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1

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study The LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program activities must support the timeline dictated by utility life extension decisions to demonstrate a lead test rod in a commercial reactor within 10 years. In order to maintain the demanding development schedule that must accompany this aggressive timeline, the LWRS Program focuses on advanced fuel cladding systems that retain standard UO2 fuel pellets for deployment in currently operating LWR power plants. The LWRS work scope focuses on fuel system components outside of the fuel pellet, allowing for alteration of the existing zirconium-based clad system through coatings, addition of ceramic sleeves, or complete replacement

2

Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 Nuclear Physics and Bio (Indonesia); Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Physics and Bio Physics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR USE IN FUEL BUNDLE HANDLING  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR USE IN FUEL BUNDLE HANDLING TOPICAL REPORT W. 8. Weihermilfer C. S. Allison Septem bet 1979 Work Performed, Under Contract EY-76-C- M - 1 8 3 0 Form 189 Number 210.1 BAlTELLE PACIFIC NORTHWEST LABORATORY RICHLAND, WA 99352 BASE TECHNOLOGY N O T I C E T h i s report was prepard n an account of work sponrored by the UAed States Govcmmenr. Neither tht Unltcd S t a t e nor !he k p n m c n t of Energy, not any of their ernploylecs, nw any of theb ccmtnctotr, hontncton. or their employper. maka any warranty. expms or Implied, or m u m any legal liability or rcrponrlbllity for the accuracy, c o m p l c r e ~ s or ulefulnm of m y information. -ratus, prodm or p r e di~1Oltd. or represents that Its u w ? would not infringe privateiy o w d rights. The views, opinions and ccnclusionr contained in this report a

4

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Evaluation of conceptual flowsheets for incorporating Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel materials in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary study by a group of experts at ORNL has generated and evaluated a number of aqueous and non-aqueous flowsheets for recovering transuranium actinides from LWR fuel for use as fuel in an LMR and, at the same time, for transmutation of the wastes to less hazardous materials. The need for proliferation resistance was a consideration in the flowsheets. The current state of development of the flowsheets was evaluated and recommendations for additional study were made. 3 refs., 6 figs.

Bell, J.T.; Burch, W.D.; Collins, E.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Prince, B.E.; Bond, W.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Delene, J.G.; Mailen, J.C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Assessment of high-burnup LWR fuel response to reactivity-initiated accidents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economic advantages of longer fuel cycle, improved fuel utilization and reduced spent fuel storage have been driving the nuclear industry to pursue higher discharge burnup of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. A design ...

Liu, Wenfeng, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Full-scale hot cell test of an acoustic sensor dedicated to measurement of the internal gas pressure and composition of a LWR nuclear fuel rod  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale hot cell test of the internal gas pressure and composition measurement by an acoustic sensor was carried on successfully between 2008 and 2010 on irradiated fuel rods in the LECA-STAR facility at Cadarache Centre. The acoustic sensor has been specially designed in order to provide a nondestructive technique to easily carry out the measurement of the internal gas pressure and gas composition of a LWR nuclear fuel rod. This sensor has been achieved in 2007 and is now covered by an international patent. The first positive result, concerning the device behaviour, is that the sensor-operating characteristics have not been altered by a two-year exposure in the hot cell ambient. We performed the gas characterisation contained in irradiated fuel rods. The acoustic method accuracy is now {+-}5 bars on the pressure measurement result and {+-}0.3% on the evaluated gas composition. The results of the acoustic method were compared to puncture results. Another significant conclusion is that the efficiency of the acoustic method is not altered by the irradiation time, and possible modification of the cladding properties. These results make it possible to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique on irradiated fuel rods. The transducer and the associated methodology are now operational. (authors)

Ferrandis, J. Y.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Leveque, G. [CNRS - Univ. Montpellier 2, Southern Electronic Inst., UMR 5214, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Baron, D. [EDF, R and D, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Segura, J. C. [EDF, SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France); Cecilia, G.; Provitina, O. [CEA - Nuclear Energy Direction DEN - Fuel Studies Dept. - Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

LIFE vs. LWR: End of the Fuel Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide energy consumption in 2003 was 421 quadrillion Btu (Quads), and included 162 quads for oil, 99 quads for natural gas, 100 quads for coal, 27 quads for nuclear energy, and 33 quads for renewable sources. The projected worldwide energy consumption for 2030 is 722 quads, corresponding to an increase of 71% over the consumption in 2003. The projected consumption for 2030 includes 239 quads for oil, 190 quads for natural gas, 196 quads for coal, 35 quads for nuclear energy, and 62 quads for renewable sources [International Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0484, Table D1 (2006) p. 133]. The current fleet of light water reactors (LRWs) provides about 20% of current U.S. electricity, and about 16% of current world electricity. The demand for electricity is expected to grow steeply in this century, as the developing world increases its standard of living. With the increasing price for oil and gasoline within the United States, as well as fear that our CO2 production may be driving intolerable global warming, there is growing pressure to move away from oil, natural gas, and coal towards nuclear energy. Although there is a clear need for nuclear energy, issues facing waste disposal have not been adequately dealt with, either domestically or internationally. Better technological approaches, with better public acceptance, are needed. Nuclear power has been criticized on both safety and waste disposal bases. The safety issues are based on the potential for plant damage and environmental effects due to either nuclear criticality excursions or loss of cooling. Redundant safety systems are used to reduce the probability and consequences of these risks for LWRs. LIFE engines are inherently subcritical, reducing the need for systems to control the fission reactivity. LIFE engines also have a fuel type that tolerates much higher temperatures than LWR fuel, and has two safety systems to remove decay heat in the event of loss of coolant or loss of coolant flow. These features of LIFE are expected to result in a more straightforward licensing process and are also expected to improve the public perception of risk from nuclear power generation, transportation of nuclear materials, and nuclear waste disposal. Waste disposal is an ongoing issue for LWRs. The conventional (once-through) LWR fuel cycle treats unburned fuel as waste, and results in the current fleet of LWRs producing about twice as much waste in their 60 years of operation as is legally permitted to be disposed of in Yucca Mountain. Advanced LWR fuel cycles would recycle the unused fuel, such that each GWe-yr of electricity generation would produce only a small waste volume compared to the conventional fuel cycle. However, the advanced LWR fuel cycle requires chemical reprocessing plants for the fuel, multiple handling of radioactive materials, and an extensive transportation network for the fuel and waste. In contrast, the LIFE engine requires only one fueling for the plant lifetime, has no chemical reprocessing, and has a single shipment of a small amount of waste per GWe-yr of electricity generation. Public perception of the nuclear option will be improved by the reduction, for LIFE engines, of the number of shipments of radioactive material per GWe-yr and the need to build multiple repositories. In addition, LIFE fuel requires neither enrichment nor reprocessing, eliminating the two most significant pathways to proliferation from commercial nuclear fuel to weapons programs.

Farmer, J C; Blink, J A; Shaw, H F

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel Development for LWR Applications  

SciTech Connect

The concept, fabrication, and key feasibility issues of a new fuel form based on the microencapsulated (TRISO-type) fuel which has been specifically engineered for LWR application and compacted within a SiC matrix will be presented. This fuel, the so-called fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel is currently undergoing development as an accident tolerant fuel for potential UO2 replacement in commercial LWRs. While the ability of this fuel to facilitate normal LWR cycle performance is an ongoing effort within the program, this will not be a focus of this paper. Rather, key feasibility and performance aspects of the fuel will be presented including the ability to fabricate a LWR-specific TRISO, the need for and route to a high thermal conductivity and fully dense matrix that contains neutron poisons, and the performance of that matrix under irradiation and the interaction of the fuel with commercial zircaloy clad.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Voit, Stewart L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: • Give “priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools.” • Give “special technical emphasis and funding priority…to activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors.” • Report “to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020.” Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and Commercialization. The activities performed during the feasibility assessment phase include laboratory scale experiments; fuel performance code updates; and analytical assessment of economic, operational, safety, fuel cycle, and environmental impacts of the new concepts. The development and qualification stage will consist of fuel fabrication and large scale irradiation and safety basis testing, leading to qualification and ultimate NRC licensing of the new fuel. The commercialization phase initiates technology transfer to industry for implementation. Attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance include improved reaction kinetics with steam and slower hydrogen generation rate, while maintaining acceptable cladding thermo-mechanical properties; fuel thermo-mechanical properties; fuel-clad interactions; and fission-product behavior. These attributes provide a qualitative guidance for parameters that must be considered in the development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. However, quantitative metrics must be developed for these attributes. To initiate the quantitative metrics development, a Light Water Reactor Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held October 10-11, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the structure and outcome of the two-day workshop. Questions regarding the content can be directed to Lori Braase, 208-526-7763, lori.braase@inl.gov.

Lori Braase

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A classification scheme for LWR fuel assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With over 100 light water nuclear reactors operating nationwide, representing designs by four primary vendors, and with reload fuel manufactured by these vendors and additional suppliers, a wide variety of fuel assembly types are in existence. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, both the Systems Integration Program and the Characteristics Data Base project required a classification scheme for these fuels. This scheme can be applied to other areas and is expected to be of value to many Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management programs. To develop the classification scheme, extensive information on the fuel assemblies that have been and are being manufactured by the various nuclear fuel vendors was compiled, reviewed, and evaluated. It was determined that it is possible to characterize assemblies in a systematic manner, using a combination of physical factors. A two-stage scheme was developed consisting of 79 assembly types, which are grouped into 22 assembly classes. The assembly classes are determined by the general design of the reactor cores in which the assemblies are, or were, used. The general BWR and PWR classes are divided differently but both are based on reactor core configuration. 2 refs., 15 tabs.

Moore, R.S.; Williamson, D.A.; Notz, K.J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced LWR Fuel Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) operating conditions in less time than it takes in other research reactors. This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiments currently planned to start in late 2008.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel during storage, handling and transportation are presented. Principal emphasis is placed on means to achieve timely detection by an international authority. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) as part of the overall Sandia Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program.

Sonnier, C.S.; Cravens, M.N.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Baseline descriptions for LWR spent fuel storage, handling, and transportation  

SciTech Connect

Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables.

Moyer, J.W.; Sonnier, C.S.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Irradiation behavior of High-Burnup LWR-MOX (mixed-oxide) Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Radiation Effects in Oxide Ceramics and Novel LWR Fuels. Presentation Title ...

16

Radiation Effects in Oxide Ceramics and Novel LWR Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear fuels, such as uranium dioxide (UO2) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels, have been used in current light water reactors (LWRs) to produce about 15% of the ... of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory and ...

17

Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs.

Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Radiation Effects in Ceramic Oxide and Novel LWR Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... TMS/ASM: Nuclear Materials Committee ... of radiation response of nuclear fuel through experiment, theory and computational multi-scale modeling. ... test reactors and commercial nuclear power reactors are all of interest.

19

The scale analysis sequence for LWR fuel depletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system is used extensively to perform away-from-reactor safety analysis (particularly criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer analyses) for spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. Spent fuel characteristics such as radiation sources, heat generation sources, and isotopic concentrations can be computed within SCALE using the SAS2 control module. A significantly enhanced version of the SAS2 control module, which is denoted as SAS2H, has been made available with the release of SCALE-4. For each time-dependent fuel composition, SAS2H performs one-dimensional (1-D) neutron transport analyses (via XSDRNPM-S) of the reactor fuel assembly using a two-part procedure with two separate unit-cell-lattice models. The cross sections derived from a transport analysis at each time step are used in a point-depletion computation (via ORIGEN-S) that produces the burnup-dependent fuel composition to be used in the next spectral calculation. A final ORIGEN-S case is used to perform the complete depletion/decay analysis using the burnup-dependent cross sections. The techniques used by SAS2H and two recent applications of the code are reviewed in this paper. 17 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Hermann, O.W.; Parks, C.V.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Distribution of characteristics of LWR [light water reactor] spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a collective description of the entire spent fuel inventory in terms of various fuel properties relevant to Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) using information available from the Characteristics Data Base (CBD), which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. A number of light-water reactor (LWR) characteristics were analyzed including assembly class representation, fuel burnup, enrichment, fuel fabrication data, defective fuel quantities, and, at PNL`s specific request, linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and the utilization of burnable poisons. A quantitative relationships was developed between burnup and enrichment for BWRs and PWRs. The relationship shows that the existing BWR ATM is near the center of the burnup-enrichment distribution, while the four PWR ATMs bracket the center of the burnup range but are on the low side of the enrichment range. Fuel fabrication data are based on vendor specifications for new fuel. Defective fuel distributions were analyzed in terms of assembly class and vendor design. LHGR values were calculated from utility data on burnup and effective full-power days; these calculations incorporate some unavoidable assumptions which may compromise the value of the results. Only a limited amount of data are available on burnable poisons at this time. Based on this distribution study, suggestions for additional ATMs are made. These are based on the class and design concepts and include BWR/2,3 barrier fuel, and the WE 17 {times} 17 class with integral burnable poison. Both should be at relatively high burnups. 16 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

Reich, W.J.; Notz, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Moore, R.S. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Dry oxidation and fracture of LWR spent fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the characteristics of oxidation and fracture of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel in dry air. It also discusses their effects on radionuclide releases in the anticipated high-level waste repository environment. A sphere model may describe diffusion-limited formation of lower oxides, such as U{sub 4}O{sub 9}, in the oxidation of the spent fuel (SF) matrix. Detrimental higher oxides, such as U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, may not form at temperatures below a threshold temperature. The nucleation process suggests that a threshold temperature exists. The calculated results regarding fracture properties of the SF matrix agree with experimental observations. Oxidation and fracture of Zircaloy may not be significant under anticipated conditions. Under saturated or unsaturated aqueous conditions, oxidation of the SF matrix is believed to increase the releases of Pu-(239+240), Am-(241+243), C-14, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. Under dry conditions, I-129 releases are likely to be small, unlike C-14, in lower oxides; Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135 may be released fast in higher oxides. 79 refs.

Ahn, T.M.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Analysis of the Reuse of Uranium Recovered from the Reprocessing of Commercial LWR Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an analysis of the factors involved in the reuse of uranium recovered from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels (1) by reenrichment and recycling as fuel to LWRs and/or (2) by recycling directly as fuel to heavy-water-reactors (HWRs), such as the CANDU (registered trade name for the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor). Reuse is an attractive alternative to the current Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) baseline plan, which stores the reprocessed uranium (RU) for an uncertain future or attempts to dispose of it as 'greater-than-Class C' waste. Considering that the open fuel cycle currently deployed in the United States already creates a huge excess quantity of depleted uranium, the closed fuel cycle should enable the recycle of the major components of spent fuel, such as the uranium and the hazardous, long-lived transuranic (TRU) actinides, as well as the managed disposal of fission product wastes. Compared with the GNEP baseline scenario, the reuse of RU in the uranium fuel cycle has a number of potential advantages: (1) avoidance of purchase costs of 11-20% of the natural uranium feed; (2) avoidance of disposal costs for a large majority of the volume of spent fuel that is reprocessed; (3) avoidance of disposal costs for a portion of the depleted uranium from the enrichment step; (4) depending on the {sup 235}U assay of the RU, possible avoidance of separative work costs; and (5) a significant increase in the production of {sup 238}Pu due to the presence of {sup 236}U, which benefits somewhat the transmutation value of the plutonium and also provides some proliferation resistance.

DelCul, Guillermo D [ORNL; Trowbridge, Lee D [ORNL; Renier, John-Paul [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Williams, Kent Alan [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Tools for LWR spent fuel characterization: Assembly classes and fuel designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Characteristics Data Base (CDB) is sponsored by the DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The CDB provides a single, comprehensive source of data pertaining to radioactive wastes that will or may require geologic disposal, including detailed data describing the physical, quantitative, and radiological characteristics of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. In developing the CDB, tools for the classification of fuel assembly types have been developed. The assembly class scheme is particularly useful for size- and handling-based describes these tools and presents results of their applications in the areas of fuel assembly type identification, characterization of projected discharges, cask accommodation analyses, and defective fuel analyses. Suggestions for additional applications are also made. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Moore, R.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA)); Notz, K.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Study of the potential uses of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to provide an evaluation of possible international and domestic uses for the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, located in South Carolina, at the conclusion of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. Four generic categories of use options for the Barnwell plant have been considered: storage of spent LWR fuel; reprocessing of LWR spent fuel; safeguards development and training; and non-use. Chapters are devoted to institutional options and integrated institutional-use options.

Not Available

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of measured LWR spent fuel composition data for use in code validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burnup credit (BUC) is a concept applied in the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel in which credit or partial credit is taken for the reduced reactivity worth of the fuel due to both fissile depletion and the buildup of actinides and fission products that act as net neutron absorbers. Typically, a two-step process is applied in BUC analysis: first, depletion calculations are performed to estimate the isotopic content of spent fuel based on its burnup history; second, three-dimensional (3-D) criticality calculations are performed based on specific spent fuel packaging configurations. In seeking licensing approval of any BUC approach (e.g., disposal, transportation, or storage) both of these two computational procedures must be validated. This report was prepared in support of the validation process for depletion methods applied in the analysis of spent fuel from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) designs. Such validation requires the comparison of computed isotopic compositions with those measured via radiochemical assay to assess the ability of a computer code to predict the contents of spent fuel samples. The purpose of this report is to address the availability and appropriateness of measured data for use in the validation of isotopic depletion methods. Although validation efforts to date at ORNL have been based on calculations using the SAS2H depletion sequence of the SCALE code system, this report has been prepared as an overview of potential sources of validation data independent of the code system used. However, data that are identified as in use in this report refer to earlier validation work performed using SAS2H in support of BUC. This report is the result of a study of available assay data, using the experience gained in spent fuel isotopic validation and with a consideration of the validation issues described earlier. This report recommends the suitability of each set of data for validation work similar in scope to the earlier work.

Hermann, O.W.; DeHart, M.D.; Murphy, B.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800{degrees}C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Magnesium transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a U-Fe alloy containing not less than about 84% by weight uranium at a temperature in the range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to produce additional uranium metal which dissolves in the U-Fe alloy raising the uranium concentration and having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The U-Fe alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with Mg metal which takes up the actinide and rare earth fission product metals. The U-Fe alloy retains the noble metal fission products and is stored while the Mg is distilled and recycled leaving the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission products isolated.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Magnesium transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses a process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl{sub 2} and a U-Fe alloy containing not less than about 84% by weight uranium at a temperature in the range of from about 800{degrees}C to about 850{degrees}C to produce additional uranium metal which dissolves in the U-Fe alloy raising the uranium concentration and having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl{sub 2} having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO{sub 2}. The Ca metal and CaCl{sub 2} is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The U-Fe alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with Mg metal which takes up the actinide and rare earth fission product metals. The U-Fe alloy retains the noble metal fission products and is stored while the Mg is distilled and recycled leaving the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission products isolated.

Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.; Pierce, R.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Parametric Study of Front-End Nuclear Fuel Cycle Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides an overview of front-end fuel cost components for nuclear plants, specifically uranium concentrates, uranium conversion services, uranium enrichment services, and nuclear fuel fabrication services. A parametric analysis of light-water reactor (LWR) fuel cycle costs is also included in order to quantify the impacts that result from changes in the cost of one or more front-end components on overall fuel cycle costs.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from lwr fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including Mg Cl.sub.2 to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy.

Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl[sub 2] and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750 C to about 850 C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl[sub 2] having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO[sub 2]. The Ca metal and CaCl[sub 2] is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including MgCl[sub 2] to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy. 2 figs.

Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

36

Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report discusses a process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl{sub 2} and a Cu-Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750{degrees}C to about 850{degrees}C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu-Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl{sub 2} having Cao and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO{sub 2}. The Ca metal and CaCl{sub 2} is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu-Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including Mg C1{sub 2} to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu-Mg alloy .hile transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu-Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg-Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg-Zn alloy.

Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fabrication and Irradiation of LWR Hydride Mini-Fuel Rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Materials for the Nuclear Renaissance II. Presentation Title, Fabrication and ...

38

Criticality safety criteria for the handling, storage, and transportation of LWR fuel outside reactors: ANS-8.17-1984  

SciTech Connect

The potential for criticality accidents during the handling, storage, and transportation of fuel for nuclear reactors represents a health and safety risk to personnel involved in these activities, as well as to the general public. Appropriate design of equipment and facilities, handling procedures, and personnel training can minimize this risk. Even though the focus of the American National Standard, `Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors,` ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983, is general criteria for the ensurance of criticality safety, ANS-8.17-1984, provides additional guidance applicable to handling, storage, and transportation of light-water- reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel units in any phase of the fuel cycle outside the reactor core. ANS-8.17 had its origin in the late 1970s when a work group consisting of representatives from private industry, personnel from government contractor facilities, and scientists and engineers from the national laboratories was established. The work of this group resulted in the issuance of ANSI/ANS-8.17 in January 1984. This document provides a discussion of this standard.

Whitesides, G.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Economic incentives and recommended development for commercial use of high burnup fuels in the once-through LWR fuel cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study calculates the reduced uranium requirements and the economic incentives for increasing the burnup of current design LWR fuels from the current range of 25 to 35 MWD/Kg to a range of 45 to 55 MWD/Kg. The changes in fuel management strategies which may be required to accommodate these high burnup fuels and longer fuel cycles are discussed. The material behavior problems which may present obstacles to achieving high burnup or to license fuel are identified and discussed. These problems are presented in terms of integral fuel response and the informational needs for commercial and licensing acceptance. Research and development programs are outlined which are aimed at achieving a licensing position and commercial acceptance of high burnup fuels.

Stout, R.B.; Merckx, K.R.; Holm, J.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nuclear Fuels - Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012... for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Nuclear Fuels - Modeling .... Using density functional theory (DFT), we have predicted that ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Qualification of the Frequency-Scanning Eddy Current Technique for LWR Fuel Assembly Structural Components Under Simulated Poolside Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing need for nondestructive characterization of hydrogen content in zirconium alloys used in light water reactor (LWR) fuel assembly components. Pending revisions to current regulations and industry emphasis on determining fuel reliability margins have driven the development of poolside-deployable nondestructive characterization techniques to inspect fuel assembly materials. Poolside inspection reduces risk, dose, time and costs related to the transportation of these materials for ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Vented nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

Grossman, Leonard N. (Livermore, CA); Kaznoff, Alexis I. (Castro Valley, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Storage of LWR (light-water-reactor) spent fuel in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the oxidation response of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels under conditions appropriate to fuel storage in air. The program is designed to investigate several independent variables that might affect the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Included are temperature (135 to 230{degree}C), fuel burnup (to about 34 MWd/kgM), reactor type (pressurized and boiling water reactors), moisture level in the air, and the presence of a high gamma field. In continuing tests with declad spent fuel and nonirradiated UO{sub 2} specimens, oxidation rates were monitored by weight-gain measurements and the microstructures of subsamples taken during the weighing intervals were characterized by several analytical methods. The oxidation behavior indicated by weight gain and time to form powder will be reported in Volume III of this series. The characterization results obtained from x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger electron spectrometry of oxidized fuel samples are presented in this report. 28 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Thomas, L.E.; Charlot, L.A.; Coleman, J.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Knoll, R.W. (Johnson Controls, Inc., Madison, WI (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Compatibility/Stability Issues in the Use of Nitride Kernels in LWR TRISO Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The stability of the SiC layer in the presence of free nitrogen will be dependent upon the operating temperatures and resulting nitrogen pressures whether it is at High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) temperatures of 1000-1400 C (coolant design dependent) or LWR temperatures that range from 500-700 C. Although nitrogen released in fissioning will form fission product nitrides, there will remain an overpressure of nitrogen of some magnitude. The nitrogen can be speculated to transport through the inner pyrolytic carbon layer and contact the SiC layer. The SiC layer may be envisioned to fail due to resulting nitridation at the elevated temperatures. However, it is believed that these issues are particularly avoided in the LWR application. Lower temperatures will result in significantly lower nitrogen pressures. Lower temperatures will also substantially reduce nitrogen diffusion rates through the layers and nitriding kinetics. Kinetics calculations were performed using an expression for nitriding silicon. In order to further address these concerns, experiments were run with surrogate fuel particles under simulated operating conditions to determine the resulting phase formation at 700 and 1400 C.

Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

6 Nuclear Fuel Designs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Message from the Director 2 Nuclear Power & Researrh Reactors 3 Discovery of Promethium 4 Nuclear Isotopes 4 Nuclear Medicine 5 Nuclear Fuel Processes & Software 6 Nuclear Fuel Designs 6 Nuclear Safety 7 Nuclear Desalination 7 Nuclear Nonproliferation 8 Neutron Scattering 9 Semiconductors & Superconductors 10 lon-Implanted Joints 10 Environmental Impact Analyses 11 Environmental Quality 12 Space Exploration 12 Graphite & Carbon Products 13 Advanced Materials: Alloys 14 Advanced Materials: Ceramics 15 Biological Systems 16 Biological Systems 17 Computational Biology 18 Biomedical Technologies 19 Intelligent Machines 20 Health Physics & Radiation Dosimetry 21 Radiation Shielding 21 Information Centers 22 Energy Efficiency: Cooling & Heating

46

Fuel-cycle costs for alternative fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the fuel cycle cost and fresh fuel requirements for a range of nuclear reactor systems including the present day LWR without fuel recycle, an LWR modified to obtain a higher fuel burnup, an LWR using recycle uranium and plutonium fuel, an LWR using a proliferation resistant /sup 233/U-Th cycle, a heavy water reactor, a couple of HTGRs, a GCFR, and several LMFBRs. These reactor systems were selected from a set of 26 developed for the NASAP study and represent a wide range of fuel cycle requirements.

Rainey, R.H.; Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Unger, W.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nuclear fuel composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. A high temperature graphite-uranium base nuclear fuel composition containing from about 1 to about 5 five weight percent rhenium metal.

Feild, Jr., Alexander L. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1980-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

48

Uranium Nitride as LWR TRISO Fuel: Thermodynamic Modeling of U-C-N  

SciTech Connect

TRISO coated particle fuel is envisioned as a next generation replacement for current urania pellet fuel in LWR applications. To obtain adequate fissile loading the kernel of the TRISO particle will need to be UN. In support of the fuel development effort, an assessment of phase regions of interest in the U-C-N system was undertaken as the fuel will be prepared by the carbothermic reduction of the oxide and it will be in equilibrium with carbon within the TRISO particle. The phase equilibria and thermochemistry of the U-C-N system is reviewed, including nitrogen pressure measurements above various phase fields. Selected measurements were used to fit a first order model of the UC1-xNx phase, represented by the inter-solution of UN and UC. Fit to the data was significantly improved by also adjusting the heat of formation for UN by ~12 kJ/mol and the phase equilbria was best reproduced by also adjusting the heat for U2N3 by +XXX. The determined interaction parameters yielded a slightly positive deviation from ideality, which agrees with lattice parameter measurements which show positive deviation from Vegard s law. The resultant model together with reported values for other phases in the system were used to generate isothermal sections of the U-C-N phase diagram. Nitrogen partial pressures were also computed for regions of interest.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Shin, Dongwon [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been engaged in an effort to develop and qualify next generation LWR fuel with enhanced performance and safety and reduced waste generation since 2010. This program, which has emphasized collaboration between the DOE, U.S. national laboratories and nuclear industry, was refocused from enhanced performance to enhanced accident tolerance following the events at Fukushima in 2011. Accident tolerant fuels have been specifically described as fuels that, in comparison with standard UO2-Zircaloy, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The program maintains an ambitious goal to insert a lead test assembly (LTA) of the new design into a commercial power reactor by 2022 .

Daniel M. Wachs

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

June 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

media Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten (2001) 75 System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout NONE (1996) 68 LWR nuclear fuel bundle data for use in fuel...

51

Materials Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Fuels (MMSNF) Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial photo of Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory University of Chicago Chicago Photography courtesy Thomas F Ewing Privacy and Security Notice The MMSNF Workshops The goal of the Materials Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Fuels (MMSNF) workshops is to stimulate research and discussions on modeling and simulations of nuclear fuels, to assist the design of improved fuels and the evaluation of fuel performance. In addition to research focused on existing or improved types of LWR reactors, recent modeling programs, networks, and links have been created to develop innovative nuclear fuels and materials for future generations of nuclear reactors. Examples can be found in Europe (e.g. F-BRIDGE project and ACTINET network and SAMANTHA cooperative network), in the USA (e.g. CASL, NEAMS, CESAR and CMSN network

52

Parametric Study of Front-End Nuclear Fuel Cycle Costs Using Reprocessed Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates front-end nuclear fuel cycle costs assuming that uranium recovered during the reprocessing of commercial light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel is available to be recycled and used in the place of natural uranium. This report explores the relationship between the costs associated with using a natural uranium fuel cycle, in which reprocessed uranium (RepU) is not recycled, with those associated with using RepU.

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

53

Air quality impacts due to construction of LWR waste management facilities  

SciTech Connect

Air quality impacts of construction activities and induced housing growth as a result of construction activities were evaluated for four possible facilities in the LWR fuel cycle: a fuel reprocessing facility, fuel storage facility, fuel fabrication plant, and a nuclear power plant. Since the fuel reprocessing facility would require the largest labor force, the impacts of construction of that facility were evaluated in detail.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This is an a submission for the Encyclopedia of Sustainable Technology on the subject of Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel. No formal abstract was required for the article. The full article will be attached.

Michael F. Simpson; Jack D. Law

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

Zocher, Roy W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element wherein a tubular cladding of zirconium or a zirconium alloy has a fission gas plenum chamber which is held against collapse by the loops of a spacer in the form of a tube which has been deformed inwardly at three equally spaced, circumferential positions to provide three loops. A heat resistant disc of, say, graphite separates nuclear fuel pellets within the cladding from the plenum chamber. The spacer is of zirconium or a zirconium alloy.

Meadowcroft, Ronald Ross (Deep River, CA); Bain, Alastair Stewart (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Experience with non-fuel-bearing components in LWR (light-water reactor) fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

Many non-fuel-bearing components are so closely associated with the spent fuel assemblies that their integrity and behavior must be taken into consideration with the fuel assemblies, when handling spent fuel of planning waste management activities. Presented herein is some of the experience that has been gained over the past two decades from non-fuel-bearing components in light-water reactors (LWRs), both pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Among the most important of these components are the control rod systems, the absorber and burnable poison rods, and the fuel assembly channels. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nuclear fuel pin scanner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for inspection of nuclear fuel pins to determine fiss loading and uniformity. The system includes infeed mechanisms which stockpile, identify and install nuclear fuel pins into an irradiator. The irradiator provides extended activation times using an approximately cylindrical arrangement of numerous fuel pins. The fuel pins can be arranged in a magazine which is rotated about a longitudinal axis of rotation. A source of activating radiation is positioned equidistant from the fuel pins along the longitudinal axis of rotation. The source of activating radiation is preferably oscillated along the axis to uniformly activate the fuel pins. A detector is provided downstream of the irradiator. The detector uses a plurality of detector elements arranged in an axial array. Each detector element inspects a segment of the fuel pin. The activated fuel pin being inspected in the detector is oscillated repeatedly over a distance equal to the spacing between adjacent detector elements, thereby multiplying the effective time available for detecting radiation emissions from the activated fuel pin.

Bramblett, Richard L. (Friendswood, TX); Preskitt, Charles A. (La Jolla, CA)

1987-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

Irradiation-Induced Defects in Oxide Nuclear Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Radiation Effects in Ceramic Oxide and Novel LWR Fuels. Presentation Title ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nuclear Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuels Nuclear Fuels Nuclear Fuels A reactor's ability to produce power efficiently is significantly affected by the composition and configuration of its fuel system. A nuclear fuel assembly consists of hundreds of thousands of uranium pellets, stacked and encapsulated within tubes called fuel rods or fuel pins which are then bundled together in various geometric arrangements. There are many design considerations for the material composition and geometric configuration of the various components comprising a nuclear fuel system. Future designs for the fuel and the assembly or packaging of fuel will contribute to cleaner, cheaper and safer nuclear energy. Today's process for developing and testing new fuel systems is resource and time intensive. The process to manufacture the fuel, build an assembly,

62

Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2A, Physical descriptions of LWR (Light-Water Reactor) fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This appendix includes a four-page Physical Description report for each assembly type identified from the current data. Where available, a drawing of an assembly follows the appropriate Physical Description report. If no drawing is available for an assembly, a cross-reference to a similar assembly is provided if possible. For Advanced Nuclear Fuels, Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, and Westinghouse assemblies, information was obtained via subcontracts with these fuel vendors. Data for some assembly types are not available. For such assemblies, the information shown in this report was obtained from the open literature and by inference from reload fuels made by other vendors. Efforts to obtain additional information are continuing. Individual Physical Description reports can be generated interactively through the menu-driven LWR Assemblies Data Base system. These reports can be viewed on the screen or directed to a printer. Special reports and compilations of specific data items can be produced on request.

Not Available

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Assessment of EPRI Fuel Reliability Guidelines for New Nuclear Plant Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the nuclear power industry pursues the licensing, construction and operation of new advanced LWR designs to meet growing electrical demand, a high level of fuel reliability will be a key factor in the ultimate acceptance and sustainability of these new plants. The new reactor designs under consideration by the industry will utilize fuel assembly/rod designs and operating conditions that are similar to the current fleet. This report assesses the applicability of the EPRI Fuel Reliability Program (FRP) ...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

64

One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A capsule is described containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

Gross, Kenny; Lambert, John

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

NUCLEAR FUEL MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is given for making the carbides of nuclear fuel material. The metal of the fuel material, which may be a fissile and/or fertile material, is transformed into a silicide, after which the silicide is comminuted to the desired particle size. This silicide is then carburized at an elevated temperature, either above or below the melting point of the silicide, to produce an intimate mixture of the carbide of the fuel material and the carbide of silicon. This mixture of the fuel material carbide and the silicon carbide is relatively stable in the presence of moisture and does not exhibit the highly reactive surface condition which is observed with fuel material carbides made by most other known methods. (AEC)

Goeddel, W.V.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop  

SciTech Connect

This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

composite Zr-based alloy hybrids, advanced Zr-based alloys, and engineered stainless steel alloys. Potential benefits and drawbacks have been identified in this study to aid...

68

NUCLEAR FUEL COMPOSITION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel reactor composition for use in a self-sustaining fast nuclear reactor is described. More particularly, a fuel alloy comprising thorium and uranium-235 is de scribed, the uranium-235 existing in approximately the same amount that it is found in natural uranium, i.e., 1.4%.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.

1960-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Phenomenology of Nuclear Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

most widely used nuclear fuel is in the form of Uranium Oxide. It is used in hundreds of nuclear power reactors, naval reactors and research reactors. This ceramic fuel form has...

70

Nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a composite cladding having a substrate and a metal barrier metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of the substrate so that the metal barrier forms a shield between the substrate and the nuclear fuel material held within the cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a low neutron absorption metal of substantially pure zirconium. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has an improved composite cladding comprised of a moderate purity metal barrier of zirconium metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The metal barrier forms a shield between the alloy tube and a core of nuclear fuel material enclosed in the composite cladding. There is a gap between the cladding and the core. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the composite cladding and has low neutron absorption characteristics. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the alloy tube from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

72

Multilayered nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element is described which is suitable for high temperature applications comprised of a kernel of fissile material overlaid with concentric layers of impervious graphite, vitreous carbon, pyrolytic carbon and metal carbide. The kernel of fissile material is surrounded by a layer of impervious graphite. The layer of impervious graphite is then surrounded by a layer of vitreous carbon. Finally, an outer shell which includes alternating layers of pyrolytic carbon and metal carbide surrounds the layer of vitreous carbon.

Schweitzer, Donald G.; Sastre, Cesar

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown...

75

Thermal analysis of uranium zirconium hydride fuel using a lead-bismuth gap at LWR operating temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next generation nuclear technology calls for more advanced fuels to maximize the effectiveness of new designs. A fuel currently being studied for use in advanced light water reactors (LWRs) is uranium zirconium hydride ...

Ensor, Brendan M. (Brendan Melvin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Thermal hydraulic analysis of hydride fuels in BWR's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project being completed by UC Berkeley and MIT to assess the possible benefits of using hydride fuel in light water nuclear reactors (LWR's). More specifically, this ...

Creighton, John Everett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A Second Examination of Fragments of Unirradiated and Irradiated CANDU Fuel, and Irradiated LWR Fuel, Oxidized in Air at 130 Degrees Centigrade and 170 Degrees Centigrade for Approximately One Thousand Days  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thisreport documents the examination of unclad fragments of unirradiated CANDU fuel, and irradiated LWR fuel, after approximately 2.8 years of oxidation in air at 130 degrees Centigrade and 170 degrees Centigrade. During oxidation, the various fuel specimens were isolated in separate vials, which were designed to permit free access of air, while preventing cross-contamination. Two specimens of each fuel type were recovered for examination from each experiment. The irradiated fuel specimens were weighed a...

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Storage of LWR spent fuel in air. Volume 3, Results from exposure of spent fuel to fluorine-contaminated air  

SciTech Connect

The Behavior of Spent Fuel in Storage (BSFS) Project has conducted research to develop data on spent nuclear fuel (irradiated U0{sub 2}) that could be used to support design, licensing, and operation of dry storage installations. Test Series B conducted by the BSFS Project was designed as a long-term study of the oxidation of spent fuel exposed to air. It was discovered after the exposures were completed in September 1990 that the test specimens had been exposed to an atmosphere of bottled air contaminated with an unknown quantity of fluorine. This exposure resulted in the test specimens reacting with both the oxygen and the fluorine in the oven atmospheres. The apparent source of the fluorine was gamma radiation-induced chemical decomposition of the fluoro-elastomer gaskets used to seal the oven doors. This chemical decomposition apparently released hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapor into the oven atmospheres. Because the Test Series B specimens were exposed to a fluorine-contaminated oven atmosphere and reacted with the fluorine, it is recommended that the Test Series B data not be used to develop time-temperature limits for exposure of spent nuclear fuel to air. This report has been prepared to document Test Series B and present the collected data and observations.

Cunningham, M.E.; Thomas, L.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Fuel/Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

80

Irradiation Planning for Fully-Ceramic Micro-encsapsulated fuel in ATR at LWR-relevant conditions: year-end report on FY-2011  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the estimation of required ATR irradiation levels for the DB-FCM fuel design (fueled with Pu and MAs). The fuel and assembly designs are those considered in a companion report [R. S. Sen et al., FCR&D-2011- 00037 or INL/EXT-11-23269]. These results, pertaining to the DB-FCM fuel, are definitive in as much as the design of said fuel is definitive. In addition to the work performed, as required, for DB-FCM fuel, work has started in a preliminary fashion on single-cell UO2 and UN fuels. These latter activities go beyond the original charter of this project and although the corresponding work is incomplete, significant progress has been achieved. However, in this context, all that has been achieved is only preliminary because the corresponding fuel designs are neither finalized nor optimized. In particular, the UO2 case is unlikely to result in a viable fuel design if limited to enrichment at or under 20 weight % in U-235. The UN fuel allows reasonable length cycles and is likely to make an optimal design possible. Despite being limited to preliminary designs and offering only preliminary conclusions, the irradiation planning tasks for UO2 and UN fuels that are summarized in this report are useful to the overall goal of devising and deploying FCM-LWR fuel since the methods acquired and tested in this project and the overall procedure for planning will be available for planning tests for the finalized fuel design. Indeed, once the fuel design is finalized and the expected burnup level is determined, the methodology that has been assembled will allow the prompt finalization of the neutronic planning of the irradiation experiment and would provide guidance on the expected experimental performance of the fuel. Deviations from the expected behavior will then have to be analyzed and the outcome of the analysis may be corrections or modifications for the assessment models as well as, possibly, fuel design modifications, and perhaps even variation of experimental control for future experimental phases. Besides the prediction of irradiation times, preliminary work was carried out on other aspects of irradiation planning. In particular, a method for evaluating the interplay of depletion, material performance modeling and irradiation is identified by reference to a companion report. Another area that was addressed in a preliminary fashion is the identification and selection of a strategy for the physical and mechanical design of the irradiation experiments. The principal conclusion is that the similarity between the FCM fuel and the fuel compacts of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant prismatic design are strong enough to warrant using irradiation hardware designs and instrumentation adapted from the AGR irradiation tests. Modifications, if found necessary, will probably be few and small, except as pertains to the water environment and its implications on the use of SiC cladding or SiC matrix with no additional cladding.

Abderrafi M. Ougouag; R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Brian Boer

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay Brian J. Quiter ?of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the lowU and 239 Pu in spent nuclear fuel using NRF. II. PERFORMING

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Cost Comparison Between Once-Through and Plutonium Single-Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the context of long-term waste management and sustainable nuclear fuel supply, there continue to be discussions regarding whether the United States should consider recycling of light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for the current fleet of U.S. LWRs. This report presents a parametric study of equilibrium fuel cycle costs for an open fuel cycle without plutonium recycling (once-through) and with plutonium recycling (single-recycling using mixed-oxide, or MOX, fuel), assuming an all-pre...

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nuclear Fuel Assembly and Related Methods for Spent Nuclear ...  

Nuclear Fuel Assembly and Related Methods for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing and Management Note: The technology described above is an early stage ...

84

Nuclear fuel recycling in 4 minutes | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel recycling in 4 minutes Share Topic Energy Energy sources Nuclear energy Nuclear fuel cycle Reactors...

85

Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nondestructive Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

09-01188, ANS Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management IV, Hiltonanalysis of spent nuclear fuel via nuclear resonanceNondestructive Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element particularly adapted for use in nuclear reactors of high power density is offered. It has fissionable fuel pellet segments mounted in a tubular housing and defining a central passage in the fuel element. A burnable poison element extends through the central passage, which is designed to contain more poison material at the median portion than at the end portions thereby providing a more uniform hurnup and longer reactivity life.

Bassett, C.H.

1961-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the discharged hydride fuel is more proliferation resistant. Preliminary feasibility assessment indicates that by replacing some of the ZrH1.6 by ThH2 it will be possible to further improve the plutonium incineration capability of PWR’s. Other possibly promising applications of hydride fuel were identified but not evaluated in this work. A number of promising oxide fueled PWR core designs were also found as spin-offs of this study: (1) The optimal oxide fueled PWR core design features smaller fuel rod diameter of D=6.5 mm and a larger pitch-to-diameter ratio of P/D=1.39 than presently practiced by industry – 9.5mm and 1.326. This optimal design can provide a 30% increase in the power density and a 24% reduction in the cost of electricity (COE) provided the PWR could be designed to have the coolant pressure drop across the core increased from the reference 29 psia to 60 psia. (2) Using wire wrapped oxide fuel rods in hexagonal fuel assemblies it is possible to design PWR cores to operate at 54% higher power density than the reference PWR design that uses grid spacers and a square lattice, provided 60 psia coolant pressure drop across the core could be accommodated. Uprating existing PWR’s to use such cores could result in 40% reduction in the COE. The optimal lattice geometry is D = 8.08 mm and P/D = 1.41. The most notable advantages of wire wraps over grid spacers are their significant lower pressure drop, higher critical heat flux and improved vibrations characteristics.

Greenspan, E

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nuclear fuel assembly spacer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor including a plurality of elongated elements, a spacer is described for retaining the elements in lateral position. The spacer consists of: an array of laterally positioned, cojoined tubular ferrules, each of the ferrules providing a passage for one of the elements, laterally oriented leaf spring members, each of the spring members spanning two adjacent ones of the ferrules and extending therein to engage and laterally support the elements extending through the adjacent ferrules, facing sides of the adjacent ferrules being formed with cutouts to receive and support the spring member. The sides of the ferrules opposite the facing sides are formed with openings to receive and restrain the ends of the spring member, the spring member being formed with a generally V-shaped central portion with an apex extending toward the adjacent sides of the adjacent ferrules whereby in the absence of elements through the adjacent ferrules the central portion contacts the adjacent sides to provide a preload on the spring member and limit the amount of projection of the spring member into the ferrules whereby the insertion of the elements through the ferrules is facilitated. The central portion of the spring member is unrestrained in the presence of the elements through the ferrules, the spring member having left and right arms extending outward from the V-shaped central portion, each of the arms including a relatively long center portion for contacting a respective one of the elements. A shorter end portion is angled toward the ferrules and a tab of reduced height at the end of each arm engaging a respective one of the openings whereby the resulting shoulders at the ends of the spring member engage the inner surface of the ferrules adjacent the openings to laterally locate and retain the spring member.

Johanssen, E.B.; Matzner, B.

1986-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

90

Release of indigenous gases from LWR fuel and the reaction kinetics with Zircaloy cladding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the open literature data to estimate: the rate of gaseous impurity release from oxide fuel, the amount and composition of the gaseous impurities, and their subsequent rate of reaction with the fuel or Zircaloy.

Beyer, C.E.; Hann, C.R.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nuclear Fuel Recycling Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that if the world is to provide sufficient energy to meet the demands of a growing population and improved standards of living in the 21 st century, nuclear energy will play a substantial role. Nuclear energy is a proven technology that will be part of the mix of technologies used by future generations due to its enormous energy potential with near-zero emissions of greenhouse gases (see related Position Statement 44). Alternative energy sources by themselves will be insufficient to meet these needs during this period of rapidly increasing energy demand. Nuclear fuel recycling, which involves separating the uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel for reuse in the fabrication of new fuel (see Position Statement 47), has the potential to reclaim most of the unused energy in spent fuel. It is a proven alternative to current U.S. policy of direct disposal of spent fuel in a geological repository, which throws away the fuel’s remaining energy content. Recycling of nuclear fuel in other countries with proper safeguards and material controls (see related Position Statement 55) under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has demonstrated the viability of high level waste volume reduction and energy resource conservation. Transitioning to a recycle policy in an era of expanded nuclear deployment will enhance resource utilization, radioactive waste management, and safeguards. Additional research and development 1 are needed to address the issue of cost and to further enhance the safeguards and safety of the various processes that are required. Such research is also needed to secure the U.S. position as a leader in nuclear technology and global nuclear materials stewardship. Therefore, the American Nuclear Society endorses the following: U.S. policy that allows an orderly transition to nuclear fuel recycling in parallel with the development of the high level waste repository, Yucca Mountain, in a manner that would enhance the repository’s efficiency; further research and development of recycle options to ensure a secure and sustainable energy future with reduced proliferation risks.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Liquid Metal Bond for Improved Heat Transfer in LWR Fuel Rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A liquid metal (LM) consisting of 1/3 weight fraction each of Pb, Sn, and Bi has been proposed as the bonding substance in the pellet-cladding gap in place of He. The LM bond eliminates the large AT over the pre-closure gap which is characteristic of helium-bonded fuel elements. Because the LM does not wet either UO2 or Zircaloy, simply loading fuel pellets into a cladding tube containing LM at atmospheric pressure leaves unfilled regions (voids) in the bond. The HEATING 7.3 heat transfer code indicates that these void spaces lead to local fuel hot spots.

Donald Olander

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

94

CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS OF COMPLEX SYSTEMS: FISSION PRODUCT BEHAVIOR IN LWR FUEL ELEMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p. 59 in Proc. Symp. Thermodynamics of Nuclear MaterialsRecommended Key Values for Thermodynamics, April, 1978, ICSUMonoxide (Cs,0)," J. Chem. Thermodynamics, H. E. Flotow and

Kohli, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising high density ceramic fissionable material enclosed in a tubular cladding of corrosion-resistant material is described. The fissionable material is in the form of segments of a tube which have cooperating tapered interfaces which produce outward radial displacement when the segments are urged axially together. A resilient means is provided within the tubular housing to constantly urge the fuel segments axially. This design maintains the fuel material in tight contacting engagement against the inner surface of the outer cladding tube to eliminate any gap therebetween which may be caused by differential thermal expansion between the fuel material and the material of the tube.

Bassett, C.H.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation.

Barry, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1963-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear Fuels: Promise and Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 1950 through 1980, scientists, engineers and national leaders confidently predicted an early twenty-first century where fast breeder reactors and commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing were commonplace. Such a scenario seemed necessary for a world with the more than 1000 GWe of nuclear energy needed to meet such an ever-increasing thirst for energy. Thirty years later uranium reserves are increasing on pace with consumption, the growth of nuclear power has been slowed, commercial breeder reactors have yet to enter the marketplace, and less than a handful of commercial reprocessing plants operate. As Nobel Laureate Niels Bohr famously said, “Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.” The programme for IChemE’s 2012 conference on the nuclear fuel cycle features a graphic of an idealized nuclear fuel cycle that symbolizes the quest for a closed nuclear fuel cycle featuring careful husbanding of precious resources while minimizing the waste footprint. Progress toward achieving this ideal has been disrupted by technology innovations in the mining and petrochemical industries, as well as within the nuclear industry.

Harold F. McFarlane

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Material Performance of Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel under Selected LWR Design Basis Scenarios: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The extension to LWRs of the use of Deep-Burn coated particle fuel envisaged for HTRs has been investigated. TRISO coated fuel particles are used in Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel within a SiC matrix rather than the graphite of HTRs. TRISO particles are well characterized for uranium-fueled HTRs. However, operating conditions of LWRs are different from those of HTRs (temperature, neutron energy spectrum, fast fluence levels, power density). Furthermore, the time scales of transient core behavior during accidents are usually much shorter and thus more severe in LWRs. The PASTA code was updated for analysis of stresses in coated particle FCM fuel. The code extensions enable the automatic use of neutronic data (burnup, fast fluence as a function of irradiation time) obtained using the DRAGON neutronics code. An input option for automatic evaluation of temperature rise during anticipated transients was also added. A new thermal model for FCM was incorporated into the code; so-were updated correlations (for pyrocarbon coating layers) suitable to estimating dimensional changes at the high fluence levels attained in LWR DB fuel. Analyses of the FCM fuel using the updated PASTA code under nominal and accident conditions show: (1) Stress levels in SiC-coatings are low for low fission gas release (FGR) fractions of several percent, as based on data of fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2} kernels. However, the high burnup level of LWR-DB fuel implies that the FGR fraction is more likely to be in the range of 50-100%, similar to Inert Matrix Fuels (IMFs). For this range the predicted stresses and failure fractions of the SiC coating are high for the reference particle design (500 {micro}mm kernel diameter, 100 {micro}mm buffer, 35 {micro}mm IPyC, 35 {micro}mm SiC, 40 {micro}mm OPyC). A conservative case, assuming 100% FGR, 900K fuel temperature and 705 MWd/kg (77% FIMA) fuel burnup, results in a 8.0 x 10{sup -2} failure probability. For a 'best-estimate' FGR fraction of 50% and a more modest burnup target level of 500 MWd/kg ,the failure probability drops below 2.0 x 10{sup -5}, the typical performance of TRISO fuel made under the German HTR research program. An optimization study on particle design shows improved performance if the buffer size is increased from 100 to 120 {micro}mm while reducing the OPyC layer. The presence of the latter layer does not provide much benefit at high burnup levels (and fast fluence levels). Normally the shrinkage of the OPyC would result in a beneficial compressive force on the SiC coating. However, at high fluence levels the shrinkage is expected to turn into swelling, resulting in the opposite effect. However, this situation is different when the SiC-matrix, in which the particles are embedded, is also considered: the OPyC swelling can result in a beneficial compressive force on the SiC coating since outward displacement of the OPyC outer surface is inhibited by the presence of the also-swelling SiC matrix. Taking some credit for this effect by adopting a 5 {micro}mm SiC-matrix layer, the optimized particle (100 {micro}mm buffer and 10 {micro}mm OPyC), gives a failure probability of 1.9 x 10{sup -4} for conservative conditions. During a LOCA transient, assuming core re-flood in 30 seconds, the temperature of the coated particle can be expected to be about 200K higher than nominal temperature (900K). For this event the particle failure fraction for a conservative case is 1.0 x 10{sup -2}, for the optimized particle design. For a FGR-fraction of 50% this value reduces to 6.4 x 10{sup -4}.

B. Boer; R. S. Sen; M. A. Pope; A. M. Ougouag

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced Nuclear Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2010 ... The United States Department of Energy has defined an approach to energy security that includes sustainable nuclear energy. To achieve ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NUCLEAR MATERIAL ATTRACTIVENESS: AN ASSESSMENT OF MATERIAL FROM PHWR'S IN A CLOSED THORIUM FUEL CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the attractiveness of material mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with reprocessing and the thorium-based LWR fuel cycle. This paper expands upon the results from earlier studies that examined the attractiveness of SNM associated with the reprocessing of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel by various reprocessing schemes and the recycle of plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in LWR. This study shows that {sup 233}U that is produced in thorium-based fuel cycles is very attractive for weapons use. Consistent with other studies, these results also show that all fuel cycles examined to date need to be rigorously safeguarded and provided moderate to high levels of physical protection. These studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of 'attractiveness levels' that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and key findings will be presented.

Sleaford, B W; Collins, B A; Ebbinghaus, B B; Bathke, C G; Prichard, A W; Wallace, R K; Smith, B W; Hase, K R; Bradley, K S; Robel, M; Jarvinen, G D; Ireland, J R; Johnson, M W

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and we posit that the exploration, development, and implementation of intrinsic mechanisms such as discussed here are part of a balanced approach aimed at preventing the misuse of nuclear material for nuclear-energy applications.

Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nuclear Fuel Materials - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 3, 2011 ... Various metallic nuclear fuels are bcc alloys of uranium that swell under ... that currently employ fuels containing highly enriched uranium.

104

Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a...

105

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experience in the nuclear fuels field. I am also extremelyreactor core components, nuclear fuel-element design hasreactors, commercial nuclear fuel still consists of uranium

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Federal fees and contracts for storage and disposal of spent LWR fuel  

SciTech Connect

The methodology for establishing a fee for federal spent fuel storage and disposal services is explained along with a presentation of the cost centers and cost data used to calculate the fee. Results of the initial fee calculation and the attendant sensitivity studies are also reviewed. The current status of the fee update is presented. The content of the proposed contract for federal services is briefly reviewed.

Clark, H.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear reactor composite fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core and composite fuel assembly for a liquid-cooled breeder nuclear reactor including a plurality of elongated coextending driver and breeder fuel elements arranged to form a generally polygonal bundle within a thin-walled duct. The breeder elements are larger in cross section than the driver elements, and each breeder element is laterally bounded by a number of the driver elements. Each driver element further includes structure for spacing the driver elements from adjacent fuel elements and, where adjacent, the thin-walled duct. A core made up of the fuel elements can advantageously include fissile fuel of only one enrichment, while varying the effective enrichment of any given assembly or core region, merely by varying the relative number and size of the driver and breeder elements.

Burgess, Donn M. (Richland, WA); Marr, Duane R. (West Richland, WA); Cappiello, Michael W. (Richland, WA); Omberg, Ronald P. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element comprising a large number og wafers of fissionable material and a protective jacket having compartments holding these wafers is described. The compartments of the jacket aid the removal of heat from the wafers, keep the wafers or fragments thereof from migrating in the jacket, and permit the escape of gaseous fission products.

Carney, K.G. Jr.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fire resistant nuclear fuel cask  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to a fire resistant nuclear fuel cask employing reversibly thermally expansible bands between adjacent cooling fins such that normal outward flow of heat is not interfered with, but abnormal inward flow of heat is impeded or blocked.

Heckman, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Moss, Marvin (Albuquerque, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

Nuclear Fuels & Zr-alloy Claddings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials: Nuclear Fuels & Zr-alloy ... Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels, an Energy Frontier Research ... However, more recently density functional theory calculations have ...

112

Sustainable Energy Through Recycling Used Nuclear Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Through Recycling Used Nuclear Fuel M.A. Williamson, A.V. Guelis, J.L. Willit, C. Pereira and A.J. Bakel Argonne National Laboratory Recycle of used nuclear fuel is central...

113

Nuclear Weapons Proliferation and the Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Sciences October 12-14, 2011, Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois Nuclear Weapons Proliferation and the Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Understanding and Reducing...

114

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements.Unlike permanent nuclear reactor core components, nuclearof the first nuclear reactors, commercial nuclear fuel still

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Public comments and Task Force responses regarding the environmental survey of the reprocessing and waste management portions of the LWR fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

This document contains responses by the NRC Task Force to comments received on the report ''Environmental Survey of the Reprocessing and Waste Management Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0116). These responses are directed at all comments, inclding those received after the close of the comment period. Additional information on the environmental impacts of reprocessing and waste management which has either become available since the publication of NUREG-0116 or which adds requested clarification to the information in that document.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Compositions and methods for treating nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

Compositions are provided that include nuclear fuel. Methods for treating nuclear fuel are provided which can include exposing the fuel to a carbonate-peroxide solution. Methods can also include exposing the fuel to an ammonium solution. Methods for acquiring molybdenum from a uranium comprising material are provided.

Soderquist, Chuck Z; Johnsen, Amanda M; McNamara, Bruce K; Hanson, Brady D; Smith, Steven C; Peper, Shane M

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT ASSEMBLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating nuclear reactor fuel element assemblies having a plurality of longitudinally extending flat fuel elements in spaced parallel relation to each other to form channels is presented. One side of a flat side plate is held contiguous to the ends of the elements and a welding means is passed along the other side of the platertransverse to the direction of the longitudinal extension of the elements. The setting and speed of travel of the welding means is set to cause penetration of the side plate with welds at bridge the gap in each channel between adjacent fuel elements with a weld-through bubble of predetermined size. The fabrication of a high strength, dependable fuel element is provided, and the reduction of distortion and high production costs are facilitated by this method. (AEC)

Stengel, F.G.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process  

SciTech Connect

The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the “UREX+3c fuel cycle” and the “Alternative Fuel Cycle” (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the resulting MOX. The study considered two sub-cases within each of the two fuel cycles in which the uranium and plutonium from the first generation of MOX spent fuel (i) would not be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX for use in LWRs or (ii) would be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX fuel for use in LWRs. The study also investigated the effects of recycling MOX spent fuel multiple times in LWRs. The study assumed that both fuel cycles would store and then reprocess spent MOX fuel that is not recycled to produce a next generation of LWR MOX fuel and would use the recovered products to produce FR fuel. The study further assumed that FRs would begin to be brought on-line in 2043, eleven years after recycle begins in LWRs, when products from 5-year cooled spent MOX fuel would be available. Fuel for the FRs would be made using the uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides recovered from MOX. For the cases where LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled one time, the 1st generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. For the cases where the LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled two times, the 2nd generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. The number of FRs in operation was assumed to increase in successive years until the rate that actinides were recovered from permanently discharged spent MOX fuel equaled the rate the actinides were consumed by the operating fleet of FRs. To compare the two fuel cycles, the study analyzed recycle of nuclear fuel in LWRs and FRs and determined the radiological characteristics of irradiated nuclear fuel, nuclear waste products, and recycle nuclear fuels. It also developed a model to simulate the flows of nuclear materials that could occur in the two advanced nuclear fuel cycles over 81 years beginning in 2020 and ending in 2100. Simulations projected the flows of uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides as these nuclear fuel materials were produced and consumed in a fleet of 100 1,000 MWe LWRs and in FRs. The model als

E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Nuclear Fuel Handling Equipment Application and Maintenance Guide: Fuel Handling Equipment Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling is a critical task during a nuclear power plant refueling outage. The proper operation of fuel handling equipment (such as fuel handling machines, fuel upending machines, fuel transfer carriages, and fuel elevators) is important to a successful refueling outage and to preparing fuel for eventual disposal.BackgroundThe fuel handling system contains the components used to move fuel from the time that the new fuel is received until the spent fuel ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework   for   Nuclear   Fuel   Cycle   Concepts,”  Of   Used   Nuclear   Fuel”,   Nuclear  Engineering  and  Radiotoxicity  of  Spent  Nuclear   Fuel,”   Integrated  

Djokic, Denia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

HIGH DENSITY NUCLEAR FUEL COMPOSITION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A nuclear fuel consisting essentially of uranium monocarbide and containing 2.2 to 4.6 wt% carbon, 0.1 to 2.3 wt% oxygen, 0.05 to 2.5 wt% nitrogen, and the balance uranium was developed. The maximum oxygen content was less than one-half the carbon content by weight and the carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are present as a single phase substituted solid solution of UC, C, O, and N. A method of preparing the fuel composition is described. (AEC)

Litton, F.B.

1962-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis Abdellatif M. Yacout Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Engineering Division The nuclear fuel cycle is a complex system with multiple components and activities that are combined to provide nuclear energy to a variety of end users. The end uses of nuclear energy are diverse and include electricity, process heat, water desalination, district heating, and possibly future hydrogen production for transportation and energy storage uses. Components of the nuclear fuel cycle include front end components such as uranium mining, conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, and the reactor component. Back end of the fuel cycle include used fuel coming out the reactor, used fuel temporary and permanent storage, and fuel reprocessing. Combined with those components there

123

Method for producing nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel is made by contacting an aqueous solution containing an actinide salt with an aqueous solution containing ammonium hydroxide, ammonium oxalate, or oxalic acid in an amount that will react with a fraction of the actinide salt to form a precipitate consisting of the hydroxide or oxalate of the actinide. A slurry consisting of the precipitate and solution containing the unreacted actinide salt is formed into drops which are gelled, calcined, and pressed to form pellets.

Haas, P.A.

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method for producing nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel is made by contacting an aqueous solution containing an actinide salt with an aqueous solution containing ammonium hydroxide, ammonium oxalate, or oxalic acid in an amount that will react with a fraction of the actinide salt to form a precipitate consisting of the hydroxide or oxalate of the actinide. A slurry consisting of the precipitate and solution containing the unreacted actinide salt is formed into drops which are gelled, calcined, and pressed to form pellets.

Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Fuel Cycle Options for Optimized Recycling of Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reduction of transuranic inventories of spent nuclear fuel depends upon the deployment of advanced fuels that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and the availability of facilities to separate and reprocess ...

Aquien, A.

126

Evaluation of alternative fuel cycle strategies for nuclear power generation in the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deployment of fuel recycling through either CONFU (COmbined Non-Fertile and UO2 fuel) thermal watercooled reactors (LWRs) or fast ABR (Actinide Burner Reactor) reactors is compared to the Once-Through LWR reactor system ...

Boscher, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Advances in metallic nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels have generated renewed interest for advanced liquid metal reactors (LMRs) due to their physical properties, ease of fabrication, irradiation behavior, and simple reprocessing. Irradiation performance for both steady-state and transient operations is excellent. Ongoing irradiation tests in Argonne-West's Idaho-based Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) have surpassed 100,000 MWd/T burnup and are on their way to a lifetime burnup of 150,000 MWd/T or greater. Metallic fuel also has a unique neutronic characteristic that enables benign reactor responses to loss-of-flow without scram and loss-of-heat-sink without scram accident conditions. This inherent safety potential of metallic fuel was demonstrated in EBR-II just one year ago. Safety tests performed in the reactor have also demonstrated that there is ample margin to fuel element cladding failure under transient overpower conditions. These metallic fuel attributes are key ingredients of the integral fast reactor (IFR) concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory.

Seidel, B.R.; Walters, L.C.; Chang, Y.I.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

BOOK: Safety Related Issues of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 26, 2007... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ... Fifteen papers cover aluminum-clad fuel discharged from research ...

129

Nuclear core and fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast flux nuclear core of a plurality of rodded, open-lattice assemblies having a rod pattern rotated relative to a rod support structure pattern. Elongated fuel rods are oriented on a triangular array and laterally supported by grid structures positioned along the length of the assembly. Initial inter-assembly contact is through strongbacks at the corners of the support pattern and peripheral fuel rods between adjacent assemblies are nested so as to maintain a triangular pitch across a clearance gap between the other portions of adjacent assemblies. The rod pattern is rotated relative to the strongback support pattern by an angle .alpha. equal to sin .sup.-1 (p/2c), where p is the intra-assembly rod pitch and c is the center-to-center spacing among adjacent assemblies.

Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nuclear Fuel Cycle | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cycle Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cycle This is an illustration of a nuclear fuel cycle that shows the required steps to process natural uranium from ore for preparation for fuel to be loaded in nuclear reactors. This is an illustration of a nuclear fuel cycle that shows the required steps to process natural uranium from ore for preparation for fuel to be loaded in nuclear reactors. The mission of NE-54 is primarily focused on activities related to the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle which includes mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment. Uranium Mining Both "conventional" open pit, underground mining, and in situ techniques are used to recover uranium ore. In general, open pit mining is used where deposits are close to the surface and underground mining is used

131

MCNP LWR Core Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

Fischer, Noah A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nuclear Fuels II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Materials Science Challenges for Nuclear Applications: Nuclear Fuels II ... reactivity and/or to flatten the radial power profile in a research or test reactor. ... Laboratory; 2Y-12 National Security Complex; 3University of Idaho

133

Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

Campana, Robert J. (Solana Beach, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nuclear fuel: a new market dynamic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After almost 20 years of low nuclear fuel prices, buyers have come to expect that these low and stable nuclear fuel prices will continue. This conventional wisdom may not reflect the significant changes and higher prices that growing demand, and the end of secondary sources of uranium and enrichment, will bring. (author)

Kee, Edward D.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

LEROY, P.G.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

136

TEPP - Spent Nuclear Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Spent Nuclear Fuel - Spent Nuclear Fuel TEPP - Spent Nuclear Fuel This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of spent nuclear fuel. This exercise manual is one in a series of five scenarios developed by the Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program. Responding agencies may include several or more of the following: local municipal and county fire, police, sheriff, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel; state, local, and federal emergency response teams; emergency response contractors;and other emergency response resources that could potentially be provided by the carrier and the originating facility (shipper). Spent Nuclear Fuel.docx More Documents & Publications

137

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,103",25.4,"16,750",50.2 "Coal",564,6.8,"2,604",7.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",151,1.8,400,1.2 "Natural Gas","2,292",27.7,"11,716",35.1 "Other1",27,0.3,730,2.2 "Other Renewable1",159,1.9,740,2.2 "Petroleum","2,989",36.1,409,1.2 "Total","8,284",100.0,"33,350",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

138

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,251",8.0,"9,643",17.7 "Coal","2,526",16.1,"13,629",25.0 "Natural Gas","11,640",74.2,"29,619",54.4 "Other1",4,"*",10,"*" "Other Renewable1",235,1.5,"1,504",2.8 "Petroleum",35,0.2,81,0.1 "Total","15,691",100.0,"54,487",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

139

Iowa Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",601,4.1,"4,451",7.7 "Coal","6,956",47.7,"41,283",71.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",144,1.0,948,1.6 "Natural Gas","2,299",15.8,"1,312",2.3 "Other Renewable1","3,584",24.6,"9,360",16.3 "Petroleum","1,007",6.9,154,0.3 "Total","14,592",100.0,"57,509",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

140

Vermont Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",620,55.0,"4,782",72.2 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",324,28.7,"1,347",20.3 "Natural Gas","-","-",4,0.1 "Other Renewable1",84,7.5,482,7.3 "Petroleum",100,8.9,5,0.1 "Total","1,128",100.0,"6,620",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ohio Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,134",6.5,"15,805",11.0 "Coal","21,360",64.6,"117,828",82.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",101,0.3,429,0.3 "Natural Gas","8,203",24.8,"7,128",5.0 "Other1",123,0.4,266,0.2 "Other Renewable1",130,0.4,700,0.5 "Petroleum","1,019",3.1,"1,442",1.0 "Total","33,071",100.0,"143,598",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

142

Maryland Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,705",13.6,"13,994",32.1 "Coal","4,886",39.0,"23,668",54.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",590,4.7,"1,667",3.8 "Natural Gas","2,041",16.3,"2,897",6.6 "Other1",152,1.2,485,1.1 "Other Renewable1",209,1.7,574,1.3 "Petroleum","2,933",23.4,322,0.7 "Total","12,516",100.0,"43,607",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

143

Kansas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,160",9.2,"9,556",19.9 "Coal","5,179",41.3,"32,505",67.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",3,"*",13,"*" "Natural Gas","4,573",36.5,"2,287",4.8 "Other Renewable1","1,079",8.6,"3,459",7.2 "Petroleum",550,4.4,103,0.2 "Total","12,543",100.0,"47,924",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

144

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,245",15.8,"11,054",30.2 "Coal","3,932",50.0,"23,363",63.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",278,3.5,"1,314",3.6 "Natural Gas","1,849",23.5,375,1.0 "Other Renewable1",165,2.1,493,1.3 "Petroleum",387,4.9,31,0.1 "Total","7,857",100.0,"36,630",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

145

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services GNEP would build and strengthen a reliable international fuel services consortium under which "fuel supplier nations" would choose to operate both nuclear power plants and fuel production and handling facilities, providing reliable fuel services to "user nations" that choose to only operate nuclear power plants. This international consortium is a critical component of the GNEP initiative to build an improved, more proliferation-resistant nuclear fuel cycle that recycles used fuel, while Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services More Documents & Publications

148

EA-1954: Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho EA-1954: Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the Idaho National...

149

Introduction to Nuclear Reactors, Fuels, and Materials: Heather ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 27, 2012 ... What goes on in a nuclear power plant. • Challenges in nuclear fuels and materials. Key lessons: • Fuels and materials change during ...

150

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading...

151

Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development Department of Energy Awards 15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development August 1,...

152

Nuclear Fuels and Materials: Jon Carmack, Idaho National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2012 ... w w w .in. l.g o v. Nuclear Fuels and Materials. Jon Carmack. Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division. Idaho National Laboratory. February 28 ...

153

Integrated process for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for recovering nuclear fuel from spent fuel assemblies that employs a single canister process container. The cladding and fuel are oxidized in the container, the fuel is dissolved and removed from the container for separation from the aqueous phase, the aqueous phase containing radioactive waste is returned to the container. This container is also the disposal vessel. Add solidification agents and compress container for long term storage.

Forsberg, C.W.

1991-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

Hawke, Basil C. (Solana Beach, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Illinois Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; ... from fossil fuels, non-biogenic ...

156

Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fuel cycle options for optimized recycling of nuclear fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accumulation of transuranic inventories in spent nuclear fuel depends on both deployment of advanced reactors that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and on availability of the facilities that separate and ...

Aquien, Alexandre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Path Forward to Advanced Nuclear Fuels: Spectroscopic Calorimetry of Nuclear Fuel Materials  

SciTech Connect

The goal is to relieve the shortage of thermodynamic and kinetic information concerning the stability of nuclear fuel alloys. Past studies of the ternary nuclear fuel UPuZr have demonstrated constituent redistribution when irradiated or with thermal treatment. Thermodynamic data is key to predicting the possibilities of effects such as constituent redistribution within the fuel rods and interaction with cladding materials.

Tobin, J G

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nuclear fuel elements having a composite cladding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in the core of nuclear reactors. The improved nuclear fuel element has a composite cladding of an outer portion forming a substrate having on the inside surface a metal layer selected from the group consisting of copper, nickel, iron and alloys of the foregoing with a gap between the composite cladding and the core of nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel element comprises a container of the elongated composite cladding, a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material disposed in and partially filling the container and forming an internal cavity in the container, an enclosure integrally secured and sealed at each end of said container and a nuclear fuel material retaining means positioned in the cavity. The metal layer of the composite cladding prevents perforations or failures in the cladding substrate from stress corrosion cracking or from fuel pellet-cladding interaction or both. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy.

Gordon, Gerald M. (Fremont, CA); Cowan, II, Robert L. (Fremont, CA); Davies, John H. (San Jose, CA)

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Application of Copper Coatings on Used Nuclear Fuel Containers by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The long term management of Canada's used nuclear fuel, administered by the Nuclear Waste Management Organization, involves an ...

162

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>A rib arrangement and an end construction for nuclearfuel elements laid end to end in a coolant tube are described. The rib arrangement is such that each fuel element, when separated from other fuel elements, fits loosely in the coolant tube and so can easily be inserted or withdrawn from the tube. The end construction of the fuel elements is such that the fuel elements when assembled end to end are keyed against relative rotation, and the ribs of each fuel element cooperate with the ribs of the adjacent fuel elements to give the assembled fuel elements a tight fit with the coolant tube. (AEC)

Weems, S.J.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Annotated Bibliography for Drying Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internationally, the nuclear industry is represented by both commercial utilities and research institutions. Over the past two decades many of these entities have had to relocate inventories of spent nuclear fuel from underwater storage to dry storage. These efforts were primarily prompted by two factors: insufficient storage capacity (potentially precipitated by an open-ended nuclear fuel cycle) or deteriorating quality of existing underwater facilities. The intent of developing this bibliography is to assess what issues associated with fuel drying have been identified, to consider where concerns have been satisfactorily addressed, and to recommend where additional research would offer the most value to the commercial industry and the U. S. Department of Energy.

Rebecca E. Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Method for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type wherein a plurality of long metal tubes packed with ceramic fuel are supported in a spaced apart relationship within an outer metal shell or shroud which provides structural support to the assembly. Spent nuclear fuel assemblies are first compacted in a stepwise manner between specially designed gag-compactors and then sheared into short segments amenable to chemical processing by shear blades contoured to mate with the compacted surface of the fuel assembly.

Weil, Bradley S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Watson, Clyde D. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Pyrochemical Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 10 years, pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel has progressed from demonstration activities to engineering-scale production operations. As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, pyrochemical treatment operations are being performed as part of the treatment of fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II at the Idaho National Laboratory. Integral to these treatment operations are research and development activities that are focused on scaling further the technology, developing and implementing process improvements, qualifying the resulting high-level waste forms, and demonstrating the overall pyrochemical fuel cycle.

K. M. Goff; K. L. Howden; G. M. Teske; T. A. Johnson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel comprises a fraction of the hazardous materials packages shipped annually in the United States. In fact, at the present time, fewer than 100 packages of spent nuclear fuel are shipped annually. At the onset of spent fuel shipments to the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada, repository, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) expects to ship 400 - 500 spent fuel transport casks per year over the life of the facility. This study summarizes work on transportation cask design and testing, regulato...

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

168

Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity.

Leuze, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fuel availability in nuclear power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Nuclear power is in focus of attention due to several factors these days and the expression “nuclear renaissance” is getting well known. However, concerned… (more)

Söderlund, Karl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nuclear Fuel Cycle | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cycle Fuel Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cycle GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding research and development of nuclear fuel and waste management technologies that meet the nation's energy supply, environmental, and energy security needs. GC-52 also advises DOE on issues involving support for international fuel cycle initiatives aimed at advancing a common vision of the necessity of the expansion of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes worldwide in a safe and secure manner. In addition, GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the management and disposition of excess uranium in DOE's uranium stockpile. GC-52 attorneys participate in meetings of DOE's Uranium Inventory Management Coordinating Committee and provide advice on compliance with statutory requirements for the sale or transfer of uranium.

171

Apparatus for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type comprising an array of fuel pins disposed within an outer metal shell or shroud. A spent fuel assembly is first compacted in a known manner and then incrementally sheared using fixed and movable shear blades having matched laterally projecting teeth which slidably intermesh to provide the desired shearing action. Incremental advancement of the fuel assembly after each shear cycle is limited to a distance corresponding to the lateral projection of the teeth to ensure fuel assembly breakup into small uniform segments which are amenable to remote chemical processing.

Weil, Bradley S. (Knoxville, TN); Metz, III, Curtis F. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

WEB RESOURCES: The Nuclear Fuel Cycle - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... A compilation of links to websites describing the nuclear fuel cycle. A link to a short overview of the entire cycle is included as well as a ...

173

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

Bassett, C.H.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

174

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... non-biogenic municipal solid waste, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, tire-derived fuel, and miscellaneous technologies. ...

175

Composite construction for nuclear fuel containers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method for producing nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction having components providing therein a barrier system for resisting destructive action by volatile fission products or impurities and also interdiffusion of metal constituents, and the product thereof. The composite nuclear fuel containers of the method comprise a casing of zirconium or alloy thereof with a layer of copper overlying an oxidized surface portion of the zirconium or alloy thereof. 1 fig.

Cheng, B.C.; Rosenbaum, H.S.; Armijo, J.S.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Composite construction for nuclear fuel containers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for producing nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction having components providing therein a barrier system for resisting destructive action by volatile fission products or impurities and also interdiffusion of metal constituents, and the product thereof. The composite nuclear fuel containers of the method comprise a casing of zirconium or alloy thereof with a layer of copper overlying an oxidized surface portion of the zirconium or alloy thereof.

Cheng, Bo-Ching (Fremont, CA); Rosenbaum, Herman S. (Fremont, CA); Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Introduction to Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Advanced Nuclear Fuels: Jon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2012 ... Increased use of fossil fuel will result in. • Resource shortfalls and regional conflicts,. • Serious environmental impact. • Worldwide expansion of ...

178

Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Bookmark and Share Much of the NE Division's research is directed toward developing software and performing analyses, system engineering design, and experiments to support the demonstration and optimization of the electrometallurgical

179

Fuel cycle analysis of once-through nuclear systems.  

SciTech Connect

Once-through fuel cycle systems are commercially used for the generation of nuclear power, with little exception. The bulk of these once-through systems have been water-cooled reactors (light-water and heavy water reactors, LWRs and HWRs). Some gas-cooled reactors are used in the United Kingdom. The commercial power systems that are exceptions use limited recycle (currently one recycle) of transuranic elements, primarily plutonium, as done in Europe and nearing deployment in Japan. For most of these once-through fuel cycles, the ultimate storage of the used (spent) nuclear fuel (UNF, SNF) will be in a geologic repository. Besides the commercial nuclear plants, new once-through concepts are being proposed for various objectives under international advanced nuclear fuel cycle studies and by industrial and venture capital groups. Some of the objectives for these systems include: (1) Long life core for remote use or foreign export and to support proliferation risk reduction goals - In these systems the intent is to achieve very long core-life with no refueling and limited or no access to the fuel. Most of these systems are fast spectrum systems and have been designed with the intent to improve plant economics, minimize nuclear waste, enhance system safety, and reduce proliferation risk. Some of these designs are being developed under Generation IV International Forum activities and have generally not used fuel blankets and have limited the fissile content of the fuel to less than 20% for the purpose on meeting international nonproliferation objectives. In general, the systems attempt to use transuranic elements (TRU) produced in current commercial nuclear power plants as this is seen as a way to minimize the amount of the problematic radio-nuclides that have to be stored in a repository. In this case, however, the reprocessing of the commercial LWR UNF to produce the initial fuel will be necessary. For this reason, some of the systems plan to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. Examples of systems in this class include the small modular reactors being considered internationally; e.g. 4S [Tsuboi 2009], Hyperion Power Module [Deal 2010], ARC-100 [Wade 2010], and SSTAR [Smith 2008]. (2) Systems for Resource Utilization - In recent years, interest has developed in the use of advanced nuclear designs for the effective utilization of fuel resources. Systems under this class have generally utilized the breed and burn concept in which fissile material is bred and used in situ in the reactor core. Due to the favorable breeding that is possible with fast neutrons, these systems have tended to be fast spectrum systems. In the once-through concepts (as opposed to the traditional multirecycle approach typically considered for fast reactors), an ignition (or starter) zone contains driver fuel which is fissile material. This zone is designed to last a long time period to allow the breeding of sufficient fissile material in the adjoining blanket zone. The blanket zone is initially made of fertile depleted uranium fuel. This zone could also be made of fertile thorium fuel or recovered uranium from fuel reprocessing or natural uranium. However, given the bulk of depleted uranium and the potentially large inventory of recovered uranium, it is unlikely that the use of thorium is required in the near term in the U.S. Following the breeding of plutonium or fissile U-233 in the blanket, this zone or assembly then carries a larger fraction of the power generation in the reactor. These systems tend to also have a long cycle length (or core life) and they could be with or without fuel shuffling. When fuel is shuffled, the incoming fuel is generally depleted uranium (or thorium) fuel. In any case, fuel is burned once and then discharged. Examples of systems in this class include the CANDLE concept [Sekimoto 2001], the traveling wave reactor (TWR) concept of TerraPower [Ellis 2010], the ultra-long life fast reactor (ULFR) by ANL [Kim 2010], and the BNL fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR) concept [Fisher 1979]. (3) Thermal systems for resource extensio

Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

180

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay,” Inst. of Nucl.239 Pu content in spent nuclear fuel [4, 5]. Development ofin the context of spent nuclear fuel, summarizes the results

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

09-01188, ANS Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management IV, HiltonParameter Library Spent Nuclear Fuel Transmission detector (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Pyrolytic carbon-coated nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nuclear fuel kernel having at least one pyrolytic carbon coating and a silicon carbon layer is provided in which extensive interaction of fission product lanthanides with the silicon carbon layer is avoided by providing sufficient UO.sub.2 to maintain the lanthanides as oxides during in-reactor use of said fuel.

Lindemer, Terrence B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Long, Jr., Ernest L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beatty, Ronald L. (Wurlingen, CH)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fuel assembly for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved fuel assembly is formed to minimize the amount of parasitic structural material wherein a plurality of hollow tubular members are juxtaposed to the fuel elements of the assembly. The tubular members may serve as guide tubes for control elements and are secured to a number of longitudinally spaced grid members along the fuel assembly. The grid members include means thereon engaging each of the fuel elements to laterally position the fuel elements in a predetermined array. Openings in the bottom of each hollow member serve as a shock absorber to cushion shock transmitted to the structure when the control elements are rapidly inserted in their corresponding tubular members.

Creagan, Robert J. (Pitcairn, PA); Frisch, Erling (Pittsburgh, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. industrys limited efforts at licensing transportation packages characterized as high-capacity, or containing high-burnup (>45 GWd/MTU) commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), or both, have not been successful considering existing spent-fuel inventories that will have to be eventually transported. A holistic framework is proposed for resolving several CSNF transportation issues. The framework considers transportation risks, spent-fuel and cask-design features, and defense-in-depth in context of pre...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed fuel elements. The enclosures are fixed at the lower ends thereof to a base. Pockets are formed between confronting walls of adjacent enclosures for receiving high absorption neutron absorbers, such as Boral, cadmium, borated stainless steel and the like for the closer spacing of spent fuel elements.

Rubinstein, Herbert J. (Los Gatos, CA); Clark, Philip M. (San Jose, CA); Gilcrest, James D. (San Jose, CA)

1978-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fuel Reliability Program: Global Nuclear Fuel Priority 1 Fuel Inspections Results Assessment Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to meet the recommendations of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1015032, Fuel Reliability Guidelines: Fuel Surveillance and Inspection, Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF) worked with the Fuel Reliability Program (FRP) and utilities to assign an inspection prioritization ranking to the GNF-fueled U.S. BWR fleet and conducted and completed a series of fuel inspections from 2007 to 2009 at the highest priority plants. Summary presentations of the inspection results were presented at E...

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described whereby fuel tubes or pins are cut, loaded with fuel pellets and a heat transfer medium, sealed at each end with slotted fittings, and assembled into a rectangular tube bundle to form a fuel element. The tubes comprising the fuel element are laterally connected between their ends by clips and tabs to form a linear group of spaced parallel tubes, which receive their vertical support by resting on a grid. The advantages of this method are that it permits elimination of structural material (e.g., fuel-element cans) within the reactor core, and removal of at least one fuel pin from an element and replacement thereof so that a burnable poison may be utilized during the core lifetime. (AEC)

Dickson, J.J.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

189

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research and Testing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 Severe Accident Test Station ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cladding research and testing. The purpose of this research is to furnish U.S. industry (EPRI, Areva, Westinghouse), and regulators (NRC) with much-needed data supporting safe and economical nuclear power generation and used fuel management. LWR fuel cladding work is tightly integrated with ORNL accident tolerant fuel development and used fuel disposition programs thereby providing a powerful capability that couples basic materials science research with the nuclear applications research and development. The ORNL LWR fuel cladding program consists of five complementary areas of research: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding material testing under design

190

Washington Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other: Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, non-biogenic municipal solid waste, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch,...

191

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other: Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, non-biogenic municipal solid waste, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch,...

192

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other: Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, non-biogenic municipal solid waste, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch,...

193

Virginia Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other: Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, non-biogenic municipal solid waste, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch,...

194

Michigan Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other: Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, non-biogenic municipal solid waste, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch,...

195

Accelerator breeder: a viable option for the production of nuclear fuels  

SciTech Connect

Despite the growing pains of the US nuclear power industry, our dependence on nuclear energy for the production of electricity and possibly process heat is likely to increase dramatically over the next few deacades. This statement dismisses fusion as being entirely too speculative to be practical within that time frame. Sometime, between the years 2000 and 2050, fissile material will be in short supply whether it is to fuel existing LWR's or to provide initial fuel inventory for FBR's. The accelerator breeder could produce the fuel shortfall predicted to occur during the first half of the 21st century. The accelerator breeder offers the only practical means today of producing, or breeding, large quantities of fissile fuel from fertile materials, albeit at high cost. Studies performed over the last few years at Chalk River Laboratory and at Brookhaven National Laboratory have demonstrated that the accelerator breeder is practical, technically feasible with state-of-the-art technology, and is economically competitive with any other proposed synthetic means of fissile fuel production. This paper gives the parameters of a nearly optimized accelerator-breeder system, then discusses the development needs, and the economics and institutional problems that this breeding concept faces.

Grand, P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nuclear fuel particles and method of making nuclear fuel compacts therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for making nuclear fuel compacts exhibiting low heavy metal contamination and fewer defective coatings following compact fabrication from a mixture of hardenable binder, such as petroleum pitch, and nuclear fuel particles having multiple layer fission-product-retentive coatings, with the dense outermost layer of the fission-product-retentive coating being surrounded by a protective overcoating, e.g., pyrocarbon having a density between about 1 and 1.3 g/cm.sup.3. Such particles can be pre-compacted in molds under relatively high pressures and then combined with a fluid binder which is ultimately carbonized to produce carbonaceous nuclear fuel compacts having relatively high fuel loadings.

DeVelasco, Rubin I. (Encinitas, CA); Adams, Charles C. (San Diego, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nuclear-fuel-cycle costs. Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel-cycle costs are given for the pressurized-water reactor once-through and fuel-recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast-breeder-reactor system. These calculations show that fuel-cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel-cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder-reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Control of degradation of spent LWR (light-water reactor) fuel during dry storage in an inert atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dry storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gas (referred to as inerted dry storage or IDS) is being developed as an alternative to water pool storage of spent fuel. The objectives of the activities described in this report are to identify potential Zircaloy degradation mechanisms and evaluate their applicability to cladding breach during IDS, develop models of the dominant Zircaloy degradation mechanisms, and recommend cladding temperature limits during IDS to control Zircaloy degradation. The principal potential Zircaloy cladding breach mechanisms during IDS have been identified as creep rupture, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Creep rupture is concluded to be the primary cladding breach mechanism during IDS. Deformation and fracture maps based on creep rupture were developed for Zircaloy. These maps were then used as the basis for developing spent fuel cladding temperature limits that would prevent cladding breach during a 40-year IDS period. The probability of cladding breach for spent fuel stored at the temperature limit is less than 0.5% per spent fuel rod. 52 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Cunningham, M.E.; Simonen, E.P.; Allemann, R.T.; Levy, I.S.; Hazelton, R.F.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fuel Cycle Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Radiochemical Separation & Processing Recycle & Waste Management Uranium Enrichment Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Fuel Cycle Science & Technology SHARE Fuel Cycle Science and Technology The ORNL expertise and experience across the entire nuclear fuel cycle is underpinned by extensive facilities and a comprehensive modeling and simulation capability ORNL supports the understanding, development, evaluation and deployment of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Management and Uranium Management and Policy » Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing minerals such as uraninite. Uranium ore can be mined from open pits or underground excavations. The ore can then be crushed and treated at a mill to separate the valuable uranium from the ore. Uranium may also be dissolved directly from the ore deposits

203

International nuclear fuel cycle fact book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

Leigh, I.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evaluation of cover gas impurities and their effects on the dry storage of LWR (light-water reactor) spent fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purposes of this report are to (1) identify the sources of impurity gases in spent fuel storage casks; (2) identify the expected concentrations and types of reactive impurity gases from these sources over an operating lifetime of 40 years; and (3) determine whether these impurities could significantly degrade cladding or exposed fuel during this period. Four potential sources of impurity gases in the helium cover gas in operating casks were identified and evaluated. Several different bounding cases have been considered, where the reactive gas inventory is either assumed to be completely gettered by the cladding or where all oxygen is assumed to react completely with the exposed fuel. It is concluded that the reactive gas inventory will have no significant effect on the cladding unless all available oxygen reacts with the UO/sub 2/ fuel to produce U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at one or two cladding breaches. Based on Zircaloy oxidation data, the oxygen inventory in a fully loaded pressurized water reactor cask such as the Castor-V/21 will be gettered by the Zircaloy cladding in about 1 year if the peak cladding temperature within the task is greater than or equal to300/sup 0/C. Only a negligible decrease in the thickness of the cladding would result. 24 refs., 4 tabs.

Knoll, R.W.; Gilbert, E.R.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Safeguarding and Protecting the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International safeguards as applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are a vital cornerstone of the global nuclear nonproliferation regime - they protect against the peaceful nuclear fuel cycle becoming the undetected vehicle for nuclear weapons proliferation by States. Likewise, domestic safeguards and nuclear security are essential to combating theft, sabotage, and nuclear terrorism by non-State actors. While current approaches to safeguarding and protecting the nuclear fuel cycle have been very successful, there is significant, active interest to further improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards and security, particularly in light of the anticipated growth of nuclear energy and the increase in the global threat environment. This article will address two recent developments called Safeguards-by-Design and Security-by-Design, which are receiving increasing broad international attention and support. Expected benefits include facilities that are inherently more economical to effectively safeguard and protect. However, the technical measures of safeguards and security alone are not enough - they must continue to be broadly supported by dynamic and adaptive nonproliferation and security regimes. To this end, at the level of the global fuel cycle architecture, 'nonproliferation and security by design' remains a worthy objective that is also the subject of very active, international focus.

Trond Bjornard; Humberto Garcia; William Desmond; Scott Demuth

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

McCarthy, William H. (Los Altos, CA); Atcheson, Donald B. (Cupertino, CA); Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan (San Jose, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Spent nuclear fuel project integrated schedule plan  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Schedule Plan establishes the organizational responsibilities, rules for developing, maintain and status of the SNF integrated schedule, and an implementation plan for the integrated schedule. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel.

Squires, K.G.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

208

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Concepts for Minor Actinide Burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, New fuel cycle strategies entail advanced nuclear fuel concepts. This especially applies for the burning of minor actinides in a fast reactor cycle ...

209

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.D. Ambers, “Assesment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescencefor Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay,” Inst. of Nucl. Mat. Man. ,clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence,”

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element structure particularly useful in high temperature nuclear reactors is presented. Basically, the structure comprises two coaxial graphite sleeves integrally joined together by radial fins. Due to the high structural strength of graphite at high temperatures and the rigidity of this structure, nuclear fuel encased within the inner sleeve in contiguous relation therewith is supported and prevented from expanding radially at high temperatures. Thus, the necessity of relying on the usual cladding materials with relatively low temperature limitations for structural strength is removed. (AEC)

Davidson, J.K.

1963-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000.degree. F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics.

Heubeck, Norman B. (Schenectady, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain-related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3,000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion and mechanical characteristics.

Heubeck, Norman B.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics. 5 figs.

Heubeck, N.B.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mitigation of Nuclear Fuel Pool Leaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The used or spent fuel from nuclear reactors is stored in spent fuel pools, which require canals for fuel transfer activities. These pools--35–40 feet or more in depth--are lined with stainless steel ranging in thickness from ~.19 in–~.38 in (~4.8 mm–~9.5 mm). The liners are anchored to the walls and slab via welds that can leak or crack. Électricité de France (EDF) has developed tools to check suspect areas of the liner seam welds for cracking or leakage. This report ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

215

SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TREATMENT OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL TO ENHANCE SEPARATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Reactive Gas Recycling (RGR) technology development has been initiated at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), with a stretch-goal to develop a fully dry recycling technology for Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF). This approach is attractive due to the potential of targeted gas-phase treatment steps to reduce footprint and secondary waste volumes associated with separations relying primarily on traditional technologies, so long as the fluorinators employed in the reaction are recycled for use in the reactors or are optimized for conversion of fluorinator reactant. The developed fluorination via SF{sub 6}, similar to the case for other fluorinators such as NF{sub 3}, can be used to address multiple fuel forms and downstream cycles including continued processing for LWR via fluorination or incorporation into a aqueous process (e.g. modified FLUOREX) or for subsequent pyro treatment to be used in advanced gas reactor designs such metal- or gas-cooled reactors. This report details the most recent experimental results on the reaction of SF{sub 6} with various fission product surrogate materials in the form of oxides and metals, including uranium oxides using a high-temperature DTA apparatus capable of temperatures in excess of 1000{deg}C . The experimental results indicate that the majority of the fission products form stable solid fluorides and sulfides, while a subset of the fission products form volatile fluorides such as molybdenum fluoride and niobium fluoride, as predicted thermodynamically. Additional kinetic analysis has been performed on additional fission products. A key result is the verification that SF{sub 6} requires high temperatures for direct fluorination and subsequent volatilization of uranium oxides to UF{sub 6}, and thus is well positioned as a head-end treatment for other separations technologies, such as the volatilization of uranium oxide by NF{sub 3} as reported by colleagues at PNNL, advanced pyrochemical separations or traditional full recycle approaches. Based on current results of the research at SRNL on SF{sub 6} fluoride volatility for UNF separations, SF{sub 6} treatment renders all anticipated volatile fluorides studied to be volatile, and all non-volatile fluorides studied to be non-volatile, with the notable exception of uranium oxides. This offers an excellent opportunity to use this as a head-end separations treatment process because: 1. SF{sub 6} can be used to remove volatile fluorides from a UNF matrix while leaving behind uranium oxides. Therefore an agent such as NF{sub 3} should be able to very cleanly separate a pure UF{sub 6} stream, leaving compounds in the bottoms such as PuF{sub 4}, SrF{sub 2} and CsF after the UNF matrix has been pre-treated with SF{sub 6}. 2. Due to the fact that the uranium oxide is not separated in the volatilization step upon direct contact with SF{sub 6} at moderately high temperatures (? 1000{deg}C), this fluoride approach may be wellsuited for head-end processing for Gen IV reactor designs where the LWR is treated as a fuel stock, and it is not desired to separate the uranium from plutonium, but it is desired to separate many of the volatile fission products. 3. It is likely that removal of the volatile fission products from the uranium oxide should simplify both traditional and next generation pyroprocessing techniques. 4. SF{sub 6} treatment to remove volatile fission products, with or without treatment with additional fluorinators, could be used to simplify the separations of traditional aqueous processes in similar fashion to the FLUOREX process. Further research should be conducted to determine the separations efficiency of a combined SF{sub 6}/NF{sub 3} separations approach which could be used as a stand-alone separations technology or a head-end process.

Gray, J.; Torres, R.; Korinko, P.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Becnel, J.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Adams, T.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

Locking support for nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A locking device for supporting and locking a nuclear fuel assembly within a cylindrical bore formed by a support plate, the locking device including a support and locking sleeve having upwardly extending fingers forming wedge shaped contact portions arranged for interaction between an annular tapered surface on the fuel assembly and the support plate bore as well as downwardly extending fingers having wedge shaped contact portions arranged for interaction between an annularly tapered surface on the support plate bore and the fuel assembly whereby the sleeve tends to support and lock the fuel assembly in place within the bore by its own weight while facilitating removal and/or replacement of the fuel assembly.

Ledin, Eric (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents September 30, 2013 Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. February 22, 2013 Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal This report provides findings from a set of social science studies

218

Future nuclear fuel cycles: prospects and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solvent extraction has played, from the early steps, a major role in the development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies, both in the front end and back end. Today's stakes in the field of energy enhance further than before the need for a sustainable management of nuclear materials. Recycling actinides appears as a main guideline, as much for saving resources as for minimizing the final waste impact, and many options can be considered. Strengthened by the important and outstanding performance of recent PUREX processing plants, solvent-extraction processes seem a privileged route to meet the new and challenging requirements of sustainable future nuclear systems. (author)

Boullis, Bernard [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Centre de Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Supervision applied to nuclear fuel reprocessing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model‐based supervision developed by systems analysts has become an acknowledged supervision aid, ensuring early detection of malfunctions and thereby allowing control of the availability and vulnerability of a process facility. However, it is associated ... Keywords: Supervision, diagnostic reasoning, nuclear fuel reprocessing, technical processes

Jacky Montmain

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Advanced Nuclear Fuel | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-based Technologies Advanced Nuclear Fuel Advanced Nuclear Fuel Y-12 developers co-roll zirconium clad LEU-Mo. The Y-12 National Security Complex has over 60 years of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Summary of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world  

SciTech Connect

This review of international practices for nuclear fuel reprocessing was prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world. The sources of information are widely varied.

Mellinger, P.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level...

223

Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

224

Innovative nuclear fuels: results and strategy  

SciTech Connect

To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on the thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion of oxide fuels. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on ceramic fuels with a focus on predictions of point defect concentrations, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, gas bubble formation and temperature evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. The second part of the talk is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. Four initiative are proposed to accelerate the discovery and design of new materials: (a) Develop an international pool of experts, (b) Create Institutes for Materials Discovery and Design, (c) Create an International Knowledge base for experimental data, models (mathematical expressions), and simulations (codes) and (d) Organize international workshops and conference sessions. The paper ends with a discussion of existing and emerging international collaborations.

Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal ...  

dry cask storage of used nuclear fuel at existing plant ... achievement of geologic disposal thermal management ... Senior Technology Commercialization Manager ...

226

Nuclear fuel cycles for mid-century development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of nuclear fuel cycles was carried out. Fuel cycles reviewed include: once-through fuel cycles in LWRs, PHWRs, HTGRs, and fast gas cooled breed and burn reactors; single-pass recycle schemes: plutonium ...

Parent, Etienne, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Nuclear reactor core and fuel element therefor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. This core consists of vertical columns of disengageable fuel elements stacked one atop another. These columns are arranged in side-by-side relationship to form a substantially continuous horizontal array. Each of the fuel elements include a block of refractory material having relatively good thermal conductivity and neutron moderating characteristics. The block has a pair of parallel flat top and bottom end faces and sides which are substantially prependicular to the end faces. The sides of each block is aligned vertically within a vertical column, with the sides of vertically adjacent blocks. Each of the blocks contains fuel chambers, including outer rows containing only fuel chambers along the sides of the block have nuclear fuel material disposed in them. The blocks also contain vertical coolant holes which are located inside the fuel chambers in the outer rows and the fuel chambers which are not located in the outer rows with the fuel chambers and which extend axially completely through from end face to end face and form continuous vertical intracolumn coolant passageways in the reactor core. The blocks have vertical grooves extending along the sides of the blocks form interblock channels which align in groups to form continuous vertical intercolumn coolant passsageways in the reactor core. The blocks are in the form of a regular hexagonal prism with each side of the block having vertical gooves defining one half of one of the coolant interblock channels, six corner edges on the blocks have vertical groves defining one-third of an interblock channel, the vertical sides of the blocks defining planar vertical surfaces.

Fortescue, P.

1986-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Nuclear Fuel Handling Equipment Application and Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling is a critical item during a nuclear power plant refueling outage. The proper operation of fuel handling equipment, such as fuel handling machines, fuel upending machines, fuel transfer carriages, and fuel elevators, is important to a successful refueling outage and to preparing fuel for eventual disposal.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan  

SciTech Connect

Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project`s current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M&O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M&O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins.

Debban, B.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Alabama Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","5,043",15.6,"37,941",24.9 "Coal","11,441",35.3,"63,050",41.4 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","3,272",10.1,"8,704",5.7 "Natural Gas","11,936",36.8,"39,235",25.8 "Other1",100,0.3,643,0.4 "Other Renewable1",583,1.8,"2,377",1.6 "Petroleum",43,0.1,200,0.1 "Total","32,417",100.0,"152,151",100.0

232

Florida Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (nw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,924",6.6,"23,936",10.4 "Coal","9,975",16.9,"59,897",26.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",55,0.1,177,0.1 "Natural Gas","31,563",53.4,"128,634",56.1 "Other1",544,0.9,"2,842",1.2 "Other Renewable1","1,053",1.8,"4,487",2.0 "Petroleum","12,033",20.3,"9,122",4.0 "Total","59,147",100.0,"229,096",100.0

233

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,835",11.5,"15,023",24.6 "Coal","4,535",28.4,"28,152",46.2 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,369",8.6,"3,658",6.0 "Natural Gas","7,894",49.4,"12,469",20.4 "Other1","-","-",28,"*" "Other Renewable1",326,2.0,"1,624",2.7 "Petroleum",22,0.1,45,0.1 "Total","15,981",100.0,"61,000",100.0

234

Texas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,966",4.6,"41,335",10.0 "Coal","22,335",20.6,"150,173",36.5 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",689,0.6,"1,262",0.3 "Natural Gas","69,291",64.0,"186,882",45.4 "Other1",477,0.4,"3,630",0.9 "Other Renewable1","10,295",9.5,"27,705",6.7 "Petroleum",204,0.2,708,0.2 "Total","108,258",100.0,"411,695",100.0

235

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","9,540",20.9,"77,828",33.9 "Coal","18,481",40.6,"110,369",48.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","2,268",5.0,"1,624",0.7 "Natural Gas","9,415",20.7,"33,718",14.7 "Other1",100,0.2,"1,396",0.6 "Other Renewable1","1,237",2.7,"4,245",1.8 "Petroleum","4,534",9.9,571,0.2 "Total","45,575",100.0,"229,752",100.0

236

California Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,390",6.5,"32,201",15.8 "Coal",374,0.6,"2,100",1.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","13,954",20.7,"33,260",16.3 "Natural Gas","41,370",61.4,"107,522",52.7 "Other1",220,0.3,"2,534",1.2 "Other Renewable1","6,319",9.4,"25,450",12.5 "Petroleum",701,1.0,"1,059",0.5 "Total","67,328",100.0,"204,126",100.0

237

Arizona Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (nw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",3937,14.9,"31,200",27.9 "Coal","6,233",23.6,"43,644",39.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","2,937",11.1,"6,831",6.1 "Natural Gas","13,012",49.3,"29,676",26.6 "Other1","-","-",15,"*" "Other Renewable1",181,0.7,319,0.3 "Petroleum",93,0.4,66,0.1 "Total","26,392",100.0,"111,751",100.0

238

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,142",8.0,"18,639",18.1 "Coal","3,417",12.8,"23,924",23.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",192,0.7,"1,109",1.1 "Natural Gas","19,574",73.2,"51,344",49.9 "Other1",213,0.8,"2,120",2.1 "Other Renewable1",325,1.2,"2,468",2.4 "Petroleum",881,3.3,"3,281",3.2 "Total","26,744",100.0,"102,885",100.0

239

Illinois Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","11,441",25.9,"96,190",47.8 "Coal","15,551",35.2,"93,611",46.5 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",34,0.1,119,0.1 "Natural Gas","13,771",31.2,"5,724",2.8 "Other1",145,0.3,461,0.2 "Other Renewable1","2,078",4.7,"5,138",2.6 "Petroleum","1,106",2.5,110,0.1 "Total","44,127",100.0,"201,352",100.0

240

Missouri Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,190",5.5,"8,996",9.7 "Coal","12,070",55.5,"75,047",81.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,221",5.6,"2,427",2.6 "Natural Gas","5,579",25.7,"4,690",5.1 "Other1","-","-",39,"*" "Other Renewable1",466,2.1,988,1.1 "Petroleum","1,212",5.6,126,0.1 "Total","21,739",100.0,"92,313",100.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, smmer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, smmer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",685,5.0,"5,918",13.8 "Coal","1,669",12.2,"8,306",19.4 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,942",14.2,659,1.5 "Natural Gas","6,063",44.3,"25,582",59.8 "Other1",3,"*",771,1.8 "Other Renewable1",304,2.2,"1,274",3.0 "Petroleum","3,031",22.1,296,0.7 "Total","13,697",100.0,"42,805",100.0

242

Georgia Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,061",11.1,"33,512",24.4 "Coal","13,230",36.1,"73,298",53.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","3,851",10.5,"3,044",2.2 "Natural Gas","12,668",34.6,"23,884",17.4 "Other1","-","-",18,"*" "Other Renewable1",637,1.7,"3,181",2.3 "Petroleum","2,189",6.0,641,0.5 "Total","36,636",100.0,"137,577",100.0

243

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,401",15.9,"27,739",33.7 "Coal","8,805",41.1,"43,670",53.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","4,277",20.0,"7,416",9.0 "Natural Gas","4,655",21.7,"2,302",2.8 "Other1","-","-",16,"*" "Other Renewable1",222,1.0,988,1.2 "Petroleum",58,0.3,217,0.3 "Total","21,417",100.0,"82,349",100.0

244

Method and apparatus for close packing of nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention is a plate of neutron absorbing material. The plate may have a releasable locking feature permitting the plate to be secured within a nuclear fuel assembly between nuclear fuel rods during storage or transportation then removed for further use or destruction. The method of the present invention has the step of placing a plate of neutron absorbing material between nuclear fuel rods within a nuclear fuel assembly, preferably between the two outermost columns of nuclear fuel rods. Additionally, the plate may be releasably locked in place.

Newman, D.F.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method and apparatus for close packing of nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention is a plate of neutron absorbing material. The plate may have a releasable locking feature permitting the plate to be secured within a nuclear fuel assembly between nuclear fuel rods during storage or transportation then removed for further use or destruction. The method of the present invention has the step of placing a plate of neutron absorbing material between nuclear fuel rods within a nuclear fuel assembly, preferably between the two outermost columns of nuclear fuel rods. Additionally, the plate may be releasably locked in place.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

52] J.H. Rust. Nuclear Power Plant Engineering. Buchanan,the economics of nuclear power plants. In addition, the longin commercial nuclear power plants. The fuel designs and

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF 3-CYCLE LWR (LIGHT WATER REACTOR) FUEL RODS FROM TURKEY POINT UNIT 3 FOR THE CLIMAX - SPENT FUEL TEST  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The destructive examination results of five light water reactor rods from the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor are presented. The examinations included fission gas collection and analyses, burnup and hydrogen analyses, and a metallographic evaluation of the fuel, cladding, oxide, and hydrides. The rods exhibited a low fission gas release with all other results appearing representative for pressurized water reator fuel rods with similar burnups (28 GWd/MTU) and operating histories.

ATKIN SD

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

1981-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Current Comparison of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares potential nuclear fuel cycle strategies – once-through, recycling in thermal reactors, sustained recycle with a mix of thermal and fast reactors, and sustained recycle with fast reactors. Initiation of recycle starts the draw-down of weapons-usable material and starts accruing improvements for geologic repositories and energy sustainability. It reduces the motivation to search for potential second geologic repository sites. Recycle in thermal-spectru

Steven Piet; Trond Bjornard; Brent Dixon; Robert Hill; Gretchen Matthern; David Shropshire

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NUCLEAR REACTOR AND THERMIONIC FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent relates to the direct conversion of fission heat to electricity by use of thermionic plasma diodes having fissionable material cathodes, said diodes arranged to form a critical mass in a nuclear reactor. The patent describes a fuel element comprising a plurality of diodes each having a fissionable material cathode, an anode around said cathode, and an ionizable gas therebetween. Provision is made for flowing the gas and current serially through the diodes. (AEC)

Rasor, N.S.; Hirsch, R.L.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research Program Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This overview introduces the Nuclear Fuel Industry (NFIR) program to member utilities while also serving as a research status update for program participants. It includes detailed descriptions of various projects, relating both the technical backgrounds and the overall scope of work. NFIR program activities are geared toward providing long-term benefits to utilities and vendors by ensuring the safe and reliable use of core materials and components. Specific information can be obtained from published tech...

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

252

Financing Strategies for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect

To help meet our nation’s energy needs, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is being considered more and more as a necessary step in a future nuclear fuel cycle, but incorporating this step into the fuel cycle will require considerable investment. This report presents an evaluation of financing scenarios for reprocessing facilities integrated into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options, from fully government owned to fully private owned, was evaluated using a DPL (Dynamic Programming Language) 6.0 model, which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest life-cycle cost, lowest unit cost). Though all business decisions follow similar logic with regard to financing, reprocessing facilities are an exception due to the range of financing options available. The evaluation concludes that lowest unit costs and lifetime costs follow a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. Other financing arrangements, however, including regulated utility ownership and a hybrid ownership scheme, led to acceptable costs, below the Nuclear Energy Agency published estimates. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual capacity led to the greatest fluctuations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; the annual operating costs dominate the government case. It is concluded that to finance the construction and operation of such a facility without government ownership could be feasible with measures taken to mitigate risk, and that factors besides unit costs should be considered (e.g., legal issues, social effects, proliferation concerns) before making a decision on financing strategy.

David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

Dwyer, O.E.

1958-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

255

Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses. Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the

256

Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

Ougouag, Abderrafi M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Shelley, ID); Gougar, Hans D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal January 26, 2012 - 2:30pm Addthis Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future was formed at the direction of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of polices for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. If we are going to ensure that the United States remains at the forefront of nuclear safety and security, non-proliferation, and nuclear energy technology we must develop an effective strategy and workable plan for the safe and secure management and disposal of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. That is why I asked General Scowcroft and Representative Hamilton to draw on their

258

Development of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to Measure the Fissile Content in Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of non-destructive assay (NDA) capabilities to directly measure the fissile content in spent fuel is needed to improve the timely detection of the diversion of significant quantities of fissile material. Currently, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not have effective NDA methods to verify spent fuel and recover continuity of knowledge in the event of a containment and surveillance systems failure. This issue has become increasingly critical with the worldwide expansion of nuclear power, adoption of enhanced safeguards criteria for spent fuel verification, and recent efforts by the IAEA to incorporate an integrated safeguards regime. In order to address these issues, the use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) has been developed to improve existing nuclear safeguards and material accountability measurements. The following characteristics of SINRD were analyzed: (1) ability to measure the fissile content in Light Water Reactors (LWR) fuel assemblies and (2) sensitivity and penetrability of SINRD to the removal of fuel pins from an assembly. The Monte Carlo Neutral Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to simulate SINRD for different geometries. Experimental measurements were also performed with SINRD and were compared to MCNPX simulations of the experiment to verify the accuracy of the MCNPX model of SINRD. Based on the results from these simulations and measurements, we have concluded that SINRD provides a number of improvements over current IAEA verification methods. These improvements include: 1) SINRD provides absolute measurements of burnup independent of the operator’s declaration. 2) SINRD is sensitive to pin removal over the entire burnup range and can verify the diversion of 6% of fuel pins within 3? from LWR spent LEU and MOX fuel. 3) SINRD is insensitive to the boron concentration and initial fuel enrichment and can therefore be used at multiple spent fuel storage facilities. 4) The calibration of SINRD at one reactor facility carries over to reactor sites in different countries because it uses the ratio of fission chambers (FCs) that are not facility dependent. 5) SINRD can distinguish fresh and 1-cycle spent MOX fuel from 3- and 4-cycles spent LEU fuel without using reactor burnup codes.

Lafleur, Adrienne

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel assemblies [412.3 metric ton heavy metal (MTHM)] and 3 canisters of greater-than-class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. Photo courtesy of Connecticut Yankee (http://www.connyankee.com/html/fuel_storage.html). Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel

260

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs SUMMARY This EIS considers programmatic (DOE-wide) alternative approaches to safely, efficiently, and responsibly manage existing and projected quantities of spent nuclear fuel until the year 2035. This amount of time may be required to make and implement a decision on the ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. DOE's spent nuclear fuel responsibilities include fuel generated by DOE production, research, and development reactors; naval reactors; university and foreign research reactors; domestic non-DOE reactors such as those at the National Institute

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Jones, R.; Carter, J.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Carter, J.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W. [Packaging Technology, Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States); Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Thermal regimes of high burn-up nuclear fuel rod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature distribution in the nuclear fuel rods for high burn-up is studied. We use the numerical and analytical approaches. It is shown that the time taken to have the stationary thermal regime of nuclear fuel rod is less than one minute. We can make the inference that the behavior of the nuclear fuel rod can be considered as a stationary task. Exact solutions of the temperature distribution in the fuel rods in the stationary case are found. Thermal regimes of high burn-up the nuclear fuel rods are analyzed.

Kudryashov, Nikolai A; Chmykhov, Mikhail A; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2009.05.063

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Effect of Highly Enriched/Highly Burnt UO2 Fuels on Fuel Cycle Costs, Radiotoxicity, and Nuclear Design Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Increased Enrichment/High Burnup and Light Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization

Robert Gregg; Andrew Worrall

267

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S.J. Thompson,“Determining Plutonium in Spent Fuel withTobin, “Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelFluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fuel Cycle Technologies Program - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

269

A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a   Geologic   Repository”,   Nuclear  Technology,   154,  in  decommissioned  U.S.  nuclear   facilities,  German  Framework   for   Nuclear   Fuel   Cycle   Concepts,”  

Djokic, Denia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Pyroprocess for processing spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a pyroprocess for processing spent nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel is chopped into pieces and placed in a basket which is lowered in to a liquid salt solution. The salt is rich in ZrF.sub.4 and containing alkali or alkaline earth fluorides, and in particular, the salt chosen was LiF-50 mol % ZrF.sub.4 with a eutectic melting point of 500.degree. C. Prior to lowering the basket, the salt is heated to a temperature of between 550.degree. C. and 700.degree. C. in order to obtain a molten solution. After dissolution the oxides of U, Th, rare earth and other like oxides, the salt bath solution is subject to hydro-fluorination to remove the oxygen and then to a fluorination step to remove U as gaseous UF.sub.6. In addition, after dissolution, the basket contains PuO.sub.2 and undissolved parts of the fuel rods, and the basket and its contents are processed to remove the Pu.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Lockport, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Screen Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options The Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) invests in research and development (R&D) to ensure that the United States will maintain its domestic nuclear energy capability and scientific and technical leadership in the international community of nuclear power nations in the years ahead. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap presents a high-level vision and framework for R&D activities that are needed to keep the nuclear energy option viable in the near term and to expand its use in the decades ahead. The roadmap identifies the development

272

Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Microsoft Word - spent nuclear fuel report.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel at the Savannah River Site DOE/IG-0727 May 2006 REPORT ON MANAGEMENT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TABLE OF CONTENTS Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Details of Finding 1 Recommendations 2 Comments 3 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 4 2. Prior Audit Reports 5 3. Management Comments 6 SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL MANGEMENT Page 1 Details of Finding H-Canyon The Department of Energy's (Department) spent nuclear fuel Operations program at the Savannah River Site (Site) will likely require Extended H-Canyon to be maintained at least two years beyond defined operational needs. The Department committed to maintain H-Canyon operational readiness to provide a disposal path for

275

EIS-0279: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Aiken, South Carolina | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

79: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Aiken, South Carolina 79: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0279: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 5, 2013 EIS-0279: Amended Record of Decision Spent Nuclear Fuel Management at the Savannah River Site April 1, 2013 EIS-0279-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management (DOE/EIS-0279-SA-01 and

276

Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Thermomechanical analysis of innovative nuclear fuel pin designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One way to increase the power of a nuclear reactor is to change the solid cylindrical fuel to Internally and Externally Cooled (I&EC) annular fuel, and adjust the flow and the core inlet coolant temperature. The switch to ...

Lerch Andrew (Andrew J.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Optimum Discharge Burnup for Nuclear Fuel: A Comprehensive Study of Duke Power's Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic analysis of two pressurized water reactors (PWRs) shows that increasing the discharge burnup of light water reactor (LWR) fuel above current values can result in significant cost benefits. Optimum discharge burnup levels, however, may not be achievable without exceeding the current limit on enrichment.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. Arizona Strip Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Founded in 1975 by uranium pioneer, Robert W. Adams, Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. (EFNI) emerged as the largest US uranium mining company by the mid-1980s. Confronting the challenges of declining uranium market prices and the development of high-grade ore bodies in Australia and Canada, EFNI aggressively pursued exploration and development of breccia-pipe ore bodies in Northwestern Arizona. As a result, EFNI's production for the Arizona Strip of 18.9 million pounds U[sub 3]O[sub 8] over the period 1980 through 1991, maintained the company's status as a leading US uranium producer.

Pool, T.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The International Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research April 16, 2013 - 12:19pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of its commitment to developing an effective strategy for the safe and secure storage and management of used nuclear fuel, the Energy Department today announced a new dry storage research and development project led by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The project will design and demonstrate dry storage cask technology for high burn-up spent nuclear fuels that have been removed from commercial nuclear power plants. "The Energy Department is committed to advancing clean, reliable and safe nuclear power - which provides the largest source of low-carbon

282

Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research April 16, 2013 - 12:19pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of its commitment to developing an effective strategy for the safe and secure storage and management of used nuclear fuel, the Energy Department today announced a new dry storage research and development project led by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The project will design and demonstrate dry storage cask technology for high burn-up spent nuclear fuels that have been removed from commercial nuclear power plants. "The Energy Department is committed to advancing clean, reliable and safe nuclear power - which provides the largest source of low-carbon

283

Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal ...  

ORNL 2011-G00239/jcn UUT-B ID 201102603 09.2011 Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Canister System Technology Summary

284

W-86: Porosity Characterization of Surrogates for Oxide Nuclear Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

W-118: Titania Based One-Dimensional Nanomaterials for Lithium Ion Batteries .... W-86: Porosity Characterization of Surrogates for Oxide Nuclear Fuels: A ...

285

Anode Materials for Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to consume current stockpiles, uranium dioxide spent nuclear fuel will be .... and Synthesis of Intermetallic Clathrates for Energy Storage and Recovery.

286

Spent Nuclear Fuel project integrated safety management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is being revised in its entirety and the document title is being revised to ``Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Safety Management Plan.

Daschke, K.D.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel ...  

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is ...

288

Nano-particles for Spent Nuclear Fuel Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... Development and Testing Advanced Ferritic Steels for Fast Reactor ...

289

Fuel Integrity Monitoring and Failure Evaluation Handbook, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook documents the current status of light water reactor (LWR) fuel integrity monitoring activities in the U.S. nuclear power industry, with an emphasis on current fuel reliability methods and fuel failure mitigation techniques. The handbook provides information on boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel release activity monitoring techniques, including trending and interpreting the activity data with respect to the condition of the failed rods. It also presents an i...

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

290

Composite Nuclear Fuel Pellet - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

ORNL 2010-G0613-jcn UT-B ID 200902238 Composite Nuclear Fuel Pellet Technology Summary To improve rates of nuclear power generation, ORNL has patented a way to increase

291

Risk and Responsibility Sharing in Nuclear Spent Fuel Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the responsibility of American utilities in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel was limited to the payment of a fee. This narrow involvement did not result in faster ...

De Roo, Guillaume

292

Method and means of packaging nuclear fuel rods for handling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel rods, especially spent nuclear fuel rods that may show physical distortion, are encased within a metallic enclosing structure by forming a tube about the fuel rod. The tube has previously been rolled to form an overlapping tubular structure and then unrolled and coiled about an axis perpendicular to the tube. The fuel rod is inserted into the tube as the rolled tube is removed from a coiled strip and allowed to reassume its tubular shape about the fuel rod. Rollers support the coiled strip in an open position as the coiled strip is uncoiled and allowed to roll about the fuel rod.

Adam, Milton F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

CHARACTERIZATION OF HYDROGEN CONTENT IN ZIRCALOY-4 NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessment of hydrogen uptake of underwater nuclear fuel clad and component materials will enable improved monitoring of fuel health. Zirconium alloys are used in nuclear reactors as fuel cladding, fuel channels, guide tubes and spacer grids, and are available for inspection in spent fuel pools. With increasing reactor exposure zirconium alloys experience hydrogen ingress due to neutron interactions and water-side corrosion that is not easily quantified without destructive hot cell examination. Contact and non-contact nondestructive techniques, using Seebeck coefficient measurements and low frequency impedance spectroscopy, to assess the hydrogen content and hydride formation within zircaloy 4 material that are submerged to simulate spent fuel pools are presented.

Pfeif, E. A.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D. L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Lasseigne, A. N. [Generation 2 Materials Technology LLC, Firestone, CO 80504 (United States); Krzywosz, K.; Mader, E. V. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

294

Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analyses Analyses Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analyses The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology, has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The Storage and Transportation activities within the UFDC are being developed to address issues regarding the extended storage of UNF and its subsequent

295

Simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel using the fission-product extraction process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fission-Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) for the simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent LWR fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository and, when combined with the separation of Am and Cm, could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-di-(t-butyl-dicyclohexano)- 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and calix[4]arene-bis-(t-octyl-benzo-crown-6 ) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium, and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with simulated and actual spent-nuclear-fuel feed solution in centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, co-extraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance ar e discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel. Recent advances in the evaluation of alternative calixarenes with increased solubility and stability are also detailed. (authors)

Law, J.D.; Peterman, D.R.; Riddle, C.L.; Meikrantz, D.A.; Todd, T.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3870 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Economics of nuclear fuel cycles : option valuation and neutronics simulation of mixed oxide fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In most studies aiming at the economic assessment of nuclear fuel cycles, a primary concern is to keep scenarios economically comparable. For Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels, a traditional way to achieve ...

De Roo, Guillaume

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Separator assembly for use in spent nuclear fuel shipping cask  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator assembly for use in a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

Bucholz, James A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies, and discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this

299

COUPON SURVEILLANCE FOR CORROSION MONITORING IN NUCLEAR FUEL BASIN  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum and stainless steel coupons were put into a nuclear fuel basin to monitor the effect of water chemistry on the corrosion of fuel cladding. These coupons have been monitored for over ten years. The corrosion and pitting data is being used to model the kinetics and estimate the damage that is occurring to the fuel cladding.

Mickalonis, J.; Murphy, T.; Deible, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Fuel cycle stewardship in a nuclear renaissance 5 Recommendation 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fuel, thereby decreasing the attractiveness of plutonium in spent fuel for use in nuclear weapons plan for its reuse. This plan should seek to: · Minimise the amount of separated plutonium produced and the time for which it needs to be stored. · Convert separated plutonium into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel as soon

Rambaut, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, USof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the National Nuclear Security Administration, US Departmentof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,247",29.8,"10,910",49.2 "Coal",546,13.1,"3,083",13.9 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",489,11.7,"1,478",6.7 "Natural Gas","1,215",29.1,"5,365",24.2 "Other1","-","-",57,0.3 "Other Renewable1",182,4.4,"1,232",5.6 "Petroleum",501,12.0,72,0.3 "Total","4,180",100.0,"22,196",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

304

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,108",22.3,"32,771",49.9 "Coal","2,036",11.1,"6,418",9.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",404,2.2,-176,-0.3 "Natural Gas","10,244",55.6,"24,902",37.9 "Other1",56,0.3,682,1.0 "Other Renewable1",226,1.2,850,1.3 "Petroleum","1,351",7.3,235,0.4 "Total","18,424",100.0,"65,682",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

305

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lattice type fissionable fuel structure for a nuclear reactor is described. The fissionable material is formed into a plurality of rod-llke bodies with each encased in a fluid-tight jacket. A plurality of spaced longitudinal fins are mounted on the exterior and extend radially from each jacket, with a portion of the fins extending radially beyond the remainder of the fins. A collar of short length for each body is mounted on the extended fins for spacing the bodies, and adjacent bodies abut each other through these collars. Should distortion of the bodies take place, coilapse of the outer fins is limited by the shorter flns, thereby insuring some coolant flow at all times. (AEC)

Duffy, J.G. Jr.

1961-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lattice-type fissionable fuel structure for a nuclear reactor is offered. The fissionable material is formed into a plurality of rod-like bodies each encased in a fluid-tight jacket. A plurality of spaced longitudinal fins are mounted on the exterior of and extend radially from each jacket, and a portion of the fins extends radially beyond the remainder of the fins. A collar of short lengih for each body is mounted on the extended fins for spacing the bodies, and adjacent bodies abut each other through these collars. Should distortion of the bodies take place, collapse of the outer fins is limited by the shorter fins thereby insuring some coolant flow therethrough at all times.

Duffy, J.G. Jr.

1961-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Electric heater for nuclear fuel rod simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an electric cartridge-type heater for use as a simulator for a nuclear fuel pin in reactor studies. The heater comprises an elongated cylindrical housing containing a longitudinally extending helically wound heating element with the heating element radially inwardly separated from the housing. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of boron nitride electrically insulate the heating element from the housing while providing good thermal conductivity. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of magnesia or a magnesia-15 percent boron nitride mixture are disposed in the cavity of the helical heating element. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the magnesia or the magnesia-boron nitride mixture is higher than that of the boron nitride disposed about the heating element for urging the boron nitride radially outwardly against the housing during elevated temperatures to assure adequate thermal contact between the housing and the boron nitride.

McCulloch, Reginald W. (Knoxville, TN); Morgan, Jr., Chester S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dial, Ralph E. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository. There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected.

Dixon, B.W.; Piet, S.J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year`s report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Analysis of Nuclear Proliferation Resistance of DUPIC Fuel Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with other fuel cycle cases. The other fuel cycles considered in this study are PWR of once-through mode (PWR-OT), PWR of reprocessing mode (PWR-MOX), in which spent PWR fuel is reprocessed and recovered plutonium is used for making MOX (Mixed Oxide), CANDU with once-through mode (CANDU-OT), PWR fuel and CANDU fuel in a oncethrough mode with reactor grid equivalent to DUPIC fuel cycle (PWR-CANDU-OT). This study is focused on intrinsic barriers, especially, radiation field of the diverted material, which could be a significant accessibility barrier, amount of special nuclear material based on 1 GWe-yr that has to be diverted and the quality of the separated fissile material. It is indicated from plutonium analysis of each fuel cycle that the MOX spent fuel is containing the largest plutonium per MTHM but PWR-MOX option based on 1 GWe-yr has the best benefit in total plutonium consumption aspects. The DUPIC option is containing a little higher total plutonium based on 1 GWe-yr than the PWR-MOX case, but the DUPIC option has the lowest fissile plutonium content which could be another measure for proliferation resistance. On the whole, the CANDU-OT option has the largest fissile plutonium as well as total plutonium per GWe-yr, which means negative points in nuclear proliferation resistance aspects. It is indicated from the radiation field analysis that fresh DUPIC fuel could play an important radiation barrier role, more than even CANDU spent fuels. In conclusion, due to those inherent features, the DUPIC fuel cycle could include technical characteristics that comply naturally with the Spent Fuel Standard, at all steps along the DUPIC linkage between PWR and CANDU. KEYWORDS: DUPIC (direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU), (DUPIC) fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle analysis, nuclear proliferaion resistance, proliferation resistance barrier, safeguards, plutonium analysis, candu type reactors, spent fuels, fuel cycles I.

Won Il Ko; Ho Dong Kim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Benefits and concerns of a closed nuclear fuel cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power can play an important role in our energy future, contributing to increasing electricity demand while at the same time decreasing carbon dioxide emissions. However, the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States today is unsustainable. As stated in the 1982 Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of spent nuclear fuel generated by commercial nuclear power plants operating in a “once-through” fuel cycle in the deep geologic repository located at Yucca Mountain. However, unyielding political opposition to the site has hindered the commissioning process to the extant that the current administration has recently declared the unsuitability of the Yucca Mountain site. In light of this the DOE is exploring other options, including closing the fuel cycle through recycling and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of closing the fuel cycle is receiving special attention because of its ability to minimize the final high level waste (HLW) package as well as recover additional energy value from the original fuel. The technology is, however, still very controversial because of the increased cost and proliferation risk it can present. To lend perspective on the closed fuel cycle alternative, this presents the arguments for and against closing the fuel cycle with respect to sustainability, proliferation risk, commercial viability, waste management, and energy security.

Widder, Sarah H.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

Decision Framework for Evaluating Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is working to develop tools to support long-term strategic planning for research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) of advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies for electricity generation. The development of a decision framework to help guide the eventual deployment of advanced nuclear technologies represents a key component of this effort. This interim report describes the structure of a prototypical EPRI decision framework and illustrates how that framework can be applied to assess nuclear fuel...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of determining Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies.

Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Nondestructive verification and assay systems for spent fuels  

SciTech Connect

This is an interim report of a study concerning the potential application of nondestructive measurements on irradiated light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels at spent-fuel storage facilities. It describes nondestructive measurement techniques and instruments that can provide useful data for more effective in-plant nuclear materials management, better safeguards and criticality safety, and more efficient storage of spent LWR fuel. In particular, several nondestructive measurement devices are already available so that utilities can implement new fuel-management and storage technologies for better use of existing spent-fuel storage capacity. The design of an engineered prototype in-plant spent-fuel measurement system is approx. 80% complete. This system would support improved spent-fuel storage and also efficient fissile recovery if spent-fuel reprocessing becomes a reality.

Cobb, D.D.; Phillips, J.R.; Bosler, G.E.; Eccleston, G.W.; Halbig, J.K.; Hatcher, C.R.; Hsue, S.T.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fuel rod retention device for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for supporting a nuclear fuel rod in a fuel rod assembly which allows the rod to be removed without disturbing other rods in the assembly. A fuel rod cap connects the rod to a bolt which is supported in the assembly end fitting by means of a locking assembly. The device is designed so that the bolt is held securely during normal reactor operation yet may be easily disengaged and the fuel rod removed when desired.

Hylton, Charles L. (Madison Heights, VA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; ... from fossil fuels, non-biogenic ...

319

Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the M2 milestone M2FT-13PN0912022, “Stranded Sites De-Inventorying Report.” In January 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013). Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses (BRC 2012). Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the nuclear power reactors have been shut down and the site has been decommissioned or is undergoing decommissioning. In this report, a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel from 12 shutdown sites was conducted. The shutdown sites were Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. These sites have no other operating nuclear power reactors at their sites and have also notified the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that their reactors have permanently ceased power operations and that nuclear fuel has been permanently removed from their reactor vessels. Shutdown reactors at sites having other operating reactors are not included in this evaluation.

Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used nuclear fuel (UNF) must maintain its integrity during the storage period in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and transporting it to treatment or recycling facilities, or to a geologic repository. This RD&D plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. The plan objective is to

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321

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used nuclear fuel (UNF) must maintain its integrity during the storage period in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and transporting it to treatment or recycling facilities, or to a geologic repository. This RD&D plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. The plan objective is to

322

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The AMP (Advanced MultiPhysics) Nuclear Fuel Performance Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AMP (Advanced MultiPhysics) Nuclear Fuel Performance code is a new, three-dimensional, multi-physics tool that uses state-of-the-art solution methods and validated nuclear fuel models to simulate the nominal operation and anticipated operational transients of nuclear fuel. The AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance code leverages existing validated material models from traditional fuel performance codes and the Scale/ORIGEN-S spent-fuel characterization code to provide an initial capability that is shown to be sufficiently accurate for a single benchmark problem and anticipated to be accurate for a broad range of problems. The thermomechanics-chemical foundation can be solved in a time-dependent or quasi-static approach with any variation of operator-split or fully-coupled solutions at each time step. The AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance code provides interoperable interfaces to leading computational mathematics tools, which will simplify the integration of the code into existing parallel code suites for reactor simulation or lower-length-scale coupling. A baseline validation of the AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance code has been performed through the modeling of an experiment in the Halden Reactor Project (IFA-432), which is the first validation problem incorporated in the FRAPCON Integral Assessment report.

Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Cochran, Bill [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Barai, Pallab [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Dilts, Gary A [ORNL; Mihaila, Bogdan [ORNL; Yesilyurt, Gokhan [ORNL; Lee, Jung Ho [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Banfield, James E [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Modeling Nuclear Fuels with a Combined Potts-Phase Field Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Science Challenges for Nuclear Applications. Presentation Title, Modeling Nuclear Fuels with a Combined Potts-Phase Field Model.

325

Review of Transmutation Fuel Studies  

SciTech Connect

The technology demonstration element of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is aimed at demonstrating the closure of the fuel cycle by destroying the transuranic (TRU) elements separated from spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Multiple recycle through fast reactors is used for burning the TRU initially separated from light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. For the initial technology demonstration, the preferred option to demonstrate the closed fuel cycle destruction of TRU materials is a sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR) used as burner reactor. The sodium-cooled fast reactor represents the most mature sodium reactor technology available today. This report provides a review of the current state of development of fuel systems relevant to the sodium-cooled fast reactor. This report also provides a review of research and development of TRU-metal alloy and TRU-oxide composition fuels. Experiments providing data supporting the understanding of minor actinide (MA)-bearing fuel systems are summarized and referenced.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management, Tucson, AZ,Assay, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 51st Annual

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

AN ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING RELIABLE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICE APPROACHES: ECONOMIC AND NON-PROLIFERATION MERITS OF NUCLEAR FUEL LEASING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of international nuclear policy since the dawn of nuclear power has been the peaceful expansion of nuclear energy while controlling the spread of enrichment and reprocessing technology. Numerous initiatives undertaken in the intervening decades to develop international agreements on providing nuclear fuel supply assurances, or reliable nuclear fuel services (RNFS) attempted to control the spread of sensitive nuclear materials and technology. In order to inform the international debate and the development of government policy, PNNL has been developing an analytical framework to holistically evaluate the economics and non-proliferation merits of alternative approaches to managing the nuclear fuel cycle (i.e., cradle-to-grave). This paper provides an overview of the analytical framework and discusses preliminary results of an economic assessment of one RNFS approach: full-service nuclear fuel leasing. The specific focus of this paper is the metrics under development to systematically evaluate the non-proliferation merits of fuel-cycle management alternatives. Also discussed is the utility of an integrated assessment of the economics and non-proliferation merits of nuclear fuel leasing.

Kreyling, Sean J.; Brothers, Alan J.; Short, Steven M.; Phillips, Jon R.; Weimar, Mark R.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

Pyroprocessing of Fast Flux Test Facility Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electrorefined uranium products exceeded 99%.

B.R. Westphal; G.L. Fredrickson; G.G. Galbreth; D. Vaden; M.D. Elliott; J.C. Price; E.M. Honeyfield; M.N. Patterson; L. A. Wurth

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method of increasing the deterrent to proliferation of nuclear fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of recycling protactinium-231 to enhance the utilization of radioactively hot uranium-232 in nuclear fuel for the purpose of making both fresh and spent fuel more resistant to proliferation. The uranium-232 may be obtained by the irradiation of protactinium-231 which is normally found in the spent fuel rods of a thorium base nuclear reactor. The production of protactinium-231 and uranium-232 would be made possible by the use of the thorium uranium-233 fuel cycle in power reactors.

Rampolla, Donald S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

THE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE: PROSPECTS FOR REDUCING ITS COST  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh would make nuclear power competitive with conventional power in lowcost coal areas if capital and operating costs can be brought to within about 10 percent of those of coal-fired plants. Substantial decreases in fuel fabrication cost are anticipated by 1970: other costs in the fuel cycle are expccted to remain about the same as at present. Unit costs and irradiation levels that would be needed to give a fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh are believed to be attainable by 1970. (auth)

Albrecht, W.L.

1959-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ukraine Loads U.S. Nuclear Fuel into Power Plant as Part of DOE-Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

fficials from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy today (April 8, 2010) participated in a ceremony in Ukraine to mark the insertion of Westinghouse-produced nuclear fuel into a nuclear power plant in Ukraine.

332

Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods.

Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor physics and fuel cycle analysis is a core competency of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division. The Division has played a major role in the design and analysis of advanced reactors, particularly liquid-metal-cooled reactors. NE researchers have concentrated on developing computer codes for

334

The Use of Thorium as Nuclear Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society endorses continued research and development of the use of thorium as a fertile a fuel material for nuclear reactors. Thorium is a potentially valuable energy source since it is about three to four times as abundant in the earth’s crust as uranium and is a widely distributed natural resource, which is readily accessible in many countries. 1 Use of thorium as a fertile fuel material leads to the following: • production of an alternative fissile uranium isotope, uranium-233 • coproduction of a highly radioactive isotope, uranium-232, which provides a high radiation barrier to discourage theft and proliferation of spent fuel. The path to sustainability of nuclear energy in several countries, notably India, profits from technology that utilizes their vast thorium resources. Waste produced during reactor operations benefits from the fact that the thorium-uranium fuel cycle does not readily produce long-lived transuranic elements. To date thorium utilization has been demonstrated in light water reactors, 2 as well as in other reactor types 3 including fast spectrum reactors, heavy water reactors, and gas-cooled reactors. In this context, the database and experience with thorium fuel and fuel cycles are very limited and must be augmented significantly before large-scale investment is committed to commercialization. Since thorium is an abundant resource that can potentially be used as a fertile nuclear fuel, it is likely to be an important contributor to the future global nuclear enterprise in several countries. It is, therefore, paramount that the evolving global thorium fuel cycle (including fuel conditioning and recycling operations) incorporate the latest in safeguards and other proliferation-resistant design features so that the thorium fuel cycle complements the uranium fuel cycle and enhances the long-term global sustainability of nuclear energy.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fabrication of high exposure nuclear fuel pellets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for making a fuel pellet for a nuclear reactor. A mixture is prepared of PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 powders, where the mixture contains at least about 30% PuO.sub.2, and where at least about 12% of the Pu is the Pu.sup.240 isotope. To this mixture is added about 0.3 to about 5% of a binder having a melting point of at least about 250.degree. F. The mixture is pressed to form a slug and the slug is granulated. Up to about 4.7% of a lubricant having a melting point of at least about 330.degree. F. is added to the granulated slug. Both the binder and the lubricant are selected from a group consisting of polyvinyl carboxylate, polyvinyl alcohol, naturally occurring high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, chemically modified high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, and mixtures thereof. The mixture is pressed to form a pellet and the pellet is sintered.

Frederickson, James R. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

338

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

339

Experience in Using Fills for Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fills for SNF Waste Packages Experience in Using Fills for Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages The use of other fill materials in waste packages has been investigated by several...

340

Handbook on Neutron Absorber Materials for Spent Nuclear Fuel Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to become a single source of information regarding technical characteristics of neutron absorber materials that have been used for storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel as well as to provide a summary of users' experience.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

342

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

343

Improved nuclear fuel assembly grid spacer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fuel assembly grid spacer and method of retaining the basic fuel rod support elements in position within the fuel assembly containment channel. The improvement involves attachment of the grids to the hexagonal channel and of forming the basic fuel rod support element into a grid structure, which provides a design which is insensitive to potential channel distortion (ballooning) at high fluence levels. In addition the improved method eliminates problems associated with component fabrication and assembly.

Marshall, John (San Jose, CA); Kaplan, Samuel (Los Gatos, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anthony   V.   Guide  Nuclear  Reactors.   University   of  of   fuel   for   nuclear   reactors—create   wastes  Level  Waste   nuclear reactors, and subsequent utilization

Djokic, Denia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Means for supporting fuel elements in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A grid structure for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a plurality of connecting members forming at least one longitudinally extending opening peripheral and inner fuel element openings through each of which openings at least one nuclear fuel element extends, said connecting members forming wall means surrounding said each peripheral and inner fuel element opening, a pair of rigid projections longitudinally spaced from one another extending from a portion of said wall means into said each peripheral and inner opening for rigidly engaging said each fuel element, respectively, yet permit individual longitudinal slippage thereof, and resilient means formed integrally on and from said wall means and positioned in said each peripheral and inner opening in opposed relationship with said projections and located to engage said fuel element to bias the latter into engagement with said rigid projections, respectively

Andrews, Harry N. (Murrysville, PA); Keller, Herbert W. (Monroeville, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Support grid for fuel elements in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support grid is provided for holding nuclear fuel rods in a rectangular array. Intersecting sheet metal strips are interconnected using opposing slots in the strips to form a rectangular cellular grid structure for engaging the sides of a multiplicity of fuel rods. Spring and dimple supports for engaging fuel and guide rods extending through each cell in the support grid are formed in the metal strips with the springs thus formed being characterized by nonlinear spring rates.

Finch, Lester M. (Pasco, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cold Demonstration of a Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) has moved from the design phase to demonstration of major components. Use of an on-site DTS allows utilities with limited crane capacities or other plant restrictions to take advantage of large efficient storage systems. This system also permits utilities to transfer spent fuel from loaded storage casks to transport casks without returning to their fuel storage pool, a circumstance that may arise during the decommissioning process.

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor...

349

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plants. WASH~1400 (NUREG 75/014). October 1975. S.Power Plants -LWR Edison." NUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRCof Fixed Nuclear Facilities, NUREG-75/l1l (Reprint of WASH-

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Impact of alternative nuclear fuel cycle options on infrastructure and fuel requirements, actinide and waste inventories, and economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel once-through cycle (OTC) scheme currently practiced in the U.S. leads to accumulation of uranium, transuranic (TRU) and fission product inventories in the spent nuclear fuel. Various separation and recycling ...

Guérin, Laurent, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Advances in Development of the Fission Product Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative for the simultaneous separation of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository, and when combined with the separation of americium (Am) and curium (Cm), could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with a simulated feed solution in 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, distribution coefficient data, coextraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance are discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel.

JAck D. Law

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Interim Storage of Used or Spent Nuclear Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports the safe, controlled, licensed, and regulated interim storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) (irradiated, spent fuel from a nuclear power reactor) until disposition can be determined and completed. ANS supports the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) determination that “spent fuel generated in any reactor can be stored safely and without significant environmental impacts for at least 30 years beyond the licensed life for operation. ” 1 Current operational and decommissioned nuclear power plants in the United States were licensed with the expectation that the UNF would be stored at the nuclear power plant site until shipment to an interim storage facility, reprocessing plant, or permanent storage. Because of delays in Federal programs and policy issues, utilities have been forced to store UNF. Current means of interim storage of UNF at nuclear power plant sites include storage of discharged fuel in a water-filled pool or in a sealed dry cask, both under safe, controlled, and monitored conditions. This UNF interim storage is designed, managed, and controlled to minimize or preclude potential radiological hazards or material releases. At nuclear power plant sites in the United States and internationally, this interim storage is regulated under site license requirements and technical specifications imposed by the national or state regulator. In the United States, NRC is the licensing and regulatory authority. ANS believes that UNF interim storage

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Reprocessing of nuclear fuels at the Savannah River Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than 30 years, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has been a major supplier of nuclear materials such as plutonium-239 and tritium-3 for nuclear and thermonuclear weapons, plutonium-238 for space exploration, and isotopes of americium, curium, and californium for use in the nuclear research community. SRP is a complete nuclear park, providing most of the processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. Key processes involve fabrication and cladding of the nuclear fuel, target, and control assemblies; rework of heavy water for use as reactor moderator; reactor loading, operation, and unloading; chemical recovery of the reactor transmutation products and spent fuels; and management of the gaseous, liquid, and solid nuclear and chemical wastes; plus a host of support operations. The site's history and the key processes from fabrication of reactor fuels and targets to finishing of virgin plutonium for use in the nuclear weapons complex are reviewed. Emphasis has been given to the chemistry of the recovery and purification of weapons grade plutonium from irradiated reactor targets.

Gray, L.W.

1986-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

354

Overview of the spent nuclear fuel project at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project`s mission at Hanford is to {open_quotes}Provide safe, economic and environmentally sound management of Hanford spent nuclear fuel in a manner which stages it to final disposition.{close_quotes} The inventory of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site covers a wide variety of fuel types (production reactor to space reactor) in many facilities (reactor fuel basins to hot cells) at locations all over the Site. The 2,129 metric tons of Hanford SNF represents about 80% of the total US Department of Energy (DOE) inventory. About 98.5% of the Hanford SNF is 2,100 metric tons of metallic uranium production reactor fuel currently stored in the 1950s vintage K Basins in the 100 Area. This fuel has been slowly corroding, generating sludge and contaminating the basin water. This condition, coupled with aging facilities with seismic vulnerabilities, has been identified by several groups, including stakeholders, as being one of the most urgent safety and environmental concerns at the Hanford Site. As a direct result of these concerns, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project was recently formed to address spent fuel issues at Hanford. The Project has developed the K Basins Path Forward to remove fuel from the basins and place it in dry interim storage. Alternatives that addressed the requirements were developed and analyzed. The result is a two-phased approach allowing the early removal of fuel from the K Basins followed by its stabilization and interim storage consistent with the national program.

Daily, J.L. [Dept. of Energy, Richland, WA (United States). Richland Operations Office; Fulton, J.C.; Gerber, E.W.; Culley, G.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 3. Alternatives for interim storage and transportation  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for interim storage and transportation. Section titles are: interim storage of spent fuel elements; interim storage of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; tank storage of high-level liquid waste; interim storage of solid non-high-level wastes; interim storage of solidified high-level waste; and, transportation alternatives. (JGB)

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

K Basin spent nuclear fuel characterization  

SciTech Connect

The results of the characterization efforts completed for the N Reactor fuel stored in the Hanford K Basins were Collected and summarized in this single referencable document. This summary provides a ''road map'' for what was done and the results obtained for the fuel characterization program initiated in 1994 and scheduled for completion in 1999 with the fuel oxidation rate measurement under moist inert atmospheres.

LAWRENCE, L.A.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide: (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs; and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids - international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and ...  

Researchers at ORNL have developed an integrated system that reduces the total life-cycle cost of used fuel storage while improving overall safety. This multicanister ...

364

Subcritical transmutation of spent nuclear fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A series of fuel cycle simulations were performed using CEA's reactor physics code ERANOS 2.0 to analyze the transmutation performance of the Subcritical Advanced Burner… (more)

Sommer, Christopher Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NRC's NRC's Integrated Strategy for NRC s Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Earl Easton 1 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission May 25, 2010 Road to Yucca Mountain * 20+ years of preparation for the licensing i review * DOE application received in June 2008 and accepted for review in September 2008 * President Obama pursues alternatives to Yucca Mountain * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 2 * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 * Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future 2 Growing Spent Fuel Inventory Cumulative Used Nuclear Fuel Scenarios 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 Metric Tons 3 - 50,000 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 Year Reference: Crozat, March 2010 Integrated Strategy * In response to the evolving national debate on spent fuel management strategy, NRC initiated a number of actions:

366

Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Analysis Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analysis While both wet and dry storage have been shown to be safe options for storing used nuclear fuel (UNF), the focus of the program is on dry storage of commercial UNF at reactor or centralized locations. This report focuses on the knowledge gaps concerning extended storage identified in numerous domestic and international investigations and provides the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign"s (UFDC) gap description, any alternate gap descriptions, the rankings by the various organizations, evaluation of the priority assignment, and UFDC-recommended action based on the comparison. Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analysis More Documents & Publications

367

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1994-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

Recapturing NERVA-Derived Fuels for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with NASA to examine fuel options for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion applications. Extensive development and testing was performed on graphite-based fuels during the Nuclear Engineer Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) and Rover programs through the early 1970s. This paper explores the possibility of recapturing the technology and the issues associated with using it for the next generation of nuclear thermal rockets. The issues discussed include a comparison of today's testing capabilities, analysis techniques and methods, and knowledge to that of previous development programs and presents a plan to recapture the technology for a flight program.

Qualls, A L [ORNL; Hancock, Emily F [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, ...

Kazimi, Mujid S.

370

GUIDE TO NUCLEAR POWER COST EVALUATION. VOLUME 4. FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

Information on fuel cycle cost is presented. Topics covered include: nuclear fuel, fuel management, fuel cost, fissionable material cost, use charge, conversion and fabrication costs, processing cost, and shipping cost. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

372

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotonically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

Forsberg, Charles W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Brian E. (Pocoima, CA); Benander, Robert E. (Pacoima, CA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Brian E. (Pacoima, CA); Benander, Robert E. (Pacoima, CA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 2. Alternatives for waste treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II of the five-volume report is devoted to the description of alternatives for waste treatment. The discussion is presented under the following section titles: fuel reprocessing modifications; high-level liquid waste solidification; treatment and immobilization of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; treatment of noncombustible solid wastes; treatment of combustible wastes; treatment of non-high-level liquid wastes; recovery of transuranics from non-high-level wastes; immobilization of miscellaneous non-high-level wastes; volatile radioisotope recovery and off-gas treatment; immobilization of volatile radioisotopes; retired facilities (decontamination and decommissioning); and, modification and use of selected fuel reprocessing wastes. (JGB)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Multidimensional Multiphysics Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Important aspects of fuel rod behavior, for example pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), fuel fracture, oxide formation, non- axisymmetric cooling, and response to fuel manufacturing defects, are inherently multidimensional in addition to being complicated multiphysics problems. Many current modeling tools are strictly 2D axisymmetric or even 1.5D. This paper outlines the capabilities of a new fuel modeling tool able to analyze either 2D axisymmetric or fully 3D models. These capabilities include temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of fuel; swelling and densification; fuel creep; pellet fracture; fission gas release; cladding creep; irradiation growth; and gap mechanics (contact and gap heat transfer). The need for multiphysics, multidimensional modeling is then demonstrated through a discussion of results for a set of example problems. The first, a 10-pellet rodlet, demonstrates the viability of the solution method employed. This example highlights the effect of our smeared cracking model and also shows the multidimensional nature of discrete fuel pellet modeling. The second example relies on our multidimensional, multiphysics approach to analyze a missing pellet surface problem. The next example is the analysis of cesium diffusion in a TRISO fuel particle with defects. As a final example, we show a lower-length-scale simulation coupled to a continuum-scale simulation.

R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; M. R. Tonks; D. R. Gaston; C. J. Permann; D. Andrs; R. C. Martineau

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nuclear fuel fabrication and refabrication cost estimation methodology  

SciTech Connect

The costs for construction and operation of nuclear fuel fabrication facilities for several reactor types and fuels were estimated, and the unit costs (prices) of the fuels were determined from these estimates. The techniques used in estimating the costs of building and operating these nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are described in this report. Basically, the estimation techniques involve detailed comparisons of alternative and reference fuel fabrication plants. Increases or decreases in requirements for fabricating the alternative fuels are identified and assessed for their impact on the capital and operating costs. The impact on costs due to facility size or capacity was also assessed, and scaling factors for the various captial and operating cost categories are presented. The method and rationale by which these scaling factors were obtained are also discussed. By use of the techniques described herein, consistent cost information for a wide variety of fuel types can be obtained in a relatively short period of time. In this study, estimates for 52 fuel fabrication plants were obtained in approximately two months. These cost estimates were extensively reviewed by experts in the fabrication of the various fuels, and, in the opinion of the reviewers, the estimates were very consistent and sufficiently accurate for use in overall cycle assessments.

Judkins, R.R.; Olsen, A.R.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Economic Analyiss of "Symbiotic" Light Water Reactor/Fast Burner Reactor Fuel Cycles Proposed as Part of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spreadsheet-based 'static equilibrium' economic analysis was performed for three nuclear fuel cycle scenarios, each designed for 100 GWe-years of electrical generation annually: (1) a 'once-through' fuel cycle based on 100% LWRs fueled by standard UO2 fuel assemblies with all used fuel destined for geologic repository emplacement, (2) a 'single-tier recycle' scenario involving multiple fast burner reactors (37% of generation) accepting actinides (Pu,Np,Am,Cm) from the reprocessing of used fuel from the uranium-fueled LWR fleet (63% of generation), and (3) a 'two-tier' 'thermal+fast' recycle scenario where co-extracted U,Pu from the reprocessing of used fuel from the uranium-fueled part of the LWR fleet (66% of generation) is recycled once as full-core LWR MOX fuel (8% of generation), with the LWR MOX used fuel being reprocessed and all actinide products from both UO2 and MOX used fuel reprocessing being introduced into the closed fast burner reactor (26% of generation) fuel cycle. The latter two 'closed' fuel cycles, which involve symbiotic use of both thermal and fast reactors, have the advantages of lower natural uranium requirements per kilowatt-hour generated and less geologic repository space per kilowatt-hour as compared to the 'once-through' cycle. The overall fuel cycle cost in terms of $ per megawatt-hr of generation, however, for the closed cycles is 15% (single tier) to 29% (two-tier) higher than for the once-through cycle, based on 'expected values' from an uncertainty analysis using triangular distributions for the unit costs for each required step of the fuel cycle. (The fuel cycle cost does not include the levelized reactor life cycle costs.) Since fuel cycle costs are a relatively small percentage (10 to 20%) of the overall busbar cost (LUEC or 'levelized unit electricity cost') of nuclear power generation, this fuel cycle cost increase should not have a highly deleterious effect on the competitiveness of nuclear power. If the reactor life cycle costs are included in the analysis, with the fast reactors having a higher $/kw(e) capital cost than the LWRs, the overall busbar generation cost ($/MWh) for the closed cycles is approximately 12% higher than for the all-LWR once-through fuel cycle case, again based on the expected values from an uncertainty analysis. It should be noted that such a percentage increase in the cost of nuclear power is much smaller than that expected for fossil fuel electricity generation if CO2 is costed via a carbon tax, cap and trade regimes, or carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).

Williams, Kent Alan [ORNL; Shropshire, David E. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fuel Reliability Program: Assessment of Nuclear Fuel Pellets Using X-Ray Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI technical report describes a feasibility study involving the application of X-ray tomography as an inspection technique to detect flaws on the surface of uranium pellets in nuclear fuel rods. The objective was to develop and evaluate a system for tomographic imaging of fuel pellets inside fuel rods that uses fast algorithms for analysis of each slice of the reconstructed image for detection of abnormalities in the pellet. The report describes the fundamentals of X-ray tomography and ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Demonstration of a transportable storage system for spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the joint demonstration project between the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the use of a transportable storage system for the long-term storage and subsequent transport of spent nuclear fuel. SMUD's Rancho Seco nuclear generating station was shut down permanently in June 1989. After the shutdown, SMUD began planning the decommissioning process, including the disposition of the spent nuclear fuel. Concurrently, Congress had directed the Secretary of Energy to develop a plan for the use of dual-purpose casks. Licensing and demonstrating a dual-purpose cask, or transportable storage system, would be a step toward achieving Congress's goal of demonstrating a technology that can be used to minimize the handling of spent nuclear fuel from the time the fuel is permanently removed from the reactor through to its ultimate disposal at a DOE facility. For SMUD, using a transportable storage system at the Rancho Seco Independent Spent-Fuel Storage Installation supports the goal of abandoning Rancho Seco's spent-fuel pool as decommissioning proceeds.

Shetler, J.R.; Miller, K.R.; Jones, R.E. (Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Herald, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

383

Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Characteristics Data Base: Programmer's guide to the LWR Quantities Data Base  

SciTech Connect

The LWR Quantities Data Base is a menu-driven PC data base developed as part of OCRWM's waste, technical data base on the characteristics of potential repository wastes, which also includes non-LWR spent fuel, high-level and other materials. This programmer's guide completes the documentation for the LWR Quantities Data Base, the user's guide having been published previously. The PC data base itself may be requested from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using the order form provided in Volume 1 of publication DOE/RW-0184.

Jones, K.E. (DataPhile, Inc., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Moore, R.S. (Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue. This report provides information and forecasts important to the domestic and world nuclear and uranium industries. 1997 represents the most recent publication year.

Dr. Zdenek D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A framework and methodology for nuclear fuel cycle transparency.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key objective to the global deployment of nuclear technology is maintaining transparency among nation-states and international communities. By providing an environment in which to exchange scientific and technological information regarding nuclear technology, the safe and legitimate use of nuclear material and technology can be assured. Many nations are considering closed or multiple-application nuclear fuel cycles and are subsequently developing advanced reactors in an effort to obtain some degree of energy self-sufficiency. Proliferation resistance features that prevent theft or diversion of nuclear material and reduce the likelihood of diversion from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. IAEA Safeguards have been effective in minimizing opportunities for diversion; however, recent changes in the global political climate suggest implementation of additional technology and methods to ensure the prompt detection of proliferation. For a variety of reasons, nuclear facilities are becoming increasingly automated and will require minimum manual operation. This trend provides an opportunity to utilize the abundance of process information for monitoring proliferation risk, especially in future facilities. A framework that monitors process information continuously can lead to greater transparency of nuclear fuel cycle activities and can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation associated with these activities. Additionally, a framework designed to monitor processes will ensure the legitimate use of nuclear material. This report describes recent efforts to develop a methodology capable of assessing proliferation risk in support of overall plant transparency. The framework may be tested at the candidate site located in Japan: the Fuel Handling Training Model designed for the Monju Fast Reactor at the International Cooperation and Development Training Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

McClellan, Yvonne; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Love, Tracia L.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Microsoft Word - nuclear_fuel_yacout.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in diameter and 1 cm long. Manufacturing of this form of uranium fuel starts with mined uranium that passes through processes of conversion and enrichment before it is made into...

388

NUCLEAR BOMBS FROM LOW- ENRICHED URANIUM OR “SPENT ” FUEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom says that low-enriched uranium is not suitable for making nuclear weapons. However, an article in USA Today claims that “rogue ” states and terrorists have discovered that this is untrue. Not only that, but terrorists could separate plutonium from irradiated fuel (often called “spent fuel”) more easily than previously thought. (584.5495) WISE Amsterdam – Lowenriched uranium (LEU) is uranium containing up to 20 % uranium-235. Uranium with higher enrichment levels is classified as high-enriched, and is subject to international safeguards because it can be used to make nuclear weapons. However, a USA Today article claims that “rogue countries and terrorists” have discovered that it is possible to make nuclear weapons with uranium of lower enrichment, according to classified nuclear threat reports (1). The information is not entirely new. Back in 1996, a standard book on nuclear weapons material stated, “a self-sustaining chain reaction in a nuclear weapon cannot occur in depleted or natural or low-enriched uranium and is only theoretically IN THIS ISSUE: possible in LEU of roughly 10 percent or greater ” (2). Fuel for nuclear power reactors would not be suitable – this is typically enriched to 3-5 % uranium-235. However, for a “rogue state” wanting to make high-enriched uranium, it would take less work to start with nuclear fuel than with natural uranium. It could be done in a “small and easy to hide ” uranium enrichment plant – perhaps similar to the plant which has recently been discovered in Iran (3). Nevertheless, it would still require a substantial operation, since the fuel would need to be converted to uranium hexafluoride, enriched and then reconverted to uranium metal. More significantly, many research reactors use uranium of just under

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

Leigh, I.W.; Lakey, L.T.; Schneider, K.J.; Silviera, D.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

International nuclear fuel cycle fact book: Revision 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. The Fact Book contains: national summaries in which a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; and international agencies in which a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement, and a listing of nuclear societies. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country as well as some general information. The latter is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the United States.

Leigh, I.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Impact of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States is expected to remain in storage for considerably longer periods than originally intended (e.g., <40 years). Extended storage (ES) time and irradiation of nuclear fuel to high-burnup values (>45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications. The likelihood and extent of fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the safety of the UNF is not well understood. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. This effort is primarily motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES. The criticality analyses consider representative UNF designs and cask systems and a range of fuel enrichments, burnups, and cooling times. The various failed-fuel configurations considered are designed to bound the anticipated effects of individual rod and general cladding failure, fuel rod deformation, loss of neutron absorber materials, degradation of canister internals, and gross assembly failure. The results quantify the potential impact on criticality safety associated with fuel reconfiguration and may be used to guide future research, design, and regulatory activities. Although it can be concluded that the criticality safety impacts of fuel reconfiguration during transportation subsequent to ES are manageable, the results indicate that certain configurations can result in a large increase in the effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}. Future work to inform decision making relative to which configurations are credible, and therefore need to be considered in a safety evaluation, is recommended.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refabrication. through which nuclear fuel passes. Fusion.with the experience at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant (seecommitment from the nuclear fuel cycle; see Section 3.2.3. )

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THERMAL-FISSION NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel elements for thermal-fission nuclear reactors are described. The fuel element is comprised of a core of alumina, a film of a metal of the class consisting of copper, silver, and nickel on the outer face of the core, and a coating of an oxide of a metal isotope of the class consisting of Un/sup 235/, U/ sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/ on the metal f ilm.

Flint, O.

1961-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Impact of actinide recycle on nuclear fuel cycle health risks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this background paper is to summarize what is presently known about potential impacts on the impacts on the health risk of the nuclear fuel cycle form deployment of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR){sup 1} and Integral Fast Reactor (IF){sup 2} technology as an actinide burning system. In a companion paper the impact on waste repository risk is addressed in some detail. Therefore, this paper focuses on the remainder of the fuel cycle.

Michaels, G.E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Double-clad nuclear-fuel safety rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

McCarthy, W.H.; Atcheson, D.B.

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold.

Seidel, Bobby R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tracy, Donald B. (Firth, ID); Griffiths, Vernon (Butte, MT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report  

SciTech Connect

The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

Dana, W.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Back-end costs of alternative nuclear fuel cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its charter, the Alternate Fuel Cycle Evaluation Program (AFCEP) was directed to evaluate the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle in support of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). The principal conclusion from this study is that the costs for recycling a broad range of reactor fuels will not have a large impact on total fuel cycle costs. For the once-through fuel cycle, the costs of fresh fuel fabrication, irradiated fuel storage, and associated transportation is about 1.2 to 1.3 mills/kWh. For the recycle of uranium and plutonium into thermal reactors, the back-cycle costs (i.e., the costs of irradiated fuel storage, transportation, reprocessing, refabrication, and waste disposal) will be from 3 to 3.5 mills/kWh. The costs for the recycle of uranium and plutonium into fast breeder reactors will be from 4.5 to 5 mills/kWh. Using a radioactive spikant or a denatured /sup 233/U-Th cycle will increase power costs for both recycle cases by about 1 mill/kWh. None of these costs substantially influence the total cost of nuclear power, which is in the range of 4 cents/kWh. The fuel cycle costs used in this study do not include costs incurred prior to fuel fabrication; that is, the cost of the uranium or thorium, the costs for enrichment, or credit for fissile materials in the discharged fuel, which is not recycled with the system.

Rainey, R.H.; Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Unger, W.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Use of silicide fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor - to lengthen fuel element lifetimes  

SciTech Connect

Based on economic considerations, it has been proposed to increase the lifetime of LEU fuel elements in the Ford Nuclear Reactor by raising the {sup 235}U plate loading from 9.3 grams in aluminide (UAl{sub x}) fuel to 12.5 grams in silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel. For a representative core configuration, preliminary neutronic depletion and steady state thermal hydraulic calculations have been performed to investigate core characteristics during the transition from an all-aluminide to an all-silicide core. This paper discusses motivations for this fuel element upgrade, results from the calculations, and conclusions.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Phoenix Memorial Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr nuclear fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could benefit, in terms of efficien

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Technical Review of Non-Destructive Assay Research for the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies Being Conducted Under the US DOE NGSI - 11544  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies BeingSociety’s Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management IV, HiltonPlutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel,” 2010 ANS Annual

Croft, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Containers: UseCoatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance2006 ABSTRACT Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simplified internal gelation process is claimed for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85/sup 0/C) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column. 3 figs.

Haas, P.A.; Fowler, V.L.; Lloyd, M.H.

1984-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simplified internal gelation process for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85.degree. C.) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column.

Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN); Fowler, Victor L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Technology Insights and Perspectives for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Concepts  

SciTech Connect

The following report provides a rich resource of information for exploring fuel cycle characteristics. The most noteworthy trends can be traced back to the utilization efficiency of natural uranium resources. By definition, complete uranium utilization occurs only when all of the natural uranium resource can be introduced into the nuclear reactor long enough for all of it to undergo fission. Achieving near complete uranium utilization requires technologies that can achieve full recycle or at least nearly full recycle of the initial natural uranium consumed from the Earth. Greater than 99% of all natural uranium is fertile, and thus is not conducive to fission. This fact requires the fuel cycle to convert large quantities of non-fissile material into fissile transuranics. Step increases in waste benefits are closely related to the step increase in uranium utilization going from non-breeding fuel cycles to breeding fuel cycles. The amount of mass requiring a disposal path is tightly coupled to the quantity of actinides in the waste stream. Complete uranium utilization by definition means that zero (practically, near zero) actinide mass is present in the waste stream. Therefore, fuel cycles with complete (uranium and transuranic) recycle discharge predominately fission products with some actinide process losses. Fuel cycles without complete recycle discharge a much more massive waste stream because only a fraction of the initial actinide mass is burned prior to disposal. In a nuclear growth scenario, the relevant acceptable frequency for core damage events in nuclear reactors is inversely proportional to the number of reactors deployed in a fuel cycle. For ten times the reactors in a fleet, it should be expected that the fleet-average core damage frequency be decreased by a factor of ten. The relevant proliferation resistance of a fuel cycle system is enhanced with: decreasing reliance on domestic fuel cycle services, decreasing adaptability for technology misuse, enablement of material accountability, and decreasing material attractiveness.

S. Bays; S. Piet; N. Soelberg; M. Lineberry; B. Dixon

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Development of Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 2, 2011 ... Session Chair: Meimei Li, Argonne National Lab; Matthew Kerr, US ... The realization of advanced nuclear reactors as a national source of reliable energy .... 2Illinois Institute of Technology; 3Argonne National Laboratory

408

Railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a detailed analysis of rail operations that are important for assessing the risk of transporting high-level nuclear waste. The major emphasis of the discussion is towards ''general freight'' shipments of radioactive material. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for selecting models and parameters that are appropriate for assessing the risk of rail transportation of nuclear waste.

Wooden, D.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points and clad configurations. The 2-ply sleeve samples show a higher bend momentum compared to those of the 1-ply sleeve samples. This is applicable to both the hybrid mock-up and bare SiC-CMC sleeve samples. Comparatively both the 1- and 2-ply hybrid mock-up samples showed a higher bend stiffness and strength compared with the standard Zr-4 mock-up sample. The characterization of the hybrid mock-up samples showed signs of distress and preliminary signs of fraying at the protective Zr-4 sleeve areas for the 1-ply SiC-CMC sleeve. In addition, the microstructure of the SiC matrix near the cracks at the region of highest compressive bending strain shows significant cracking and flaking. The 2-ply SiC-CMC sleeve samples showed a more bonded, cohesive SiC matrix structure. This cracking and fraying causes concern for increased fretting during the actual use of the design. Tomography was proven as a successful tool to identify open porosity during pre-test characterization. Although there is currently insufficient data to make conclusive statements regarding the overall merit of the hybrid cladding design, preliminary characterization of this novel design has been demonstrated.

IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Spark Plasma Sintering of Fuel Cermets for Nuclear Reactor Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of the fabrication of tungsten based nuclear fuel cermets via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) is investigated in this work. CeO2 is used to simulate fuel loadings of UO2 or Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuels within tungsten-based cermets due to the similar properties of these materials. This study shows that after a short time sintering, greater than 90 % density can be achieved, which is suitable to possess good strength as well as the ability to contain fission products. The mechanical properties and the densities of the samples are also investigated as functions of the applied pressures during the sintering.

Yang Zhong; Robert C. O'Brien; Steven D. Howe; Nathan D. Jerred; Kristopher Schwinn; Laura Sudderth; Joshua Hundley

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Manufacture of bonded-particle nuclear fuel composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A preselected volume of nuclear fuel particles are placed in a cylindrical mold cavity followed by a solid pellet of resin--carbon matrix material of preselected volume. The mold is heated to liquefy the pellet and the liquefied matrix forced throughout the interstices of the fuel particles by advancing a piston into the mold cavity. Excess matrix is permitted to escape through a vent hole in the end of the mold opposite to that end where the pellet was originally disposed. After the matrix is resolidified by cooling, the resultant fuel composite is removed from the mold and the resin component of the matrix carbonized. (Official Gazette)

Stradley, J.G.; Sease, J.D.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY13 Report  

SciTech Connect

In Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) the SNAP demonstration was enhanced with respect to query and navigation usability issues.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nuclear fuel elements and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element for a high temperature gas nuclear reactor that has an average operating temperature in excess of 2000.degree. C., and a method of making such a fuel element. The fuel element is characterized by having fissionable fuel material localized and stabilized within pores of a carbon or graphite member by melting the fissionable material to cause it to chemically react with the carbon walls of the pores. The fissionable fuel material is further stabilized and localized within the pores of the graphite member by providing one or more coatings of pyrolytic carbon or diamond surrounding the porous graphite member so that each layer defines a successive barrier against migration of the fissionable fuel from the pores, and so that the outermost layer of pyrolytic carbon or diamond forms a barrier between the fissionable material and the moderating gases used in an associated high temperature gas reactor. The method of the invention provides for making such new elements either as generally spherically elements, or as flexible filaments, or as other relatively small-sized fuel elements that are particularly suited for use in high temperature gas reactors.

Schweitzer, Donald G. (Bayport, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Perils of plutonium [spent nuclear fuel storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the security of the ponds at reactor sites where radioactive spent fuel are being stored. A recent report by a panel of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, said that attacks by knowledgeable terrorists with access ...

P. P. Predd

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Air Shipment of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania to Russia  

SciTech Connect

Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without shipment license special exceptions when the last Romanian highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel was transported to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This air shipment required the design, fabrication, and licensing of special 20 foot freight containers and cask tiedown supports to transport the eighteen TUK 19 shipping casks on a Russian commercial cargo aircraft. The new equipment was certified for transport by road, rail, water, and air to provide multi modal transport capabilities for shipping research reactor spent fuel. The equipment design, safety analyses, and fabrication were performed in the Russian Federation and transport licenses were issued by both the Russian and Romanian regulatory authorities. The spent fuel was transported by truck from the VVR S research reactor to the Bucharest airport, flown by commercial cargo aircraft to the airport at Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to the final destination in a secure nuclear facility at Chelyabinsk, Russia. This shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in close cooperation with the Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation and the International Atomic Energy Agency, and was managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). This paper describes the planning, shipment preparations, equipment design, and license approvals that resulted in the safe and secure air shipment of this spent nuclear fuel.

Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Lucian Biro; Alexander Buchelnikov

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Department of Energy's Spent Nuclear Fuel Canisters andTransporta...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nuclear fuel generated from research and development, plutonium production, and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (Naval Reactors). Under current national policy, the Department...

417

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since greenhouse gases are a global concern, rather than a local concern as are some kinds of effluents, one must compare the entire lifecycle of nuclear power to alternative technologies for generating electricity. A recent critical analysis by Sovacool (2008) gives a clearer picture. "It should be noted that nuclear power is not directly emitting greenhouse gas emissions, but rather that lifecycle emissions occur through plant construction, operation, uranium mining and milling, and plant decommissioning." "[N]uclear energy is in no way 'carbon free' or 'emissions free,' even though it is much better (from purely a carbon-equivalent emissions standpoint) than coal, oil, and natural gas electricity generators, but worse than renewable and small scale distributed generators" (Sovacool 2008). According to Sovacool, at an estimated 66 g CO2 equivalent per kilowatt-hour (gCO2e/kWh), nuclear power emits 15 times less CO2 per unit electricity generated than unscrubbed coal generation (at 1050 gCO2e/kWh), but 7 times more than the best renewable, wind (at 9 gCO2e/kWh). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2009) has long recognized CO2 emissions in its regulations concerning the environmental impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. In Table S-3 of 10 CFR 51.51(b), NRC lists a 1000-MW(electric) nuclear plant as releasing as much CO2 as a 45-MW(e) coal plant. A large share of the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle is due to the energy consumption to enrich uranium by the gaseous diffusion process. A switch to either gas centrifugation or laser isotope separation would dramatically reduce the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Strom, Daniel J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Microscopic Examination of a Corrosion Front in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent uranium oxide nuclear fuel hosts a variety of trace chemical constituents, many of which must be sequestered from the biosphere during fuel storage and disposal. In this paper we present synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy and microscopy findings that illuminate the resultant local chemistry of neptunium and plutonium within spent uranium oxide nuclear fuel before and after corrosive alteration in an air-saturated aqueous environment. We find the plutonium and neptunium in unaltered spent fuel to have a +4 oxidation state and an environment consistent with solid-solution in the UO{sub 2} matrix. During corrosion in an air-saturated aqueous environment, the uranium matrix is converted to uranyl U(VI)O{sub 2}{sup 2+} mineral assemblage that is depleted in plutonium and neptunium relative to the parent fuel. At the corrosion front interface between intact fuel and the uranyl-mineral corrosion layer, we find evidence of a thin ({approx}20 micrometer) layer that is enriched in plutonium and neptunium within a predominantly U{sup 4+} environment. Available data for the standard reduction potentials for NpO{sup 2+}/Np{sup 4+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/U{sup 4+} couples indicate that Np(IV) may not be effectively oxidized to Np(V) at the corrosion potentials of uranium dioxide spent nuclear fuel in air-saturated aqueous solutions. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in dose contribution according to performance assessment models of the proposed U. S. repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A scientific understanding of how the UO{sub 2} matrix of spent nuclear fuel impacts the oxidative dissolution and reductive precipitation of neptunium is needed to predict its behavior at the fuel surface during aqueous corrosion. Neptunium would most likely be transported as aqueous Np(V) species, but for this to occur it must first be oxidized from the Np(IV) state found within the parent spent nuclear fuel [1]. In the immediate vicinity of the spent fuel's surface the redox and nucleation behavior is likely to promote/enhance nucleation of NpO{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Alternatively, Np may be incorporated into uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) alteration phases [2]. In some cases, less-soluble elements such as plutonium will be enriched near the surface of the corroding fuel [3]. We have used focused synchrotron x-rays from the MRCAT beam line at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab to examine a specimen of spent nuclear fuel that had been subject to 10 years of corrosion testing in an environment of humid air and dripping groundwater at 90 C [4]. We find evidence of a region, approximately 20 microns in thickness, enriched in plutonium and neptunium at the corrosion front that exists between the uranyl silicate alteration mineral rind and the unaltered uranium oxide fuel (Figures 1 and 2). The uranyl silicate is itself found to be depleted in these transuranic elements relative to their abundance relative to uranium in the parent fuel. This suggests a low mobility of these components owing to a resistance to oxidize further in the presence of a UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/U{sup 4+} couple [5].

J.A> Fortner; A.J. Kropf; R.J. Finch; J.C. Cunnane

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Modeling Deep Burn TRISO Particle Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. First principles calculations are being used to investigate the critical issue of fission product palladium attack on the SiC coating layer. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel. Kinetic Monte Carlo techniques are shedding light on transport of fission products, most notably silver, through the carbon and SiC coating layers. The diffusion of fission products through an alternative coating layer, ZrC, is being assessed via DFT methods. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Schuck, Paul C [ORNL; Rudin, Sven [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wills, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wirth, Brian D. [University of California, Berkeley; Kim, Sungtae [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY12 Report  

SciTech Connect

Building on previous internal investments and leveraging ongoing advancements in semantic technologies, PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In developing this proof of concept prototype, the utility and relevancy of semantic technologies to the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D) has been better understood.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.; Neorr, Peter A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Methods and apparatuses for the development of microstructured nuclear fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microstructured nuclear fuel adapted for nuclear power system use includes fissile material structures of micrometer-scale dimension dispersed in a matrix material. In one method of production, fissile material particles are processed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) fluidized-bed reactor including a gas inlet for providing controlled gas flow into a particle coating chamber, a lower bed hot zone region to contain powder, and an upper bed region to enable powder expansion. At least one pneumatic or electric vibrator is operationally coupled to the particle coating chamber for causing vibration of the particle coater to promote uniform powder coating within the particle coater during fuel processing. An exhaust associated with the particle coating chamber and can provide a port for placement and removal of particles and powder. During use of the fuel in a nuclear power reactor, fission products escape from the fissile material structures and come to rest in the matrix material. After a period of use in a nuclear power reactor and subsequent cooling, separation of the fissile material from the matrix containing the embedded fission products will provide an efficient partitioning of the bulk of the fissile material from the fission products. The fissile material can be reused by incorporating it into new microstructured fuel. The fission products and matrix material can be incorporated into a waste form for disposal or processed to separate valuable components from the fission products mixture.

Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Carroll, David W. (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David J. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Collins, Jack L. (Knoxville, TN); Shell, Sam E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles -- Main Challenges and Strategic Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a critical review of the technological challenges to the growth of nuclear energy, emerging advanced technologies that would have to be deployed, and fuel cycle strategies that could conceivably involve interim storage, plutonium recycling in thermal and fast reactors, reprocessed uranium recycling, and transmutation of minor actinide elements and fission products before eventual disposal of residual wastes.

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

424

Changing Biomass, Fossil, and Nuclear Fuel Cycles for Sustainability  

SciTech Connect

The energy and chemical industries face two great sustainability challenges: the need to avoid climate change and the need to replace crude oil as the basis of our transport and chemical industries. These challenges can be met by changing and synergistically combining the fossil, biomass, and nuclear fuel cycles.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Criticality Risks During Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a best-estimate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify the frequency of criticality accidents during railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel casks. The assessment is of sufficient detail to enable full scrutiny of the model logic and the basis for each quantitative parameter contributing to criticality accident scenario frequencies.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

METHOD OF FORMING A FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for preparing a fuel element for a nuclear reactor. The method includes the steps of sandblasting a body of uranium dioxide to roughen the surface thereof, depositing a thin layer of carbon thereon by thermal decomposition of methane, and cladding the uranium dioxide body with zirconium by gas pressure bonding. (AEC)

Layer, E.H. Jr.; Peet, C.S.

1962-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effect of residual stress on the life prediction of dry storage canisters for used nuclear fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Used nuclear fuel dry storage canisters will likely be tasked with holding used nuclear fuel for a period longer than originally intended. Originally designed for 20 years, the storage time will likely approach 100 years. ...

Black, Bradley P. (Bradley Patrick)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF FISSION-PRODUCT GAMMA-RAY ENERGY DEPOS WATER REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS, VOLUME 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports studies undertaken to produce a precise and readily interpretable description of the distribution of absorbed energy in an LWR fuel element. Data are useful in determining the spatial distribution of absorption of fission-product gamma-ray energy around regions of high local power density following the shutdown of a nuclear reactor.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

Lee, S.Y.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in the Design of Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Experiments for Advanced Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Increased Enrichment/High Burnup and Light Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization

B. T. Rearden; W. J. Anderson; G. A. Harms

432

Long-term global nuclear energy and fuel cycle strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Vision Project is examining, using scenario building techniques, a range of long-term nuclear energy futures. The exploration and assessment of optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies is an essential element of the study. To this end, an established global E{sup 3} (energy/economics/environmental) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed using this multi-regional E{sup 3} model, wherein future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term demographic (population, workforce size and productivity), economic (price-, population-, and income-determined demand for energy services, price- and population-modified GNP, resource depletion, world-market fossil energy prices), policy (taxes, tariffs, sanctions), and top-level technological (energy intensity and end-use efficiency improvements) drivers. Using the framework provided by the global E{sup 3} model, the impacts of both external and internal drivers are investigated. The ability to connect external and internal drivers through this modeling framework allows the study of impacts and tradeoffs between fossil- versus nuclear-fuel burning, that includes interactions between cost, environmental, proliferation, resource, and policy issues.

Krakowski, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Locations of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Map of the United States of America showing the locations of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

434

Introduction of Thorium-Based Fuels in High Conversion Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regular Technical Paper / Special Issue on the Symposium on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Oxide and Novel LWR Fuels / Fission Reactors

V. Vallet; B. Gastaldi; J. Politello; A. Santamarina; L. Van Den Durpel

435

ASSESSING THE PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE OF INNOVATIVE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES.  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Security Administration is developing methods for nonproliferation assessments to support the development and implementation of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This paper summarizes the key results of that effort. Proliferation resistance is the degree of difficulty that a nuclear material, facility, process, or activity poses to the acquisition of one or more nuclear weapons. A top-level measure of proliferation resistance for a fuel cycle system is developed here from a hierarchy of metrics. At the lowest level, intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to proliferation are defined. These barriers are recommended as a means to characterize the proliferation characteristics of a fuel cycle. Because of the complexity of nonproliferation assessments, the problem is decomposed into: metrics to be computed, barriers to proliferation, and a finite set of threats. The spectrum of potential threats of nuclear proliferation is complex and ranges from small terrorist cells to industrialized countries with advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Two general categories of methods have historically been used for nonproliferation assessments: attribute analysis and scenario analysis. In the former, attributes of the systems being evaluated (often fuel cycle systems) are identified that affect their proliferation potential. For a particular system under consideration, the attributes are weighted subjectively. In scenario analysis, hypothesized scenarios of pathways to proliferation are examined. The analyst models the process undertaken by the proliferant to overcome barriers to proliferation and estimates the likelihood of success in achieving a proliferation objective. An attribute analysis approach should be used at the conceptual design level in the selection of fuel cycles that will receive significant investment for development. In the development of a detailed facility design, a scenario approach should be undertaken to reduce the potential for design vulnerabilities. While, there are distinctive elements in each approach, an analysis could be performed that utilizes aspects of each approach.

BARI,R.; ROGLANS,J.; DENNING,R.; MLADINEO,S.

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

22.251 / 22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, ...

Kazimi, Mujid S.

437

Retrievable fuel pin end member for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom end member (17b) on a retrievable fuel pin (13b) secures the pin (13b) within a nuclear reactor (12) by engaging on a transverse attachment rail (18) with a spring clip type of action. Removal and reinstallation if facilitated as only axial movement of the fuel pin (13b) is required for either operation. A pair of resilient axially extending blades (31) are spaced apart to define a slot (24) having a seat region (34) which receives the rail (18) and having a land region (37), closer to the tips (39) of the blades (31) which is normally of less width than the rail (18). Thus an axially directed force sufficient to wedge the resilient blades (31) apart is required to emplace or release the fuel pin (13b) such force being greater than the axial forces on the fuel pins (13b) which occur during operation of the reactor (12).

Rosa, Jerry M. (Los Gatos, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology, has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The Storage and Transportation staff within the UFDC are responsible for addressing issues regarding the

439

Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M&O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis Department. Before using the results of this calculation, the reader is cautioned to verify that the assumptions made in this calculation regarding the waste stream, the loading process, and the staging of the spent nuclear fuel assemblies are applicable.

A. Alsaed

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

ELECTRON BEAM WELDING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

The rapid technological development of the nuclear and space industries has placed a great demand on metal joining processes. One of the most promising processes is electron beam welding. Welding with the electron beam ofiers high integrity in addition to the ability to fabricate unusual configurations. Advanced nuclear fuels require both reliability and unusual designs for satisfactory operation under extreme conditions of temperature and stress. To investigate the problems and techniques involved in fabricating large, advanced nuclear fuel components from Zircaloy-2 material, several cladding pieces were designed and built using the electron beam process. These designs included five basic joint types for assembling the cladding. Destructive and nondestructive examinations were employed including corrosion testing and extensive metallographic examination. Weldment size, fit-up'' of the parts to be joined, fixturing and work carriage mechanisms, as they pertain to electron beam welding, are also discussed. The electron beam process has been demonstrated as a very satisfactory method for fabricating unusual fuel cladding. Fuel cladding components with lengths up to 8 ft have been fabricated for in-reactor irradiation. (auth)

Klein, R.F.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Issued on January 11, 2013, the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste is a framework for moving toward a sustainable program to deploy an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste.pdf More Documents & Publications Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and

442

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste The Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste is a framework for moving toward a sustainable program to deploy an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste More Documents & Publications Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste

443

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prevent serious damage to the nuclear fuel, since it is thetransportation: for nuclear plants, fuel handling is carriedSpecific Fossil Fuel Geothermal Nuclear Solid Waste Disposal

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z