Ohio Growth in solar means growth in Ohio VP 100: Growth in solar means growth in Ohio October 6, 2010 - 10:57am Addthis DuPont is betting on major growth in the market for solar energy -- and therefore for its Tedlar film, a durable backing for silicon solar panels. | Photo Courtesy of DuPont DuPont is betting on major growth in the market for solar energy -- and therefore for its Tedlar film, a durable backing for silicon solar panels. | Photo Courtesy of DuPont Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Market research company Solarbuzz reports that global demand for solar power soared by 54 percent in the second quarter of 2010. The research firm reports that in the United States, the annual number of total watts installed moved from 485 MW in all of 2009 to 2.3 GW as of June -- and

212

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS-155 Building Emergency Team Seminars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Building Emergency Team Seminars COURSE SYLLABUS Subject Category: Building Emergency Teams Schedule: Quarterly Course Length: 2.0 hours Medical Approval: None Delivery Method: Classroom Location/Time: To be determined Course Prerequisites: EHS 154; EHS 116; EHS 530 Retraining/Recertification: N/A Course Purpose: This course is designed for Lab employees who have been assigned as members of Building Emergency Teams (BETs) and have received the basic training required (EHS 154, EHS 116, EHS 530). These seminars will update and refresh the skills already learned, i.e.: responsibilities of fire department; utility turn off switches; rescue boxes; first aid triage, etc. Course Objectives: * To update BET members on skills learned in initial training.

213

A LYMAN BREAK GALAXY IN THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE GRISM SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect

We present observations of a luminous galaxy at z = 6.573-the end of the reionization epoch-which has been spectroscopically confirmed twice. The first spectroscopic confirmation comes from slitless Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically), which show a dramatic continuum break in the spectrum at rest frame 1216 A. The second confirmation is done with Keck + DEIMOS. The continuum is not clearly detected with ground-based spectra, but high wavelength resolution enables the Ly{alpha} emission line profile to be determined. We compare the line profile to composite line profiles at z = 4.5. The Ly{alpha} line profile shows no signature of a damping wing attenuation, confirming that the intergalactic gas is ionized at z = 6.57. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms, even at redshifts where Ly{alpha} is too attenuated by the neutral intergalactic medium to be detectable using traditional spectroscopy from the ground.

Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Cohen, Seth; Zheng Zhenya [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ (United States); Pirzkal, Norbert; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton; Peth, Michael A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Spinrad, Hyron [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Reddy, Naveen [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Hathi, Nimish [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA (United States); Budavari, Tamas [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ferreras, Ignacio [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Gardner, Jonathan P. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gronwall, Caryl [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Haiman, Zoltan [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Kuemmel, Martin [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Meurer, Gerhardt, E-mail: James.Rhoads@asu.edu [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, M468, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); and others

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas  

SciTech Connect

We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do not have complete Ly beta absorption.

Xiaohui Fan; Michael A. Strauss; Gordon T. Richards; Joseph F. Hennawi; Robert H. Becker; Richard L. White; Aleksandar M. Diamond-Stanic; Jennifer L. D onley; Linhua Jiang; J. Serena Kim; Marianne Vestergaard; Jason E. Young; James E. Gunn; Robert H. Lupton; Gillian R. Knapp; Donald P. Schneider; W. N. Brandt; Neta A. Bahcall; J. C. Barentine; J. Brinkmann; Howard J. Brewington; Masataka F ukugita; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Dan Long; Eric H. N eilsen, Jr.; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden; Wolfgang Voges

2005-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do not have complete Ly beta absorption.

Fan, X; Barentine, J C; Becker, R H; Brandt, W N; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hennawi, J F; Jiang, L; Kim, J S; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Lupton, R H; Nitta, A; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Snedden, S A; Strauss, M A; Vestergaard, M; Voges, W; White, R L; Young, J E; eilsen, E H N; onley, J L D; ukugita, M F; Bahcall, Neta A.; Becker, Robert H.; Brewington, Howard J.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gunn, James E.; Harvanek, Michael; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Jiang, Linhua; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Voges, Wolfgang; White, Richard L.; Young, Jason E.; eilsen, Eric H. N; onley, Jennifer L. D; ukugita, Masataka F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Survey of z > 5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx} 2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha}+NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson troughs in Ly{alpha}. These troughs are narrower than those observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

Fan, X; Strauss, M A; Richards, G T; Hennawi, J F; Becker, R H; White, R L; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Donley, J L; Jiang, L; Kim, J S; Vestergaard, M; Young, J E; Gunn, J E; Lupton, R H; Knapp, G R; Schneider, D P; Brandt, W N; Bahcall, N A; Barentine, J C; Brinkmann, J; Brewington, H J; Fukugita, M; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesinski, J; Long, D; Neilsen Jr., E H; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Voges, W

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

A survey of z > 5.7 quasars in the sloan digital sky survey. 4. discovery of seven additional quasars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha} + NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly{alpha}. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

Fan, Xiao-Hui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L.D; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Kim, J.Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W.N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis /LLNL, Livermore /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Fermilab /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Transition to a Virtually Incompressible Oxide Phase at a Shock Pressure of 120 GPa (1.2 Mbar): Gd3Ga5O12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cubic, single-crystal, transparent Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} has a density of 7.10 g/cm{sup 3}, a Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of 30 GPa, and undergoes a continuous phase transition from 65 GPa to a quasi-incompressible (QI) phase at 120 GPa. Only diamond has a larger HEL. The QI phase of Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} is more incompressible than diamond from 170 to 260 GPa. Electrical conductivity measurements indicate the QI phase has a bandgap of 3.1 eV. Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} can be used to obtain substantially higher pressures and lower temperatures in metallic fluid hydrogen than was achieved previously by shock reverberation between Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} disks. Dynamic compression achieves pressures, densities, and temperatures that enable investigation of ultracondensed matter at conditions yet to be achieved by any other technique. The prototypical example is observation of minimum metallic conductivity (MMC) of dense fluid hydrogen at 140 GPa, nine-fold compression of liquid density, and {approx}3000 K [1-3]. The high pressure and density and relatively low temperature are achieved by multiple-shock compression [2]. Temperature T is relatively low in the sense that T/TP{sub F} {approx} 0.01, where T{sub F} is the Fermi temperature. The time scale of compression is sufficiently long to achieve thermal equilibrium and sufficiently short so the process is adiabatic. Similar results are obtained for oxygen [4] and nitrogen [5]. Fluid Cs and Rb undergo the same transition at 2000 K near their liquid-vapor critical points [6]. All five elemental fluids have essentially the same value of MMC and the density dependences of their semiconductivities scale with the quantum-mechanical charge-density distributions of the respective atoms [5]. Liquid H{sub 2} is one of the most compressible of all materials. In this paper, we report that the dielectric crystal Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} (GGG) transitions to a virtually incompressible phase at 120 GPa shock pressure.

Mashimo, T; Chau, R; Zhang, Y; Kobayoshi, T; Sekine, T; Fukuoka, K; Syono, Y; Kodama, M; Nellis, W J

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Preparation and evaluation of electrocatelysts for phosphoric acid fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highly dispersed platinum has been placed on carbon supports so that they may be used as phosphoric acid fuel cell electrocatalysts. These catalysts were characterized for both the platinum surface areas and crystallite sizes. For a given carbon impregnation technique with the noble metal salt, a definite correlation between the specific surface area of the derived platinum crystallites to the BET surface area of the carbon support was found.

Jalan, V M

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Near Optimal Multiple Alignment Within a Band In Polynomial Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. c­Diagonal Alignment Let S = fs1 ; s2 ; : : : ; sng be a set of n sequences, each of length m, and M one gap per sequence. Given n sequences S = fs1 ; : : : ; sng, over alpha­ bet \\Sigma = f1; : : : ; Ag ; : : : ; sng, each s i has length m. Output: a multiple alignment M. 1. for L from m to nm do for any s i 1

Ma, Bin

222

Phrase Elimination in Greedy Parsing Dictionary Coders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bet set of size # with uniform, independent distribution when the length N is much smaller than # . It is estimated that such expected size is: #(N) = e -(N-1)/# # + # 1 - e -(N-1)/# ## derived with results from [1]. It is also verified with experiments that such estimation is accurate. It is also shown that 3% improvement is typical over LZW coders with LRC and 5% better than standard LZW. References

With Deferred Innovation; Zhen Yao

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C7, suppZ6ment au n07, Tome 40, JuiZZet 1979, page C7-355 CHEMICAL KINETICS STUDY OF NITROGENOXIDE SYNTHESISIN A D.C. PLASMA JET :A PROPOSEDMODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bet- ween 8 and 12 usec (T=4000+5000+4800K) and proces- ses (7) (8) and (9) produce an equivalent] is maximum. Between 12 and 18 usec (T=4800+4200K) the proces- ses (7) (8) and (9) always produce NO but with a lower rate until a zero rate is reached at 18 usec and the process (9) destroy N. Between 18 and 60 ~sec

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

224

Dynamic response of physisorbed hydrogen molecules on lanthanide-modified zirconia nanoparticles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the microstructure and surface properties of ultrafine Ce- and Nd-modified zirconia powders by a joint adsorption-isotherm and neutron-scattering study. While the average pore size distribution and specific surface area can be determined by BET analysis of nitrogen adsorption, neutron inelastic scattering from surface adsorbed hydrogen provides additional information about the modulation of local potential energies over the substrate surfaces and distinguishes subtle differences in the microporous and mesoporous structure of the two samples.

Loong, C.K.; Trouw [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ozawa, Masakuni; Suzuke, Suguru [Nagoya Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Role of char during reburning of Nnitrogen oxides. Second quarterly report, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Reburning is an emerging three-stage combustion technology designed for the reduction of NO by introducing a small amount of reburning fuel above the primary flame where the majority of NO is chemically reduced to nitrogen. While coal, in general, has not been considered an effective reburning fuel, research at the University of Mississippi suggested that lignite has a reburning efficiency even higher than that of methane. Furthermore, heterogeneous mechanisms are more important than homogeneous mechanisms for char/NO reaction. The objectives of this research are to investigate: (1) implications of pore structure analysis, (2) parameters governing heterogeneous reactions, and (3) estimation of rates of NO reduction and mass transfer limitations. Experiments have been performed in a flow reactor with a simulated fuel gas at a stoichiometric ratio (SR) 1.1. Reburning fuels in this study include chars derived from Pittsburgh No.8 bituminous coal and Mississippi lignite. Chars were produced in N{sub 2} by suspending a sample basket in a tube furnace. Pore structure analyses include BET-N{sub 2}, BET-CO{sub 2}, and DR-CO{sub 2} surface pore size distribution, micropore volume, total pore volume, and average pore radius. These studies suggest that neither BET-N{sub 2} nor DR- CO{sub 2} surface area is a normalization factor of chars of different origin. Reaction with NO leads to closures of pores, which may be contributed by formation of surface complexes.

Chen, Wei-Yin [Mississippi Univ., University, MS (United States); Fan, L.T. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Lu, Te-Chang; Tang, Lin [Mississippi Univ., University, MS (United States); Meng, Fang [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A HST/WFC3-IR MORPHOLOGICAL SURVEY OF GALAXIES AT z = 1.5-3.6. II. THE RELATION BETWEEN MORPHOLOGY AND GAS-PHASE KINEMATICS  

SciTech Connect

We analyze rest-frame optical morphologies and gas-phase kinematics as traced by rest-frame far-UV and optical spectra for a sample of 204 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range z {approx} 2-3 drawn from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey. We find that spectroscopic properties and gas-phase kinematics are closely linked to morphology: compact galaxies with semimajor axis radii r {approx}< 2 kpc are substantially more likely than their larger counterparts to exhibit Ly{alpha} in emission. Although Ly{alpha} emission strength varies widely within galaxies of a given morphological type, all but one of 19 galaxies with Ly{alpha} equivalent width W {sub Ly{alpha}} > 20 A have compact and/or multiple-component morphologies with r {<=} 2.5 kpc. The velocity structure of absorption lines in the galactic continuum spectra also varies as a function of morphology. Galaxies of all morphological types drive similarly strong outflows (as traced by the blue wing of interstellar absorption line features), but the outflows of larger galaxies are less highly ionized and exhibit larger optical depth at the systemic redshift that may correspond to a decreasing efficiency of feedback in evacuating gas from the galaxy. This v {approx} 0 km s{sup -1} gas is responsible both for shifting the mean absorption line redshift and attenuating W {sub Ly{alpha}} (via a longer resonant scattering path) in galaxies with larger rest-optical half-light radii. In contrast to galaxies at lower redshifts, there is no evidence for a correlation between outflow velocity and inclination, suggesting that outflows from these puffy and irregular systems may be poorly collimated. Our observations are broadly consistent with theoretical models of inside-out growth of galaxies in the young universe, in which typical z {approx} 2-3 star-forming galaxies are predominantly unstable, dispersion-dominated, systems fueled by rapid gas accretion that later form extended rotationally supported disks when stabilized by a sufficiently massive stellar component.

Law, David R. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Steidel, Charles C. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Shapley, Alice E.; Nagy, Sarah R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Reddy, Naveen A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Erb, Dawn K., E-mail: drlaw@di.utoronto.ca, E-mail: ccs@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: aes@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: snagy@ucla.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

THE BARYON CENSUS IN A MULTIPHASE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM: 30% OF THE BARYONS MAY STILL BE MISSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although galaxies, groups, and clusters contain {approx}10% of the baryons, many more reside in the photoionized and shocked-heated intergalactic medium (IGM) and in the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We update the baryon census in the (H I) Ly{alpha} forest and warm-hot IGM (WHIM) at 10{sup 5-6} K traced by O VI {lambda}1032, 1038 absorption. From Enzo cosmological simulations of heating, cooling, and metal transport, we improve the H I and O VI baryon surveys using spatially averaged corrections for metallicity (Z/Z {sub Sun }) and ionization fractions (f {sub HI}, f {sub OVI}). Statistically, the O VI correction product correlates with column density, (Z/Z {sub Sun })f {sub OVI} Almost-Equal-To (0.015)(N {sub OVI}/10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}){sup 0.70}, with an N {sub OVI}-weighted mean of 0.01, which doubles previous estimates of WHIM baryon content. We also update the Ly{alpha} forest contribution to baryon density out to z = 0.4, correcting for the (1 + z){sup 3} increase in absorber density, the (1 + z){sup 4.4} rise in photoionizing background, and cosmological proper length dl/dz. We find substantial baryon fractions in the photoionized Ly{alpha} forest (28% {+-} 11%) and WHIM traced by O VI and broad-Ly{alpha} absorbers (25% {+-} 8%). The collapsed phase (galaxies, groups, clusters, CGM) contains 18% {+-} 4%, leaving an apparent baryon shortfall of 29% {+-} 13%. Our simulations suggest that {approx}15% reside in hotter WHIM (T {>=} 10{sup 6} K). Additional baryons could be detected in weaker Ly{alpha} and O VI absorbers. Further progress requires higher-precision baryon surveys of weak absorbers, down to minimum column densities N {sub HI} {>=} 10{sup 12.0} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVI} {>=} 10{sup 12.5} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVII} {>=} 10{sup 14.5} cm{sup -2}, using high signal-to-noise data from high-resolution UV and X-ray spectrographs.

Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, Charles W.; Smith, Britton D., E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu, E-mail: smit1685@msu.edu, E-mail: charles.danforth@colorado.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The QUEST RR Lyrae Survey: III. The Low Galactic Latitude Catalogue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results for the QUEST RR Lyrae Survey at low galactic latitude, conducted entirely with observations obtained with the QUEST mosaic camera and the 1.0/1.5m J\\"urgen Stock Schmidt telescope at the National Observatory of Venezuela. The survey spans an area of 476 sq. deg on the sky, with multi-epoch observations in the V, R and I photometric bands for 6.5x10^6 stars in the galactic latitude range 3095 per cent and ~85 per cent for RRab and RRc stars respectively. Photometric metallicities were computed based on the light curves and individual extinctions calculated from minimum light colours for each RRab star. Distances were obtained with typical errors ~7 per cent. The RR Lyrae survey simultaneously spans a large range of heliocentric distances 0.5<= R_hel(kpc)<=40 and heights above the plane -15<=z(kpc)<=+20, with well known completeness across the survey area, making it an ideal set for studying the struc ture of the Galactic thick disk.

Mateu, Cecilia; Downes, Juan José; Briceño, César; Zinn, Robert; Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

H{alpha} ABSORPTION IN TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

Absorption of stellar H{alpha} by the upper atmosphere of the planet HD 189733b has recently been detected by Jensen et al. Motivated by this observation, we have developed a model for atomic hydrogen in the n = 2 state and compared the resulting H{alpha} line profile to the observations. The model atmosphere is in hydrostatic balance, as well as thermal and photoionization equilibrium. Collisional and radiative transitions are included in the determination of the n = 2 state level population. We find that H{alpha} absorption is dominated by an optical depth {tau} {approx} 1 shell, composed of hydrogen in the metastable 2s state that is located below the hydrogen ionization layer. The number density of the 2s state within the shell is found to vary slowly with radius, while that of the 1s state falls rapidly. Thus while the Ly{alpha} absorption, for a certain wavelength, occurs inside a relatively well defined impact parameter, the contribution to H{alpha} absorption is roughly uniform over the entire atomic hydrogen layer. The model can approximately reproduce the observed Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} integrated transit depths for HD 189733b by using an ionization rate enhanced over that expected for the star by an order of magnitude. For HD 209458b, we are unable to explain the asymmetric H{alpha} line profile observed by Jensen et al., as the model produces a symmetric line profile with transit depth comparable to that of HD 189733b. In an appendix, we study the effect of the stellar Ly{alpha} absorption on the net cooling rate.

Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li Zhiyun, E-mail: dac5zm@virginia.edu, E-mail: pla7y@virginia.edu, E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF SDSS-III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) is designed to measure the scale of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter over a larger volume than the combined efforts of all previous spectroscopic surveys of large-scale structure. BOSS uses 1.5 million luminous galaxies as faint as i = 19.9 over 10,000 deg{sup 2} to measure BAO to redshifts z < 0.7. Observations of neutral hydrogen in the Ly{alpha} forest in more than 150,000 quasar spectra (g < 22) will constrain BAO over the redshift range 2.15 < z < 3.5. Early results from BOSS include the first detection of the large-scale three-dimensional clustering of the Ly{alpha} forest and a strong detection from the Data Release 9 data set of the BAO in the clustering of massive galaxies at an effective redshift z = 0.57. We project that BOSS will yield measurements of the angular diameter distance d{sub A} to an accuracy of 1.0% at redshifts z = 0.3 and z = 0.57 and measurements of H(z) to 1.8% and 1.7% at the same redshifts. Forecasts for Ly{alpha} forest constraints predict a measurement of an overall dilation factor that scales the highly degenerate D{sub A} (z) and H {sup -1}(z) parameters to an accuracy of 1.9% at z {approx} 2.5 when the survey is complete. Here, we provide an overview of the selection of spectroscopic targets, planning of observations, and analysis of data and data quality of BOSS.

Dawson, Kyle S.; Ahn, Christopher P.; Bolton, Adam S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Schlegel, David J.; Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aubourg, Eric; Bautista, Julian E. [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Barkhouser, Robert H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beifiori, Alessandra [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blake, Cullen H. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Blomqvist, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Borde, Arnaud [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Brandt, W. N., E-mail: kdawson@astro.utah.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); and others

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

MEMQRANDUM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,:?' _. ,:?' _. .,. (p. z-3 ;: = 381 I!.0 MEMQRANDUM TO: FILE DATE +a& 7 -- -_ --------____ FROM: SUBJECT: SITE NAME: C ALTERNATE --------------'------------------------ OdYS NAME: -------------____-____ CITY: GOIS, STATE: -------- ----------------- c= OWNER(S) ------__ Past: c 36C~ Current: c, dfS --------- ----------- -------------------------- 'Owner contacted yes IJ no; if yes, date contacted_lySj 0 7 t(-zN/tr/y) TYPE OF OPERATION -----------______ 0 Research & Development 0 Production scale tasting 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample SI Analysis cl Facility Type / /g n,-?;?=;;;i"g 0 Research Organization 0 Government Spons.ored Faci 1 i ty 0 Other ~~~~~~--__~~~--_----- fi Production c] DizsposalfStorage

232

O Ti-tE LOVE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ItqQtJulRl' IICt' O Ti-tE LOVE ~t?Al. . . At2D Al.CLkTED IChTTEtt~ . ' . . . : . ' . i I . . . . .mr TttE HOt\' ORAULE~ STANLEY FItZl:; SFCAKER ' . : ,J WE\J i' ORti STATE ASSH' rtrLY l r . . isay 29,.1980 Consultant to the Kew York ' , .' .I, " ..' . ,"' ! -. . . : . . . I.. . . . . ~. ,:- 9.. :. .' , * Ill . ,.. , ,i / All . ' %: : . : . . -. ;:. * :... . _ -. .' . . . I . ' J n' f armed. ?%c firtdingo and backup documentatiin embodied in thi preliminafy report compel the Task Yorao to call trprm ym; thr: . . I SpcnXer, to cwthorim crnd ompowcr the Assemly Sta?ding,CozmiCte I ' . : ,. . ..: .I' .,' :. .~.. ,:. :,-"'. ; ..d ::. . . .~~ ' .,' .' . : ' , ' ..,, -. . -. . . : : ? :. . . . .; *. . 1 ,.' .i. . . : \. .- :. " ' . . . c. : . I ! .'

233

Santa Fe, New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fe, New Mexico Fe, New Mexico May 29-31, 2013 Se q u e n c i n g , F i n i s h i n g , A n a ly s i s i n t h e F u t u r e M e e t i ng 8 t h A nn u a l 2013 SFAF Meeting Page 1 Contents Agenda Overview......................................... 3 May 29 th Agenda.................................. 11 Speaker Presentations (May 29 th ).................. 13 Meet and Greet Party w/ Food & Beverages... 39 Poster Session............................................ 41 May 30 th Agenda................................. 97 Speaker Presentations (May 30

234

Ris National Laboratory Technical University of Denmark November 2007 Ris Energy Report 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EtHaNoL FoR tRaNSPoRt 49 7.6 tHERmaL FuEL CoNVERSIoN ­ PyRoLySIS, gaSIFICatIoN aND ComBuStIoN 54 7.7 Nu. biomass can also be used for heating, replacing oil or natural gas that can be used as motor fuel. Coal is comparable to its proposal of a 15% reduction by 2010 for the 1997 kyoto negotiations, if we take into ac

235

Numerical methods for systems of highly oscillatory ordinary differential equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of the Jacobian or an approx- imation to it, inside the numerical method. Various methods have been developed for the differential equation y(t) = f(y(t)) = Ly(t) +N(y(t)) with y(tn) = yn. 7 1.3 Exponential integrators The first paper to construct what are now... ?(t) = f(yn?1) + f ?(yn?1)(y ? yn?1). The exact solution to this linearised problem is yn = yn?1 + h?1(hf ?(yn?1))f(yn?1), where the function ?1 , is defined as ?1(z) = ez ? 1 z . This method is of order two, for general problems of the form f...

Khanamiryan, Marianna

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Conflict between the Buddhist and the Naiyayika Philosophers: A Brief Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solipsism. The Pram'(lIJa-vartika was lost in India but we are lucky enough that the manuscript of this work hasbeen discovered by Rahul Sankrityayana from Tibet. In this pioneering work, Dharmak1rti discusses his own philosophy of idealism, general­ ly... neither assert nor deny His existence26u• . For a century, from Dharmak1rti's time down to the 1st quarter of the 8th century, Buddhist philosophy was conspicuous by the absence of any remarkable original work due to absence of any talented philosopher...

Sadhukhan, Sanjit Kumar

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

m(T2): The Truth behind the glamour.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 03 04 22 6v 1 2 3 A pr 2 00 3 Cavendish HEP-2002-02/14 PACS: 14.80.Ly 13.85.Qk mT2 : the truth behind the glamour Alan Barr† Christopher Lester‡ Phil Stephens§ Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road... .5 % 22.2 % Table 1: The lightest chargino mass, the mass difference, ?M?˜1 = m?+1 ?m?01 , and two chargino branching ratios for the AMSB-like points discussed in section 4.2. The hadronic branching ratios can be found in [7]. 4.2 Case 2 – AMSB...

Barr, Alan; Lester, Christopher G; Stephens, Phil

238

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 18, 30 September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]hLg, j'd]G; Knfg]6 / cfsif{0f a'l6sn] ;d]t ;xefuLtf hgfPsf lyP . km]zg ;Ktfxdf o;k6s ef/lto Unf8;{ df]8n x06sf ljh]tf ;'k/ df]8nx? ;d]t / x]sflyP . df]8nx?;+u} gfos–gflosf, ufos– uflosf, 6LeL Pªs/ h:tf ;]nLla|6L nu- fotsf l8Knf]Dof6x? ;d]t ¥ofDkdf k...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

239

The place of exceptional covers among all diophantine relations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let F"q be the order q finite field. An F"q cover @f:X->Y of absolutely irreducible normal varieties has a nonsingular locus. Then, @f is exceptional if it maps one-one on F"q"^"t points for ~-ly many t over this locus. Lenstra suggested a curve Y may ... Keywords: Canonical permutation representations, Covers of projective varieties, Davenport pairs, Exceptional covers, Fiber products and correspondences, Riemann's existence theorem, Serre's Open Image Theorem, The genus zero problem, Zeta functions and Poincaré series

Michael D. Fried

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Khesbn no. 73-74 - October 1973 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1ttr" ;ll:p yrl$tyD .typ,'.rtD! 't-f.tN;r ty] rJ)D fNf nylDnYt! LfY .1Y)tl:t't 7:1tf 4n) ''rtD r''N 'ty:)y1] ,)xprno l5Ni2 9t tgt OY l0t'l'ly) rtD ': r)N iTtNluyr Ds'r tN Jtrl'l '

Admin, LAYCC

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Argonne Lea Computing F A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lea Lea Computing F A r g o n n e L e a d e r s h i p C o m p u t i n g FA c i l i t y 2 0 1 3 S c i e n c e H i g H l i g H t S Argonne leadership computing Facility C O N T E N T S About ALCF ...............................................................................................................................2 MirA...............................................................................................................................................3 SCienCe DireCtor'S MeSSAge ..........................................................................................4 ALLoCAtion ProgrAMS .......................................................................................................5 eArLy SCienCe ProgrAM ....................................................................................................

242

A Highly Porous and Robust (3,3,4)-Connected Metal?Organic Framework Assembled with a 90° Bridging-Angle Embedded Octacarboxylate Ligand  

SciTech Connect

A dicopper(II)-paddle-wheel-based metal-organic framework (PCN-80, see picture) with a rare (3,3,4)-connected topology has been synthesized by using a unique octatopic ligand featuring 90{sup o} bridging-angle dicarboxylate moieties. PCN-80 has Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Langmuir surface areas of 3850 and 4150 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}, respectively. It exhibits high gas-uptake capacity for H{sub 2} and large adsorption selectivity of CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2}.

Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Makal, Trevor A.; Li, Jian-Rong; Zhou, Hong-Cai (TAM)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

A study on oxidized glassy carbon sheets for bipolar supercapacitor electrodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitors (EDLC) for high energy and power density applications, based on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, are being developed in this laboratory. In the context of this project, GC sheets were oxidized and investigated with Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Nitrogen Gas Adsorption (BET). During oxidation on active film with open pores is built on the surface of the GC. Upon oxidation, the internal volumetric surface area of the active film decreases, whereas the volumetric electrochemical double layer capacitance increases. The authors show that this effect is correlated with the opening, the growth and the coalescence of the pores.

Braun, A.; Baertsch, M.; Geiger, F. [and others

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

2D Riemann-Christoffel curvature tensor via a 3D space using a specialized permutation scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a space in which Christoffel symbols of the second kind are symmetrical in lower indices exists, it makes for a supplement to the standard procedure when a 2D surface is normally induced from the geometry of the surrounding 3D space in which the surface is embedded. There it appears appropriate to use a scheme for straightforward permutation of indices of Gkij, when such a space would make this transformation possible, so as to obtain the components of the 2D Riemann-Christoffel tensor (here expressed in geodetic coordinates for an ellipsoid of revolution, of use in geophysics). By applying my scheme I find the corresponding indices in 2D and 3D supplement-spaces, and I compute components of the Riemann-Christoffel tensor. By operating over the elements of the projections alone, the all-known value of 1/MN for the Gaussian curvature on an ellipsoid of revolution is obtained. To further validate my scheme, I show that in such a 3D space the tangent vector to a PHI-curve for LAM=const1 would be parallel to a tangent vector to a PHI-curve for LAM=const2 on the surface of an ellipsoid of revolution. Surfaces parameterized by Gauss surface normal coordinates, such as the Earth, now can have the Riemann-Christopher curvature tensor computed in a straightforward fashion for the topographic surface hel(PHIel, LAMel) of the Earth, given Christoffel symbols for such a representation in terms of orthonormal functions on the ellipsoid of revolution.

Mensur Omerbashich

2009-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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246

UCRL-CR--10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-10 -10 4934 DE91 000814 PHOTOCONDUCTIVITY OF ACTIVATED CARBONFIBERS ' Ko Kuriyama Mo S. ,Dresselhaus MIT ...... ' Cambridge, Massachusetts ' MASTEB ,_ ' _Yii:i" ' £31STRIBUTION OFIT_"IIS DoCUMEt"JT IS L I?',_'-:'_ , I)IS('I,AIMI,',R Work pt`rforlnt`(I iiil(|t`r lilt' llll._illl'_-'_Of lilt' I J,,H, I)t, pllrl- mt`ni of i,_nt`r_)' I),_' l,=lwrt`n_'t` I,Ivi.,rmort` Ntllhrn=ll l,ld_or=_- Ior,_'mldc,r _'onlrzlct mlml}t`r W-74(15-1,1N(;.4X, 'l'hi,_ doc'mm..||l t_'=l.,_ prt`p=lrt`d =Is ==_l=lt'v,,,|ml o1' work _ptm._(!rvd I_)' IIn =lp, t`|lC')' 01' lht` (ll|ilt`(l ,_tiHl's (;|_vt`rnn|t`nt. Nvilht, r lht` I Inilt`d ,Sl=dL, s (;o_'t`rl|u|el|l mir Iht` t ll|i_'t`r_lt.,,'of ('lllifl)r,fl_l mrr lilLY o1"II,.,Ir v|lll_l_|)'t`t`_, I|mkt`_ _lll)' ,_'_mrr_lnl); exprt`_ or i|npllt`d, or _l_sl|i|lt`_ _|,ly lel_=lllhd)lilly i_r r¢'sl)(m- _ihilll)'

247

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 14, 10 May 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O{Psf] sfo{qmddf ;+3if{ Aof08sf ;Gtf]if kl/of/, ;Gtf]if u'?ª, ;'lbk alzi7, ;'/h / u0f]zn] nfO{e sG;6{ k|:t't u/]sf lyP . To:t} g]kfnsf rrL{t o'jf ufos k|sfz kf}8]n, ;GWof u|'k, td' af}4 ;]jf ;dfhssf snfsf/x?n] uLt g[To k|:t't u/]sf lyP . em08} $ 306f... '¥ofPsf] lyof] . pgn] 8]9 jif{cl3 cd]l/sL gful/s;Fu} ljx] u/]/ pt} 3/hd ul;s]sLl5g . ;ft dlxgf cl3 cd]l/sf k'u]sL gflosf k'hf rGb afN6Ldf]/sf] Ps Aofkfl/s s]Gb|df sfd ub}{ df]8\\lnª\\ lt/ nfUg] tof/Ldf l5g . cf7 jif{ cl3 k'u]sf nf]s ufos k|]d/fhf dxtn] cd...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

248

Effect of selected aldehydes on the growth and fermentation of ethanologenic Escherichia coli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioethanol production from lignocellulosic raw-materials requires the hydrolysis of carbohydrate polymers into a fermentable syrup. During the hydrolysis of hemicellulose with dilute acid, a variety of toxic compounds are produced such as soluble aromatic aldehydes from lignin and furfural from pentose destruction. In this study, the authors have investigated the toxicity of representative aldehydes (furfural, 5-hydroxymethlyfurfural, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, syringaldehyde, and vanillin) as inhibitors of growth and ethanol production by ethanologenic derivatives of Escherichia coli B (strains K011 and LY01). Aromatic aldyhydes were at least twice as toxic as furfural of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural on a weight basis. The toxicities of all aldehydes (and ethanol) except furfural were additive when tested in binary combinations. In all cases, combinations with furfural were unexpectedly toxic. Although the potency of these aldehydes was directly related to hydrophobicity indicating a hydrophobic site of action, none caused sufficient membrane damage to allow the leakage of intracellular magnesium even when present at sixfold the concentrations required for growth inhibition. Of the aldehydes tested, only furfural strongly inhibited ethanol production in vitro. A comparison with published results for other microorganisms indicates that LY01 is equivalent or more resistant than other biocatalysts to the aldehydes examined in this study.

Zaldivar, J.; Ingram, L.O. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Cell Science; Martinez, A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Cell Science]|[Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Inst. de Biotecnologia

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pyrolysis of tire rubber: Porosity and adsorption characteristics of the pyrolytic chars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tire rubber has been pyrolyzed at various temperatures under a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting chars have been analyzed for their porosity using nitrogen gas adsorption and for their aqueous adsorption characteristics using phenol, methylene blue, and the reactive dyes Procion Turquoise H-A and Procion Red H-E3B. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were modeled to the BET and Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equations to determine effective surface areas, mesopore volumes, and micropore volumes. Results showed that pyrolysis of tire rubber was essentially complete at 500 C and resulted in a char yield of approximately 42 wt%. Pyrolytic chars exhibited BET surface areas up to 85 m{sup 2}/g and micropore volumes up to 0.04 mL/g. Owing to their poorly developed micropore structure, the pyrolytic chars exhibited limited aqueous adsorption capacity for compounds of small molecular weight, such as phenol. However, the chars possessed significantly greater adsorption capacity for species of large molecular weight which was attributed to the presence of large mesopore volumes (up to 0.19 mL/g).

Miguel, G.S.; Fowler, G.D.; Sollars, C.J. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

None  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Buildings Energy Technology (BET) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technology required for economic energy conservation in buildings and communities. Each issue of BET also will include an article presenting a program overview or highlighting a current energy conservation technology project of DOE`s Office of Building Technologies (OBT) plus a listing of scheduled meetings of interest. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. Information on the following subjects is included within the scope of this publication, but all subjects may not appear in each issue: Space Conditioning Equipment and Lighting Systems, Appliances, Building Structures, Solar Access, Solar Energy Collection, Building Management and Planning, Integration of Buildings and Communities, Photovoltaic Systems, Heat Storage, and Education, Policy, and Technology Transfer.

Hicks, S.C.; Cason, D.L. [eds.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Highly ordered magnetic mesoporous silicas for effective elimination of carbon monoxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalysts based on crystalline nanoparticles of Fe metal supported on mesoporous silica have been developed. The synthetic process involves hydrogen reduction processing for high abundant Fe metal nanoparticles within the mesopores, in which impregnated Fe salt in the inner nanopores of mesoporous silica is thermally treated under hydrogen at 500 Degree-Sign C. Detailed characterization was achieved by XRD, XPS, BET, and HR-TEM techniques. The catalytic efficiency was demonstrated as a function of the used amounts and reaction time. The results show that more than 90% of the carbon monoxide was eliminated at room temperature during a period 80 min with 0.5 g of catalyst. - Graphical abstract: Strategy for the preparation of highly abundant Fe nanoparticle embedded MS catalyst by hydrogen reduction process and HR-TEM images of cross-sectional and top view. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MS based heterogeneous catalyst with Fe nanoparticles were demonstrated for CO elimination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly Fe nanoparticle embedded MS catalyst prepared by hydrogen reduction process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematic characterization was achieved by XRD, XPS, BET, and HR-TEM analyses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 90% of the CO was eliminated at RT during 80 min with 0.5 g of catalyst.

Lee, Jiho [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul 153-801 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Ho Chang, Jeong, E-mail: jhchang@kicet.re.kr [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul 153-801 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Preparation of molybdenum carbides with multiple morphologies using surfactants as carbon sources  

SciTech Connect

Molybdenum carbides with surfactants as carbon sources were prepared using the carbothermal reduction of the appropriate precursors (molybdenum oxides deposited on surfactant micelles) at 1023 K under hydrogen gas. The carburized products were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and BET surface area measurements. From the SEM images, hollow microspherical and rod-like molybdenum carbides were observed. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the annealing time of carburization had a large effect on the conversion of molybdenum oxides to molybdenum carbides. And BET surface area measurements indicated that the difference of carbon sources brought a big difference in specific surface areas of molybdenum carbides. - Graphical abstract: Molybdenum carbides having hollow microspherical and hollow rod-like morphologies that are different from the conventional monodipersed platelet-like morphologies. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum carbides were prepared using surfactants as carbon sources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The kinds of surfactants affected the morphologies of molybdenum carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time of heat preservation at 1023 K affected the carburization process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum carbides with hollow structures had larger specific surface areas.

Wang, Hongfen, E-mail: wanghongfen11@163.com [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)] [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Wang, Zhiqi [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China)] [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Chen, Shougang [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)] [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Gamma-Ray Burst/Pulsar for Cosmic-Ray Positrons with a Dark Matter-like Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that a nearby gamma-ray burst (GRB) or GRB-like (old, single and short-lived) pulsar/supernova remnant/microquasar about 10^{5-6} years ago may be responsible for the excesses of cosmic-ray positrons and electrons recently observed by the PAMELA, ATIC/PPB-BETS, Fermi and HESS experiments. We can reproduce the smooth Fermi/HESS spectra as well as the spiky ATIC/PPB-BETS spectra. The spectra have a sharp cutoff that is similar to the dark matter predictions, sometimes together with a line (not similar), since higher energy cosmic-rays cool faster where the cutoff/line energy marks the source age. A GRB-like astrophysical source is expected to have a small but finite spread in the cutoff/line as well as anisotropy in the cosmic-ray and diffuse gamma-ray flux, providing a method for the Fermi and future CALET experiments to discriminate between dark matter and astrophysical origins.

Kunihito Ioka

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Toward New Candidates for Hydrogen Storage: High Surface Area Carbon Aerogels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the hydrogen surface excess sorption saturation value of 5.3 wt% at 30 bar pressure at 77 K, from an activated carbon aerogel with a surface area of 3200 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. This sorption value is one of the highest we have measured in a material of this type, comparable to values obtained in high surface area activated carbons. We also report, for the first time, the surface area dependence of hydrogen surface excess sorption isotherms of carbon aerogels at 77 K. Activated carbon aerogels with surface areas ranging from 1460 to 3200 m{sup 2}/g are evaluated and we find a linear dependence of the saturation of the gravimetric density with BET surface area for carbon aerogels up to 2550 m{sup 2}/g, in agreement with data from other types of carbons reported in the literature. Our measurements show these materials to have a differential enthalpy of adsorption at zero coverage of {approx}5 to 7 kJ/mole. We also show that the introduction of metal nanoparticles of nickel improves the sorption capacity while cobalt additions have no effect.

Kabbour, H; Baumann, T F; Satcher, J H; Saulnier, A; Ahn, C C

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sintering Effects on Morphology, Thermal Stability and Surface Area of Sol-Gel Derived Nano-Hydroxyapatite Powder  

SciTech Connect

Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics have been recognized as substitute materials for bone and teeth in orthopedic and dentistry field due to their chemical and biological similarity to human hard tissue. The nanosized and nanocrystalline forms of HAP have great potential to revolutionize the hard tissue-engineering field, starting from bone repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery systems. This paper reports the synthesis of biomimetic nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) by sol-gel method using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (CNT) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively to obtain a desired Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Deionized water was used as a diluting media for HAP sol preparation and ammonia was used to adjust the pH to 11. After aging, the HAP gel was dried at 55 deg. C and sintered to different temperatures (200 deg. C, 400 deg. C, 600 deg. C, 800 deg. C, 1000 deg. C and 1200 deg. C). The dried and sintered powders were characterized for phase composition using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The particle size and morphology was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior of the dried HAP nanopowder was studied in the temperature range of 55 deg. C to 1000 deg. C using thermal gravimetric analyser (TGA). The BET surface area of absorbance was determined by Nitrogen adsorption using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The presence of characteristic peaks of the phosphate and OH groups in FTIR spectrums confirmed the formation of pure HAP in dried as well as sintered powders. XRD results also confirmed the formation of stoichiometric nano-HAP. Sintering revealed that with increase in temperature, both the crystallinity and crystallite size of nano-HAP particles increased. The synthesized nano-HAP powder was found to be stable upto 1000 deg. C without any additional phase other than HAP, whereas peak of {beta}-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) was observed at 1200 deg. C. Photomicrograph of TEM showed that the nanopowder sintered at 600 deg. C is composed of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (26.0-45.6 nm), which is well in agreement with the crystallite size calculated using XRD data. TGA study showed the thermal stability of the synthesized nano-HAP powder. The BET surface area decreased with increase in sintering temperature.

Kapoor, Seema [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Batra, Uma [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Kohli, Suchita [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chd. (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

eCopy, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tne -submitted manuscript has been authored Tne -submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractOr of the U. S. Government under contract No. W·31·109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty·free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so for U. S. Government purposes. I L8-162 1/91 Steering magnets and BPM's in the high energy transfer line. R. K. Koul Argonne N ational Laboratory This note contains the details concerning the steering magnets and the beam position monitors needed in the high energy transfer line. The computer code, written in "C" and used for the ray tracing of the positron particles was written 10ca1ly with the express pur- pose of handling this problem. However, the accuracy of the code was tested by calculating

258

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P. Yoho, P.E. i l i * Green corporate philosophy and senior management commitment * Reduced greenhouse gas emissions nine years ahead of target * Alternatives to oil are a big part of BP' including natural gas, LNG, solar and hydrogen * Hydrogen Bus Project won Australia' prestigious environmental award * UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station * Two hydrogen pipelines in Houston area BP Env ronmenta Comm tment s portfolio, s most BP' * li l " li i i * i l pl i i * Li l li l * " i i l i 2 i i ll i i l pl ifi i * 8" ly idl i i l s Hydrogen Pipelines Two nes, on y a brand new 12 ne s act ve Connect Houston area chem ca ant w th a ref nery nes come off a p

259

2page.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N S U P P L E M E N T A L E D I T I O N J U LY 1 3 , 2 0 0 6 PMA Partnership Implements New SCADA System at Springfield Operations Center Southwestern successfully installed its new Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system at its Operations Center in Springfield, MO, on June 20, 2006. This new software, developed in cooperation with Western Area Power Administration (Western), essentially replaces the old Unix-based commercial system with a personal- computer-based SCADA and Automatic Generation Control (AGC) power control system. The new system provides additional functionality that meets recent requirements from the North American Electric Reliability Council for better alarming capabilities and situational awareness, and also

260

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC GLOBAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 71 2; W(A)-2011-067 ; CH-1639 General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC) requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above cooperative agreement for work entitled, "Model Based Optimal Sensor Network Design for Condition Monitoring in an IGCC Plant". The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop a systematic model-based approach for addressing the problem of optimal sensor placement (OSP) in a sensor network used for condition monitoring of key process equipment in an IGCC plant , namely, gasifier refractory lining and RSC fouling . This waiver is for inventions of GE-GRC on ly. The work under this cooperative agreement is expected to take place from August 20, 2010 through December 30, 2012, at a total cost of $1

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261

One West Third Street Tulsa Oklahoma  

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Conley Jennings Conley Jennings Lineman Springfield, MO Special thanks to: Marshall Boyken Mike Deihl Ruben Garcia Bethel Herrold William Hiller Beth Nielsen George Robbins Gary Swartzlander Cris Van Horn Rutha Williams Jan Woolverton U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J U LY - S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 5 Strategic Workshop Unites Hydropower Community At the invitation of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), Federal power customers joined representatives of the Corps, the Power Marketing Administrations, and national Federal power customer associations in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on August 9-10, 2005, for the second Hydropower Strategic Workshop. Nearly 100 people, including those involved in the daily operation of Corps hydropower projects and powerplants, managers and technical staff of Federal power customers, and

262

CEM: You Asked, We Answered | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEM: You Asked, We Answered CEM: You Asked, We Answered CEM: You Asked, We Answered July 29, 2010 - 4:15pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Last week, we invited you to submit your questions on the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) via E-mail, Facebook and Twitter. We received a diverse set of questions, which we presented to two of the key decision makers here at the Department of Energy, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David Sandalow and Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Cathy Zoi. jsalsman (via Twitter): What is @energy's position on http://3.ly/100by2030 (editor: links to a plan that claims that 100 percent of the world's energy, for all purposes, could be supplied by wind, water and solar resources, by as early as 2030 ) Is a 30%

263

I~  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

__, I,- __.j .^,, ~~.,l~, _I.x__ . ,,,,, ,_^_ ,,_xx,. ,~.__~_x -,-.. _1 ,.,., __, I,- __.j .^,, ~~.,l~, _I.x__ . ,,,,, ,_^_ ,,_xx,. ,~.__~_x -,-.. _1 ,.,., - I~ .c \ -- - g-' . @ ~--~Z~, Ls-u &. 0 -*,- hiK ,,-& b TO FILE ' = .-. r. AUG 2 9 1945 A~TPPHC~~~ METALS COPUDOP~TIO~ '* ~,ci~ly~1~~ 41 BROAD STREET (In duplicate) November 6, 1942 The District Engineer, u. s . Zngineer Office, Zanhattarn District, P. 0. 30x 4.2, Station P., i?C:: York, X.Y. Attention: Idajo- Thomas T. Crenshav:. Gentlemen: Classification Cancc!!A ZG? ;~yp~~ Follo~5.nS our conversation of yesterday, P;e here*oy confirm gi-ang you optior., vslid up to tine erd of Xcver.ssr 19LZ2, for the purchase cf: - :fbmm.I;1T,: _, ..I-- ASout 42 short tons of Sodi- Uranate Cranze, holding about 83-l/2$ of U30 ; packed in ooxes. . About 64 short tons of Sodium Uranate Yello:,

264

CONSIDERATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF UNDULATORS L. C. Teng A. Relevant Radiation Formulas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSIDERATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF UNDULATORS CONSIDERATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF UNDULATORS L. C. Teng A. Relevant Radiation Formulas LS-66 July 28, 1986 (1) The midplane field in an undu1ator is given approximately by where y = s = t Bo = coordinate in coordinate in B (s) Y direction direction undu1ator period length peak field of gap of beam The orbit wiggles in the transverse direction x perpendicular to y and s, and is given by where d prime = Ts x' = 2;P cos (2~ t) - x~ cos (2~ ~) o Po = }- (rigidity, Bp = ~ p, of beam). o The deflection parameter K is defined by x' K max. wiggle angle 0 = ~ - radiation angle - l/y 2~po where Y is the particle energy in rest energy, mc 2 , units. A device '" with K > 10 for which the radiation spectrum is more-or-1ess continuous is

265

Newsletter (January 2010) SHR.pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Workshop Announce- 1 FPD Corner 2 CAP Corner 3 PMCDP Schedule 4 Question of the Month 5 Questions or Comments 5 P R O J E C T M A N A G E M E N T C A R E E R D E V E L O P M E N T P R O G R A M Pathways to Project Success J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 0 Cost: There is no registration fee. However, attendees are responsible for their own travel and lodging expenses. Registration: Registration is now open at http://bit.ly/83brzl and will close February 19, 2010. The Agenda is available at http://management.energy.gov/1771.htm. Both government and contractor executives and managers are invited to attend the March 9 & 10 workshop, although, due to meeting room space constraints, registration will be limited. PMCDP Course: The PMCDP Level 1, Course

266

VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peru1sylvania Avenue, NW Peru1sylvania Avenue, NW Room62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Steele: June 12, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected a Fisher & Paykel Appliances ("F&P") residential clothes washer, model WA42T26GW1, for testing as part ofDOE's ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Program. On March 18, 2013, DOE notified F&P that DOE testing showed the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR requirement for water factor ("WF") 1 or modified energy factor ("MEF"). 2 F&P replied to DOE on April 16, 2013, making two claims. First, F&P argued that DOE had impropel'ly tested the warm wash cycles on the relevant units because the tested model has a "uniformly distributed warm wash temperature selection/' as defined in section 1.17 of

267

SPEAR3 | A Brighter Source at SSRL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pat Dehmer's Talk: Pat Dehmer's Talk: Almost precisely se ven years ago, the Office of Basic Energy Sciences commissioned the first review of its four light sources. The review was headed by Bob Birgeneau, who was then the Dean of Science at MIT. The committee members were among the most distinguished researchers in the country. However, very deliberately, only a fraction of them knew about the light sources. Some of the others were skeptics. A few were hostile, primari ly because of the large budgets associated with construction and operation of the light sources. We asked this committee ten questions. The first question, the most important question, was: "What has been the scientific impact of synchrotron radiation based research during the past decade, and what is it expected to be during the next decade?"

268

7-9-draft3.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration, Administration, like: Mike Deihl Administrator Tulsa, Oklahoma Special thanks to: Ladell Butts Scott Carpenter Dallas Cooper Linda Dunham Ruben Garcia Tom Green Janet Hagar Gregg Happle William Hiller Sean Long Stan Mason Linda Mummey Beth Nielsen Fritha Ohlson George Robbins Dave Sargent Aiden Smith Jane Thomas Mistie Yost U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J U LY - S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 7 Hilltop Helps Ease Transmission Woes The electricity is flowing a little easier in northern Arkansas these days, thanks to the August 2007 energization of an interconnection between Southwestern and Entergy Arkansas, Inc. (Entergy) near Silver Hill, Arkansas. Planning for the tie has been underway for over five years, with the goal of easing potential undervoltage and overload conditions, thus allowing increasing

269

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

44 results: 44 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Ronnen M. Levinson [Clear All Filters] 2013 Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson. "Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building." Energy and Buildings 56 (2013): 210-220. 2012 Levinson, Ronnen M.. The Case for Cool Roofs., 2012. 2011 Menon, Surabi, and Ronnen M. Levinson. Cool roofs and global cooling: a response to Jacobson & Ten Hoeve (2011)., 2011. Sleiman, Mohamad, George Ban-Weiss, Haley E. Gilbert, David François, Paul Berdahl, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Hugo Destaillats, and Ronnen M. Levinson. "Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar

270

pac 2003 boundary3.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-yr program review May 13-14, 2003 5-yr program review May 13-14, 2003 Alcator Alcator C-Mod Divertor and Edge Physics program Presented by B. Lipschultz Relationship to other programs General program description Past 5 year highlights Transport Neutrals Impurities High heat flux & particle handling C-Mod 5-yr program review May 13-14, 2003 Alcator Alcator C-Mod C-Mod in relation to other tokamaks C-Mod operation overlaps that of other tokamaks in edge/divertor dimensionless parameters w/different dimensional parameters Some of the differences in edge & divertor dimensional parameters are Higher density (similar to ITER in divertor) Higher parallel heat flux (300-500 MW/m 2 , 3-5x other tokamaks, similar to ITER) Higher divertor opacity to Ly α (similar to ITER) Higher SOL plasma pressures (similar than ITER)

271

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

272

October 21, 2003, Board Public Meeting Presentations - DOE Independent Safety Oversight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEARING HEARING Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance October 21,2003 1 Office of Independent Oversight 1 and Performance Assurance 1 h.?s=- Role of Independent Oversight l Direct Report to the Secretary of Energy l Oversight for both NNSA and ESE l DOE's Corporate Oversight Entity l Provides Independent Performance-Based Evaluations Ytl l Well-Established Inspection Processes Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance OA's Technical Competence l Dedicated Team of Experienced Inspectors l Extensive Managerial and Technical Expertise l Technical Qualification Program and External Certifications Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance ? Some Key Inspection Focus Areas i l ISM Programs LY.W 0 Safety Systems

273

Manufacturing Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOT_RT_Sub_Template.ppt | 1/6/2009 | 1 EOT_RT_Sub_Template.ppt | 1/6/2009 | 1 BOEING is a trademark of Boeing Management Company. Copyright © 2009 Boeing. All rights reserved. Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Manufacturing Perspective Karl M. Nelson (karl.m.nelson@boeing.com) Boeing Research & Technology Engineering, Operations & Technology | Boeing Research & Technology Materials & Fabrication Technology EOT_RT_Sub_Template.ppt | 1/12/2009 | Structural Tech 2 Copyright © 2009 Boeing. All rights reserved. DOE Hydrogen Program Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels Mark Leavitt, Alex Ly Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc. Karl Nelson, Brice Johnson The Boeing Company Ken Johnson, Kyle Alvine, Stan Pitman, Michael Dahl, Daryl Brown

274

Lamp Divisions  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

--- --- /A;; i :' r%i;in~house ilEc;' i:Z3:~cra:ion Lamp Divisions , _.. (I +i. 0 :,,,rg. . I . . -= i?e p/q! qe)-' &se pw E.rcale?l iev, Je!sey 07m March 20, 1 gs? ::r . J. A. Jones I ti. 5. Muclear Regulatory Commission .> = ..- haterials Licensing Branch -s - ,.I, - - Division of Fuel Cycle and hateri al Safety LY. , $2 - _ . ' -' . 3 _- - Yeshington, C. C. 2@555 - :_ :--, =-- -- .-?J -.: y...., : :- 7 Dear Mr. Jones : y-- --, ? . *I 2=15 2 r; X -P The following is our final report of the decontamination efZor?s takz in our Bui Iding 7 basement and wi 11 also serve to update our report i& November 12, 1980. As stated in NRC' s report of December 22, 1983, two closeout inspect ions were conducted by your King of Prussia off i ce on November 21 and December 2,

275

LA-10256-MS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10256-MS 10256-MS Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the United States Department of Energy under contract W-7405-ENG-36. Radiological Survey and Evaluation of the Fallout Area fom the Trinity Test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Misile Range, New Mexco - ~ ~S1S' :ts rV T Los Alamos National Laboratory Ly© /.aU U UwHjm ©,Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer Prepared by Kathy Derouin, Group HSE-8 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,

276

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

66 results: 66 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Craig P. Wray [Clear All Filters] 2013 Rapp, Vi H., Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray. Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II., 2013. Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson. "Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building." Energy and Buildings 56 (2013): 210-220. J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray. Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography., 2013. 2012 J. Chris Stratton, William J. N. Turner, Craig P. Wray, and Iain S. Walker.

277

NEPACOMPUANCESURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPACOMPUANCESURVEY NEPACOMPUANCESURVEY Project lnfonnatlon Project Title: Geothermal Technologies Program Date: 7/26/10 DOE Code: 6730.020.61041 Contractor Code: 8067-447 Project Lead: Ly1e Johnson Project Overview The work to be done is the installation of a sump in Little Teapot Creek from which water for the cooling loop 1. Brief project description pnclude anything that could impact the at the ~F can be withdrawn. The work will consis of burying a section of 8 foot diameter galvanized steel environment] culvert in the creek to produce a sump for the suction of a pump. The culvert will be set vertically to the bed rock or to a maximum depth of 8 fee~ which ever is less. The permit for withdrawal of the water has already 2. Legal location been received

278

ON THE REMOTE DETECTION OF SUPRATHERMAL IONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA AND THEIR ROLE AS SEEDS FOR SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Forecasting large solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with shocks driven by fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) poses a major difficulty in the field of space weather. Besides issues associated with CME initiation, the SEP intensities are difficult to predict, spanning three orders of magnitude at any given CME speed. Many lines of indirect evidence point to the pre-existence of suprathermal seed particles for injection into the acceleration process as a key ingredient limiting the SEP intensity of a given event. This paper outlines the observational and theoretical basis for the inference that a suprathermal particle population is present prior to large SEP events, explores various scenarios for generating seed particles and their observational signatures, and explains how such suprathermals could be detected through measuring the wings of the H I Ly{alpha} line.

Laming, J. Martin; Moses, J. Daniel; Ko, Yuan-Kuen [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7684, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ng, Chee K. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Rakowski, Cara E.; Tylka, Allan J. [NASA/GSFC Code 672, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Deepest Spectrum of the Universe? Constraints on the Lyman Continuum Background at High Redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an ongoing experiment to search for the meta-galactic Lyman-continuum background at z~2-3. We are obtaining one of the deepest optical spectra ever, using LRIS/Keck-II to search for the fluorescent Ly-alpha emission from optically thick HI clouds. The null results of our pilot study (Bunker, Marleau & Graham 1998) placed a 3-sigma upper bound on the mean intensity of the ionizing background of J_{nu 0} radiation field. We have recently greatly extended our search, obtaining a 16-hour spectrum which is sensitive to UV background fluxes ~1E-21 erg/s/cm^2/Hz/sr (z~2.3 at 3-sigma, assuming the HI clouds are ~10arcsec in extent). We describe how the results of this study can be used to constrain the quasar luminosity function and the contribution of high-redshift star-forming galaxies to the ambient ionizing background.

Andrew J. Bunker; Francine R. Marleau; James R. Graham

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Deepest Spectrum of the Universe? Constraints on the Lyman Continuum Background at High Redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an ongoing experiment to search for the meta-galactic Lyman-continuum background at z~2-3. We are obtaining one of the deepest optical spectra ever, using LRIS/Keck-II to search for the fluorescent Ly-alpha emission from optically thick HI clouds. The null results of our pilot study (Bunker, Marleau & Graham 1998) placed a 3-sigma upper bound on the mean intensity of the ionizing background of J_{nu 0} radiation field. We have recently greatly extended our search, obtaining a 16-hour spectrum which is sensitive to UV background fluxes ~1E-21 erg/s/cm^2/Hz/sr (z~2.3 at 3-sigma, assuming the HI clouds are ~10arcsec in extent). We describe how the results of this study can be used to constrain the quasar luminosity function and the contribution of...

Bunker, A J; Graham, J R; Bunker, Andrew J.; Marleau, Francine R.; Graham, James R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ultraviolet structure in the lensed QSOs 0957+561  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging and spectra of the lensed QSO pair 0957+561 are presented and discussed. The data are principally those from the STIS NUV MAMA, and cover rest wavelengths from 850A to 1350A. The QSOs are both extended over about 1 arcsec, with morphology that matches with a small rotation, and includes one feature aligned with the VLBI radio jets. This is the first evidence of lensed structure in the host galaxy. The off-nuclear spectra arise from emission line gas and a young stellar population. The gas has velocity components with radial velocities at least 1000 km/s with respect to the QSO BLR, and may be related to the damped Ly alpha absorber in the nuclear spectra.

J. B. Hutchings

2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

CONSTRAINING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS THROUGH LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study primordial magnetic field effects on the matter perturbations in the universe. We assume magnetic field generation prior to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), i.e., during the radiation-dominated epoch of the universe expansion, but do not limit analysis by considering a particular magnetogenesis scenario. Contrary to previous studies, we limit the total magnetic field energy density and not the smoothed amplitude of the magnetic field at large (of the order of 1 Mpc) scales. We review several cosmological signatures, such as halo abundance, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and Ly{alpha} data. For a cross-check, we compare our limits with that obtained through the cosmic microwave background faraday rotation effect and BBN. The limits range between 1.5 nG and 4.5 nG for n{sub B} in (- 3; -1.5).

Kahniashvili, Tina; Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Maravin, Yurii [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Tevzadze, Alexander G., E-mail: tinatin@andrew.cmu.edu [Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi 0128 (Georgia)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

The binding of herbicidal halovinyl anilides to the photosystem II Q sub B site and the relationship between affinities and molecular characteristics  

SciTech Connect

A new class of herbicidal halovinyl anilides, which inhibit photosynthetic electron transport, have been shown to inhibit {sup 14}C-atrazine binding in spinach thylakoid membranes. A scatchard analysis of the {sup 14}C-atrazine binding inhibition of the lead compound, LY221204, has shown it to be a competitive inhibitor. Preliminary QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship) studies suggested that 75-80% of the variance in vivo activity could be explained by size and electronic properties and that activity increased with smaller and more electron releasing substituents. To analyze the effects of these properties on intrinsic activity, a larger QSAR study was undertaken. Atrazine binding inhibition data was generated for a group of substituted, non-conjugated vinyl anilides at 1 and 10 {mu}M concentrations and plotted as a function of physicochemical parameters. The results will be presented.

Eilers, R.J.; Crouse, G.D.; Durst, G.L.; Streusand, V.J.; Manly, C.J.; Webster, J.D. (DowElanco, Greenfield, IN (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3: A TEST FOR STELLAR FEEDBACK, GALACTIC OUTFLOWS, AND COLD STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

We present new results on the kinematics, thermal and ionization state, and spatial distribution of metal-enriched gas in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of massive galaxies at redshift {approx}3, using the Eris suite of cosmological hydrodynamic ''zoom-in'' simulations. The reference run adopts a blastwave scheme for supernova feedback that produces large-scale galactic outflows, a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold, metal-dependent radiative cooling, and a model for the diffusion of metals and thermal energy. The effect of the local UV radiation field is added in post-processing. The CGM (defined as all gas at R > 0.2 R{sub vir} = 10 kpc, where R{sub vir} is the virial radius) contains multiple phases having a wide range of physical conditions, with more than half of its heavy elements locked in a warm-hot component at T > 10{sup 5} K. Synthetic spectra, generated by drawing sightlines through the CGM, produce interstellar absorption-line strengths of Ly{alpha}, C II, C IV, Si II, and Si IV as a function of the galactocentric impact parameter (scaled to the virial radius) that are in broad agreement with those observed at high redshift by Steidel et al. The covering factor of absorbing material declines less rapidly with impact parameter for Ly{alpha} and C IV compared to C II, Si IV, and Si II, with Ly{alpha} remaining strong (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 300 mA) to {approx}> 5 R{sub vir} = 250 kpc. Only about one third of all the gas within R{sub vir} is outflowing. The fraction of sightlines within one virial radius that intercept optically thick, N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.2} cm{sup -2} material is 27%, in agreement with recent observations by Rudie et al. Such optically thick absorption is shown to trace inflowing ''cold'' streams that penetrate deep inside the virial radius. The streams, enriched to metallicities above 0.01 solar by previous episodes of star formation in the main host and in nearby dwarfs, are the origin of strong (N{sub C{sub II}}>10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) C II absorption with a covering factor of 22% within R{sub vir} and 10% within 2 R{sub vir}. Galactic outflows do not cause any substantial suppression of the cold accretion mode. The central galaxy is surrounded by a large O VI halo, with a typical column density N{sub O{sub VI}} {approx}> 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and a near unity covering factor maintained all the way out to 150 kpc. This matches the trends recently observed in star-forming galaxies at low redshift by Tumlinson et al. Our zoom-in simulations of this single system appear then to reproduce quantitatively the complex baryonic processes that determine the exchange of matter, energy, and metals between galaxies and their surroundings.

Shen Sijing; Madau, Piero; Prochaska, J. Xavier [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Guedes, Javiera [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mayer, Lucio [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-9057 Zurich (Switzerland); Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Electricity Liberalisation in the European Union: A Progress Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

la n d Fr a n ce Ger m a n y Gre e ce Ire la n d Ita ly Lu x Ne d No rw a y Po rtu ga l Sp a in Sw itze rla n d UK Source: IEA Energy Statistics 2008 other sources tide wind solar thermal solar PV geothermal hydro nuclear waste biomass gas oil coal... .2 Solar PV 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7** Solar thermal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Other sources 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 1.1 HHI 2781 2589 2339 2271 2242 * EU-27 + Norway ** Includes solar thermal generation Source: IEA and Eurostat data 18 increased merger activity to exploit...

Pollitt, Michael G.

286

Ronnen Levinson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ronnen M. Levinson Ronnen M. Levinson Ronnen Levinson Windows and Envelope Materials Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90-2000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2056H (510) 486-7494 RMLevinson@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson. "Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building." Energy and Buildings 56 (2013): 210-220. 2012 Levinson, Ronnen M.. The Case for Cool Roofs., 2012. Download: PDF (205.7 KB) 2011 Menon, Surabi, and Ronnen M. Levinson. Cool roofs and global cooling: a

287

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

288

Layout 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

32 32 0163-6804/11/$25.00 © 2011 IEEE INTRODUCTION A grid network is a collection of geographical- ly distributed resources, such as storage clus- ters, supercomputers, and scientific equipment, that are accessible to users over a network. Examples of e-Science grids include the Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid Project, the Biomedical Informatics Research Network, and the George E. Brown Network for Earthquake Engineering and Simulation. These networks typically deal with the trans- fer of large amounts of data in the terabytes and petabytes range. When the grid resources are connected by application-configurable optical paths (e.g., on an optical wavelength- routed network), the grid can be considered a LambdaGrid [1]. Optical wavelength-routed wavelength-divi-

289

UNITED STATES A T O M I C ENERGY C O M M I S S I O N  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AECU - 785 AECU - 785 THE EFFECT OF ELECTRONIC PARAMAGNETISM ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE FREQUENCIES IN METALS By C. H. Townes Conyers Herring W. D. Knig^it Columbia University Bell Telephone Laboratories Trinity College Tochnicai Information Division, ORE, Oak Ridgo, Tonnossoo J^ This document is FUBLK:LY RELEASABLF //> [\AAUMJ DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

290

Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roofs for sustainability and energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roofs for sustainability and energy integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roofs for sustainability and energy efficiency Title Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roofs for sustainability and energy efficiency Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2013 Authors Ly, Peter, George Ban-Weiss, Nathan Finch, Craig Wray, Mark de Ogburn, William W. Delp, Hashem Akbari, Scott Smaby, Ronnen Levinson, and Bret Gean Corporate Authors SEI Group Inc. Document Number ESTCP EW-200813 Pagination 156 pp. Date Published 09/2013 Publisher Naval Facilities Engineering Command - Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Type Technical Report Report Number TR-NAVFAC-EXWC-PW-1303 Keywords Buildings Energy Efficiency, energy efficiency, Energy Usage, renewable energy, Renewable Energy: Policy & Programs Abstract

291

IGCC+S Financing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II II William G. Rosenberg, Dwight C. Alpern, Michael R. Walker Energy Technology Innovation Project a joint project of the Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and the Environment and Natural Resources Program Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs 2 0 0 4 - 0 8 J U LY 2 0 0 4 Deploying IGCC in this Decade with 3Party Covenant Financing VOLUME II William G. Rosenberg, Dwight C. Alpern, and Michael R. Walker Energy Technology Innovation Project a joint project of the Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and the Environment and Natural Resources Program Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Center for Business and Government John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University July 2004 Financing IGCC - 3Party Covenant ii

292

Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: DATE: May 21,2008 SUBJECT: Fonnat of Petition for Advance Waiver of Patent Rights The attached document sets forth the fonnat to be used by field patent counsel for a Petition for an Advance Waiver of Patent Rights under 10 CFR 784. ~ Ja ' ,. ~ " " j ", .., lY CQ i -.-- Paul A GotiIi b Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property 1 * Printed with soy ink on recycled paper UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PETITION FOR ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER 10 C.F.R. PART 784 DOE WAIVER NO. (To be supplied by DOE) Notice: If you need help in completin9..1hisform. contact t~atent Counsel assisting the activity that is issuing your award or the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property in the Office of General Counsel in DOE Headauarters. Visit: www.gc.energy.gov/documents/lntellectual Property (IP) Service

293

Homoclinic Stripe Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study homoclinic stripe patterns in the two-dimensional generalized Gierer-Meinhardt equation, where we interpret this equation as a prototypical representative of a class of singularly perturbed mono-stable reaction-diffusion equations. The structure of a stripe pattern is essentially one-dimensional, therefore we can use results from the literature to establish the existence of the homoclinic patterns. However, we extend these results to a maximal domain in the parameter space and establish the existence of a bifurcation that forms a new upper bound on this domain. Beyond this bifurcation, the Gierer-Meinhardt equation exhibits self-replicating pulse, respectively stripe, patterns in one, resp. two, dimension(s). The structure of the self-replication process is very similar to that in the Gray-Scott equation. We investigate the stability of the homoclinic stripe patterns by an Evans function analysis of the associated linear eigenvalue problem. We extend the recently developed NLEP (= NonLocal Eigenvalue Problem) approach to two-dimensional systems. Except for a region near the upper bound of the domain of existence in parameter space, this method enables us to get explicit information on the spectrum of the linear problem. We prove that, in this subregion, all homoclinic stripe patterns must be unstable as solutions on R 2 . However, stripe patterns can be stable on domains of the type R (0; Ly ). Our analysis enables us to determine an upper bound on Ly , moreover, the analysis indicates that stripe patterns can become stable on R 2 near the upper bound of the existence domain. This is confirmed numerically: it is shown by careful simulations that there can be stable homoclinic stripe patterns on R 2 for parameter values near the self-repli...

Arjen Doelman; Harmen; Harmen Van Der Ploeg

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Lx-Yx Relation: Using Galaxy Cluster X-Ray Luminosity as a Robust, Low Scatter Mass Proxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a sample of 115 galaxy clusters at 0.1LY relation (11% intrinsic scatter in Lx) is recovered if sufficiently large core regions (0.15R500) are excluded. The intrinsic scatter is well described by a lognormal distribution and the relations are consistent for relaxed and disturbed/merging clusters. We investigate the LY relation in low-quality data (e.g. for clusters detected in X-ray survey data) by estimating Lx from soft band count rates, and find that the scatter increases somewhat to 21%. We confirm the tight correlation between Yx and mass and the self-similar evolution of that scaling relation out to z=0.6 for a subset of clusters in our sample with mass estimates from the literature. This is used to estimate masses for the entire sample and hence measure the LM relation. We find that the scatter in the LM relation is much lower than previous estimates, due to the full removal of cluster cores and more robust mass estimates. For high-redshift clusters the scatter in the LM relation remains low if cluster cores are not excluded. These results suggest that cluster masses can be reliably estimated from simple luminosity measurements in low quality data where direct mass estimates, or measurements of Yx are not possible. This has important applications in the estimation of cosmological parameters from X-ray cluster surveys.

B. J. Maughan

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

A HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO COMPOSITE SPECTRUM OF GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS  

SciTech Connect

We present a composite spectrum of 60 long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with redshifts in the range 0.35 < z < 6.7 observed with low-resolution optical spectra. The composite spectrum covers the wavelength range 700-6600 A in the rest frame and has a mean signal-to-noise ratio of 150 per 1 A pixel and reaches a maximum of {approx}300 in the range 2500-3500 A. Equivalent widths are measured from metal absorption lines from the Ly{alpha} line to {approx}5200 A, and associated metal and hydrogen lines are identified between the Lyman break and Ly{alpha} line. The average transmission within the Lyman forest is consistent with that found along quasar lines of sight. We find a temporal variation in fine-structure lines when dividing the sample into bursts observed within 2 hr from their trigger and those observed later. Other lines in the predominantly neutral gas show variations too, but this is most likely a random effect caused by weighting of individual strong absorption lines and which mimics a temporal variation. Bursts characterized with high- or low-prompt GRB energy release produce afterglows with similar absorption line strengths, and likewise for bursts with bright or faint optical afterglows. Bursts defined as dark from their optical to X-ray spectral index have stronger absorption lines relative to the optically bright bursts. The composite spectrum has strong Ca II and Mg II absorption lines as commonly found in dusty galaxies, however, we find no evidence for dust or a significant molecular content based on the non-detection of diffuse interstellar bands. Compared to starburst galaxy spectra, the GRB composite has much stronger fine-structure lines, while metal absorption lines are weaker.

Christensen, L. [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Bolzmanstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fynbo, J. P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen Oe (Denmark); Prochaska, J. X. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Thoene, C. C.; De Ugarte Postigo, A. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, 23807, Merate (Italy); Jakobsson, P., E-mail: lise.christensen@ph.tum.de [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 26260 of 28,904 results. 51 - 26260 of 28,904 results. Rebate Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Energy Trust of Oregon offers the Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program to customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. In order to... http://energy.gov/savings/industrial-and-agricultural-production-efficiency-program Rebate LADWP- Solar Incentive Program '''''Note: LADWP reached its budget limit for non-residential solar incentive applications in Augugst 2012. Applicants who have not received a confirmation as of August 22, 2012, have had their... http://energy.gov/savings/ladwp-solar-incentive-program Rebate NV Energy (Northern Nevada Gas)- SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Nevada)

297

Bacteria Catalog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Catalog Bacteria Catalog Name: Robin Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I would just like to have a list brought up of gram neg. and gram pos. bacteria, names of bacteria and what category they fall under. Such as Staphylococcus aureus is gram positive. This would be very helpful in my MBIO LAB. Thank you, student at NSU, central Louisiana. Replies: Your best bet would be to start with looking in the backs of microbiology text books. Many of them have an index with this information. The internet may also be helpful. Saundra Sample Gram positive: Staphylococcus sp., Streptococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Cornyebacterium sp., Clostridium sp. Gram negative: E coli, Pseudomonas sp., Proteus sp., Enterobacter sp., Klebsiella sp., Serratia sp., Citrobacter sp.

298

Technical Approach for the Development of DOE Building America Builders Challenge Technology Information Packages (Revised)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4687 4687 Revised August 2009 Technical Approach for the Development of DOE Building America Builders Challenge Technology Information Packages D.R. Roberts and R. Anderson National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-550-44687 Revised August 2009 Technical Approach for the Development of DOE Building America Builders Challenge Technology Information Packages D.R. Roberts and R. Anderson Prepared under Task No. BET88001 The addition of Appendix D is the only revision to the January 2009

299

Have You Ever Seen a Cat Cracker in Person? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Have You Ever Seen a Cat Cracker in Person? Have You Ever Seen a Cat Cracker in Person? Have You Ever Seen a Cat Cracker in Person? June 8, 2011 - 2:47pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs Want a surefire bet to be hipper at the Department of Energy? Well, I have no idea. But I do know how to have a bit more fun: learn the energy slang. Folks in the energy sector have some great nicknames for the energy infrastructure and processes they use every day. Here are a few: Wheeling Electricity "wheeling" is when electricity is moved through a local grid for use in another area. Christmas Tree A Christmas tree is a set of valves, pipes, and fittings used to control the flow of oil and gas as it leaves a well and enters a pipeline. Doghouse

300

EL-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EL- EL- 019 MDP-02 r r = = = = = = = = = = = Attachment C Page 1 of 1 " .... ---- PLEASE FILM BOTH - SIDES BOTHSIDE.FRM COMPL. DATE , , CLOSING REF ~ READING FILE PROCUREMENT BPO ~ ~ DOE/CONTRACTS: SMITH DCO PROJECT ADMINISTRATION 81'1. ! ~ ~ DOEiHEAooUARTERS DHQ TECHNICAL REPORTS BTR ~ ~ PROJECT CONTROLS BPe ~ ~ ANL' A.J [Norak ANL ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY BET "'""' ~. . ~ ~ : : : : : ::~ ~II~~: :~:~::::::ANCE : : : ~ ~ M.A. Zurek ANL 11. 1 TO DOE ~ ~ 137/138 WAYNE/MAYWOOD POCC READING FILE FROM DOE ~ ~ 139 COLONIE (CISS) ADMIN RCD _ H. L ~~ Y"'.:L ~ ~ '""" CAm """,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Biloxi, Mississippi | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biloxi, Mississippi Biloxi, Mississippi FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Biloxi, Mississippi October 7, 2013 - 2:54pm Addthis FUPWG: Energy Partnerships - A Winning Bet; Biloxi, Mississippi - May 5-6, 2009 May 5-6, 2009 Hosted by Mississippi Power, A Southern Company Subsidiary Tuesday, May 5, 2009 8:30 am Mississippi Power Welcome Don Horsley, Vice President of Customer Services and Retail Marketing, Mississippi Power 8:40 am Welcome and Introduction David McAndrew, Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) 9:00 am Washington Update David McAndrew, DOE FEMP (PDF 4.2 MB) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Guidance Utility Energy Services Contract (UESC) Report 9:30 am Host Success Story: Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport / MPC Utilities Hardening Project

302

Energy Incentive Programs, Nevada | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Nevada Energy Incentive Programs, Nevada October 29, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Updated December 2012 Nevada utilities budgeted nearly $80 million in 2011 to promote energy efficiency and load management in the state. What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? Nevada does not have public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs. What utility energy efficiency programs are available to me? NV Energy, the result of a 2008 merger between Nevada Power Company, Sierra Pacific Power Company and Sierra Pacific Resources, provides energy efficiency programs and financial incentives to commercial/industrial customers as a result of its integrated resource planning (IRP) process. NV Energy's SureBet Incentive Program provides prescriptive and custom

303

Layout 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGI, JGI, approaching its eighth year of existence and its sixth of operation at the Production Genomics Facility (PGF) in Walnut Creek, continues to grow-in staff, space requirements and the posi- tive impact our sequencing and science are having on the scientific community. As our influence and distance between our workstations expands, there emerges a need to keep our team bet- ter informed and to cultivate an environ- ment that recognizes our meaningful contributions to this growing concern, hence the creation of The JGI Primer. On the occasion of the maiden voyage of our newsletter, The JGI Primer, I would like to share with you my enthusiasm for my favorite holiday, Halloween. For me and my lab, Halloween has always served as an occasion to bring us together for some big fun.

304

In Situ Experiment and Modelling of RC-Structure Using Ambient Vibration and Timoshenko Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, several experiments were reported using ambient vibration surveys in buildings to estimate the modal parameters of buildings. Their modal properties are full of relevant information concerning its dynamic behaviour in its elastic domain. The main scope of this paper is to determine relevant, though simple, beam modelling whose validity could be easily checked with experimental data. In this study, we recorded ambient vibrations in 3 buildings in Grenoble selected because of their vertical structural homogeneity. First, a set of recordings was done using a 18 channels digital acquisition system (CityShark) connected to six 3C Lennartz 5s sensors. We used the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) technique to extract the modal parameters of these buildings. Second, it is shown in the following that the experimental quasi-elastic behaviour of such structure can be reduced to the behaviour of a vertical continuous Timoshenko beam. A parametric study of this beam shows that a bijective relation exists bet...

Michel, Clotaire; Guéguen, Philippe; Boutin, Claude

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Research Article HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important to develop a renewable source of energy to overcome a limited source fossil energy. Palm oil is a potential alternative and environmental friendly energy resource in Indonesia due to high production capacity of this vegetable oil. The research studied effect of catalyst to selectivity of biofuel product from cracking of palm oil. The catalyst consisted of HZSM-5 catalyst with or without impregnation. The research was conducted in two steps, namely catalyst synthesized and catalytic cracking process. HZSM-5 was synthesized using Plank methods. The characterization of the synthesized catalysts used AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy) and BET (Brunaueur Emmet Teller). The cracking was carried out in a fixed bed microreactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm which was filled with 0.6 gram catalyst. The Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst was recommended for cracking palm oil for the high selectivity to gasoline. © 2013

Achmad Roesyadi; Danawati Hariprajitno; N. Nurjannah; Santi Dyah Savitri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Not all funding options will have the same risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald. Excerpt below: When we think about starting or growing a business, it's impossible not to think about money. It's what makes business go round, after all. But does coming up with funding always have to mean you're betting the farm that things will turn out as intended? Generally speaking, raising capital for a business venture does indeed carry some risk, but not all types of funding are created equally. Dilutive funds, for example, typically cost more and carry higher risk than their non-dilutive counterparts. And although both have their place, it's important to know the difference and when one is more appropriate than another.

Madison, Alison L.

2011-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Thermally induced structural changes in coal combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objectives are (1) to measure the effect of devolatilization temperature and time on properties of the char and (2) characterize and quantify the effect of thermal annealing on char reactivity during char burnout under conditions of pulverized combustion. Coal devolatilization runs continued during the reporting period. Elemental analysis and N{sub 2} BET surface areas measurements were carried out on the three chars produced in the devolatilization runs. The results are presented. Experiments in the electrodynamic balance during the reporting period were focused on developing ways to measure the particle mass loss and, therefore, the reaction rate directly. This work is summarized in the attached Appendix. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Gavalas, G.R.; Flagan, R.C.

1990-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

308

1 Setting Speculative and Reactive Capacities When an Early Demand Signal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider a fashion goods retailer choosing a strategy for contracting production of its products. It can 1) speculate by contracting for a certain quantity to be produced well ahead of uncertain demand at relatively low unit cost, 2) react by waiting until demand is known, and only then contracting for just the right quantity at a higher unit cost, or 3) hedge its bets by speculating on a portion of the total quantity, and reacting to demand for the rest. Using a twoproduct two-stage model, we identify the conditions under which each strategy is preferred, and determine capacity requirements. We find that fashion retailing often benefits from the dual strategy due to relatively higher obsolescence costs. But the use of the dual strategy is sensitive to the cost premium for reactive capacity and to the makeup of reactive production costs as either largely variable or fixed.

Kyle Cattani; Ely Dahan; Glen M. Schmidt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Facile synthesis of flower-like Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} porous spheres for the lithium-ion battery electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The porous hierarchical spherical Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} assembled by nanosheets have been successfully fabricated. The porosity and the particle size of the product can be controlled by simply altering calcination temperature. SEM, TEM and SAED were performed to confirm that mesoporous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures are built-up by numerous nanoparticles with random attachment. The BET specific surface area and pore size of the product calcined at 280 deg. C are 72.5 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 4.6 nm, respectively. Our experiments further demonstrated that electrochemical performances of the synthesized products working as an anode material of lithium-ion battery are strongly dependent on the porosity. - Graphical abstract: The flower-like Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} porous spheres with hierarchical structure have been successfully prepared via a simple calcination process using cobalt hydroxide as precursor.

Zheng Jun; Liu Jing; Lv Dongping; Kuang Qin [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Jiang Zhiyuan, E-mail: zyjiang@xmu.edu.c [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Xie Zhaoxiong; Huang Rongbin; Zheng Lansun [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Impact of Biodiesel on the Oxidation Kinetics and Morphology of Diesel Particulate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We compare the oxidation characteristics of four different diesel particulates generated with a modern light-duty engine. The four particulates represent engine fueling with conventional ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), biodiesel, and two intermediate blends of these fuels. The comparisons discussed here are based on complementary measurements implemented in a laboratory micro-reactor, including temperature programmed desorption and oxidation, pulsed isothermal oxidation, and BET surface area. From these measurements we have derived models that are consistent with the observed oxidation reactivity differences. When accessible surface area effects are properly accounted for, the oxidation kinetics of the fixed carbon components were found to consistently exhibit an Arrhenius activation energy of 113 6 kJ/mol. Release of volatile carbon from the as-collected particulate appears to follow a temperaturedependent rate law.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

Israel Cabasso; Youxin Yuan

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

The aerocapacitor: An electrochemical double-layer energy-storage device  

SciTech Connect

The authors have applied unique types of carbon foams developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to make an {open_quotes}aerocapacitor{close_quotes}. The aerocapacitor is a high power-density, high energy-density, electrochemical double-layer capacitor which uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. These electrodes possess very high surface area per unit volume and are electrically continuous in both the carbon and electrolyte phase on a 10 nm scale. Aerogel surface areas range from 100 to 700 m{sup 2}/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.3 to 1.0 g/cc. This morphology permits stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power densities (7.5 kW/kg). Materials parameterization has been performed, and device capacitances of several tens of Farads per gram and per cm{sup 3} of aerogel have been achieved.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Draconian measures needed to avert climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On Nov. 12, 2008, the Paris-based International Energy Agency (IEA) released its World Energy Outlook. This year's edition is gloomier than usual, essentially reinforcing the message that others have been saying for some time. Short of a miracle technological breakthrough and/or a bold global agreement to cut back greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are likely to continue to grow, leading to rising global mean temperatures. Negotiators at the international conference in Copenhagen to agree to a post-Kyoto treaty will face insurmountable obstacles. Already, there are indications that many rich countries are hedging their bets that if developing countries do not come on board, they will not do their share either. The crux of the problem is the current inequalities in per capita GHG emissions between the rich and the poor.

NONE

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Cosmic Ray Anomalies Inspired Some Discussion on Modified Chaplygin Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The postulation of Dark energy and Dark matter on the basis of observational results does not end the mystery of their existence. Theoretically new insights into dark matter have been achieved analyzing recent experimental data from the cosmic ray physics. It has been shown that, if the dark matter is a hidden scalar field, then it is not only possible to explain the ATIC/PPB BETS excess but also the observed dark matter abundance naturally and simultaneously. Being motivated, mainly by the assumption of hidden scalar field and some associated works, we consider the Modified Chaplygin Gas for some thermodynamical analysis. The point that if the scalar field is assumed to oscillate before the reheating was not completed, i.e., T_R importance of thermodynamical analysis. We, assuming the properties of Modified Chaplygin Gas, derive an expression for the second law of thermodynamics. It is obse...

Saikia, Julie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Cosmic Ray Anomalies Inspired Some Discussion on Modified Chaplygin Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The postulation of Dark energy and Dark matter on the basis of observational results does not end the mystery of their existence. Theoretically new insights into dark matter have been achieved analyzing recent experimental data from the cosmic ray physics. It has been shown that, if the dark matter is a hidden scalar field, then it is not only possible to explain the ATIC/PPB BETS excess but also the observed dark matter abundance naturally and simultaneously. Being motivated, mainly by the assumption of hidden scalar field and some associated works, we consider the Modified Chaplygin Gas for some thermodynamical analysis. The point that if the scalar field is assumed to oscillate before the reheating was not completed, i.e., T_R importance of thermodynamical analysis. We, assuming the properties of Modified Chaplygin Gas, derive an expression for the second law of thermodynamics. It is observed that it also sheds some new lights on Generalised Second Law.

Julie Saikia; Balendra Kr. Dev Choudhury

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

317

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

Redey, Laszlo I. (6851 Carpenter St., Downers Grove, IL 60516); Vissers, Donald R. (611 Clover Ct., Naperville, IL 60540); Prakash, Jai (2205 Arbor Cir. 8, Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Carbonaceous materials as lithium intercalation anodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial and polymer-derived carbonaceous materials were examined as lithium intercalation anodes in propylene carbonate (pyrolysis graphites) electrolytes. The reversible capacity (180--355 mAh/g) and the irreversible capacity loss (15--200 % based on reversible capacity) depend on the type of binder, carbon type, morphology, and phosphorus doping concentration. A carbon-based binder was chosen for electrode fabrication, producing mechanically and chemically stable electrodes and reproducible results. Several types of graphites had capacity approaching LiC{sub 6}. Petroleum fuel green cokes doped with phosphorous gave more than a 20 % increase in capacity compared to undoped samples. Electrochemical characteristics are related to SEM, TEM, XRD and BET measurements.

Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mayer, S.T. [Polystor, Livermore, CA (United States); Song, X.; Kinoshita, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Development of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1995--31 March 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the reporting period we completed synthesis of about 100 g of catalyst with nominal composition 100 Fe/3 Cu/4 K/16 SiO{sub 2} (S-3416-2), and of another batch (173 g) of the same catalyst (S-3416-3). Also, we synthesized two additional batches of catalyst with nominal composition 100 Fe/5 Cu/6 K/24 SiO{sub 2}, in the amounts of 240 g (S-5624-3) and 200 g (S-5624-4). These amounts are sufficient for all planned tests with these two catalysts for the entire duration of this contract. The synthesized catalysts were characterized by atomic absorption, and BET surface area and pore size distribution measurements.

Bukur, D.B.; Lang, X.; Reddy, B.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Characterization and Reaction Testing of Cobalt Carbide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide was investigated for cobalt carbide synthesized from Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} by CO carburization in a fixed-bed reactor. The cobalt carbide synthesized was characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The catalysts were tested in the slurry phase using a continuously stirred tank reactor at P = 2.0 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO = 2:1 in the temperature range of 493-523 K, and with space velocities varying from 1 to 3 Nl h{sup -1} g{sub cat}{sup -1}. The results strongly suggest that a fraction of cobalt converts to a form with greater metallic character under the conditions employed. This was more pronounced on a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis run conducted at a higher temperature (523 versus 493 K).

Khalid S.; Mohandas J.C.; Gnanamani M.K.; Jacobs G.; Ma W.; Ji Y.; Davis B.H.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

DYNAMOMETER EVALUATION OF PLASMA-CATALYST FOR DIESEL NOX REDUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-stage plasma-catalyst system was developed and tested on an engine dynamometer. Previous laboratory testing suggested high NOx efficiency could be obtained. With hexene reductant added to the exhaust, over 90% NOx reduction was observed. However, with diesel or Fischer-Tropsch reductant the catalyst efficiency rapidly dropped off. Heating the catalyst in air removed brown deposit from the surface and restored conversion efficiency. Following the engine tests, the used catalysts were evaluated. BET surface area decreased, and TPD revealed significant storage. This storage appears to be partly unburned diesel fuel that can be removed by heating to around 250-300 C, and partly hydrocarbons bonded to the surface that remain in place until 450-500 C. Laboratory testing with propene reductant demonstrated that the catalyst regains efficiency slowly even when operating temperature does not exceed 300 C. This suggests that control strategies may be able to regenerate the catalyst by occasional moderate heating.

Hoard, J; Schmieg, S; Brooks, D; Peden, C; Barlow, S; Tonkyn, R

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

323

Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a letter report to complete level 3 milestone "Assess aging characteristics of silica aerogels" for DOE FCRD program. Recently, samples of Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel were aged in flowing dry air for up to 6 months and then loaded with iodine. This dry-air aging simulated the impact of long-term exposure to process gases during process idling. The 6-month aged sample exhibited an iodine sorption capacity of 32 mass%, which was 9 mass % lower than that for an un-aged Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel. In an attempt to understand this decrease in sorption capacity, we characterized physical properties of the aged samples with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed no impact of aging on the aerogel microstructure or the silver nanoparticles in the aerogel, including their spatial distribution and morphology.

Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Robinson, Matthew J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} with methane over molybdenum catalyst. Quarterly technical report, September 1, 1994--November 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

One of the primary concerns in coal utilization is the emission of sulfur compounds, especially SO{sub 2}. This project deals with catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} with methane using molybdenum sulfide catalyst supported on different activated carbons: Darco TRS, Norit ROZ-3, and an activated carbon prepared from Illinois coal IBC-110. The work conducted during this quarter has concentrated on catalyst preparation and characterization along with synthesis of activated carbon from IBC-110 coal, as well as, construction of the apparatus for catalytic tests of SO{sub 2} reduction with methane. It was found that Darco TRS supported catalysts have larger surface area than the pure activated carbon, whereas the impregnation of Norit ROZ-3 did not significantly change the BET surface area. Also, the synthesis of activated carbon support from IBC-110 is in progress.

Wiltowski, T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Regmi Research Series ,Year 5, January 1, 1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ntroductiont! on the bas i s of ttm cnta log o'f the N~p a l IAlroor Lihr.bet of constructing ~mples according to the ppsoC~ stylo. (Contd) Those who came out of the forests and returned to their homes could...

Regmi, Mahesh C

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) HSCoE Final Report Executive Summary September 30, 2010 Lin Simpson Director, HSCoE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, Colorado NREL is a national laboratory operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308. HSCoE Final Report, Executive Summary Acronyms and Abbreviations ANL APCI B Be BET C CA Ca Caltech COF Cr Cu DOE DRIFTS Duke EERE F Fe FY g g/mol H H 2 K kJ kW L Li LLNL 2 m Met-Cars Mg Michigan Missouri mL Mn Mo MOF mol N Na Ni NIST nm Argonne National Laboratory Air Products and Chemicals Inc. boron

327

Audio Clips | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Audio Clips Audio Clips Searching OSTI products Searching OSTI products using the deep web (August 2009) Listen Now Transcript Know about OSTI searching I bet you didn't know this about searching! (July 2009) Listen Now Transcript Science.gov - Greater Precision, Quicker Results Science.gov - Greater Precision, Quicker Results (June 2009) Listen Now Transcript Solar Energy R&D Global Science Gateway Now Open (June 2007) Listen Now Transcript Science Accelerator Science Accelerator (June 2009) Listen Now Transcript WorldWideScience Alliance WorldWideScience Alliance Established (June 2008) Listen Now or play: WorldWideScience Alliance Established (M4A File - 3334 KB) Transcript OSTI Sixty Years of Knowledge Sharing (1947-2007) Sixty Years of Knowledge Sharing (1947-2007) (March 2007) Listen Now

328

Carbonaceous materials as lithium intercalation anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commercial and polymer-derived carbonaceous materials were examined as lithium intercalation anodes in propylene carbonate (pyrolysis < 1350C, carbons) and ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate (graphites) electrolytes. The reversible capacity (180--355 mAh/g) and the irreversible capacity loss (15--200 % based on reversible capacity) depend on the type of binder, carbon type, morphology, and phosphorus doping concentration. A carbon-based binder was chosen for electrode fabrication, producing mechanically and chemically stable electrodes and reproducible results. Several types of graphites had capacity approaching LiC{sub 6}. Petroleum fuel green cokes doped with phosphorous gave more than a 20 % increase in capacity compared to undoped samples. Electrochemical characteristics are related to SEM, TEM, XRD and BET measurements.

Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mayer, S.T. [Polystor, Livermore, CA (United States); Song, X.; Kinoshita, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Carbon spheres-assisted strategy to prepare mesoporous manganese dioxide for supercapacitor applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoporous MnO{sub 2} microstructures with large specific surface area have been successfully synthesized by an in-situ redox precipitation method in the presence of colloidal carbon spheres. The samples of them had much higher specific surface area, pore size and pore volume than those obtained via routes without carbon spheres. The morphology, chemical compositions and porous nature of products were fully characterized. Electrochemical measurements showed that these mesoporous MnO{sub 2} could function well when used as positive electrode materials for supercapacitor. Ideal electrochemical capacitive performances and cyclic stability after 2000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles could be observed in 1 M neutral Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte with a working voltage of 1.7 V. - Graphical Abstract: Mesoporous MnO{sub 2} microstructures with large S{sub BET} were successfully synthesized by in-situ redox precipitation method in the presence of colloidal carbon spheres. Electrochemical measurements showed that these mesoporous MnO{sub 2} could be well used as electrode materials for supercapacitor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesoporous MnO{sub 2} was prepared by in-situ redox method assisted by carbon spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S{sub BET}, pore size and volume were higher than MnO{sub 2} obtained without carbon spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They could function well when used as electrode materials for supercapacitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ideal capacitive behaviors and long cycling life showed after 2000 charge-discharge.

Li Siheng [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, and Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Low-carbon Chemical Power, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin St., Changchun 130022 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Qi Li, E-mail: qil@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, and Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Low-carbon Chemical Power, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin St., Changchun 130022 (China); Lu Lehui; Wang Hongyu [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, and Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Low-carbon Chemical Power, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin St., Changchun 130022 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Determination of the adsorptive capacity and adsorption isotherm of vapor-phase mercury chloride on powdered activated carbon using thermogravimetric analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the adsorptive capacity and adsorption isotherm of vapor-phase mercury chloride on powdered activated carbon (PAC). The technique is commonly applied to remove mercury-containing air pollutants from gas streams emitted from municipal solid waste incinerators. An alternative form of powdered activated carbon derived from a pyrolyzed tire char was prepared for use herein. The capacity of waste tire-derived PAC to adsorb vapor-phase HgCl{sub 2} was successfully measured using a self-designed TGA adsorption system. Experimental results showed that the maximum adsorptive capacities of HgCl{sub 2} were 1.75, 0.688, and 0.230 mg of HgCl{sub 2} per gram of powdered activated carbon derived from carbon black at 30, 70, and 150{sup o} for 500 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of HgCl{sub 2}, respectively. Four adsorption isotherms obtained using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Brunauer-Emmett-eller (BET) models were used to simulate the adsorption of HgCl{sub 2}. The comparison of experimental data associated with the four adsorption isotherms indicated that BET fit the experimental results better than did the other isotherms at 30{sup o}, whereas the Freundlich isotherm fit the experimental results better at 70 and 150{sup o}. Furthermore, the calculations of the parameters associated with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms revealed that the adsorption of HgCl{sub 2} by PAC-derived carbon black favored adsorption at various HgCl{sub 2} concentrations and temperatures. 35 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Hsun-Yu Lin; Chung-Shin Yuan; Wei-Ching Chen; Chung-Hsuang Hung [National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan (China). Institute of Environmental Engineering

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Screening of low cost sorbents for arsenic and mercury capture in gasification systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor has been developed to investigate trace metal capture on selected sorbents for cleaning the hot raw gas in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants. The new reactor design is presented, together with initial results for mercury and arsenic capture on five sorbents. It was expected that the capture efficiency of sorbents would decrease with increasing temperature. However, a commercial activated carbon, Norit Darco 'Hg', and a pyrolysis char prepared from scrap tire rubber exhibit similar efficiencies for arsenic at 200 and at 400{sup o}C (70% and 50%, respectively). Meta-kaolinite and fly ash both exhibit an efficiency of around 50% at 200{sup o}C, which then dropped as the test temperature was increased to 400{sup o}C. Activated scrap tire char performed better at 200{sup o}C than the pyrolysis char showing an arsenic capture capacity similar to that of commercial Norit Darco 'Hg'; however, efficiency dropped to below 40% at 400{sup o}C. These results suggest that the capture mechanism of arsenic (As4) is more complex than purely physical adsorption onto the sorbents. Certain elements within the sorbents may have significant importance for chemical adsorption, in addition to the effect of surface area, as determined by the BET method. This was indeed the case for the mercury capture efficiency for all four sorbents tested. Three of the sorbents tested retained 90% of the mercury when operated at 100{sup o}C. As the temperature increased, the efficiency of activated carbon and pyrolysis char reduced significantly. Curiously, despite having the smallest Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area, a pf-combustion ash was the most effective in capturing mercury over the temperature range studied. These observations suggest that the observed mercury capture was not purely physical adsorption but a combination of physical and chemical processes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Cedric Charpenteau; Revata Seneviratne; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Synthesis and characterization of zirconia aerogels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zirconia gels were prepared using zirconium n-propoxide, acetic acid and npropanol using the sol-gel process. Zirconium alkoxides are very moisture sensitive, but controlled hydrolysis was achieved through generation of water from the esterification reaction between acetic acid and n-propanol. The hydrolysis product then polymerizes through a fast condensation reaction to produce a gel. The wetgels were dried under supercritical conditions in an autoclave to yield aerogels. 'ne aerogels were characterized using BET nitrogen adsorption method, X-ray powder diffraction, Infrared Analysis and Simultaneous Thermal Analysis. The aerogels were sulfated and characterized using pyridine adsorption and NMR. Gelation times increased with increasing acetic acid content and also with increasing alcohol content. The gelation process was accelerated with increasing temperature and was found to obey the Arrhenius relation. The surface areas of the aerogels increased but pore sizes decreased with increasing alkoxide concentration. The differential thermal analysis curve was characterized by the appearance of three regions of change: ( i ) removal of the solvent and free water, ( i i ) removal of the residual organics and phase transformation from cubic to monoclinic form, and ( iii ) the reversible transformation between monoclinic and tetragonal phases. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction studies confirmed the results from the thermal analysis. The BET nitrogen adsorption / desorption isotherms were studied to follow the changes in the pore shapes of the aerogels prepared under different conditions. Pyridine adsorption on sulfated aerogel showed peaks for Lewis acid sites, Br6nsted acid sites and a combination of both. The superacidity of sulfated zirconia is attributed to the presence of the combination of both types of the acid sites.

Khazi-Syed, Azghar H.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Structural response of coal to drying and pentane sorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments probed the response of coal toward drying and subsequent sorption and desorption of pentane. The change in porosity due to drying was calculated from the difference between the expected volume change associated with H{sub 2}O loss and the observed volume change. For low rank coals, a slight increase in porosity was found. For coals {gt}85 wt % carbon a slight decrease occurred. Pentane sorption experiments were conducted for up to 365 days using coals dried at room temperature. A significant amount of pentane could not be removed upon evacuation for 100 min at room temperature, conditions suitable for removal of this sorbate from interconnected macro-, meso-, and micropores. However, much of this pentane could be removed upon extended evacuation. Negligible swelling of coal accompanies pentane sorption despite its considerable presence indicating that pentane adsorbs on surfaces of open pore space. The quantity of 'slow reversible' pentane was compared to the quantity of CO{sub 2} determined from BET experiments. The degree of connectivity of the pore system of coal was estimated from the ratio of 'slow reversible' pentane surface area to CO{sub 2} BET surface area. A ratio of 1.0 indicates a completely unconnected pore network, while a ratio of 0.0 indicates a completely interconnected pore network. The range of this ratio was 0.46-0.73 for coal dried under high vacuum at room temperature. These findings indicate that interconnection among pores is incomplete for these coals. For most coals, drying at 150{sup o}C affects the quantity of slow reversible pentane, and this is associated with alteration in the connectivity of the network pore structure of coal. 52 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

S.R. Kelemen; L.M. Kwiatek; M. Siskin; A.G.K. Lee [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ (United States)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Improving Operational Strategies of an Institutional Building in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Building and Energy Technologies Department (BET) of the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research has pledged to achieve 10% reduction in buildings energy consumption by the year 2005. Working in line with the Kuwaiti government that highly recognizes the national and international concerns to reduce global warming gases, BET formulated its 5-year strategic goal. Efforts were concentrated on buildings with partial occupancy, namely office buildings, where it was found that inefficient operation strategies were undertaken by building operators. Generally, office buildings were operated without taking the occupancy schedules into consideration. This actually created a great opportunity to reform common operation strategies and increase buildings energy efficiency, which is a step forward to achieve the set goal. This paper demonstrates the findings of a pilot study of an office/institutional building, located in Kuwait that targeted mainly reducing its energy consumption by modifying its operation strategies. The study focused on the major end user systems of the building main source of energy that is electricity, namely the air-conditioning, and lighting systems. It was estimated that for the base year, which was selected to be year 1999, the recommended operation strategies would save 21% of the annual energy consumption. The annual savings in electrical energy totaled over 2800 kWhr, which is equivalent to $18,400 (O&MS). Reflecting the savings on the national level and for buildings of similar type and occupancy pattern, it is estimated that the nation would save over $70 million due to the heavy government subsidy. In addition, the power plants emissions of CO2 will be reduced by 749 millions kg.

Al-Ragom, F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Engineering Plant One-Carbon Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary and secondary metabolism intersect in the one-carbon (C1) area. Primary metabolism supplies most of the C1 units and competes with secondary metabolism for their use. This competition is potentially severe because secondary products such as lignin, alkaloids, and glycine betaine (GlyBet) require massive amounts of C1 units. Towards the goal of understanding how C1 metabolism is regulated at the metabolic and gene levels so as to successfully engineer C1 supply to match demand, we have: (1) cloned complete suites of C1 genes from maize and tobacco, and incorporated them into DNA arrays; (2) prepared antisense constructs and mutants engineered with alterations in C1 unit supply and demand; and (3) have quantified the impacts of these alterations on gene expression (using DNA arrays), and on metabolic fluxes (by combining isotope labeling, MS, NMR and computer modeling). Metabolic flux analysis and modeling in tobacco engineered for GlyBet synthesis by expressing choline oxidizing enzymes in either the chloroplast or cytosol, has shown that the choline biosynthesis network is rigid, and tends to resist large changes in C1 demand. A major constraint on engineering enhanced flux to GlyBet in tobacco is a low capacity of choline transport across the chloroplast envelope. Maize and sorghum mutants defective in GlyBet synthesis show greatly reduced flux of C1 units into choline in comparison to GlyBet-accumulating wildtypes, but this is not associated with altered expression of any of the C1 genes. Control of C1 flux to choline in tobacco, maize and sorghum appears to reside primarily at the level of N-methylation of phosphoethanolamine. A candidate signal for the control of this flux is the pool size of phosphocholine which down-regulates and feedback inhibits phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase. Methionine S-methyltransferase (MMT) catalyzes the synthesis of S-methylmethionine (SMM) from methionine (Met) and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). SMM can be reconverted to Met by donating a methyl group to homocysteine, and concurrent operation of this reaction and that mediated by MMT sets up the SMM cycle. The genes encoding the enzymes of the SMM cycle were cloned and characterized during this project. SMM has been hypothesized to be essential as a methyl donor or as a transport form of sulfur, and the SMM cycle has been hypothesized to guard against depletion of the free Met pool by excess AdoMet synthesis, or to regulate AdoMet level and hence the AdoMet/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio (the methylation ratio). To test these hypotheses, we isolated insertional mmt mutants of Arabidopsis and maize. Both mutants lacked the capacity to produce SMM and thus had no SMM cycle. They nevertheless grew and reproduced normally and the seeds of the Arabidopsis mutant had normal sulfur contents. These findings rule out an indispensable role for SMM as a methyl donor or in sulfur transport. The Arabidopsis mutant had significantly higher AdoMet a nd lower S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHCy) levels than the wild type, and consequently a higher methylation ratio (20 vs. 14). Free Met and thiol pools were unaltered in this mutant, although there was a 50% decrease in free threonine (Thr) and changes in other amino acids. These data indicate that the SMM cycle contributes to regulation of AdoMet levels rather than preventing depletion of free Met. Since AdoMet activates Thr synthase, that Thr level was not higher but lower in the mmt mutant implies that AdoMet is sequestered away from Thr synthase, which is chloroplastic. Results obtained with the Arabidopsis mmt mutant and wildtype have been integrated into a metabolic model of the intersecting methylation, SMM, and methionine salvage cycles. This model adequately accounts for the steady-state pool sizes of Met, SMM, AdoMet and AdoHCy in wildtype, and the small changes in AdoMet and AdoHCy levels associated with knockout of MMT. This model is now being used to predict the time-course of changes in AdoMet, Met, AdoHCy, and SMM mass isotopomers when Arabidopsis is fed with 13C5-Met at different

David Rhodes

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

THE COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT OF LUMINOUS TeV BLAZARS. II. REWRITING THE THERMAL HISTORY OF THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The universe is opaque to extragalactic very high energy gamma rays (VHEGRs, E > 100 GeV) because they annihilate and pair produce on the extragalactic background light. The resulting ultrarelativistic pairs are commonly assumed to lose energy primarily through inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons, reprocessing the original emission from TeV to GeV energies. In Broderick et al., we argued that this is not the case; powerful plasma instabilities driven by the highly anisotropic nature of the ultrarelativistic pair distribution provide a plausible way to dissipate the kinetic energy of the TeV-generated pairs locally, heating the intergalactic medium (IGM). Here, we explore the effect of this heating on the thermal history of the IGM. We collate the observed extragalactic VHEGR sources to determine a local VHEGR heating rate. Given the pointed nature of VHEGR observations, we estimate the correction for the various selection effects using Fermi observations of high- and intermediate-peaked BL Lac objects. As the extragalactic component of the local VHEGR flux is dominated by TeV blazars, we then estimate the evolution of the TeV blazar luminosity density by tying it to the well-observed quasar luminosity density and producing a VHEGR heating rate as a function of redshift. This heating is relatively homogeneous for z {approx}history of the IGM. Due to the homogeneous nature of the extragalactic background light, TeV blazars produce a uniform volumetric heating rate. This heating is sufficient to increase the temperature of the mean density IGM by nearly an order of magnitude, and at low densities by substantially more. It also naturally produces the inverted temperature-density relation inferred by recent observations of the high-redshift Ly{alpha} forest, a feature that is difficult to reconcile with standard reionization models. Finally, we close with a discussion on the possibility of detecting this hot low-density IGM suggested by our model either directly or indirectly via the local Ly{alpha} forest, the Comptonized CMB, or free-free emission, but we find that such measurements are currently not feasible.

Chang, Philip; Broderick, Avery E.; Pfrommer, Christoph, E-mail: aeb@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: pchang@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: christoph.pfrommer@h-its.org [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

337

The BigBoss Experiment  

SciTech Connect

BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (k{sub max} = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (k{sub max} = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.

Schelgel, D.; Abdalla, F.; Abraham, T.; Ahn, C.; Allende Prieto, C.; Annis, J.; Aubourg, E.; Azzaro, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Baugh, C.; Bebek, C.; Becerril, S.; Blanton, M.; Bolton, A.; Bromley, B.; Cahn, R.; Carton, P.-H.; Cervanted-Cota, J.L.; Chu, Y.; Cortes, M.; /APC, Paris /Brookhaven /IRFU, Saclay /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, CPT /Durham U. / /IEU, Seoul /Fermilab /IAA, Granada /IAC, La Laguna / /IAC, Mexico / / /Madrid, IFT /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. / / /New York U. /Valencia U.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT “forests” have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel® foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 °C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel® electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of a characteristic CNT sample was measured to be 232 m2/g with a cryogenic (77K) hydrogen storage of 0.85 wt%. This level of hydrogen adsorption is slightly higher than that predicted by the Chahine rule, indicating that these CNTs may bind hydrogen more strongly than other carbonaceous materials. More work is needed to confi rm and determine the reason for increased hydrogen adsorption in these CNTs, and to test them for use as catalyst support networks. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing CNTs for energy storage applications using water-assisted CVD.

Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Verde iPad app | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

iPad app iPad app Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Verde iPad app Agency/Company /Organization: Verde Sustainable Solutions, L3C Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Phase: Create Early Successes Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Mobile Device Website: www.verdel3c.com Country: United States Locality: all Web Application Link: bit.ly/wuHQ1S Cost: Paid UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

03-10-05.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/13/05 - 03/19/05: 3/13/05 - 03/19/05: Hanford - 2 INL - 6 RFETS - 17 SRS - 4 (subject to change) total shipments received as of 03/09/05: 3,415 Disposal Waste disposed as of 03/09/05: 4,337 standard waste boxes 1,356 ten-drum overpacks 60,833 waste drums 27,031 cubic meters Operations: First on, last out A "TRU-ly" unique waste story ... TRU TeamWorks is a biweekly e-newsletter for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant team D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A Acronym List Archives Links WIPP Home Page Contact us with or submit your e-mail address for updates. feedback Tools Feedback By the Numbers Operations: Lab down under Unused areas in WIPP mine will soon be put to good use ... Working Smart: Submissions wanted

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341

One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jane Thomas Jane Thomas Supply Technician Tulsa, Oklahoma Special thanks to: SWPA Marshall Boyken Kenny Broadaway Mike Dawson Scott Holland Beth Nielsen Margaret Skidmore Randy Staponski Gary Swartzlander Ron Szatmary Steve Wall Jon Worthington CNI/Bearskin Ashley Butler Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia William Hiller Kathy O'Neal KC District Corps George Boban Andre Vasseur Tulsa District Corps Dan Brueggenjohann Little Rock District Corps Lee Beverly U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J U LY - D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 0 continued on page 7 The Stockton Powerplant in Missouri is back online after an extended outage caused when a blade section sheared off of the project's only turbine in February 2009. The nearly five-ton section of blade was reattached in early August 2010 after related repairs had been

342

This  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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343

Flim3.l Elaenbud  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fe Fe 66 i.. y, N&i) -, mc . _ Flim3.l Elaenbud w. B. Ra* ' PBBDBm $ToIB SlllJBoLI 3!3HtwR3thaah ,- ". i ti?-,J~ -; Awvt 3% 1951 on hg?mt mlh, a visit Ma zsRcb to t&m ?!bylmd cha cQulpa?zy T&en3 Mnotfte r;au%s am proce88ed for the 8xtrac?tion of ru% sa2ar and lnuttle-gracie timrim ni*tratea. ?kywuod Chsrdcal Co. has been process- ~tharsmrtrrlalsforrpp~~ly50pacln~dbu&rcarjr~ 8t8xtiAl backgroMd in tlha haa.ing of tlLuhmbe8ring naataia&. mr this rn8oxl# it unb thopght aM8abls to l.zmat;tgrte the e%posurss and health 6rxp8tieMe at thb plant in order t&t tM8 4lxperfeMs a8y beplsttowelr~andii~a~8iQnbecQBue8inti~iothe ~OfOQRPaa~~~ff~88Of~~~Ofi~~l. The di8cu8sions uhich ue had with the phnt personnrl cexbw8d 0rod tborri~~t~of~pprurttopsra~f~~t8a~~Yorkof~ss

344

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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345

I I LI I L I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LI LI - I L I 1 II C c - ORNL/RASA-9618 OAK RlDGE NATlONAl. LA8ORATORY Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey at B&T Metals, 425 West Town Street, Columbus, Ohio (cooolv) M . E. Murray V. P. Patania C. A. Johnson M N M E D *wD OPEbM~ B V WUCNEEDllW?ME IWiARCH CoRpoRAng FoRTHEwITf@%tATeB ltEpAAMwTmBMeR(Ly ORNL-27 (34el ~~- L._~ This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Avaiiable to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1; prices available from (615) 576-8301, FlS 626-8401. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the

346

BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sol-lClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I Sol-lClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I I . CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF P PAGES 9B. DATED (SEE E M 11) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI01 Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specifmd in the solicitation as mended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - coples of the amendment; @) By acknowledging r d p t of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By seperate letter or telegram whlch includes a refer- to the solicitation and mendmmt numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtus of this msndment you desire to change an offer drem-ly submitted, such change

347

ORNL DAAC News ORNL DAAC News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 T he ORNL Distrib- uted Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a NA- SA-sponsored source f o r b i o g e o ch e m i c a l a n d e c o l o g i c a l d a t a and services useful in environmental research. The ORNL DAAC cur- r e n t ly a rch i ve s a n d distributes nearly 900 products categorized as Field Campaign, Land Validation, Regional and Global, or Model Archive. Please visit us online at http://daac.ornl.gov for a comprehensive de- scription of data, services, and tools available from the ORNL DAAC. Cur- rent and past news can be found at http://daac. ornl.gov/news.shtml. http://www.nasa.gov * New Model Re-leased * NACP Data sets released * BIGFOOT Meteoro- logical data set. * 24 LBA data sets released * NASA Customer Survey Contents: National Aeronautics and Space Administration

348

V  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. 1.1 I . COO-30.72-25 11 t 1 Hadronic Form Factors in Asymptotically Free Field Theories David J. Gross and S.B. Treiman Joseph Henry Labor atorie s of Physics -NOTICE- Pri nce ton Uni ver sit y 1 1 This repor t was prep ared as an acco unt of work 1 Pri nce ton , New Jer sey 1 spons ored by the Unite d State s Gove rnme nt. Neith er 1 1 the Un ited Sta tes nor the Un ited Sta tes Ato mic Ene rgy I 08 54 0 1 j Comm issi on, nor any of thei r empl oyee s, nor any of I the ir con trac tors , sub con trac tors , or the ir em plo yee s, 111 »tti' R'111 wou ld not infr inge priv ate ly own ed righ ts. 1 - .3 ABSTRACT The breakdown of Bjorken scaling in asymptotically free gauge theories of the strong interactions is explored for its implications on the large q2 behavior of nucleon form factors.

349

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table A13. Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices (Trillion Cubic Feet per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Production Dry Gas Production 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20.29 20.96 22.10 23.02 23.64 24.71 26.10 0.8% Supplemental Natural Gas 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 -0.0% Net Imp orts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.98 2.64 2.78 2.13 1.30 0.97 0.32 -7.8% Pipeline 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.68 2.23 2.42 1.62 0.97 0.83 0.18 -9.3% Liquefied Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.30 0.41 0.36 0.51 0.34 0.14 0.14 -4.1% Total Supp ly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.33 23.66 24.94 25.21 25.00 25.74 26.48 0.4% Consumption by Sector Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.87 4.75 4.80 4.84

350

TITLE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Peccrdei et .... g:~.g-..o*c *ck .*,- Peccrdei et .... g:~.g-..o*c *ck .*,- &.-. fi+ E C 7 ---.----.- .-.... 3$rS --------- ixx4!30 F A ~ 953 ' 27565' glla 5tcpEe.l. Peeorder Reception N o . - STATE OF COtOPA00 COUFlTY OF GARFIELD MfEREAS, under date of kcember 7 , 1966, an oil and gas l e a s e was entered i n t o between Claude V. Hayward, lessor, snd Rustrat dl1 Ccmpany Incorporated, Lessee, covering, among other l a n d s , t a t 1 1 , being the Northeast Quarter ~b the Southwest Q u a r t e r o f Section 25, f - 7 4 , R-95-W, Garfield County, Calnrnda, sa3d lease being recorded O n 86ak 381, Fag? 418, o f the ~rritdrd$ of B a r f leld County, C s l o r e d ~ ; and @ WWEEA., under date o f l%y 5 , 1967, a U n l t Agrarmnt fas the Dcvelapmnt and Opcratlon o f the Rulison Vn4 t Area I n Gsrfield and He58 Counties Colorado, was entered 1 nto betwen Aus t r

351

M TW T F_ SM TWTF 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Julyi 27," 2001 Julyi 27," 2001 Julhy 2001 August2001 M TW T F_ SM TWTF 5 1 2 34 567 1 2 3 4- .rnday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 -15 16 17 18 19 20 21 . 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 29 30 31- 26 27 28 29 30 31 TaSk ad '_ .__________________ 0 _Getthe most out of Outook 98 - 800 900 1000_ _ 10:47am-11:02am Welcome to Calendar! - . 1100 _ 2 100 Notes 200 30o 4 oo 500 6 o Kipo i, 6 Knpowicz, Robert 1 DE039.Q136 2 F g52 68 July 30, 20 1 u ly 2001 0 Aug ust 20 01 |JUBly ^30U 2U 1 c M T W T F C M TW T F 1 2 3 4 5 6 - 12 34. 4londay 8 91011 121314 5 6 7 8 91011 -15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 - 2223 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2930 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 TaskPad 7 ~~~~~~am 7 "~'~~ 0_ 3 TO Q Taskdad 7___________________________ the mosoutof Outlook98

352

A FOURTH H I 21 cm ABSORPTION SYSTEM IN THE SIGHT LINE OF MG J0414+0534: A RECORD FOR INTERVENING ABSORBERS  

SciTech Connect

We report the detection of a strong H I 21 cm absorption system at z = 0.5344, as well as a candidate system at z = 0.3389, in the sight line toward the z = 2.64 quasar MG J0414+0534. This, in addition to the absorption at the host redshift and the other two intervening absorbers, takes the total to four (possibly five). The previous maximum number of 21 cm absorbers detected along a single sight line is two and so we suspect that this number of gas-rich absorbers is in some way related to the very red color of the background source. Despite this, no molecular gas (through OH absorption) has yet been detected at any of the 21 cm redshifts, although, from the population of 21 cm absorbers as a whole, there is evidence for a weak correlation between the atomic line strength and the optical-near-infrared color. In either case, the fact that so many gas-rich galaxies (likely to be damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems) have been found along a single sight line toward a highly obscured source may have far-reaching implications for the population of faint galaxies not detected in optical surveys, a possibility which could be addressed through future wide-field absorption line surveys with the Square Kilometer Array.

Tanna, A.; Webb, J. K. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Curran, S. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Whiting, M. T. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bignell, C., E-mail: sjc@physics.usyd.edu.au [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Rt. 28/92 Green Bank, WV 24944-0002 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

Cowper, G.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

A suppressor T cell in the human mixed lymphocyte reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T lymphocytes are known to exert both positive and negative regulatory controls on effector cells in the immune response. The positive helper effects on antibody production were recognized first (1, 2). Later, suppressor functions were demonstrated in humoral immune responses (3-5) and more recently in delayed hypersensitivity (6) and the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) (7). ' It is now clear from the work of Cantor and Boyse (8) that there are two types of regulatory T lymphocytes, helper and suppressor cells, which belong to separate populations distinguishable by their Ly surface antigens. Like helper T cells, suppressor T cells appear to be genetically controlled by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). These regulatory genes map in the I region of the mouse MHC (H-2), which is serologically divisable into A, B, J, E, and C regions. Kapp et al. (9) showed that the immune response to the synthetic peptide L-glutamic acid6°-L-alanine3°-L-tyrosine TM in mice was regulated by an antigen-specific immune suppression gene. Tada et al. (10) have shown that immune T cells can release a supernatant factor which specifically

A. J. Mcmichael; T. Sasazuki

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Cosmic Hydrogen Was Significantly Neutral a Billion Years After the Big Bang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ionization fraction of cosmic hydrogen, left over from the big bang, provides crucial fossil evidence for when the first stars and quasar black holes formed in the infant universe. Spectra of the two most distant quasars known show nearly complete absorption of photons with wavelengths shorter than the Ly-alpha transition of neutral hydrogen, indicating that hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) had not been completely ionized at a redshift z~6.3, about a billion years after the big bang. Here we show that the radii of influence of ionizing radiation from these quasars imply that the surrounding IGM had a neutral hydrogen fraction of tens of percent prior to the quasar activity, much higher than previous lower limits of ~0.1%. When combined with the recent inference of a large cumulative optical depth to electron scattering after cosmological recombination from the WMAP data, our result suggests the existence of a second peak in the mean ionization history, potentially due to an early formation episode of the first stars.

Stuart Wyithe; Abraham Loeb

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

High resolution n = 3 to n = 2 spectra of neon-like silver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectra of the n = 3 to n = 2 transitions in neon-like silver emitted from the Princeton Large Torus have been recorded with a high-resolution Bragg-crystal spectrometer. The measurements cover the wavelength region 3.3 to 4.1 A and include the forbidden 3p ..-->.. 2p electric quadrupole lines. Transitions in the adjacent sodium-like, and aluminum-like charge states of silver have also been observed and identified. The Ly-..cap alpha.. spectra of hydrogen-like argon and iron, the K..cap alpha.. spectra of helium-like argon, potassium, manganese, and iron, and the K..beta.. spectrum of helium-like argon fall in the same wavelength region in first or second order and have been measured concurrently. These spectra provide a coherent set of wavelength reference data obtained with the same spectrometer and from the same tokamak. This set is used as a basis to compare wavelength predictions for one- and two-electron systems to each other and to determine the transition energies of the silver lines with great accuracy.

Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Cohen, S.; Hill, K.W.; Timberlake, J.; Walling, R.S.; Chen, M.H.; Hagelstein, P.L.; Scofield, J.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Detection of H2 Emission from Mira B in UV Spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ultraviolet spectra of Mira's companion star from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The companion is generally assumed to be a white dwarf surrounded by an accretion disk fed by Mira's wind, which dominates the UV emission from the system. The STIS UV spectrum is dominated by numerous, narrow H2 lines fluoresced by H I Ly-alpha, which were not detected in any of the numerous observations of Mira B by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). The high temperature lines detected by IUE (e.g., C IV 1550) still exist in the STIS spectrum but with dramatically lower fluxes. The continuum fluxes in the STIS spectra are also much lower, being more than an order of magnitude lower than ever observed by IUE, and also an order of magnitude lower than fluxes observed in more recent HST Faint Object Camera objective prism spectra from 1995. Thus, the accretion rate onto Mira B was apparently much lower when STIS observed the star, and this change altered the character of Mira B's UV spectrum.

Brian E. Wood; Margarita Karovska; Warren Hack

2001-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels Contribute to Thromboxane A2-Induced Contraction of Rat Small Mesenteric Arteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Thromboxane A 2 (TxA 2)-induced smooth muscle contraction has been implicated in cardiovascular, renal and respiratory diseases. This contraction can be partly attributed to TxA2-induced Ca 2+ influx, which resulted in vascular contraction via Ca 2+-calmodulin-MLCK pathway. This study aims to identify the channels that mediate TxA2-induced Ca 2+ influx in vascular smooth muscle cells. Methodology/Principal Findings: Application of U-46619, a thromboxane A2 mimic, resulted in a constriction in endothelium-denuded small mesenteric artery segments. The constriction relies on the presence of extracellular Ca 2+, because removal of extracellular Ca 2+ abolished the constriction. This constriction was partially inhibited by an L-type Ca 2+ channel inhibitor nifedipine (0.5–1 mM). The remaining component was inhibited by L-cis-diltiazem, a selective inhibitor for CNG channels, in a dose-dependent manner. Another CNG channel blocker LY83583 [6-(phenylamino)-5,8-quinolinedione] had similar effect. In the primary cultured smooth muscle cells derived from rat aorta, application of U46619 (100 nM) induced a rise in cytosolic Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+]i), which was inhibited by L-cis-diltiazem. Immunoblot experiments confirmed the presence of CNGA2 protein in vascular smooth muscle cells. Conclusions/Significance: These data suggest a functional role of CNG channels in U-46619-induced Ca 2+ influx and contraction of smooth muscle cells.

Yuk Ki Leung; Juan Du; Yu Huang; Xiaoqiang Yao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 6, 7-20 December 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]bLj'ªsf ufFpn]x?n] dfcf]jfbL x'F eGb} rGbf c;'Ng] Ps gSsnL dfcf]jfbLnfO{ kqmfp u/L ;'/Iff kmf}hnfO{ a'emfP . @@ jlif{o lagf]b vjf; gfdsf lt o'jfn] :yfgLo laBfnosf k|wfgfWofks l8NnL/d0f a/fn / lai0f' /fO{nfO{ @% xhf/ gub dfu u/]sf lyP . To; cl3 ^ sft... 'xn] 38L, ;ft ;o gub / Ps tf]nf ;'gsf] cf}7L+ n'6]/ nusf] lyof] . dfcf]jfbLsf] gfd lnP/ rGbf dfu ug]{ lu/f]x k'jL{ If]qdf clxn] lgs} a9]sf] 5 . dfcf]jfbL eg]k5L rf8} dflg;x? 8/fpg] / s]xL dflg; tyf pBf]uL Aofkf/Lx? af6} *÷!) nfv ?k}of c;'Ng ;lsg] e...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

360

CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

Hudson, H. S. [SSL, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Woods, T. N., E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Dr., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

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361

TRANSITION REGION EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE  

SciTech Connect

There are relatively few observations of UV emission during the impulsive phases of solar flares, so the nature of that emission is poorly known. Photons produced by solar flares can resonantly scatter off atoms and ions in the corona. Based on off-limb measurements by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, we derive the O VI {lambda}1032 luminosities for 29 flares during the impulsive phase and the Ly{alpha} luminosities of 5 flares, and we compare them with X-ray luminosities from GOES measurements. The upper transition region and lower transition region luminosities of the events observed are comparable. They are also comparable to the luminosity of the X-ray emitting gas at the beginning of the flare, but after 10-15 minutes the X-ray luminosity usually dominates. In some cases, we can use Doppler dimming to estimate flow speeds of the O VI emitting gas, and five events show speeds in the 40-80 km s{sup -1} range. The O VI emission could originate in gas evaporating to fill the X-ray flare loops, in heated chromospheric gas at the footpoints, or in heated prominence material in the coronal mass ejection. All three sources may contribute in different events or even in a single event, and the relative timing of UV and X-ray brightness peaks, the flow speeds, and the total O VI luminosity favor each source in one or more events.

Johnson, H.; Raymond, J. C.; Murphy, N. A.; Suleiman, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giordano, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Ko, Y.-K. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ciaravella, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

Alpha-2 adrenergic activity of bromocriptine and quinpirole in chicken pineal gland. Effects on melatonin synthesis and ( sup 3 H)rauwolscine binding  

SciTech Connect

In the pineal gland and retina of chickens, serotonin N-acetyl-transferase (NAT) activity and melatonin content are modulated by different receptors, alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in pineal gland and D2-dopamine receptors in retina. The effect of two D2-dopamine receptor agonists, bromocriptine and quinpirole (LY 171555), on melatonin synthesis in these tissues was investigated. Systemic administrations of bromocriptine and quinpirole decreased nocturnal NAT activity and melatonin content of both pineal gland and retina. Bromocriptine was equipotent in the two tissues, whereas quinpirole was approximately 100-fold more potent in retina than in pineal gland. In pineal gland, the suppressive effects of bromocriptine and quinpirole on NAT activity were blocked by yohimbine, a selective alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, but not by spiperone, a D2-dopamine receptor antagonist. In contrast, bromocriptine- and quinpirole-induced decreases of the enzyme activity in retina were antagonized by spiperone, and not affected by yohimbine. The nocturnal increase of NAT activity of pineal glands in vitro was inhibited with an order of potency clonidine greater than bromocriptine greater than quinpirole. Additionally, bromocriptine and quinpirole displaced the specific binding of (3H)rauwolscine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, to membranes from chicken pineal gland, with potencies comparable to those observed for inhibition of NAT activity in vitro. It is suggested that bromocriptine and quinpirole, in addition to their D2-dopaminergic activity, can stimulate alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in pineal gland of chicken.

Zawilska, J.; Iuvone, P.M. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Discovery of a Metal-Line Absorber Associated with a Local Dwarf Starburst Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical and near-infrared images, H I 21 cm emission maps, optical spectroscopy, and Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet spectroscopy of the QSO/galaxy pair SBS 1122+594/IC 691. The QSO sight line lies at a position angle of 27 degrees from the minor axis of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy IC 691 (cz_gal = 1204+-3 km/s, L_B ~ 0.09 L*, current star formation rate = 0.08-0.24 solar masses per year) and 33 kpc (6.6 arcmin) from its nucleus. We find that IC 691 has an H I mass of M_HI = (3.6+-0.1) x 10^8 solar masses and a dynamical mass of M_dyn = (3.1+-0.5) x 10^10 solar masses. The UV spectrum of SBS 1122+594 shows a metal-line (Ly-alpha + C IV) absorber near the redshift of IC 691 at cz_abs = 1110+-30 km/s. Since IC 691 is a dwarf starburst and the SBS 1122+594 sight line lies in the expected location for an outflowing wind, we propose that the best model for producing this metal-line absorber is a starburst wind from IC 691. We place consistent metallicity limits on IC 691 ([Z/Zsun] ~ -0.7) and the metal-line absorber ([Z/Zsun] energy to the surrounding intergalactic medium.

Brian A. Keeney; John T. Stocke; Jessica L. Rosenberg; Jason Tumlinson; Donald G. York

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

X-ray Thomson scattering measurements from shock-compressed deuterium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray Thomson scattering has recently been shown to be an effective method of diagnosing a variety of high energy density plasma conditions. We apply this powerful technique to the widely studied problem of shock-compressed liquid deuterium. The behavior of deuterium under extreme conditions has received considerable attention due to its central role in models of giant planets and the importance of the high-pressure insulator-metal transition. We have used spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from electron-plasma waves to perform microscopic observations of ionization during compression. In these experiments, a single shock was launched in cryogenic deuterium reaching compressions of 3x. The 2 keV Ly-{alpha} line in silicon was used as an x-ray source in a forward scattering geometry. In addition to elastic scattering from tightly bound electrons, this low probe energy accessed the collective plasmon oscillations of delocalized electrons. Inelastic scattering from the plasmons allowed accurate measurements of the free electron density through the spectral position of the resonance and provided an estimate of the temperature through its ratio with the elastic feature. Combined with velocity interferometry from the reflective shock front, this lead to a direct determination of the ionization state. We compare the measured ionization conditions with computational models. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of using this technique to determine electrical conductivity and to directly observe pressure-induced molecular dissociation along the Hugoniot.

Davis, P.; Doeppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Fortmann, C.; Unites, W.; Salmonson, J.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H. [University of California, Berkeley. Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); University of California, Berkeley. Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States)

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

365

CO ICE PHOTODESORPTION: A WAVELENGTH-DEPENDENT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

UV-induced photodesorption of ice is a non-thermal evaporation process that can explain the presence of cold molecular gas in a range of interstellar regions. Information on the average UV photodesorption yield of astrophysically important ices exists for broadband UV lamp experiments. UV fields around low-mass pre-main-sequence stars, around shocks and in many other astrophysical environments are however often dominated by discrete atomic and molecular emission lines. It is therefore crucial to consider the wavelength dependence of photodesorption yields and mechanisms. In this work, for the first time, the wavelength-dependent photodesorption of pure CO ice is explored between 90 and 170 nm. The experiments are performed under ultra high vacuum conditions using tunable synchrotron radiation. Ice photodesorption is simultaneously probed by infrared absorption spectroscopy in reflection mode of the ice and by quadrupole mass spectrometry of the gas phase. The experimental results for CO reveal a strong wavelength dependence directly linked to the vibronic transition strengths of CO ice, implying that photodesorption is induced by electronic transition (DIET). The observed dependence on the ice absorption spectra implies relatively low photodesorption yields at 121.6 nm (Ly{alpha}), where CO barely absorbs, compared to the high yields found at wavelengths coinciding with transitions into the first electronic state of CO (A{sup 1}{Pi} at 150 nm); the CO photodesorption rates depend strongly on the UV profiles encountered in different star formation environments.

Fayolle, Edith C.; Linnartz, Harold [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bertin, Mathieu; Romanzin, Claire; Michaut, Xavier; Fillion, Jean-Hugues [Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire pour l'Atmosphere et l'Astrophysique, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS UMR7092, 75005 Paris (France); Oeberg, Karin I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

X-ray Emission Measurements following Charge Exchange between C6+ and He  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray spectra following charge exchange collisions between C6+ and He are presented for collision energies between 460 eV/u and 32,000 eV/u. Spectra were obtained at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ion-atom merged-beams apparatus, using a microcalorimeter X-ray detector capable of fully resolving the C VI Lyman series lines through Ly-gamma. These line ratios are sensitive to the initial electron l-distribution and test our understanding of the charge exchange process. In addition, these line ratios are important for identifying charge exchange in astrophysical contexts involving the interaction of solar wind ions with neutrals. Our measurements are performed at collision velocities (300 km/s to 2500 km/s) which overlap most of the solar wind range. Additional data of this type can hopefully be combined with computations to provide an extensive set of reliable line ratios and absolute cross sections for the interpretation of a variety of astrophysical situations.

Defay, X [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, K [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; McCammon, D [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Wulf, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Andrianarijaona, V. M. [Pacific Union College] [Pacific Union College; Fogle, Jr., M R, [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Seely, D. G. [Albion College] [Albion College; Draganic, Ilija N [ORNL] [ORNL; Havener, Charles C [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph for petawatt laser, x-ray backlighter source studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph was designed to measure time-integrated x-ray spectra in the {approx}1.5 to 2 keV range (6.2-8.2 A wavelength) from small-mass, thin-foil targets irradiated by the VULCAN petawatt laser focused up to 4x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. The spectrograph consists of two cylindrically curved potassium-acid-phthalate crystals bent in the meridional plane to increase the spectral range by a factor of {approx}10 compared to a flat crystal. The device acquires single-shot x-ray spectra with good signal-to-background ratios in the hard x-ray background environment of petawatt laser-plasma interactions. The peak spectral energies of the aluminum He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} resonance lines were {approx}1.8 and {approx}1.0 mJ/eV sr ({approx}0.4 and 0.25 J/A sr), respectively, for 220 J, 10 ps laser irradiation.

Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Nilson, P. M.; Storm, M.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Hey, D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Shepherd, R.; Snavely, R. A.; Key, M. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); King, J. A.; Zhang, B. [Department of Applied Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Stephens, R. B.; Akli, K. U. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Highbarger, K.; Daskalova, R. L. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); and others

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hot surface ionic line emission and cold K-inner shell emission from petawatt-laser-irradiated Cu foil targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hot, 2 to 3 keV electron temperature surface plasma was observed in the interaction of a 0.7 ps petawatt laser beam with solid copper-foil targets at intensities >10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Copper K-shell spectra were measured in the range of 8 to 9 keV using a single-photon-counting x-ray charged-coupled-device camera. In addition to K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell lines, the emission contained the Cu He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} lines, allowing the temperature to be inferred. These lines have not been observed previously with ultrafast laser pulses. For intensities less than 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, only the K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell emissions are detected. Measurements of the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield as a function of the laser intensity are in general agreement with a model that includes refluxing and confinement of the suprathermal electrons in the target volume.

Theobald, W.; Delettrez, J.A.; Mileham, C.; Myatt, J.; Regan, S.P.; Sawada, H.; Stoeckl, C.; Storm, M.; Sangster, T.C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Akli, K.; King, J.A.; Zhang, B. [Department of Applied Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Clarke, R.; Green, J.; Heathcote, R.; Lancaster, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.A. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Freeman, R.R. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Glenzer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States)] (and others)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hot surface ionic line emission and cold K-inner shell emission from petawatt-laser irradiated Cu foil targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hot, T{sub e} {approx} 2- to 3-keV surface plasma was observed in the interaction of a 0.7-ps petawatt laser beam with solid copper-foil targets at intensities >10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Copper K-shell spectra were measured in the range of 8 to 9 keV using a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD camera. In addition to K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell lines, the emission contained the Cu He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} lines, allowing the temperature to be inferred. These lines have not been observed previously with ultrafast laser pulses. For intensities less than 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, only the K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell emissions are detected. Measurements of the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield as a function of the laser intensity are in agreement with a model that includes refluxing and confinement of the suprathermal electrons in the target volume.

Theobald, W; Akli, K; Clarke, R; Delettrez, J A; Freeman, R R; Glenzer, S; Green, J; Gregori, G; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; King, J A; Koch, J A; Kuba, J; Lancaster, K; MacKinnon, A J; Key, M; Mileham, C; Myatt, J; Neely, D; Norreys, P A; Park, H; Pasely, J; Patel, P; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Zhang, B; Sangster, T C

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

370

The mechanism of HIV-1 Nef-mediated downregulation of CD4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he lp er T ce lls , w hi le C D 8 T c el ls b ec om e cy to to xi c T ly m ph oc yt es ( no t sh ow n; h ow ev er , t he m ec ha ni sm o f T l ym ph oc yt e di ff er en tia tio n is d es cr ib ed i n Se ct io n 1. 2. 3) . I n... th e B c el l r ec ep to r an d se cr et ed a nt ib od ie s ar e de pi ct ed a s bl ac k [ Y ] . T he s qu ar e ba ck gr ou nd s fo r ea ch c el l i nd ic at es th e lo ca tio n th at th e ce ll is m os t l ik el y to b e fo...

Chaudhuri, Rittik

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF THE INTRINSIC N V NARROW ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEMS OF THREE QUASARS  

SciTech Connect

We employ detailed photoionization models to infer the physical conditions of intrinsic narrow absorption line systems found in high-resolution spectra of three quasars at z = 2.6-3.0. We focus on a family of intrinsic absorbers characterized by N V lines that are strong relative to the Ly{alpha} lines. The inferred physical conditions are similar for the three intrinsic N V absorbers, with metallicities greater than 10 times the solar value (assuming a solar abundance pattern), and with high ionization parameters (log U {approx} 0). Thus, we conclude that the unusual strength of the N V lines results from a combination of partial coverage, a high ionization state, and high metallicity. We consider whether dilution of the absorption lines by flux from the broad emission line region can lead us to overestimate the metallicities and we find that this is an unlikely possibility. The high abundances that we infer are not surprising in the context of scenarios in which metal enrichment takes place very early on in massive galaxies. We estimate that the mass outflow rate in the absorbing gas (which is likely to have a filamentary structure) is less than a few M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} under the most optimistic assumptions, although it may be embedded in a much hotter, more massive outflow.

Wu Jian; Charlton, Jane C.; Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ganguly, Rajib, E-mail: jwu@astro.psu.ed, E-mail: misawatr@shinshu-u.ac.j [Department of Computer Science, Engineering, and Physics, University of Michigan-Flint, 213 Murchie Science Building, 303 Kearsley Street, Flint, MI 48502 (United States)

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

The effect of neutrals on the global heliosphere and interplanetary shock propagation time to the heliopause  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-dimensional time-dependent two-fluid hydrodynamic model has been used to study numerically the effect of interstellar neutrals on the size and structure of the heliosphere. The interstellar neutrals, coupled to the plasma by charge-exchange collisions, lead to a dramatic decrease in the size of the heliosphere -- 30% for the parameters studied. We find that a build up of neutral hydrogen in front of the leading edge of the heliospbere, seen in earlier models, occurs only when the flow in the interstellar medium is supersonic. When the flow is subsonic, no such hydrogen ``wall`` is seen in the simulations, suggesting that the distribution of scattered solar H Ly a light may be quite different for this case. We have also calculated the propagation of an interplanetary shock to the heliopause as a possible trigger for the 1992 Voyager 2--3 kHz radio emission event. We find that the interstellar plasma density, observed emission cut-off frequency, and heliopause location can all b made consistent once the effect of the reduction in the size of the heliosphere by the interaction with the neutrals is included.

Liewer, P.C. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Karmesin, S.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Brackbill, J.U. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 7, 23 December 2005 - 3 January 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

af]Ng'ePsf] lyof] . cfd;efdf hg ufos ?ljg uGwe{, h]jL 6'x'/], gGbs[i0f hf]zL, /fds[i0f b'jfn cfbLn] lg/+s'ztGq la?4 uLt ufpbf pk:yLt hgtf gfr]sf lyP . g]skf Pdfn] sf]zL c~rn ;dGjo ;dLtLsf] cfof]hgfdf ;DkGg ;f] lazfn cfd ;efdf Ps nfv eGbf a9L... {ssf] Wofg dxf]T;j lt/ tfgL/ x]sf5g . pgLx? ;+u} dxf]T;jsf] d~rdf /fli6«o tyf :yfgLo VoftL k|fKt ufos ufoLsf xfF:o snfsf/x? k|:t't ePsflyP . dxf]T;j cjwLe/ b}lgs ?kdf ;Fem b'O{ 306f ;Dd x'g] dgf]/~hgfTds sfo{qmddf km]zg zf], ;fFuLtLs sfo{qmd, a8L laN8Lª...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

374

THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT FROM THE MEASUREMENTS OF THE ATTENUATION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY SPECTRUM  

SciTech Connect

The attenuation of high-energy gamma-ray spectrum due to the electron-positron pair production against the extragalactic background light (EBL) provides an indirect method to measure the EBL of the universe. We use the measurements of the absorption features of the gamma-rays from blazars as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to explore the EBL flux density and constrain the EBL spectrum, star formation rate density (SFRD), and photon escape fraction from galaxies out to z = 6. Our results are basically consistent with the existing determinations of the quantities. We find a larger photon escape fraction at high redshifts, especially at z = 3, compared to the result from recent Ly{alpha} measurements. Our SFRD result is consistent with the data from both gamma-ray burst and ultraviolet (UV) observations in the 1{sigma} level. However, the average SFRD we obtain at z {approx}> 3 matches the gamma-ray data better than the UV data. Thus our SFRD result at z {approx}> 6 favors the fact that star formation alone is sufficiently high enough to reionize the universe.

Gong Yan; Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR THE DETECTION OF LEAKS IN PIPE LINES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for detecting leaks in pipe lines carrying fluid. The steps include the following: injecting a radioactive solution into a fluid flowing in the line; flushing the line clear of the radioactive solution; introducing a detector-recorder unit, comprising a radioactivity radiation detector and a recorder which records the detector signal over a time period at a substantially constant speed, into the line in association with a go-devil capable of propelling the detector-recorder unit through the line in the direction of the fluid flow at a substantia1ly constant velocity; placing a series of sources of radioactivity at predetermined distances along the downstream part of the line to make a characteristic signal on the recorder record at intervals corresponding to the location of said sources; recovering the detector-recorder unit at a downstream point along the line; transcribing the recorder record of any radioactivity detected during the travel of the detector- recorder unit in terms of distance along the line. (AEC)

Jefferson, S.; Cameron, J.F.

1961-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Lyman-alpha wing absorption in cool white dwarf stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kowalski & Saumon (2006) identified the missing absorption mechanism in the observed spectra of cool white dwarf stars as the Ly-alpha red wing formed by the collisions between atomic and molecular hydrogen and successfully explained entire spectra of many cool DA-type white dwarfs. Owing to the important astrophysical implications of this issue, we present here an independent assessment of the process. For this purpose, we compute free-free quasi-molecular absorption in Lyman-alpha due to collisions with H and H2 within the one-perturber, quasi-static approximation. Line cross-sections are obtained using theoretical molecular potentials to describe the interaction between the radiating atom and the perturber. The variation of the electric-dipole transition moment with the interparticle distance is also considered. Six and two allowed electric dipole transitions due to H-H and H-H2 collisions, respectively, are taken into account. The new theoretical Lyman-alpha line profiles are then incorporated in our ...

Rohrmann, R D; Kepler, S O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Probing Unification With Chandra HETGS and XMM-Newton EPIC And RGS Spectroscopy of the Narrow Emission Line Galaxy NGC 2110  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from Chandra HETGS (250 ks over two epochs) and XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS (60 ks) observations of NGC 2110, which has been historically classified as a Narrow Emission Line Galaxy galaxy. Our results support the interpretation that the source is a Seyfert 2 viewed through a patchy absorber. The nuclear X-ray spectrum of the source is best described by a power law of photon index $\\Gamma$ ~1.7, modified by absorption from multiple layers of neutral material at a large distance from the central supermassive black hole. We report the strong detections of Fe K$\\alpha$ and Si K$\\alpha$ lines, which are marginally resolved with the Chandra HETGS, and we constrain the emission radius of the fluorescing material to >1 pc. There is some evidence for modest additional broadening at the base of the narrow Fe K$\\alpha$ core with a velocity ~4500 km s$^{-1}$. We find tentative evidence for ionized emission (O VIII Ly $\\alpha$, an O VIII RRC feature, and possibly a Ne IX forbidden line) in the Chandra MEG ...

Evans, Daniel A; Turner, T Jane; Weaver, Kimberly A; Marshall, Herman L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Activation of the MAP Kinase Cascade by Exogenous Calcium-Sensing Receptor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Rat-1 fibroblasts and ovarian surface epithelial cells, extracellular calcium induces a proliferative response which appears to be mediated by the G-protein coupled Calcium-sensing Receptor (CaR), as expression of the non-functional CaR-R795W mutant inhibits both thymidine incorporation and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in response to calcium. In this report we utilized CaR-transfected HEK293 cells to demonstrate that functional CaR is necessary and sufficient for calcium-induced ERK activation. CaR-dependent ERK activation was blocked by co-expression of the Ras dominant-negative mutant, Ras N17, and by exposure to the phosphatidyl inositol 3' kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. In contrast to Rat-1 fibroblasts, CaR-mediated in vitro kinase activity of ERK2 was unaffected by tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin in CaR-transfected HEK293 cells. These results suggest that usage of distinct pathways downstream of the CaR varies in a cell-type specific manner, suggesting a potential mechanism by which activation of the CaR could couple to distinct calcium-dependent responses.

Hobson, Susan A.; Wright, Jay W.; Lee, Fred; Mcneil, Scott; Bilderback, Tim R.; Rodland, Karin D.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

WAR DEPARTaMMeNT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i i ..I WAR DEPARTaMMeNT Imentory~at ~etnl Bydridaa aa of 2i Js+ua?y is 20 toxss Bozml. .' imsntary Of 10 t0z.w allc7fs 10 tom as BX0683. p 5 Production of heels at Ravsre Coppsr & Brass Com_saay: ~ ExLrwion ia axpested to continua at 30 tons par waskand, whioh _ ..-,:~ is squix&mt to 130 tons per average nonth.Bcri;lg Febrmryx ht is estiziited ~.;'i thxt extrusionail be 6% on old specification bilf&a snd 30;; on nsv billets. It is estixstad or:ly nsa apasifioatim billets will be extmdad ., during Pm-oh sad April. Yisld of haala from new billets is eatizatsd at S$ and ou old billets at-83. C'n this basis, productioc of heals during Pebriarf ..; eouals S tons and'duriuC ,farch and Aaril equals 1% tons, xssking a total of .-;:: .Z& tons of heels available duriag this period.~ It ma assuned thst the .:;

380

CANDELS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE OBSERVED GALAXY POPULATION TO COSMIC REIONIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present measurements of the specific ultraviolet luminosity density from a sample of 483 galaxies at 6 {approx} 50%. We examine the contribution from galaxies in different luminosity ranges and find that the sub-L* galaxies we detect are stronger contributors to the ionizing photon budget than the L > L* population, unless f {sub esc} is luminosity dependent. Combining our observations with constraints on the emission rate of ionizing photons from Ly{alpha} forest observations at z = 6, we find that we can constrain f {sub esc} < 34% (2{sigma}) if the observed galaxies are the only contributors to reionization, or <13% (2{sigma}) if the luminosity function extends to a limiting magnitude of M {sub UV} = -13. These escape fractions are sufficient to sustain an ionized IGM by z = 6. Current constraints on the high-redshift galaxy population imply that the volume ionized fraction of the IGM, while consistent with unity at z {<=} 6, appears to drop at redshifts not much higher than 7, consistent with a number of complementary reionization probes. If faint galaxies dominated the ionizing photon budget at z = 6-7, future extremely deep observations with the James Webb Space Telescope will probe deep enough to directly observe them, providing an indirect constraint on the global ionizing photon escape fraction.

Finkelstein, Steven L.; Pawlik, Andreas H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Papovich, Casey [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Ryan, Russell E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Finlator, Kristian [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dunlop, James S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Faber, Sandy M.; Kocevski, Dale D. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Newman, Jeffrey A., E-mail: stevenf@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pitt-PACC, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

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381

789-B.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma 74103-3502 918-595-6600 Fax 918-595-6656 www.swpa.gov The UPDATE is published by and for customers, retirees, and employees of Southwestern Power Administration like: Dudley Steele Electrician Jonesboro Maintenance Unit Special thanks to: Marshall Boyken Miya Boyken Mike Denny Ruben Garcia Gary Gregory William Hiller Rick Jones Darlene Low Jim McDonald Jerry Murr Beth Nielsen Rutha Williams Mistie Yost U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J U LY - S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 6 Gore Crew Utilizes More Horsepower Deep in a canyon in the Ozark National Forest this past summer, the Gore Maintenance Office discovered a stand of trees growing dangerously tall under a Southwestern transmission line. Tree-clearing outside the right-of-way by another entity's contractor

382

Ants and leeches  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ants and leeches Ants and leeches Name: Grace M Stephen Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can ants be trained to go through a maze? How are leeches being used in modern medicine? Replies: Ants lay down chemical trails (using a compound not dissimilar to formic acid) between food sources and their nest. So if you set up a maze with some food, ants will appear to learn the maze over time, but they are actually just following chemical trails (which are strengthened by each ant that follows the route). I'm not certain that you could train ants to run mazes in the usual sense, but I wouldn't bet against it (I used to train fish). Leeches are excellent at draining off excess fluid that may accumulate around healing wounds. In particular on the extremities, this fluid can build up and cause pressure that inhibits healing and the restoration of normal blood circulation. Thus leeches can be and are being used following such surgery

383

T'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

j: ;;I : j: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1 \ ,iu" I;ts'J-F.; ~+X'l'W~ 20, ,$57 I::J 3x : sz\,T[jC; 03 NO&( Q>i SU~c$LJ.]~&jCT AT-32 \XTA ' ~~~A?~~IfR~ I&LfX l~LULJT~.Cll..Z~~~~C p" ,- ' \' , , i;l ,,"p' ,~~?;""r~~~~, >,a .;. .,-' $" Y' J pi\rSs;lcJj tJT ~~$TIC~~:3J, LEtCX~ C@>L?AllY Tf-j.! ' \:$.:,.,. ::~;{li~tS.Lc, + J *yJ.-f- *a:.*~ y,,.: -...: -;s< ,,& ,..i' ii: .:' ;:;;t _ . . ..3 ^ 1 L:" 'ihe pym;+';i: of t,h& me;r,orandUn 2s kc, S~T~r;~~.ize tl?E S bklS of Work uErl.yr & sj:pJ;' j-ct su-bcor:tlxLct bet%e:'7! ciihxI:'D 2nd Lhr: Tit2Cxx-i

384

Bacteria Strains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Strains Bacteria Strains Name: Michael Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: In the medical setting, how prevalent are strains of Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (bacterium)? Any statistical data would be helpful..... Replies: You can find a report on incidence at http://www.slackinc.com/general/iche/stor1096/thru.htm The Virtual Museum of bacteria, at http://www.bacteriamuseum.org contains general information about bacteria, including antibiotic resistance, and in the near future will contain specialized information on S. aureus Dr. Trudy Wassenaar I don't have those figures for you but you can probably find them at www.CDC.gov. this is the site for the Centers for Disease Control and their job is to keep track of these things. I bet if you go to a search engine (ie yahoo.com, etc.) and search under +"CDC" +"vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus" you might even get to the right page.

385

Hand Washing vs Sanitizers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hand Washing vs Sanitizers Hand Washing vs Sanitizers Name: allison Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Which works better, antibacterial hand sanitizers, or just plain soap and water? Replies: Soap and water removes more than just bacteria. Soap and water is your best bet. Steve Sample For that answer I would direct you to a few web sites: www.cnn.com:80/health/9808/05/antibacterial.warning/index.html www.cnn.com:80/health/9909/16/killer.ap/index.html and www.microbe.org and go to the "wash up" icon. They have a whole section devoted to handwashing. Good luck Van Hoeck It depends on the need. For a surgeon hand sanitizers are essential, and they have to be applied correctly. There is a famous story of a surgeon who refused to use them because he was allergic to the substance, and he just washed his hands with soap vigorously, and of course used surgical gloves. Nevertheless, he infected several patients with Staphilocccus aureus, a bacteria that lives on the skin harmless, but that can cause severe infections in patients when it is helped entering the body through wounds. The surgeon was caught. So for serious disinfection (also when handling contaminated material) soap is not enough. It is for normal hand-cleaning.

386

LgCOOleS, Se*&,,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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387

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Each Substance Unique Density Each Substance Unique Density Name: Colin Status: educator Grade: 6-8 Location: CO Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Is it true that the density of each substance is unique? (That is my understanding.) So when my students ask, will a substance with a density of 1g/cc float or sink in water, I should tell them that this is a highly unlikely situation because pure, distilled water is the only known substance with that density? Replies: Hi Colin, No, the density of a substance is not a unique property of the substance. Density is not enough to uniquely identify a solid or liquid. It certainly is one of several physical properties that one likes to measure in order to be sure that a substance is what one supposes it to be. Consider carbon. In its graphitic form a sample of carbon will have a density of about 2.2. In the form of diamond, carbon's density is about 3.5. This simple example shows that the manner in which the element is formed results in a phase with a very different density. More generally, one can form various minerals with various densities and there is no guarantee that one of those will not have a density of 1. The same is true with liquids - thousands of new compounds are synthesized every year, and I am willing to bet any money that some of them have a density of 1 g/cc.

388

Vitamin C and immunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vitamin C and immunity Vitamin C and immunity Name: Kathryn A Mulligan Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Will vitamin C boost immunity? Can sorrow or anger deplete it? Does lack of sleep affect it? Can we stockpile immunity? Replies: I haven't seen any "scientific" evidence for a role for Vitamin C by itself in immunity but nutrition in general is certainly important. People who suffer from malnutrition have a much higher incidence of disease. The possible role of physical/emotional stress in immunity is a very complex issue. There is no doubt that factors from the immune system and nervous system interact but it is not yet clear how emotions and sleep may effect immunity. Some studies indicate that stress is somewhat beneficial in immunity while others have shown it to be detrimental. If stress is having a negative effect on you in general then you can bet that your immune system will likewise be negatively effected. And no, there is no real t way to stockpile immunity, it is a normal body process. The most you can do is stay away from things that will depress your immune system.

389

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

390

Voltammetric characterization of ruthenium oxide-based aerogels and other RuO{sub 2} solids: The nature of capacitance in nanostructured materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ruthenium dioxide is an important electrode material for applications in electrocatalysis and power sources. High surface areas are achieved in hydrous RuO{sub 2} precipitates and in mixed ruthenium oxide-titanium oxide, (Ru-Ti)O{sub x}, aerogels ( in which nanoscale domains are networked to form a highly porous structure). The electrochemical properties of (Ru-Ti)O{sub x} aerogels, RuO{sub 2}, and hydrous RuO{sub 2} are examined by direct pressing of sub-milligram quantities of the solid onto the surface of a conductive carbon/wax composite. Voltammetric measurements in acidic electrolyte confirm a pseudocapacitive response for all the RuO{sub x}-based materials. Despite an improvement in BET surface area, as compared with other RuO{sub 2} materials, the (Ru-Ti)O{sub x} aerogel displays a low specific capacitance, which correlated to the high degree of crystallinity of the aerogel. Nanocrystallites of rutile RuO{sub 2}, formed during thermal treatment of the sol-gel Ru/Ti precursors, deleteriously affect the specific capacitance of the material; however, all RuO{sub x} domains in the aerogel are voltammetrically addressable. The influence of proton-donating species on the observed capacitance for the (Ru-Ti)O{sub x} aerogel is evident from the dependence of the voltammetric charge in acidic electrolyte on the potential scan rate.

Long, J.W.; Swider, K.E.; Merzbacher, C.I.; Rolison, D.R. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report number 20, July 1--September 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this time period, at WVU, the authors have obtained models for the kinetics of the HAS (higher alcohol synthesis) reaction over the Co-K-MoS{sub 2}/C catalyst. The Rotoberty reactor was then replaced in the reactor system by a plug-flow tubular reactor. Accordingly, the authors re-started the investigations on sulfide catalysts. The authors encountered and solved the leak problem from the sampling valve for the non-sulfided reactor system. They also modified the system to eliminate the condensation problem. Accordingly, they are continuing their kinetic studies on the reduced Mo-Ni-K/C catalysts. They have set up an apparatus for temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) studies, and have obtained some interesting results on TPR characterizations. At UCC, the complete characterization of selected catalysts has been started. The authors sent nine selected types of ZnO, Zn/CrO and Zn/Cr/MnO catalysts and supports for BET surface area, SEM, XRD and ICP. They also sent fresh and spent samples of the Engelhard Zn/CrO catalyst impregnated with 3 wt% potassium for ISS and XPS testing. In Task 2, work on the design and optimization portion of this task, as well as on the fuel testing, is completed. All funds have been expended and there are no personnel working on this project.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Methanol electro-oxidation on unsupported Pt-Ru alloys at different temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide compositional range of unsupported platinum-ruthenium alloy catalysts were prepared by thermal decomposition of the chlorides and chloroacids. The electrocatalysts were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The BET surface area of the electrocatalysts increases with increasing Ru content up to {approximately}70 atomic percent (a/o) and then reaches a plateau value. Electrodes fabricated from the electrocatalysts were also evaluated as anodes for methanol electro-oxidation in sulfuric acid over a range of temperatures. Unlike the situation for pure Pt, Ru is inactive for methanol electro-oxidation at 25 C but becomes active at higher temperatures. The peak current observed during an anodic potential scan gradually shifts to more cathodic potentials with increasing temperature. When a comparison is made on the basis of electrode geometric surface area, a {approximately}50 a/o ruthenium electrocatalyst provides the highest activity for methanol electro-oxidation at both 25 and 60C. The methanol electro-oxidation rate is 0.5 orders with respect to methanol concentration (between 0.1 and 2 M) for the Pt-Ru ({approximately}50:50) electrode.

Chu, D.; Gilman, S. [Army Research Lab., Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States). Physical Sciences Directorate

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres  

SciTech Connect

NiO solid/hollow spheres with diameters about 100 nm have been successfully synthesized through thermal decomposition of nickel acetate in ethylene glycol at 200 deg. C. These spheres are composed of nanosheets about 3-5 nm thick. Introducing poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) surfactant to reaction system can effectively control the products' morphology. By adjusting the quantity of PVP, we accomplish surface areas-tunable NiO assembled spheres from {approx}70 to {approx}200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. Electrochemical tests show that NiO hollow spheres deliver a large discharge capacity of 823 mA h g{sup -1}. Furthermore, these hollow spheres also display a slow capacity-fading rate. A series of contrastive experiments demonstrate that the surface area of NiO assembled spheres has a noticeable influence on their discharge capacity. - Graphical abstract: The mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres have been achieved by a solvothermal method. N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms show the S{sub BET} of NiO is tunable. NiO spheres show large discharge capacity and slow capacity-fading rate.

Zhang Meng, E-mail: meng_zhang@haut.edu.c [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou, Henan 450007 (China); Yan Guojin; Hou Yonggai; Wang Chunhua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou, Henan 450007 (China)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Novel carbonaceous materials for lithium secondary batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonaceous materials have been synthesized using pillared clays (PILCs) as templates. The PILC was loaded with organic materials such as pyrene in the liquid and vapor phase, styrene in the vapor phase, trioxane, ethylene and propylene. The samples were then pyrolyzed at 700 C in an inert atmosphere, followed by dissolution of the inorganic template by conventional demineralization methods. X-ray powder diffraction of the carbons showed broad d{sub 002} peaks in the diffraction pattern, indicative of a disordered or turbostratic system. N{sub 2} BET surface areas of the carbonaceous materials range from 10 to 100 m{sup 2}/g. There is some microporosity (r < 1 nm) in the highest surface area carbons. Most of the surface area, however, comes from a mixture of micro and mesopores with radii of 2--5 nm. Electrochemical studies were performed on these carbons. Button cells were fabricated with capacity- limiting carbon pellets electrodes as the cathode a/nd metallic lithium foil as the anode. Large reversible capacities (up to 850 mAh/g) were achieved for most of the samples. The irreversible capacity loss was less than 180 mAh/g after the first cycle, suggesting that these types of carbon materials are very stable to lithium insertion and de-insertion reactions.

Sandi, G.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.; Johnson, C.S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor  

SciTech Connect

During the 1980's, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an Aerocapacitor''; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m[sup 2]/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm[sup 3] and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1980`s, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an ``Aerocapacitor``; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m{sup 2}/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Optimal power management for a hydraulic hybrid delivery truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic hybrid propulsion and energy storage components demonstrate characteristics that are very different from their electric counterparts, thus requiring unique control strategies. This paper presents a methodology for developing a power management strategy tailored specifically to a parallel Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicle (HHV) configured for a medium-size delivery truck. The Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicle is modelled in the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment to facilitate system integration and control studies. A Dynamic Programming (DP) algorithm is used to obtain optimal control actions for gear shifting and power splitting bet ween the engine and the hydraulic motor over a representative urban driving schedule. Features of optimal trajectories are then studied to derive i mplementable rules. System behaviour demonstrates that the new control strategy takes advantage of high power density and efficiency characteristics of hydraulic components, and minimizes disadvantages of low energy density, to achieve enhanced overall efficiency. Simulation results indicate that the potential for fuel economy improvement of medium trucks with hydraulic hybrid propulsion can be as high as 48 %. 1

Bin Wu; Chan-chiao Lin; Zoran Filipi; Huei Peng

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

High temperature water adsorption on The Geysers rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to measure water retention by geothermal reservoir rocks at the actual reservoir temperature, the ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quality of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers geothermal reservoir was measured at 150{sup degree}C, 200{sup degree}C, and 250{sup degree}C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {<=}p/p{sub degree} {<=} 0.98, where p{sub degree} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A correlation is sought between water adsorption, the surface properties, and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Passive CO{sub 2} removal using a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve  

SciTech Connect

Manufacture and characterization of a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), and its efficacy as a CO{sub 2} gas adsorbent are reported. The CFCMS consists of an isotropic pitch derived carbon fiber and a phenolic resin derived carbon binder. Activation (selective gasification) of the CFCMS creates microporosity in the carbon fibers, yielding high micropore volumes (>0.5 cm{sup 3}/g) and BET surface areas (>1000 m{sup 2}/g). Moreover, the CFCMS material is a rigid, strong, monolith with an open structure that allows the free-flow of fluids through the material. This combination of properties provides an adsorbent material that has several distinct advantages over granular adsorbents in gas separation systems such as pressure swing adsorption (PSA) units. The results of our initial evaluations of the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and kinetics of CFCMS are reported. The room temperature CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of CFCMS is >120 mg of CO{sub 2} per g of CFCMS. A proposed project is described that targets the development, over a three-year period, of a demonstration separation system based on CFCMS for the removal of CO{sub 2} from a flue gas slip stream at a coal-fired power plant. The proposed program would be conducted jointly with industrial and utility partners.

Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

THE GALACTIC CENTER WEATHER FORECAST  

SciTech Connect

In accretion-based models for Sgr A*, the X-ray, infrared, and millimeter emission arise in a hot, geometrically thick accretion flow close to the black hole. The spectrum and size of the source depend on the black hole mass accretion rate M-dot . Since Gillessen et al. have recently discovered a cloud moving toward Sgr A* that will arrive in summer 2013, M-dot may increase from its present value M-dot{sub 0}. We therefore reconsider the 'best-bet' accretion model of Moscibrodzka et al., which is based on a general relativistic MHD flow model and fully relativistic radiative transfer, for a range of M-dot . We find that for modest increases in M-dot the characteristic ring of emission due to the photon orbit becomes brighter, more extended, and easier to detect by the planned Event Horizon Telescope submillimeter Very Long Baseline Interferometry experiment. If M-dot {approx}>8 M-dot{sub 0}, this 'silhouette' of the black hole will be hidden beneath the synchrotron photosphere at 230 GHz, and for M-dot {approx}>16 M-dot{sub 0} the silhouette is hidden at 345 GHz. We also find that for M-dot > 2 M-dot{sub 0} the near-horizon accretion flow becomes a persistent X-ray and mid-infrared source, and in the near-infrared Sgr A* will acquire a persistent component that is brighter than currently observed flares.

Moscibrodzka, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, 4505 South Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Shiokawa, H.; Gammie, C. F. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Dolence, J. C., E-mail: monikam@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Heterogeneous organic acid uptake on soot surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric particulates have been known to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore their presence can indirectly affect important processes such as global radiation balance through cloud formation. Soot particles are well known to be atmospheric constituents, but the hydrophobic nature of fresh soot likely prohibits them from encouraging cloud development. Soot aged through contact with oxygenated organic compounds may become hydrophilic enough to promote water uptake. In this study I have observed the interaction between a number of carboxylic acids and soot from different fuel sources and formation mechanisms. A low pressure fast flow reactor was used to control the contact between the solid phase soot and gas phase organics, while chemical ionization-mass spectrometry was utilized to monitor concentrations of gas phase organics. Most acids irreversibly deposited on the soot surfaces, and the uptake coefficient was measured in the wide range of 9.0 x 10-4 to 1.0 x 10-1. The Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface areas of the soots were measured and the soot bulk and surface chemical compositions were investigated with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy to help explain differences in uptake. By comparing the mono and dicarboxylic acids and the information gathered from soot physiochemical properties I have discussed possible uptake mechanisms.

Levitt, Nicholas Paul

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge  

SciTech Connect

Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

Israel Cabasso; Youxin Yuan

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Technical progress report, June 1993--August 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various preparation methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide and various alkali doping procedures were studied to determine if various preparation paramenters affected catalyst activity. Testing was performed on an undoped molybdenum disulfide sample with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.1 MPa and at temperatures of 245, 255, 265, 275, 280, 300, 320, and 295C, and only hydrocarbons were formed. A methanol injection experiment with undoped catalyst showed that homologation of methanol did not occur over the undoped MOS{sub 2}. Catalytic testing on a cesium formate doped molybdenum disulfide catalyst corresponding to 9 wt% Cs/MoS{sub 2} at 8.1 MPa and temperatures of 245, 255, 265, 275, 285, and 295C, mostly linear alcohols. The CS/MOS{sub 2} sample was protected from air exposure during preparation and testiag. As with the other recently tested alkali-promoted MOS{sub 2} catalysts, this cataylst was not as active as previous CS/MOS{sub 2} catalysts [1], and some deactivation during these systematic studies was observed. X-Ray powder diffraction and BET surface area measurements are being used to characterize the catalysts, and electron microscopy analyses are being carried out.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Carr, T.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Titanium Oxide Aerogel Prepared from Titanium Metal and HydrogenPeroxide  

SciTech Connect

The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with excess titanium metal produces rigid titanium oxide aquagels. Subsequent solvent exchanges with ethanol and carbon dioxide, and supercritical drying produces the corresponding aerogels. The aerogels are translucent yellow in appearance, are amorphous to X-rays, and have a BET surface area of 350 m{sup 2}/g. The empirical formula of the material, as prepared, is TiO{sub 3}H{sub 2.7}C{sub 0.35}. Infrared spectroscopy indicates the presence of peroxide and carbonate groups. the microstructure of the aerogel consists of a network of elongated particles 2-5 nm in diameter and tens of nm in length. Thermal treatment under argon at 473 K causes rapid decomposition of the aerogel, forming a blue-gray powder consisting of a mixture of rutile and anatase with a surface area of 80 m{sup 2}/g. Additional thermal treatment at 973 K under air forms predominantly rutile, with a surface area of 20 m{sup 2}/g.

Ayers, M.R.; Hunt, A.J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes  

SciTech Connect

An electrically regenerated electrosorption process known as carbon aerogel CDI was developed for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area and very low resistivity. After polarization, anions and cations are removed from electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. The solution is thus separated into two streams, brine and water. Based on this, carbon aerogel CDI appears to be an energy-efficient alternative to evaporation, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis. The energy required by this process is about QV/2, plus losses. Estimated energy requirement for sea water desalination is 18-27 Wh gal{sup -1}, depending on cell voltage and flow rate. The requirement for brackish water desalination is less, 1.2-2.5 Wh gal{sup -1} at 1600 ppM. This is assuming that stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration.

Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)  

SciTech Connect

Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration ('biochar'). Here we present a molecular-level assessment of the physical organization and chemical complexity of biomass-derived chars and, specifically, that of aromatic carbon in char structures. BET-N{sub 2} surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron-based Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy are used to show how two plant materials (wood and grass) undergo analogous, but quantitatively different physical-chemical transitions as charring temperature increases from 100 to 700 C. These changes suggest the existence of four distinct categories of char consisting of a unique mixture of chemical phases and physical states: (i) in transition chars the crystalline character of the precursor materials is preserved, (ii) in amorphous chars the heat-altered molecules and incipient aromatic polycondensates are randomly mixed, (iii) composite chars consist of poorly ordered graphene stacks embedded in amorphous phases, and (iv) turbostratic chars are dominated by disordered graphitic crystallites. The molecular variations among the different char categories translate into differences in their ability to persist in the environment and function as environmental sorbents.

Keiluweit, M.; Nico, P.S.; Johnson, M.G.; Kleber, M.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Survey Evidence on the Willingness of U.S. Consumers to Pay for Automotive Fuel Economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prospect theory, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002, holds that human beings faced with a risky bet will tend to value potential losses about twice as much as potential gains. Previous research has demonstrated that prospect theory could be sufficient to explain an energy paradox in the market for automotive fuel economy. This paper analyzes data from four random sample surveys of 1,000 U.S. households each in 2004, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Households were asked about willingness to pay for future fuel savings as well as the annual fuel savings necessary to justify a given upfront payment. Payback periods inferred from household responses are consistent over time and across different formulations of questions. Mean calculated payback periods are short, about 3 years, but there is substantial dispersion among individual responses. Calculated payback periods do not appear to be correlated with the attributes of respondents. Respondents were able to quantitatively describe their uncertainty about both vehicle fuel economy and future fuel prices. Simulation of loss averse behavior based on this stated uncertainty illustrate how loss aversion could lead consumers to substantially undervalue future fuel savings relative to their expected value.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Evans, David H [Sewanee, The University of the South; Hiestand, John [Indiana University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Chalcogels : porous metal-chalcogenide networks from main-group metal ions. Effect of surface polarizability on selectivity in gas separation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the synthesis of metal-chalcogenide gels and aerogels from anionic chalcogenide clusters and linking metal ions. Metal ions such as Sb{sup 3+} and Sn{sup 2+}, respectively chelated with tartrate and acetate ligands, react in solution with the chalcogenide clusters to form extended polymeric networks that exhibit gelation phenomena. Chalcogenide cluster anions with different charge densities, such as [Sn{sub 2}S{sub 6}]{sup 4-} and [SnS{sub 4}]{sup 4-}, were employed. In situ rheological measurements during gelation showed that a higher charge density on the chalcogenide cluster favors formation of a rigid gel network. Aerogels obtained from the gels after supercritical drying have BET surface areas from 114 to 368 m{sup 2}/g. Electron microscopy images coupled with nitrogen adsorption measurements showed the pores are micro (below 2 nm), meso (2-50 nm), and macro (above 50 nm) regions. These chalcogels possess band gaps in the range of 1.00-2.00 eV and selectively adsorb polarizable gases. A 2-fold increase in selectivity toward CO{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 6} over H{sub 2} was observed for the Pt/Sb/Ge{sub 4}Se{sub 10}-containing aerogel compared to aerogel containing Pt{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}. The experimental results suggest that high selectivity in gas adsorption is achievable with high-surface-area chalcogenide materials containing heavy polarizable elements.

Bag, S.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hitting the ground running  

SciTech Connect

Very few of us get to start clean: getting a new organization, new space, and hiring new people for a new information management program. In over 20 years in some aspect of this profession, the author has never faced that particular challenge. By far the majority of information management opportunities involve taking over from someone else. Sometimes, a predecessor has gone on to better things on his/her initiative; that is not always the case. Sometimes the group is one you were a part of yesterday. If the function functions, time moves on and changes may be needed to accommodate new technology, additional and/or changed tasks, and alterations in corporate missions. If the function does not, it is a good bet that you were hired or promoted as an agent of change. Each of these situations poses challenges. This presentation is about that first few months and first year in a new assignment. In other words, you have the job, now what?

KEENEN,MARTHA JANE; NUSBAUM,ANNA W.

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

411

BPM: THE nEXT STAGE FOR CPI 7 BPM – THE POWER OF PROCESS TO THE PEOPLE 9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the emergence of robust Web Services standards, expensive and customized point-to-point integration has become a thing of the past. Organizations are increasingly turning to Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) in order to gain business agility, interoperable, reusable and bet-ter management of policies across software. Some organizations are looking to SOA to standardize run-time policy management for compli-ance and corporate governance initiatives. This paper describes some of these architectural insights and key standards used in building out an SOA, including SOA design-time and run-time components. The design of Web Services applications is distinct from the design of an SOA. While Web Services development is iterative and organizations can enable their applications one at a time, in order to reach the broader benefits of SOA, organizations need to deliberately design their SOA from a whole company perspective. Ad hoc collections of services strung together as a set of point solutions go back to the same problems SOA was created to address—they create expensive, customized, IT-intensive point solutions with no hope of reuse and no coherent platform from which to build composite applications. The process of SOA design centered around business requirements is referred to here as intentional SOA or iSOA. By focusing on, documenting and measuring business value, organizations can ensure that they will reap the promised advantages of SOA of reuse, agility, and run-time governance.

Miko Matsumura; Software Ag; Like Six Sigma; White Paper Soa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Beam Energy Tracking System of the LHC Beam Dumping System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHC Beam Dumping System (LBDS) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, will be installed around the straight section 6. It comprises per ring 15 horizontally deflecting extraction kickers, followed by 1 quadrupole, 15 vertically deflecting steel septum magnets, 10 dilution kickers and, in a separate cavern several hundred meters away, an external absorber assembly. A beam dump request can occur at any moment during the operation of the collider, from injection at 450 GeV up to top energy at 7 TeV. The Beam Energy Tracking System (BETS) monitors the deflection strength of each active element of the LBDS with respect to the beam energy in order to guarantee the correct extraction trajectory over the complete operational range and under all operational conditions. Its main functions are the acquisition of the beam energy, the generation of the kick strength reference signals for the extraction and dilution kickers, the continuous checking that the kicker high voltage generat...

Barlow, R A; Carlier, E; Gräwer, G; Voumard, N; Gjelsvik, R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Preparation and evaluation of electrocatalysts for phosphoric-acid fuel cells. Final technical report, May 1, 1978-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this electrocatalysis program was to define the feasibility of lowering the electrocatalyst cost and to increase the electrocatalyst activity in phosphoric acid fuel cells to improve the commercial viability of fuel cells for producing electric power. Highly dispersed platinum was placed on carbon supports. These catalysts were characterized for both the platinum surface areas and crystallite sizes. For a given carbon impregnation technique with the noble metal salt, a definite correlation between the specific surface area of the derived platinum crystallites and the BET surface area of the carbon support was found. A high dispersion of platinum was achieved on a novel high surface area catalyst support - CONSEL. Using high resolution phase contrast electron microscopy, the crystal lattice of highly dispersed platinum on carbon was resolved and, with the lattice images of graphitic carbon black as an internal calibration, the lattice spacing for a small crystallite of platinum was measured within 2% of the value for bulk platinum. Twenty-one catalysts were formulated with variations in the type of carbon support, the platinum metal loading, and the platinum crystallite size. Characteristics and test results are described. (WHK)

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network in Yersinia pestis, strain 91001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, the aetiological agent of bubonic plague, is one the deadliest pathogens known to man. Despite its historical reputation, plague is a modern disease which annually afflicts thousands of people. Public safety considerations greatly limit clinical experimentation on this organism and thus development of theoretical tools to analyze the capabilities of this pathogen is of utmost importance. Here, we report the first genome-scale metabolic model of Yersinia pestis biovar Mediaevalis based both on its recently annotated genome, and physiological and biochemical data from literature. Our model demonstrates excellent agreement with Y. pestis known metabolic needs and capabilities. Since Y. pestis is a meiotrophic organism, we have developed CryptFind, a systematic approach to identify all candidate cryptic genes responsible for known and theoretical meiotrophic phenomena. In addition to uncovering every known cryptic gene for Y. pestis, our analysis of the rhamnose fermentation pathway suggests that betB is the responsible cryptic gene. Despite all of our medical advances, we still do not have a vaccine for bubonic plague. Recent discoveries of antibiotic resistant strains of Yersinia pestis coupled with the threat of plague being used as a bioterrorism weapon compel us to develop new tools for studying the physiology of this deadly pathogen. Using our theoretical model, we can study the cells phenotypic behavior under different circumstances and identify metabolic weaknesses which may be harnessed for the development of therapeutics. Additionally, the automatic identification of cryptic genes expands the usage of genomic data for pharmaceutical purposes.

Ali Navid; Eivind Almaas

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

415

HP’s Adaptive Enterprise Strategy and Utility Data Center Solution Management Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

That enterprise server utilization is low should come as no surprise. Enterprises upgraded their environments to address Y2K issues, and added more capacity in anticipation of endless growth. Supporting alternative approaches was seen as a way to hedge bets in a time of rapidly evolving enterprise technology. This added more equipment. Then the economy plummeted. Of course, these seemingly prudent excesses became an obvious source of waste in an era of constraint and outright shrinkage. Enterprises stopped buying, but unless they abandoned an application or closed a web site, they usually did not dispose of any of their IT assets early. Instead, most enterprises have turned their attention to getting more use out of existing hardware and software assets – to the point of sharing what was traditionally owned. So how do you convert the mansions of yesteryear into the efficiency of multi-tenancy? You architect a robust system of halls and doors, redesign rooms for multi-use and – oh yes – add more sound insulation. You do the same in IT environments. In the past few years, networks (halls) have become more pervasive, and switches (doors) have grown more intelligent (soundproof and secure). IT devices have become more reliable and self-healing. Partitioning and virtual machines have made server assets divisible. Encryption, precipitated security schemes, policy-based automation, and a myriad of point

Analyst Anne Macfarland

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Second amendment and extension to Annex IV enhanced oil recovery thermal processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the result of efforts under the several tasks of the Second Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Energy Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 12 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 11 and 14 through 24. The first and second reports on Annex IV, Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1 and Report IV-2 (DOE/BETS/SP-83/15 and DOE/BC-84/6/SP), contain the results from the first 14 tasks, with the exception of an INTEVEP Survey for Task II which is included here. Those reports are dated April 1983 and August 1984 and are both entitled, ''EOR Thermal Processes''. Selected papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Peterson, G.; Munoz, J.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Highly selective inorganic crystalline ion-exchange material for Sr{sup 2+} in acidic solutions  

SciTech Connect

We report a novel antimony titanate ion exchange material, stable in highly acidic conditions and selective to strontium against competing cations, with possible applications at Defense Waste Sites. Its development was based on good selectivity for Cs and Sr by the CSTs and literature information on the ion exchange properties of antimony compounds. This new material has been tested for the selective removal of parts per million level concentrations of Sr{sup 2+} ions from solutions with a pH in the range of 1 M HNO{sub 3} tO 5.7 M Na{sup +}/0.6 M OH{sup -} (with the most important results in the highly acidic regimes). This doped titanate has been characterized with an array of techniques, including equilibrium distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) determinations over a wide pH range, power X-ray diffraction, TEM, BET, direct-current plasma (DCP), and thermal analyses. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Nenoff, T.M.; Miller, J.E.; Thoma, S.G.; Trudell, D.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Quaternary ammonium borohydride adsorption in mesoporous silicate MCM-48  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic borohydrides have a high gravimetric hydrogen density but release H2 only under energetically unfavorable conditions. Surface chemistry may help in lowering thermodynamic barriers, but inclusion of inorganic borohydrides in porous silica materials has proved hitherto difficult or impossible. We show that borohydrides with a large organic cation are readily adsorbed inside mesoporous silicates, particularly after surface treatment. Thermal analysis reveals that the decomposition thermodynamics of tetraalkylammonium borohydrides are substantially affected by inclusion in MCM-48. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data show that the compounds adsorb on the silica surface. Evidence of pore loading is supplemented by DSC/TGA, XRD, FTIR, and BET isotherm measurements. Mass spectrometry shows significant hydrogen release at lower temperature from adsorbed borohydrides in comparison with the bulk borohydrides. INS data measured for partially decomposed samples indicates that the decomposition of the cation and anion is likely simultaneous. Additionally, these data confirm the formation of Si-H bonds on the silica surface upon decomposition of adsorbed tetramethylammonium borohydride.

Wolverton, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daemen, Luke L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartl, Monika A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Intensified Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Process with Microchannel Catalytic Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A microchannel catalytic reactor with improved heat and mass transport has been used for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to produce fuels and chemicals. This type of novel reactor takes advantages of highly active and selective catalysts with increased site density so that the FT synthesis process can be intensified. It was demonstrated that this microchannel reactor based process can be carried out at gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) as high as 60,000 hr-1 to achieve greater than 60% of one-pass CO conversion while maintaining low methane selectivity (<10%) and high chain growth probability(>0.9). Such superior FT synthesis performance has not ever been reported in the prior open literatures. The overall productivity to heavy hydrocarbons has been significantly improved over the conventional reactor technology. In this study, performance data were obtained in a wide range of pressure (10atm-35atm) and hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio (1-2.5). The catalytic system was characterized by BET, scanning electron microcopy (SEM), transmission electron microcopy(TEM), and H2 chemisorption. A three dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model were used to simulate temperature profiles in the exothermic reaction system in order to optimize the reactor design and intensify the synthesis process. Intraparticle non-isothermal characteristics are also analyzed for the FT synthesis catalyst.

Cao, Chunshe; Hu, Jianli; Li, Shari; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Wang, Yong

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

420

Studies on KIT-6 Supported Cobalt Catalyst for Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KIT-6 molecular sieve was used as a support to prepare cobalt catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) using an incipient wetness impregnation method to produce cobalt loadings of 15 and 25 wt%. The catalysts were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission election microscopy (STEM), extended X-ray absorption fine spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy. The catalytic properties for FTS were evaluated using a 1L CSTR reactor. XRD, pore size distribution, and STEM analysis indicate that the KIT-6 mesostructure remains stable during and after cobalt impregnation and tends to form smaller cobalt particles, probably located inside the mesopores. The mesoporous KIT-6 exhibited a slightly higher cobalt dispersion compared to amorphous SiO{sub 2} supported catalyst. With the higher Co loading (25 wt%) on KIT-6, partial structural collapse was observed after the FTS reaction. Compared to an amorphous SiO{sub 2} supported cobalt catalyst, KIT-6 supported cobalt catalyst displayed higher methane selectivity at a similar Co loading, likely due to diffusion effects.

Gnanamani, M.; Jacobs, G; Graham, U; Ma, W; Pendyala, V; Ribeiro, M; Davis, B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ly bet hel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported Co catalysts with desired activity, selectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Accomplishments for this quarter are: Four new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3 and five more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat; The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued; Seven new catalysts have been tested for their F-T synthesis performance; An investigation of the effect of pre-treatment (i.e. calcination in static air versus flowing air, direct reduction without prior calcination) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Novel Synthesis and Structural Analysis of Ferrihydrite  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring ferrihydrite is both impure and difficult to isolate, so the numerous applications and interesting properties of ferrihydrite have spurred the development of various synthetic techniques. Nearly all techniques are based on the hydrolysis of an iron salt and require careful control of temperature, pH, and concentration. In this Article, we report a new synthetic method which does not require such control and is perhaps the fastest and simplest route to synthesizing ferrhydrite. XRD, TEM, BET, and chemical purity characterizations show that the chemically pure, 2-line ferrihydrite product consists of crystallites 2-6 nm in diameter which aggregate to form mesoporous, high surface area agglomerates that are attractive candidates for the many adsorption applications of ferrihydrite. X-ray PDF data were also collected for the ferrihydrite product and refined against the hexagonal structural model recently proposed by Michel et al. These analyses suggest that ferrihydrite has a consistent, repeatable structure independent of variation in the synthetic method, water content of the sample, or particle size of the crystallites, and this structure can be adequately described by the proposed hexagonal model.

Smith, Stacey J.; Page, Katharine; Kim, Hyunjeong; Campbell, Branton J.; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Woodfield, Brian F. (BYU); (LANL)

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

423

Kinetics of silica deposition from simulated geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supersaturated brines were passed through columns packed with several forms of silica (crystalline ..cap alpha.. quartz, polycrystalline ..cap alpha.. quartz, and porous Vycor). Also, silica deposition on ThO/sub 2/ microspheres and titanium powder was studied under controlled conditions of supersaturation, pH, temperature, and salinity. The residence time was varied by adjustments of flow rate and column length. The silica contents of the input and effluent solutions were determined colorimetrically by a molybdate method which does not include polymers without special pretreatment. Essentially identical deposition behavior was observed once the substrate was thoroughly coated with amorphous silica and the BET surface area of the coated particles was taken into account. The reaction rate is not diffusion limited in the columns. The silica deposition is a function of the monomeric Si(OH)/sub 4/ concentration in the brine. The deposition on all surfaces examined was spontaneously nucleated. The dependence on the supersaturation concentration, hydroxide ion concentration, surface area, temperature and salinity were examined. Fluoride was shown to have no effect at pH 5.94 and low salinity. The empirical rate law which describes the data in 1 m NaCl in the pH range 5-7 and temperatures from 60 to 120/sup 0/C is given.

Bohlmann, E.G.; Mesmer, R.E.; Berlinski, P.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is essential to the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization. These same properties are also needed to refine existing devolatilization sub-models utilized in large-scale modeling of coal combustion systems. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. The coal ranks to be investigated will include a high volatile A bituminous (PSOC 1451 D) and a low volatile bituminous (PSOC 1516D). An anthracite (PSOC 1468) will be used as a non-volatile coal reference. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Our River  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

426

gxxx005-conlaw.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Page 1 TESTS OF DISCRETE SPACE-TIME SYMMETRIES TESTS OF DISCRETE SPACE-TIME SYMMETRIES TESTS OF DISCRETE SPACE-TIME SYMMETRIES TESTS OF DISCRETE SPACE-TIME SYMMETRIES CHARGE CONJUGATION (C ) INVARIANCE CHARGE CONJUGATION (C ) INVARIANCE CHARGE CONJUGATION (C ) INVARIANCE CHARGE CONJUGATION (C ) INVARIANCE CONLAW=C PAR=S009;DESIG=4 Γ(π 0 → 3γ)/Γ total <3.1 × 10 -8 , CL = 90% η C-nonconserving decay parameters NODE=S014230 NODE=S014A1 π + π - π 0 left-right asymmetry (0.09 + 0.11 - 0.12 ) × 10 -2 NODE=S014AS π + π - π 0 sextant asymmetry (0.12 + 0.10 - 0.11 ) × 10 -2 NODE=S014AQ π + π - π 0 quadrant asymmetry (- 0.09 ± 0.09) × 10 -2 NODE=S014A2 π + π - γ left-right asymmetry (0.9 ± 0.4) × 10 -2 NODE=S014BET π + π - γ parameter β (D-wave) - 0.02 ± 0.07 (S = 1.3) PAR=S014;DESIG=104 Γ(η → π 0 γ)/Γ total <9 × 10 -5 , CL = 90% PAR=S014;DESIG=103 Γ(η → 2π 0 γ)/Γ

427

LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR USE IN FUEL BUNDLE HANDLING  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR USE IN FUEL BUNDLE HANDLING TOPICAL REPORT W. 8. Weihermilfer C. S. Allison Septem bet 1979 Work Performed, Under Contract EY-76-C- M - 1 8 3 0 Form 189 Number 210.1 BAlTELLE PACIFIC NORTHWEST LABORATORY RICHLAND, WA 99352 BASE TECHNOLOGY N O T I C E T h i s report was prepard n an account of work sponrored by the UAed States Govcmmenr. Neither tht Unltcd S t a t e nor !he k p n m c n t of Energy, not any of their ernploylecs, nw any of theb ccmtnctotr, hontncton. or their employper. maka any warranty. expms or Implied, or m u m any legal liability or rcrponrlbllity for the accuracy, c o m p l c r e ~ s or ulefulnm of m y information. -ratus, prodm or p r e di~1Oltd. or represents that Its u w ? would not infringe privateiy o w d rights. The views, opinions and ccnclusionr contained in this report a

428

BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RU RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE MAYFIELD VANDERGRIF T GIRT Y SAY NEW SALEM WET MOR E COWANSHAN NOC K ST ILLWAT ER ELD ERS RIDGE BLAIR CARROLLT OWN BU RNIN G WELL COOKPORT MCCREA FU RNACE RIDGWAY NEW ALEXANDR IA IRISH RU N WILC OX PLU M CREEK PADDYTOWN KEATING HOR TON GUF FEY WH ITESBURG BET ULA SMELTZ ER ODONN ELL DECAT UR W HAZELHU RST ST RONGSTOWN COL EGROVE SH EFFIELD WERT Z H OLLOW RED HILL ULYSSES PLATT SVIL LE BR ANCH W LATR OBE LEID Y TRIU

429

Insects and flies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insects and flies Insects and flies Name: Carol L Giles Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would the world be like without insects? How long can a fly hibernate being that its life span is very short? Name the insect that has the longest life span. Replies: If all insects were to suddenly die, then the insect-eating small animals (e.g. chickens, bats, birds, frogs) would die, as would most flowering plants (apple trees, corn, potatoes), from a lack of insects to carry the pollen from male to female plant. Higher animals that ate the flowering plants or insect-eating animals would then die. Given these facts, and starting from the fact that insects themselves constitute the majority of the life on the planet, it's a safe bet that the sudden death of all insects would mean the death of most or perhaps nearly all the life on Earth. If on the other hand the insects died off slowly, or had never been, probably some other small life form of very similar habits would evolve to fill the niche.

430

Overexpression of SnoN/SkiL, amplified at the 3q26.2 locus, in ovarian cancers: A role in ovarian pathogenesis  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of 235 serous epithelial ovarian cancers demonstrated a regional increase at 3q26.2 encompassing SnoN/SkiL, a coregulator of SMAD/TGF{beta} signaling. SnoN RNA transcripts were elevated in {approx}80% of advanced stage serous epithelial ovarian cancers. In both immortalized normal (TIOSE) and ovarian carcinoma cell lines (OVCA), SnoN RNA levels were increased by TGF{beta} stimulation and altered by LY294002 and JNK II inhibitor treatment suggesting that the PI3K and JNK signaling pathways may regulate TGF{beta}-induced increases in SnoN RNA. In TIOSE, SnoN protein levels were reduced 15min post TGF{beta}-stimulation, likely by proteosome-mediated degradation. In contrast, in OVCA, SnoN levels were elevated 3h post-stimulation potentially as a result of inhibition of the proteosome. To elucidate the role of SnoN in ovarian tumorigenesis, we explored the effects of both increasing and decreasing SnoN levels. In both TIOSE and OVCA, SnoN siRNA decreased cell growth between 20 and 50% concurrent with increased p21 levels. In TIOSE, transient expression of SnoN repressed TGF{beta} induction of PAI-1 promoters with little effect on the p21 promoter or resultant cell growth. In contrast to the effects of transient expression, stable expression of SnoN in TIOSE led to growth arrest through induction of senescence. Collectively, these results implicate SnoN levels in multiple roles during ovarian carcinogenesis: promoting cellular proliferation in ovarian cancer cells and as a positive mediator of cell cycle arrest and senescence in non-transformed ovarian epithelial cells.

Nanjundan, Meera; Cheng, Kwai Wa; Zhang, Fan; Lahad, John; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Smith-McCune, Karen; Fishman, David; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

The UVES Large Program for Testing Fundamental Physics II: Constraints on a Change in ? Towards Quasar HE 0027-1836  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an accurate analysis of the H2 absorption lines from the zabs ~ 2.4018 damped Ly{\\alpha} system towards HE 0027-1836 observed with the Very Large Telescope Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (VLT/UVES) as a part of the European Southern Observatory Large Programme "The UVES large programme for testing fundamental physics" to constrain the variation of proton-to-electron mass ratio, {\\mu} = mp/me. We perform cross-correlation analysis between 19 individual exposures taken over three years and the combined spectrum to check the wavelength calibration stability. We notice the presence of a possible wavelength dependent velocity drift especially in the data taken in 2012. We use available asteroids spectra taken with UVES close to our observations to confirm and quantify this effect. We consider single and two component Voigt profiles to model the observed H2 absorption profiles. We use both linear regression analysis and Voigt profile fitting where {\\Delta}{\\mu}/{\\mu} is explicitly considered as an additional fitting parameter. The two component model is marginally favored by the statistical indicators and we get {\\Delta}{\\mu}/{\\mu} = (-2.5 +/- 8.1(stat) +/- 6.2(sys)) ppm. When we apply the correction to the wavelength dependent velocity drift we find {\\Delta}{\\mu}/{\\mu} = (-7.6 +/- 8.1(stat) +/- 6.3(sys)) ppm. It will be important to check the extent to which the velocity drift we notice in this study is present in UVES data used for previous {\\Delta}{\\mu}/{\\mu} measurements.

H. Rahmani; M. Wendt; R. Srianand; P. Noterdaeme; P. Petitjean; P. Molaro; J. B. Whitmore; M. T. Murphy; M. Centurion; H. Fathivavsari; S. D'Odorico; T. M. Evans; S. A. Levshakov; S. Lopez; C. J. A. P. Martins; D. Reimers; G. Vladilo

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

AN EXPONENTIAL DECLINE AT THE BRIGHT END OF THE z = 6 GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a search for the most luminous star-forming galaxies at redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 6 based on Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey data. We identify a sample of 40 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) brighter than magnitude z' = 25.3 across an area of almost 4 deg{sup 2}. Sensitive spectroscopic observations of seven galaxies provide redshifts for four, of which only two have moderate to strong Ly{alpha} emission lines. All four have clear continuum breaks in their spectra. Approximately half of the LBGs are spatially resolved in 0.7 arcsec seeing images, indicating larger sizes than lower luminosity galaxies discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope, possibly due to ongoing mergers. The stacked optical and infrared photometry is consistent with a galaxy model with stellar mass {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. There is strong evidence for substantial dust reddening with a best-fit A{sub V} = 0.75 and A{sub V} > 0.48 at 2{sigma} confidence, in contrast to the typical dust-free galaxies of lower luminosity at this epoch. The spatial extent and spectral energy distribution suggest that the most luminous z Almost-Equal-To 6 galaxies are undergoing merger-induced starbursts. The luminosity function of z = 5.9 star-forming galaxies is derived. This agrees well with previous work and shows strong evidence for an exponential decline at the bright end, indicating that the feedback processes that govern the shape of the bright end are occurring effectively at this epoch.

Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Rd, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); McLure, Ross J.; Bruce, Victoria A. [SUPA Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Hibon, Pascale [Gemini Observatory, Gemini South, AURA/Chile, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Bielby, Richard [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); McCracken, Henry J. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Kneib, Jean-Paul; Ilbert, Olivier [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Universite Aix-Marseille, 38 Rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Bonfield, David G.; Jarvis, Matt J., E-mail: chris.willott@nrc.ca [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Linear Theory Power Spectrum from the Lyman-alpha Forest in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the SDSS Ly-alpha forest P_F(k,z) measurement to determine the linear theory power spectrum. Our analysis is based on fully hydrodynamic simulations, extended using hydro-PM simulations. We account for the effect of absorbers with damping wings, which leads to an increase in the slope of the linear power spectrum. We break the degeneracy between the mean level of absorption and the linear power spectrum without significant use of external constraints. We infer linear theory power spectrum amplitude Delta^2_L(k_p=0.009s/km,z_p=3.0)=0.452_{-0.057-0.116}^{+0.069+0.141} and slope n_eff=-2.321_{-0.047-0.102}^{+0.055+0.131} (possible systematic errors are included through nuisance parameters in the fit - a factor >~5 smaller errors would be obtained on both parameters if we ignored modeling uncertainties). The errors are correlated and not perfectly Gaussian, so we provide a chi^2 table to accurately describe the results. The result corresponds to sigma_8=0.85, n=0.94, for a LCDM model with Omega_m=0.3, Omega_b=0.04, and h=0.7, but is most useful in a combined fit with the CMB. The inferred curvature of the linear power spectrum and the evolution of its amplitude and slope with redshift are consistent with expectations for LCDM models, with the evolution of the slope, in particular, being tightly constrained. We use this information to constrain systematic contamination, e.g., fluctuations in the UV background. This paper should serve as a starting point for more work to refine the analysis, including technical improvements such as increasing the size and number of the hydrodynamic simulations, and improvements in the treatment of the various forms of feedback from galaxies and quasars.

P. McDonald; U. Seljak; R. Cen; D. Shih; D. H. Weinberg; S. Burles; D. P. Schneider; D. J. Schlegel; N. A. Bahcall; J. W. Briggs; J. Brinkmann; M. Fukugita; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; D. E. Vanden Berk

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

High-Energy Processes in Young Stars: Chandra X-ray Spectroscopy of HDE 283572, RY Tau, and LkCa 21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weak-lined T Tauri stars (WTTS) represent the important stage of stellar evolution between the accretion phase and the zero-age main sequence. At this stage, the star decouples from its accretion disk, and spins up to a higher rotation rate than in the preceding classical T Tauri phase. Consequently, dynamo processes can be expected to become even stronger at this stage. High energy processes can have effects on the remaining circumstellar material, possibly including protoplanets and planetesimals, and these effects may account for certain observable properties of asteroids in the current solar system. Chandra observed for 100 ks the WTTS HDE 283572 which probes the PMS stage of massive A-type stars. We present first results of the analysis of its high-resolution X-ray spectrum obtained with the High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. A wide range of Fe lines of high ionization states are observed, indicating a continuous emission measure distribution. No significant signal is detected longward of the O \\textsc{viii} Ly$\\alpha$ line because of the high photoelectric absorption. We also report on the preliminary analysis of the zeroth order spectra of RY Tau and LkCa21. In particular, we show evidence of an emission line in RY Tau at 6.4 keV that we identify as fluorescent emission by neutral Fe caused by a strong X-ray flare which illuminated some structure in (or surrounding) the CTTS. A comparison of X-ray spectra of classical T Tau stars, other WTTS, and young main-sequence stars is made.

Marc Audard; Stephen L. Skinner; Kester W. Smith; Manuel Guedel; Roberto Pallavicini

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

THE MULTI-OBJECT, FIBER-FED SPECTROGRAPHS FOR THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY AND THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5 m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Ly{alpha} absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 deg{sup 2} of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near-ultraviolet to the near-infrared, with a resolving power R = {lambda}/FWHM {approx} 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 nm < {lambda} < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.

Smee, Stephen A.; Barkhouser, Robert H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gunn, James E.; Carr, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert H.; Loomis, Craig [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Uomoto, Alan [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Roe, Natalie; Schlegel, David [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rockosi, Constance M. [UC Observatories and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 375 Interdisciplinary Sciences Building (ISB) Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Leger, French; Owen, Russell; Anderson, Lauren [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 09195 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S.; Olmstead, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Brinkmann, Jon; Long, Dan [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Annis, James, E-mail: smee@pha.jhu.edu [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); and others

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

SDSS-III: MASSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEYS OF THE DISTANT UNIVERSE, THE MILKY WAY, AND EXTRA-SOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS Data Release 8 (DR8), which was made public in 2011 January and includes SDSS-I and SDSS-II images and spectra reprocessed with the latest pipelines and calibrations produced for the SDSS-III investigations. This paper presents an overview of the four surveys that comprise SDSS-III. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation feature of large-scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {>=} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {mu}m data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of 2011 January, SDSS-III has obtained spectra of more than 240,000 galaxies, 29,000 z {>=} 2.2 quasars, and 140,000 stars, including 74,000 velocity measurements of 2580 stars for MARVELS.

Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Agol, Eric; Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aihara, Hiroaki [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Arns, James A. [Kaiser Optical Systems, Ann Arbor, MI 48103 (United States); Aubourg, Eric [Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris-Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Balbinot, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS 91501-970 (Brazil); Barkhouser, Robert [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bickerton, Steven J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bochanski, John J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bolton, Adam S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

IN-SITU PROBING OF RADIATION-INDUCED PROCESSING OF ORGANICS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ICE ANALOGS-NOVEL LASER DESORPTION LASER IONIZATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the evolution of organic molecules in ice grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) under cosmic rays, stellar radiation, and local electrons and ions is critical to our understanding of the connection between ISM and solar systems. Our study is aimed at reaching this goal of looking directly into radiation-induced processing in these ice grains. We developed a two-color laser-desorption laser-ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopic method (2C-MALDI-TOF), similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results presented here with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) probe molecules embedded in water-ice at 5 K show for the first time that hydrogenation and oxygenation are the primary chemical reactions that occur in astrophysical ice analogs when subjected to Ly{alpha} radiation. We found that hydrogenation can occur over several unsaturated bonds and the product distribution corresponds to their stabilities. Multiple hydrogenation efficiency is found to be higher at higher temperatures (100 K) compared to 5 K-close to the interstellar ice temperatures. Hydroxylation is shown to have similar efficiencies at 5 K or 100 K, indicating that addition of O atoms or OH radicals to pre-ionized PAHs is a barrierless process. These studies-the first glimpses into interstellar ice chemistry through analog studies-show that once accreted onto ice grains PAHs lose their PAH spectroscopic signatures through radiation chemistry, which could be one of the reason for the lack of PAH detection in interstellar ice grains, particularly the outer regions of cold, dense clouds or the upper molecular layers of protoplanetary disks.

Gudipati, Murthy S.; Yang Rui, E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: ryang73@ustc.edu [University of Maryland (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The He II Fowler lines and the O III and N III Bowen fluorescence lines in the symbiotic nova RR Tel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new measure of reddening (E$_{(B-V)}$$\\sim$0.00) has been obtained from the comparison between the observed and the theoretical intensity decrement for 20 emission lines of the $\\ion{He}{ii}$ Fowler (n$\\to$3) series. This value has been confirmed by the STIS and IUE continuum distribution, and by the value of n$_H$ from the damped profile of the IS H Ly-$\\alpha$ line. We have obtained very accurate measurements for about thirty Bowen lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and a precise determination of the efficiency in the O1 and O3 excitation channels (18 % and 0.7 %, respectively). The relative $\\ion{O}{iii}$ intensities are in good agreement with the predictions by Froese Fischer (1994). A detailed study of the decays from all levels involved in the Bowen mechanism has lead to the detection of two new $\\ion{O}{iii}$ Bowen lines near $\\lambda$ 2190. High resolution IUE data have shown a nearly linear decline with time, from 1978 to 1995, in the efficiency of the O1 and O3 processes, with a steeper slope for the O3 channel. A detailed study of the $\\ion{N}{iii}$ $\\lambda$ 4640 lines and of their excitation mechanism has shown that, recombination and continuum fluorescence being ruled out, line fluorescence remains the only viable mechanism to pump the 3d $^2D_{5/2}$ and 3d $^2D_{3/2}$ levels of $\\ion{N}{iii}$. We point out the important role of multiple scattering in the resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and $\\ion{N}{iii}$ near $\\lambda$ 374 and show that the observed $\\ion{N}{iii}$ line ratios and intensities can be explained in terms of line fluorescence by the three resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ at $\\lambda$$\\lambda$ 374.432, 374.162 and 374.073 under optically thick conditions.

P. Selvelli; J. Danziger; P. Bonifacio

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

The He ii Fowler lines and the O iii and N iii Bowen fluorescence lines in the symbiotic nova RR Tel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Received.....; accepted Aims. A detailed study of the Oiii and Niii Bowen lines in the spectrum of RR Tel Methods. Absolute intensities for the Heii, Oiii, and Niii emission lines have been obtained from STIS, UVES, FEROS and IUE data, after re-calibration of UVES and FEROS on the STIS scale. Results. A new measure of reddening (E(B?V)?0.00) has been obtained from the comparison between the observed and the theoretical intensity decrement for 20 emission lines of the Heii Fowler (n?3) series. This value has been confirmed by the STIS and IUE continuum distribution, and by the value of nH from the damped profile of the IS H Ly-? line. We have obtained very accurate measurements for about thirty Bowen lines of Oiii and a precise determination of the efficiency in the O1 and O3 excitation channels (18 % and 0.7 %, respectively). The relative Oiii intensities are in good agreement with the predictions by Froese Fischer (1994). A detailed study of the decays from all levels involved in the Bowen mechanism has lead to the detection of two new Oiii Bowen lines near?2190. High resolution IUE data have shown a nearly linear decline with time, from 1978 to 1995, in the efficiency of the O1 and O3 processes, with a steeper slope for the O3 channel. A detailed study of the Niii? 4640 lines and of their excitation mechanism has shown that, recombination and continuum fluorescence being ruled out, line fluorescence remains the only viable mechanism to pump the 3d 2 D5/2 and 3d 2 D3/2 levels of Niii. We point out the important role of multiple scattering in the resonance lines of Oiii

P. Selvelli; J. Danziger; P. Bonifacio; Cifist Marie; Curie Excellence Team

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

NEW COOLING SEQUENCES FOR OLD WHITE DWARFS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present full evolutionary calculations appropriate for the study of hydrogen-rich DA white dwarfs. This is done by evolving white dwarf progenitors from the zero-age main sequence, through the core hydrogen-burning phase, the helium-burning phase, and the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch phase to the white dwarf stage. Complete evolutionary sequences are computed for a wide range of stellar masses and for two different metallicities, Z = 0.01, which is representative of the solar neighborhood, and Z = 0.001, which is appropriate for the study of old stellar systems, like globular clusters. During the white dwarf cooling stage, we self-consistently compute the phase in which nuclear reactions are still important, the diffusive evolution of the elements in the outer layers and, finally, we also take into account all the relevant energy sources in the deep interior of the white dwarf, such as the release of latent heat and the release of gravitational energy due to carbon-oxygen phase separation upon crystallization. We also provide colors and magnitudes for these sequences, based on a new set of improved non-gray white dwarf model atmospheres, which include the most up-to-date physical inputs like the Ly{alpha} quasi-molecular opacity. The calculations are extended down to an effective temperature of 2500 K. Our calculations provide a homogeneous set of evolutionary cooling tracks appropriate for mass and age determinations of old DA white dwarfs and for white dwarf cosmochronology of the different Galactic populations.

Renedo, I.; Althaus, L. G.; GarcIa-Berro, E. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades 5, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Romero, A. D.; Corsico, A. H. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Rohrmann, R. D., E-mail: garcia@fa.upc.ed [Observatorio Astronomico, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Laprida 854, (5000) Cordoba (Argentina)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Probing Unification With Chandra HETGS and XMM-Newton EPIC And RGS Spectroscopy of the Narrow Emission Line Galaxy NGC 2110  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from Chandra HETGS (250 ks over two epochs) and XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS (60 ks) observations of NGC 2110, which has been historically classified as a Narrow Emission Line Galaxy galaxy. Our results support the interpretation that the source is a Seyfert 2 viewed through a patchy absorber. The nuclear X-ray spectrum of the source is best described by a power law of photon index $\\Gamma$ ~1.7, modified by absorption from multiple layers of neutral material at a large distance from the central supermassive black hole. We report the strong detections of Fe K$\\alpha$ and Si K$\\alpha$ lines, which are marginally resolved with the Chandra HETGS, and we constrain the emission radius of the fluorescing material to >1 pc. There is some evidence for modest additional broadening at the base of the narrow Fe K$\\alpha$ core with a velocity ~4500 km s$^{-1}$. We find tentative evidence for ionized emission (O VIII Ly $\\alpha$, an O VIII RRC feature, and possibly a Ne IX forbidden line) in the Chandra MEG and XMM-Newton RGS spectra, which could be associated with the known extended X-ray emission that lies ~160 pc from the nucleus. We suggest that the $10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ partially covering absorber originates in broad-line region clouds in the vicinity of the AGN, and that the $3\\times10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ coverer is likely to have a more distant origin and have a flattened geometry in order to allow the small-scale radio jet to escape.

Daniel A. Evans; Julia C. Lee; T. Jane Turner; Kimberly A. Weaver; Herman L. Marshall

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production and cooling energy savings from installation of a production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Title Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 56 Pagination 210 - 220 ISSN 0378-7788 Keywords Advanced Technology Demonstration, building design, Building heat transfer, cool roof, energy efficiency, Energy Performance of Buildings, energy savings, Energy Usage, energy use, Heat Island Abstract Reflective roofs can reduce demand for air conditioning and warming of the atmosphere. Roofs can also host photovoltaic (PV) modules that convert sunlight to electricity. In this study we assess the effects of installing a building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roof on an office building in Yuma, AZ. The system consists of thin film PV laminated to a white membrane, which lies above a layer of insulation. The solar absorptance of the roof decreased to 0.38 from 0.75 after installation of the BIPV, lowering summertime daily mean roof upper surface temperatures by about 5 °C. Summertime daily heat influx through the roof deck fell to ±0.1 kWh/m2from 0.3-1.0 kWh/m2. However, summertime daily heat flux from the ventilated attic into the conditioned space was minimally affected by the BIPV, suggesting that the roof was decoupled from the conditioned space. Daily PV energy production was about 25% of building electrical energy use in the summer. For this building the primary benefit of the BIPV appeared to be its capacity to generate electricity and not its ability to reduce heat flows into the building. Building energy simulations were used to estimate the cooling energy savings and heating energy penalties for more typical buildings.

443

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Manhattan Project: Y-12: Design, 1942-1943  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ernest Lawrence slumps in his chair from fatigue in front of a cyclotron control panel while conducting calutron-related experiments, Berkeley, 1943. Y-12: DESIGN Ernest Lawrence slumps in his chair from fatigue in front of a cyclotron control panel while conducting calutron-related experiments, Berkeley, 1943. Y-12: DESIGN (Oak Ridge: Clinton, 1942-1943) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 Although the Lewis Report had placed gaseous diffusion ahead of the electromagnetic approach, many were still betting in early 1943 that Ernest Lawrence (right) and his "calutron" would eventually predominate. Lawrence and his laboratory of mechanics at the University of California, Berkeley, continued to experiment with the giant 184-inch cyclotron magnet, trying to reach a consensus on which shims, sources, and Electromagnetic method for the enrichment of uranium collectors to incorporate into the Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant that was to be built at Oak Ridge. Research on magnet size and placement and beam resolution led Lawrence and his group in fall 1942 to propose an arrangement of huge electromagnetic coils connected by a bus bar in an oval racetrack configuration, as seen from above. Forty-eight gaps in the racetrack between the coils would each contain two vacuum tanks. With two racetracks per building, ten buildings would be necessary to provide the estimated 2,000 sources and collectors needed to separate 100 grams of uranium-235 daily. The Berkeley researchers hoped that improvements in calutron design, or placing multiple sources and collectors in each tank, might increase efficiency and reduce the number of tanks and buildings required, but experimental results were inconclusive even as Stone & Webster of Boston, the Y-12 contractor at Oak Ridge, prepared to break ground.

445

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Title Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Liu Journal Journal of the Electrochemical Society Volume 160 Start Page A849 Issue 6 Pagination A849 - A855 Date Published 01/2013 ISSN 0013-4651 Abstract Pure tin (Sn) nanoparticles can be cycled in stable and high gravimetric capacity (>500 mAh/g) with a polyfluorene-type conductive polymer binder in composite electrodes. Crystalline Sn nanoparticles (<150 nanometers, nm) were used as anode materials in this study. The average diameter of Sn secondary particles is 270 nm, calculated based on BET surface area. The composite electrodes contain a conductive polymer binder that constitutes 2% to 10% of the material, without any conductive additives (e.g., acetylene black). The electrode containing the 5% conductive binder showed the best cycling performance, with a reversible capacity of 510 mAh/g. Crystallinity of Sn particles gradually degrades during cycling, and pulverization of particles was observed after long-term cycling, leading to the capacity fade. The conductive polymer binder shows advantages over other conventional binders, such as Poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) binders, because it can provide electrical conductivity and strong adhesion during Sn volume change.

446

Homemade Fly Killer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homemade Fly Killer Homemade Fly Killer Name: Pam Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is a great homemade recipe for killing flies in the yard and house without endangering birds, dogs and cats? (we have many (flies, dogs, cats and birds, that is!!!!) Replies: Your best bet is one of the variants of traps. For example, the hanging strips of fly paper seem to stick a good number of flies. I have yet to see a bird dumb enough to run into and get stuck on one. Some of the funnel like traps (I've seen some for beetles, and yellow jackets) would likely work too if you stuck something attractive to flies inside. What you would do with captured flies, I'm not sure, but you definitely wouldn't want to leave it too long, if you put some real piece of food exposed inside as bait they would lay eggs on it, which would hatch as maggots, etc. There are ways to have the bait protected from any eggs (in a compartment screened off, for example). Then you could dunk the trap in water and leave it until they all died, or under an inverted bucket in a puddle of water with a lit candle, which would consume all the air and eventually choke them. You could just let them starve or dehydrate by leaving them in the trap, although that would take a while. The kids you teach maybe could think of other ways to kill them off without using toxic chemicals. Most of them would either be something mechanical (release into the blades of a high speed fan would be a little messy, but effective), or denial of the basics of life (air, water, food).

447

Facile synthesis of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure and energy storage ability studies  

SciTech Connect

The dense manganese oxide nanorods with an extremely narrow distribution are synthesized at a low temperature using first cathodic electrodeposition subsequently heat treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the nanorods have bar shapes, and their average diameter is less than 50 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) study, the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern in TEM images and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) result show that the nanorods are {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} single crystal. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption analysis indicate that the BET surface area of the {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods is 93 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. By recording the potential-time curve during the electrodeposition process, it is revealed that water reduction reaction has a major role in the electrogeneration of base at the cathode surface under the applied electrochemical conditions. Finally, based on the H{sub 2} bubbling on the cathode surface, the mechanism of the formation and the growth of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods are proposed and discussed. For the electrochemical supercapacitor application, electrochemically prepared {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} is found to be stable for a large number of cycles with high specific capacitance, 338 F g{sup -1} at a scan rate of 10 mV s{sup -1}. Finally, the charge-discharge mechanism is discussed. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New nanostructures of MnO{sub 2} is synthesized by simple method of cathodicelectrodeposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The product has unique one-dimensional morphology with average diameter size of 50 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The experiment conditions (temperature, current density) has not been reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The one-nanostructures obtained without using of hard template or surfactant.

Yousefi, Taher, E-mail: anozadg@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Moallem University, PO Box: 31979-37551, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Materials Research School, NSTRI, PO Box: 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golikand, Ahmad Nozad, E-mail: taher_yosefy@yahoo.com [Materials Research School, NSTRI, PO Box: 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hossein Mashhadizadeh, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Moallem University, PO Box: 31979-37551, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghazadeh, Mustafa [Department of Optic and Spectroscopy, Lasers and Optics Research School, NSTRI, PO Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H{sub 2} to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO{sub 2}-rich gases, a Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Jerry Meldon; Xiaomei Qi

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z