Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment Recent experimental observations have made it clear that cavity formation can occur in light-water reactor internal components fabricated from austenitic stainless during the course of their service life. In order to assess the potential for cavity swelling in these components at end-of-life doses, it is necessary to develop a validated computational model that incorporates the relevant physical mechanisms and accounts for recent experiment data. Such a modeling activity is underway; the model development and some preliminary results are described. For the relatively low temperatures involved, cavity formation is shown to be sensitive to

2

Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment Recent experimental observations have made it clear that cavity formation can occur in light-water reactor internal components fabricated from austenitic stainless during the course of their service life. In order to assess the potential for cavity swelling in these components at end-of-life doses, it is necessary to develop a validated computational model that incorporates the relevant physical mechanisms and accounts for recent experiment data. Such a modeling activity is underway; the model development and some preliminary results are described. For the relatively low temperatures involved, cavity formation is shown to be sensitive to

3

Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LTR-2012/390 LTR-2012/390 Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment R. E. Stoller, A. V. Barashev, and S. I. Golubov Materials Science and Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Prepared for: Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy September 2012 ORNL/LTR-2012/390 1 Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment Abstract Recent experimental observations have made it clear that cavity formation can occur in light-water reactor internal components fabricated from austenitic stainless during the course of their service life. In order to assess the potential for cavity swelling

4

Technical program to study the benefits of nonlinear analysis methods in LWR component designs. Technical report TR-3723-1  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the study program to assess the benefits of nonlinear analysis methods in Light Water Reactor (LWR) component designs. The current study reveals that despite its increased cost and other complexities, nonlinear analysis is a practical and valuable tool for the design of LWR components, especially under ASME Level D service conditions (faulted conditions) and it will greatly assist in the evaluation of ductile fracture potential of pressure boundary components. Since the nonlinear behavior is generally a local phenomenon, the design of complex components can be accomplished through substructuring isolated localized regions and evaluating them in detail using nonlinear analysis methods.

Raju, P. P.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(i.e., r < 0.5 nm). Next there is a transient which is a result of some of the subcritical bubbles reaching a critical radius and beginning to grow as voids 6,8. At this...

6

Indigestible fiber components as possible internal markers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INZERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AQf University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1975 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INTERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Approved as to style and content by: !, /, (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar ent) (Member) (Member...

Jacobs, Bernard Frederick

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study The LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program activities must support the timeline dictated by utility life extension decisions to demonstrate a lead test rod in a commercial reactor within 10 years. In order to maintain the demanding development schedule that must accompany this aggressive timeline, the LWRS Program focuses on advanced fuel cladding systems that retain standard UO2 fuel pellets for deployment in currently operating LWR power plants. The LWRS work scope focuses on fuel system components outside of the fuel pellet, allowing for alteration of the existing zirconium-based clad system through coatings, addition of ceramic sleeves, or complete replacement

8

Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems (BWRs, 21% and PWRs, 34%).

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Multiphysics simulations for LWR analysis  

SciTech Connect

Accurate prediction of the neutron and temperature distributions within an operating nuclear reactor requires the solution of multiple coupled physics equations. In a light water reactor (LWR), there is a very strong coupling between the power distribution (described by the radiation transport equation) and the temperature and density distributions (described by a thermal diffusion equation in combination with a fluid flow model). This study aims to begin to quantify the impact of such feedback mechanisms as well as identify numerical difficulties associated with such multiphysics problems. A description of the multiphysics model and current solution strategy within the Exnihilo code package for coupling between 3-D radiation transport and 3-D heat transfer is given. Numerical results detailing the effects of varying the nature of the coupling and the impact of mesh refinement for a representative 3x3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) 'mini-assembly' are presented. (authors)

Hamilton, S.; Clarno, K.; Berrill, M.; Evans, T.; Davidson, G.; Lefebvre, R.; Sampath, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hansel, J.; Ragusa, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University (United States); Josey, C. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Multiphysics Simulations for LWR Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Accurate prediction of the neutron and temperature distributions within an operating nuclear reactor requires the solution of multiple coupled physics equations. In a light water reactor (LWR), there is a very strong coupling between the power distribution (governed by the radiation transport equation) and the temperature and density distributions (governed by a thermal diusion equation in combination with a fluid flow model). This study aims to begin to quantify the impact of such feedback mechanisms as well as identify numerical diculties associated with such multiphysics problems. A description of the multiphysics model and current solution strategy within the Exnihilo code package will be presented, along with numerical results for a representative 3 3 PWR mini-assembly.

Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Davidson, Gregory G [ORNL; Hansel, J [Texas A& M University; Ragusa, J [Texas A& M University; Josey, Colin [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative  

SciTech Connect

Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ``Alternative Teams,`` chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S&S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT`s analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

REQUEST BY HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC., CERAMIC COMPONENTS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, CERAMIC , CERAMIC COMPONENTS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER UT-BATTELLE, LLC SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000000986 UNDER PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-00OR22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-00-011 [ORO-751] Honeywell International Inc, Ceramic Components (Honeywell) has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under UT-Battelle, LLC Subcontract No. 4000000986, entitled, "Hot Section Components in Advanced Microturbines" under UT-Battelle Prime Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The scope of work involves the application of silicon nitride ceramics as hot-section components in advanced microturbines. The work is sponsored by the Office of Industrial Technologies Industrial Power Program.

15

Effect of material heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.  

SciTech Connect

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the design of Class 1 components of nuclear power plants. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify design curves for applicable structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. The existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) can be a factor of 20 lower in water than in air. This report presents experimental data on the effect of heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic Type 304 SS in LWR coolant environments. A detailed metallographic examination of fatigue test specimens was performed to characterize the crack morphology and fracture morphology. The key material, loading, and environmental parameters and their effect on the fatigue life of these steels are also described. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic SSs as a function of material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented.

Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components  

SciTech Connect

On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Status of the International Cooperative Program for Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components - PINC  

SciTech Connect

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has occurred world-wide in nuclear power plants and is seen as a serious issue. Crack samples show very tight and very complex cracks in the nickel-base weld metal and forgings that are difficult to detect, size, and characterize. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting a research program on non-destructive evaluation (NDE) reliability in detecting and characterizing PWSCC. This program is part of an international cooperative research project called the Program for the Inspection of Nickel-Alloy Components (PINC), led by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which has been set up to leverage efforts in several countries to address this significant and common problem. This work has the general goal of developing an understanding of the morphology of PWSCC and assessing the NDE responses from it.

Schuster, George J.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Moyer, Carol E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.  

SciTech Connect

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Modeling and Analysis of UN TRISO Fuel for LWR Application Using the PARFUME Code  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboraroty (INL) PARFUME (particle fuel model) code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel under irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel were calculated, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn up. These material properties have large uncertainties at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, a large experimental effort would be needed to establish material properties, including kernel and PyC swelling rates, under these conditions before definitive conclusions can be drawn on the behavior of UN TRISO fuel in LWRs.

Blaise Collin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

Alman, David E. (Corvallis, OR); Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR); Davis, Daniel L. (Albany, OR)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improving the safety of LWR power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Study to identify current, potential research issues and efforts for improving the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This final report describes the work accomplished, the results obtained, the problem areas, and the recommended solutions. Specifically, for each of the issues identified in this report for improving the safety of LWR power plants, a description is provided in detail of the safety significance, the current status (including information sources, status of technical knowledge, problem solution and current activities), and the suggestions for further research and development. Further, the issues are ranked for action into high, medium, and low priority with respect to primarily (a) improved safety (e.g. potential reduction in public risk and occupational exposure), and secondly (b) reduction in safety-related costs (improving or maintaining level of safety with simpler systems or in a more cost-effective manner).

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Uranium mononitride as a potential commercial LWR fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper evaluated uranium mononitride (UN) as a potential replacement for 5% enriched UO{sub 2} fuel in Generation III and III+ commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Significant improvement in LWR performance depends on developing and implementing changes in the nuclear fuel used in these reactors. Compared to UO{sub 2}, UN offers several advantages such as higher uranium loading and better thermal conductivity. In this paper, the thermal safety margin of UN was evaluated at both normal and accident conditions using a readily available coupled CFD model developed for the US DOE CASL program. One of the prime technical challenges in utilization of UN as LWR fuel is the water compatibility because pure phase UN is not stable in water at 350 deg. C. The water corrosion resistance of UN and the corrosion mechanism were reviewed and mitigation methods were proposed. (authors)

Xu, P.; Yan, J.; Lahoda, E. J.; Ray, S. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, 5801 Bluff Rd, Columbia, SC 29209 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced lwr fuel Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 THE CASE FOR FUSION-FISSION HYBRIDS ENABLING SUSTAINABLE NUCLEAR POWER Summary: uranium energy content recovered in present LWR "once-through" fuel cycles (uranium would be...

24

Method for Producing Components with Internal Architectures, Such as Micro-Channel Reactors, via Diffusion Bonding Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partners partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,900,811 entitled "Method for Producing Components with Internal Architectures, Such as Micro-Channel Reactors, via Diffusion Bonding Sheets."Disclosed in this patent is a method for producing microchannels using graduated diffusion bonding of a stack of precision machined foils or sheets (laminates) to make a micro-channel reactor. The method is a novel multi-step process for the diffusion bonding of laminates, which is independent of the channel width-to-fin lamina thickness (fin aspect ratio) and allows for laminae to uniformly and effectively bond. Unlike conventional hot-pressing methods, the NETL invention increases functional reaction surface area for higher conversion efficiency and reactor performance, and avoids

25

Report on Assessment of Environmentally--Assisted Fatigue for LWR Extended  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Assessment of Environmentally--Assisted Fatigue for LWR on Assessment of Environmentally--Assisted Fatigue for LWR Extended Service Conditions Report on Assessment of Environmentally--Assisted Fatigue for LWR Extended Service Conditions This report provides an update on the assessment of environmentally-assisted fatigue for light water reactor (LWR) extended service conditions. The report is a deliverable in FY11 under the work package for LWRS under the Advanced Reactor Concepts. Most of the current fleet of aging LWRs were designed using the 1970s version of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessels Code, Section III, and are reaching their design lifetime of 30-40 yrs. For economic reasons, the utilities have great interest in extending the operating life of the plants via the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing renewal application

26

Report on Assessment of Environmentally--Assisted Fatigue for LWR Extended  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Assessment of Environmentally--Assisted Fatigue for LWR on Assessment of Environmentally--Assisted Fatigue for LWR Extended Service Conditions Report on Assessment of Environmentally--Assisted Fatigue for LWR Extended Service Conditions This report provides an update on the assessment of environmentally-assisted fatigue for light water reactor (LWR) extended service conditions. The report is a deliverable in FY11 under the work package for LWRS under the Advanced Reactor Concepts. Most of the current fleet of aging LWRs were designed using the 1970s version of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessels Code, Section III, and are reaching their design lifetime of 30-40 yrs. For economic reasons, the utilities have great interest in extending the operating life of the plants via the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing renewal application

27

Technology transfer effectiveness through international joint ventures (IJVs) to their component suppliers: a study of the automotive industry of Pakistan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the important topic of technology transfer effectiveness from international joint ventures (IJVs) established in the automotive industry of Pakistan to their local… (more)

Khan, Sardar Zaheer Ahmad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique  

SciTech Connect

This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

Michael Corradini; Kumar Sridharan

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost  

SciTech Connect

This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods.

Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Development of an integrated, unattended assay system for LWR-MOX fuel pellet trays  

SciTech Connect

Four identical unattended plutonium assay systems have been developed for use at the new light-water-reactor mixed oxide (LWR-MOX) fuel fabrication facility at Hanau, Germany. The systems provide quantitative plutonium verification for all MOX pellet trays entering or leaving a large, intermediate store. Pellet-tray transport and storage systems are highly automated. Data from the ``I-Point`` (information point) assay systems will be shared by the Euratom and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Inspectorates. The I-Point system integrates, for the first time, passive neutron coincidence counting (NCC) with electro-mechanical sensing (EMS) in unattended mode. Also, provisions have been made for adding high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The system accumulates data for every tray entering or leaving the store between inspector visits. During an inspection, data are analyzed and compared with operator declarations for the previous inspection period, nominally one month. Specification of the I-point system resulted from a collaboration between the IAEA, Euratom, Siemens, and Los Alamos. Hardware was developed by Siemens and Los Alamos through a bilateral agreement between the German Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) and the US DOE. Siemens also provided the EMS subsystem, including software. Through the USSupport Program to the IAEA, Los Alamos developed the NCC software (NCC COLLECT) and also the software for merging and reviewing the EMS and NCC data (MERGE/REVIEW). This paper describes the overall I-Point system, but emphasizes the NCC subsystem, along with the NCC COLLECT and MERGE/REVIEW codes. We also summarize comprehensive testing results that define the quality of assay performance.

Stewart, J.E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Pollat, L.L. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Review of literature on the TMI accident and correlation to the LWR Safety Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

This report is the result of approximately two man-months of effort devoted to assimilating and comprehending significant publicly available material related to Three Mile Island Unit 2 and events during and subsequent to the accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Those events were then correlated with the Preliminary LWR Safety Technology Program Plan (Preliminary Program Plan) prepared for the US Department of Energy by Sandia National Lab. This report is being submitted simultaneously with the SAI report entitled Preliminary Prioritization of Tasks in the Draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan.

Miller, W.J.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 Nuclear Physics and Bio (Indonesia); Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Physics and Bio Physics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

First Conclusions of the WPEC/Subgroup-22 Nuclear Data for Improved LEU-LWR Reactivity Predictions  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a summary of a collective work in the framework of the Working Party in International Nuclear Data Evaluation and Co-operation (WPEC) to investigate the reasons for systematic reactivity underprediction of thermal LEU-LWR (Low-Enriched Uranium, Light-Water Reactor). This keff underprediction ({approx_equal} -500 pcm) is observed with the most recent nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B-VI.8, JENDL3.3 and JEFF3.0) This report reviews the evaluation work performed at several laboratories [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Commissariat a l'energie atomique de Bruyeres-Le-Chatel (CEA-BRC), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] as well as the integral tests (mainly at LANL, Knoll Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL), Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG-Petten, CEA and IAEA) of the successive versions of the new evaluated files. The present status of the work can be summarized as follows: Improved evaluations of 238U inelastic data proposed by LANL and CEA-BRC were tested against integral benchmarks and partially improve the reactivity prediction. The thermal capture cross-section of 238U has been revised, and a new evaluation of 238U resonance parameters, up to 20 keV, is in progress at ORNL. Integral tests have ensured that the modifications of 238U capture cross-section in the thermal and resolved range were still compatible with 238U integral measurements (238U capture rate ratios measured in critical facilities and 239Pu build-up prediction in a depleted pressurized water reactor (PWR) assembly).It is demonstrated that the combination of the new inelastic data (LANL or BRC) with the preliminary ORNL resonance parameter set gives a good correction of the reactivity under-estimation. The provisional conclusions of this collective work are expected to contribute toward the improvement of the future versions of nuclear data libraries.

Courcelle, Arnaud [CEA-DEN-Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance, Cedex (France)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

FMDP reactor alternative summary report. Volume 1 - existing LWR alternative  

SciTech Connect

Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] are becoming surplus to national defense needs in both the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. This document summarizes the results of analysis concerned with existing light water reactor plutonium disposition alternatives.

Greene, S.R.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Draft of new maintenance standards for LWR in Japan  

SciTech Connect

Activities of development of new maintenance standards for operating nuclear power plant in Japan are described. The work of drafting the standards has been done by the Committee of Nuclear Plant Operation and Maintenance Standards (POMS), that was organized in the Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation under the entrustment from the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. The articles of ASME Section XI related to inspection, flaw evaluation and repair have been examined and modified, if necessary, so as to introduce latest Japanese database and technological knowledge. In the area of repairs, many repair techniques verified in recent years in Japan were incorporated i n addition to those specified in ASME Section XI. Finally major differences between ASME Section XI and the draft of the standards are listed.

Iida, Kunihiro [Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Observations of internal tide variability in the far field of the Hawaiian Ridge: The far field component of the Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of the Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME) observations of internal tides in two regions on either side of the Hawaiian Ridge were obtained by tomography thermistors and CTD casts from FLIP. The tomographic observations detect radiation of low internal?tide modes in broad areas while the thermistors and CTD casts measure the ‘‘local’’ internal?tide variability. These observations are used to estimate the amount of energy carried away from the Ridge by the internal tides to estimate the relative energies of low? and high?mode internal tides and to test numerical models of internal?tide generation. Barotropic currents and pressure were also measured by tomography electromagnetic and pressure sensors so that with careful modeling the energy lost from the barotropic tides at the Ridge can be determined. Thermistor data obtained on one mooring showed that the M2 mode?1 internal tide was mainly phase?locked and carried 1.3 kW/m of energy. Modes 2 and 3 had amplitudes comparable to mode?1 but they were not phase locked. Energy fluxes at three other moorings were 1.2 2.0 and 6.7 kW/m. Energy fluxes obtained by tomography were 0 (1 kW/m) or less; the line?integral data are less susceptible to the interference effects in the outgoing internal waves.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR USE IN FUEL BUNDLE HANDLING  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR USE IN FUEL BUNDLE HANDLING TOPICAL REPORT W. 8. Weihermilfer C. S. Allison Septem bet 1979 Work Performed, Under Contract EY-76-C- M - 1 8 3 0 Form 189 Number 210.1 BAlTELLE PACIFIC NORTHWEST LABORATORY RICHLAND, WA 99352 BASE TECHNOLOGY N O T I C E T h i s report was prepard n an account of work sponrored by the UAed States Govcmmenr. Neither tht Unltcd S t a t e nor !he k p n m c n t of Energy, not any of their ernploylecs, nw any of theb ccmtnctotr, hontncton. or their employper. maka any warranty. expms or Implied, or m u m any legal liability or rcrponrlbllity for the accuracy, c o m p l c r e ~ s or ulefulnm of m y information. -ratus, prodm or p r e di~1Oltd. or represents that Its u w ? would not infringe privateiy o w d rights. The views, opinions and ccnclusionr contained in this report a

39

LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability  

SciTech Connect

Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K. [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Takano, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Sato, S. [Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Shimazu, Y. [Fukui University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Integrated Diagnostic and Prognostic Tools for Residual Life Estimation in Aging Nuclear Power Plant Components  

SciTech Connect

Recent events in Japan have focused renewed attention on the safe operation of light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs). A central issue in safe, long-term operations of existing and planned NPPs is the early detection and monitoring of significant materials degradation. Materials aging and degradation in passive components is expected to be the key factor in determining the operational life of an NPP and may limit long-term operations in the current LWR fleet. Methods for detecting and assessing the degradation state in NPP structural materials, followed by approaches to estimate the remaining useful life (RUL) of the component, are therefore necessary for safe, long-term operations. This paper explores advanced diagnostic and prognostic approaches to detecting material degradation, and then determining RUL given the current material state.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Henager, Charles H.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wasser- und wasserstoffgehalt in oxidischen LWR-kernbrennstoffen und in borcarbid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analyzing hydrogen and water released from UO2, UO2-Gd2O3 and UO2-PuO2 pellets by different hot extraction methods led to the result that nearly all the water is adsorbed on the surface and in open pores. The released gases are approximately 80% water and up to 20% hydrogen. Only 10% of the water content of B4C is adsorbed to the surface and in open pores. 90% of the water is chemicaly bonded as boric acids adhered to the B4C. During more than five years of special measuring experience and quality control equivalent water contents in the range of 1 – 3 ppm were found in UO2 and mixed oxide fuel rods. These data fulfil the LWR-specification requirement of 10 ppm with high confidence. Fuel rod failures by cladding hydriding are now excluded. Zusammenfassung Die Bindung des Wassers an das UO2 ist nach den vorliegenden Untersuchungen praktisch nur eine Sorption an der zugänglichen Oberfläche. Vergleichende Untersuchungen wie hier an B4C durchgeführt und Modellbetrachtungen über die Oberflächenbelegung (2 – 3 ppm H2O füllen mit einer monomolekularen Schicht die experimentell bestimmte BET-Oberfläche aus) unterstützen diese Annahme. Aus den intensiven Untersuchungen an sehr vielen oxidischen Kernbrennstoffpellets über einen mehr als fünfjährigen Fertigungszeitraum ergibt sich, da? Äquivalentwassergehalte von 1 – 3 ppm an Brennstäben mit UO2-Pellets und Mischoxidpellets sicher realisierbar sind. Diese niedrigen Gehalte erfüllen die Spezifikationsforderung mit hohem Sicherheitsabstand. Seit der Beherrschung des Feuchteproblems in der Brennstoff- und Brennstabfertigung sind “Sunburst” -Defekte an LWR-Brennstäben nicht mehr aufgetreten.

E. Brandau; L. Köhler

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Data: An often-ignored component of safety-related systems Alastair Faulkner, MSc.; CEng.; MBCS.; CSE International Ltd. Flixborough. UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and operation of safety-related systems. The work described in this paper sets out to provide much neededData: An often-ignored component of safety-related systems Alastair Faulkner, MSc.; CEng.; MBCS. UK Keywords: Data, data-driven, safety-related systems Abstract Safety-related systems are being

Storey, Neil

44

A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components  

SciTech Connect

The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

Woods, M.; Erickson, R.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, A.; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; /Daresbury /CERN /DESY /KEK, Tsukuba /LLNL, Livermore /Lancaster U.

2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

Stack Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stack Components Stack Components Nancy L. Garland Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Fuel Cell Team FORS 5G-086 (202) 586-5673 nancy.garland@ee.doe.gov Stack Components F u e l P r o c e s s o r Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 e - H+ Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate e - e - e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 e - e - H+ H+ Power Stack Component Barriers $10 Other Bipolar Plates Membranes Electrodes $25 $5 $5 Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW BARRIERS * Stack material cost/manufacturing * Durability * Electrode performance * Thermal and water management Stack Component Targets

46

Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Preparation of nuclear libraries with deterministic and stochastic methods for LWR reflectors  

SciTech Connect

The explicit reflector methodology is used in the system of codes CASMO-5 / SIMULATE-3 to include the reflector around the active core into the computational region and avoid adopting any ad-hoc or experimental albedo coefficients as boundary conditions. However, to complete the core calculation, a set of cross sections and discontinuity factors is needed for the reflector nodes and the accuracy of these nuclear parameters influences the final results, in particular along the peripheral regions of the core. In this paper the explicit reflector methodology of CASMO-5 is adopted to evaluate the few-group cross sections and discontinuity factors of the different reflector cases, based on the design of Generation II and III LWR reactors. In addition, in the perspective of using Monte-Carlo codes as a complementary option for lattice calculations of reflector configurations, the stochastic SERPENT code is also included as part of this benchmark. With the latter, the impact of applying 2-D reflector models with homogenized materials instead of explicit representation of the real geometrical structures is moreover evaluated and shown to be limited. (authors)

Canepa, S.; Hursin, M.; Ferroukhi, H.; Pautz, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Uranium Nitride as LWR TRISO Fuel: Thermodynamic Modeling of U-C-N  

SciTech Connect

TRISO coated particle fuel is envisioned as a next generation replacement for current urania pellet fuel in LWR applications. To obtain adequate fissile loading the kernel of the TRISO particle will need to be UN. In support of the fuel development effort, an assessment of phase regions of interest in the U-C-N system was undertaken as the fuel will be prepared by the carbothermic reduction of the oxide and it will be in equilibrium with carbon within the TRISO particle. The phase equilibria and thermochemistry of the U-C-N system is reviewed, including nitrogen pressure measurements above various phase fields. Selected measurements were used to fit a first order model of the UC1-xNx phase, represented by the inter-solution of UN and UC. Fit to the data was significantly improved by also adjusting the heat of formation for UN by ~12 kJ/mol and the phase equilbria was best reproduced by also adjusting the heat for U2N3 by +XXX. The determined interaction parameters yielded a slightly positive deviation from ideality, which agrees with lattice parameter measurements which show positive deviation from Vegard s law. The resultant model together with reported values for other phases in the system were used to generate isothermal sections of the U-C-N phase diagram. Nitrogen partial pressures were also computed for regions of interest.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Shin, Dongwon [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Eclipsing Binaries as Astrophysical Laboratories Internal Structure, Convective Core Overshooting and Evolution of the B-star Components of V380 Cygni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New photometric solutions have been carried out on the important eccentric eclipsing system V380 Cygni (B1.5II-III + B2V) from UBV differential photoelectric photometry obtained by us. The photometric elements obtained from the analysis of the light curves have been combined with the spectroscopic solution recently published by Popper & Guinan and have led to the physical properties of the system components. The effective temperature of the stars has been determined by fitting IUE UV spectrophotometry to Kurucz model atmospheres and compared with other determinations from broad-band and intermediate-band standard photometry. The values of mass, absolute radius, and effective temperature, for the primary and secondary stars are: 11.1+/-0.5 Mo, 14.7+/-0.2 Ro, 21350+/-400 K, and 6.95+/-0.25 Mo, 3.74+/-0.07 Ro, 20500+/-500 K, respectively. In addition, a re-determination of the system's apsidal motion rate has been done from the analysis of 12 eclipse timings obtained from 1923 to 1995. Using stellar structur...

Guinan, E F; Fitzpatrick, E L; Giménez, A; Jordi, C; McCook, G P; Popper, D M; Guinan, Edward F.; Ribas, Ignasi; Fitzpatrick, Edward L.; Gimenez, Alvaro; Jordi, Carme; Cook, George P. Mc; Popper, Daniel M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Internal Dosimetry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21-2008 21-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD INTERNAL DOSIMETRY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1121-2008 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE Components and their contractors. 2. Constructive comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should be sent to Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy (HS-11) U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

51

Anthony International: Order (2013-CE-5357)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Anthony International to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Anthony International had failed to certify that any basic models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

52

Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components  

SciTech Connect

Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

LWR Sustainability Program Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Integrated Program Plan, Revision 2, INL-EXT-11-23452, April 2014. pdf DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program -...

54

Internal Tides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Internal tides are internal waves at tidal frequencies and are generated by interaction of the barotropic surface tide with bottom topography. Being dependent on ocean stratification and background currents, internal tides tend to be highly variable in time, sometimes almost erratic, yet in the open ocean the lowest mode can travel great distances across ocean basins while remaining phase-locked with the astronomical potential. Internal tides are an important energy source for ocean mixing.

R.D. Ray

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

international programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9%2A en International Programs http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorisminternationalprograms

56

Modeling Methodology for Component Reuse and System Integration for Hurricane Loss Projection Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Methodology for Component Reuse and System Integration for Hurricane Loss Projection Distributed Multimedia Information System Laboratory School of Computing and Information Sciences Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA 2 Department of Finance Florida International University, Miami

Chen, Shu-Ching

57

Electronic Component Obsolescence  

SciTech Connect

Electronic component obsolescence occurs when parts are no longer available to support the manufacture and/or repair of equipment still in service. Future instrumentation containing complex components WILL face obsolescence issues as technology advances. This paper describes hardware and software obsolescence as well as factors to consider when designing new instrumentation.

Sohns, Carl William [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Vortex trimer in three-component Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex trimer is predicted in three-component Bose-Einstein condensates with internal coherent couplings. The molecule is made by three constituent vortices which are bounded by domain walls of the relative phases. We show that the shape and the size of the molecule can be controlled by changing the internal coherent couplings.

Minoru Eto; Muneto Nitta

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

International telecommunications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A NEW Japanese telecommunications company established by Cable and Wireless of the United Kingdom began international services last week ... company an operating licence (see Nature 326, 319; 1987). The costs of international telecommunications in Japan are expected to drop significantly as a result of the new competition. ...

David Swinbanks

1989-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

60

ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sydney is Australia's largest city and its centre of finance and commerce. The Harbour Bridge, Opera House and Sydney Tower are internationally recognised icons, which represent both Sydney and its rich developed close links with many international institutions, particularly in Asia. ENGINEERING IN SYDNEY

University of Technology, Sydney

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Internal Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 1 of 6 9 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Internal Communication Process Document Number: P-009 Rev 11_0303 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A P-009 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 09_0902 Modified process to better fit current practice. 10_0831 Added verbiage to clarify process. Added initiation phrase to process steps. 11_0303 Added QAM to the last step and made minor editorial updates. P-009 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 3 of 6 I. Purpose

62

Building and Connecting Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While equations are an essential part of model development, it quickly becomes tedious to write out all the equations for the components in a system. In this chapter, we show how to reuse constitutive equation...

Michael Tiller Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

64

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

65

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DURABILITY OF BUILDING MATERIALS AND COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Based Building Design Services C.S. HAN, J.C. KUNZ, and K.H. LAW Center for Integrated Facility Engineering, 1999 Vancouver, Canada AN INTERNET-BASED DISTRIBUTED BUILDING DESIGN SERVICE FRAMEWORK Internet architecture that enables the delivery of building design services over the Internet. With this architecture

Stanford University

66

International Portfolio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) is a multi-year international effort focused on developing and implementing energy efficiency technologies in both the USA and in China. The...

67

Component external leakage and rupture frequency estimates  

SciTech Connect

In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and rupture frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and rupture frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and rupture events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.

Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

MU INTERNATIONAL DIRECTORY International Directory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Ag., Food & Natural Resources International Programs http://students.missouri.edu/~asa Association of Malaysian Students http://www.missouri.edu/~ctl2m5/index.html Bangladesh Student Association

Taylor, Jerry

69

Internal Dosimetry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1121-2008 Change Notice No.1 October 2013 DOE STANDARD INTERNAL DOSIMETRY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy- technical-standards-program ii Change Notice 1. Internal Dosimetry DOE-STD-1121-2008 Page/Section Change Throughout Change: airborne contamination To: airborne radioactivity Section 1.5, p. 4 Change: HPS N 13.1-1999 To: HPS N 13.1-2011 Section 1.5, p. 4 Change: HPS N 13.6-1999 To: HPS N 13,.6-2010 Section 1.5, p. 4 Delete: HPS N 13.14-1994, Internal Dosimetry Programs for

70

BNL CRCR LEAF Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, 4359-4366 (2004), which can be found by following this link. Accelerator System Components The LEAF facility layout indicates the locations of the laser system, the RF components, the electron gun and the beam lines. RF System The modulator cabinet and S-band (2.856 GHz) klystron are located in the laser room. A copper waveguide carries the 15 MW RF pulse from the klystron to the electron gun in the accelerator vault. (A klystron is a high-power RF amplifier. You can visit the ALS MicroWorlds site for more information on klystrons and the principles of RF particle acceleration.) Electron Gun Accelerator and Beam Line 5 psec beam line The electron gun (link to picture) is located in the southwest corner of

71

Injection molded component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

INTERNATIONAL COURSEGUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Applied Science, Arts and Design, Information Sciences and Engineering. INTERNATIONAL COURSE GUIDE01 #00212K, University of Canberra College #01893E. Information in this guide was correct at time in a competitive global market. This can involve work integrated learning, and in many courses students have

Canberra, University of

73

International Educational  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Journal of Educational Technology Opportunities and options for Web-enabled databases.D., Arizona State University The landscape of Web-based instruction is changing due to the convergence of the Web and database servers. Web-based database (WBD) servers enhance Web-based instruction by providing

Yu, Alex

74

INTERNATIONAL STUDYCENTRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;6 Experiential Learning 8 21st Century Education 9 Supporting your Success 18 Financing your Castle Education is located in a 15th century castle, but our focus is the 21st century, an age of networks and processes escaping the Nazis, Dr. Alfred Bader fled to England in 1938, from where he was sent to an internment camp

Abolmaesumi, Purang

75

INTERNATIONAL STUDYCENTRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;6 Experiential Learning 8 21st Century Education 9 Supporting your Success 18 Financing your Castle Education in a 15th century castle, but our focus is the 21st, a century of networks and processes.Where people escaping the Nazis, Dr. Alfred Bader fled to England in 1938, from where he was sent to an internment camp

Graham, Nick

76

Failure Rate Data Analysis for High Technology Components  

SciTech Connect

Understanding component reliability helps designers create more robust future designs and supports efficient and cost-effective operations of existing machines. The accelerator community can leverage the commonality of its high-vacuum and high-power systems with those of the magnetic fusion community to gain access to a larger database of reliability data. Reliability studies performed under the auspices of the International Energy Agency are the result of an international working group, which has generated a component failure rate database for fusion experiment components. The initial database work harvested published data and now analyzes operating experience data. This paper discusses the usefulness of reliability data, describes the failure rate data collection and analysis effort, discusses reliability for components with scarce data, and points out some of the intersections between magnetic fusion experiments and accelerators.

L. C. Cadwallader

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS Signed by Secretary Spencer Abraham January 2001-December 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS Joint Statement of ntent between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and The Ministry of Energy and Mines of the Republic ofPeru on Cooperation in the Field of Energy -Tab 1 Fifth Hemispheric Energy Ministers Meeting Mexico City, Mexico - March 9, 2001. Mexico Declaration - Energy: A Crucial Factor for Integration and Sustainable Development in the Hemisphere - Tab 2 Extension of the Agreement for Energy Cooperation between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and the Secretariat ofEnergy of the United Mexican States, and its Four Annexes - Tab3 Implementing Agreement between the Department ofEnergy of the United States ofAmerica and the

78

Use of phenomena identification and ranking (PIRT) process in research related to design certification of the AP600 advanced passive light water reactor (LWR)  

SciTech Connect

The AP600 LWR is a new advanced passive design that has been submitted to the USNRC for design certification. Within the certification process the USNRC will perform selected system thermal hydraulic response audit studies to help confirm parts of the vendor`s safety analysis submittal. Because of certain innovative design features of the safety systems, new experimental data and related advances in the system thermal hydraulic analysis computer code are being developed by the USNRC. The PIRT process is being used to focus the experimental and analytical work to obtain a sufficient and cost effective research effort. The objective of this paper is to describe the application and most significant results of the PIRT process, including several innovative features needed in the application to accommodate the short design certification schedule. The short design certification schedule has required that many aspects of the USNRC experimental and analytical research be performed in parallel, rather than in series as was normal for currently operating LWRS. This has required development and use of management techniques that focus and integrate the various diverse parts of the research. The original PIRTs were based on inexact knowledge of an evolving reactor design, and concentrated on the new passive features of the design. Subsequently, the PIRTs have evolved in two more stages as the design became more firm and experimental and analytical data became available. A fourth and final stage is planned and in progress to complete the PIRT development. The PIRTs existing at the end of each development stage have been used to guide the experimental program, scaling analyses and code development supporting the audit studies.

Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Eltawila, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Component failure data handbook  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Precision Cleaning Titanium Components  

SciTech Connect

Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline  

SciTech Connect

Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

83

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2003 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected to nearly double between 2001 and 2025, with the most robust growth in demand expected among the developing nations. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption in the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case. Consumption of natural gas worldwide is projected to increase by an average of 2.8 percent annually from 2001 to 2025, compared with projected annual growth rates of 1.8 percent for oil consumption and 1.5 percent for coal. Natural gas consumption in 2025, at 176 trillion cubic feet, is projected to be nearly double the 2001 total of 90 trillion cubic feet (Figure 40). The natural gas share of total energy consumption is projected to increase from 23 percent in 2001 to 28 percent in 2025.

84

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

strength data from with FE model "load factors" and stress field to estimate fast fracture strength and fatigue resistance of design component Determination of FE model "load...

85

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Radiation (Part I) - Alkali-AggregateSilica Reaction (Part II) - Creepcreep-fracture interaction (Roadmap to be developed) Part I- Irradiated Concrete Research results...

86

Heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of microchannels with internal longitudinal fins.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electronic components generate large amount of heat during their operation, which requires to be dissipated. Over the past decade, internal heat generation levels have exponentially… (more)

Foong, Andrew Jun Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

International Rectifier Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rectifier Corporation Rectifier Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name International Rectifier Corporation Place El Segundo, California Zip 90245 Product Manufacturer of analog and mixed signal ICs, advanced circuit devices, integrated power systems and components that enable high performance of end products in home appliances, industrial motor-driven equipment, autos, and information technology. References International Rectifier Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. International Rectifier Corporation is a company located in El Segundo, California . References ↑ "International Rectifier Corporation" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Rectifier_Corporation&oldid=347054"

88

21 11 13 INTERNATIONAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31 E 32 F 32 #12; iv INTERNATIONAL ERGONOMICS ASSOCIATION #12; 3 INTERNATIONAL ERGONOMICS ASSOCIATION CODE OF CONDUCT ERGONOMICS ASSOCIATION (2006) http://www.iea.cc/browse.php?contID=international_ergonomics_association A6

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

89

International Student and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Admissions Disability Services International Student and Scholar Services International Student of Continuing Education Theresa Ganglghassemlouei and Beth Isensee, International Student and Scholar Services Colleges & Programs Student Outcomes: · Process improvements · Enhance orientation content based

Amin, S. Massoud

90

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microsystems Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News MICROSYSTEMS SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & COMPONENTS Clear Latest MSTC News Ed Cole appointed Fellow by ASM International Researching new detectors for chemical, biological threats MESA fab streaming video MESAFab streaming video Get Adobe Flash player The concept of integrating more than one transistor on a single chip has had a profound and lasting impact on our society. From the first use in the Minuteman missile to the proliferation of consumer products today, microelectronic circuits have dramatically improved performance, functionality, and reliability, while reducing cost

91

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY Int. J. Climatol. 19: 951974 (1999)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY Int. J. Climatol. 19: 951­974 (1999) AN EXPERT SYSTEM; surface air temperature 1. INTRODUCTION An important component of recent research efforts in climatology

Martin, James H.

92

Proceedings of the international workshop on spallation materials technology  

SciTech Connect

This document contains papers which were presented at the International Workshop on Spallation Materials Technology. Topics included: overviews and thermal response; operational experience; materials experience; target station and component design; particle transport and damage calculations; neutron sources; and compatibility.

Mansur, L.K.; Ullmaier, H. [comps.] [comps.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cleanroom Work Support Component Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfactory cleanroom operations require adequate support components. The same care in design required for the cleanroom proper must also be used in layout ... and activities that are carried out in the cleanroom

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Generation of internal waves in the deep ocean J. Nycander  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

topography. The geographical distribution of the energy flux from tides to internal waves is determined essential to determine the energy flux from tides to internal waves. [3] The total dissipation of the M2 tide, which accounts for about two thirds of the energy of all tidal components combined, is known

Nycander, Jonas

95

STEP Intern Job Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

STEP Intern Job Description, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

96

Assessor Training International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NVLAP Assessor Training International Arrangements #12;Assessor Training 2009: International;Assessor Training 2009: International Arrangements 3 2009 is the 10th anniversary of the signing granted by a signatory to the ILAC Arrangement #12;Assessor Training 2009: International Arrangements 4

97

Conference Proceedings International Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference Proceedings 10th International Conference on Hand-Arm Vibration 7-11 June 2004 Flamingo, the entertainment capital of the world: The 10th International Hand-Arm Vibration Conference will be the second time this international conference has been hosted in the US. The first was the 2nd International Hand-Arm Vibration

Hemmers, Oliver

98

IN TODAY'S PAPER International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

India's participation in the multi-billion-dollar International Thermonuclear Reactor project which aims

99

Internal Audit Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Contacts Organizational Chart IAS Search Staff Only Lab Search Phone Book A-Z Index Privacy and Security Notice "Internal Auditing is an independent, objective assurance and consulting activity designed to add value and improve an organization's operations. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes." The Institute of Internal Auditors Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing About IAS | Audit Committee | Audit Planning | Ethics & Investigations | External Audit Coordination Advisory Services | Other Relevant Audit Links | Contacts | Organizational

100

Internal Audit Preparation Worksheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 1 of 5 2 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid Document Number: F-012 Rev. 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-007, Internal Audit Process Notify of Changes: Internal Auditors Referenced Document(s): F-011 Internal Audit Report F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 11_0304 Change title from Worksheet to Job Aid and changed revision from alpha to numeric for consistency. F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 3 of 5 Internal Audit Preparation Worksheet F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 4 of 5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Physical Components, Coordinate Components, and the Speed of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For generalized coordinate systems, the numerical values of vector and tensor components do not generally equal the physical values, i.e., the values one would measure with standard physical instruments. Hence, calculating physical components from coordinate components is important for comparing experiment with theory. Surprisingly, however, this calculational method is not widely known among physicists, and is rarely taught in relativity courses, though it is commonly employed in at least one other field (applied mechanics.) Different derivations of this method, ranging from elementary to advanced level, are presented. The result is then applied to clarify the oftentimes confusing issue of whether or not the speed of light in non-inertial frames is equal to c.

Robert D. Klauber

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

102

International Macroeconomic Data Set | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Macroeconomic Data Set International Macroeconomic Data Set Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data International Macroeconomic Data Set Dataset Summary Description The International Macroeconomic Data Set provides data from 1969 through 2020 for real (adjusted for inflation) gross domestic product (GDP), population, real exchange rates, and other variables for the 190 countries and 34 regions that are most important for U.S. agricultural trade. The data presented here are a key component of the USDA Baseline projections process, and can be used as a benchmark for analyzing the impacts of U.S. and global macroeconomic shocks. The data for the Baseline projections are updated once a year to reflect the assumptions used for the Baseline. The historical data will be revised several times a year as the underlying data evolve.

103

Automated cleaning of electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Technologies and Devices International Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Devices International Inc and Devices International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Technologies and Devices International Inc Place Silver Spring, Maryland Zip 20904 Product Develops, manufactures and markets electronic components using III-V nitride semiconductor materials and silicon carbide. References Technologies and Devices International Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Technologies and Devices International Inc is a company located in Silver Spring, Maryland . References ↑ "Technologies and Devices International Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Technologies_and_Devices_International_Inc&oldid=352072" Categories:

105

Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components  

SciTech Connect

Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

Wilson III, George R. (Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin (United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)); Freerks, Robert L. (Rentech, Incorporated, 1331 17th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202 (United States))

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Primary Components of Binomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for primary components of special binomial ideals. A feature of this work is that our results are independent of the characteristic of the field. First of all, we analyze the primary decomposition of a special class of binomial ideals, lattice ideals...

Eser, Zekiye

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

108

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

109

International Standards for Telecommunications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article International Standards for Telecommunications M. B. Williams As soon as telegraph...surprising that the International Telecommunications Union, the forum for world-wide...and evolution of all branches of telecommunications. Increasingly, the distinction...

M. B. Williams

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Essays in international trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a collection of essays on the effect of trade costs on international trade. Chapter 1 derives and empirically examines how factor proportions determine the structure of commodity trade when international ...

Romalis, John

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

International aeronautical user charges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: 1.1 BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION Very few issues relating to the international air transportation industry are today as divisive as those pertaining to user charges imposed at international airports and enroute ...

Odoni, Amedeo R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

An Internal Coaxil Cable Seal System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a seal system for a coaxial cable more specifically an internal seal system placed within the coaxial cable and its constituent components. A series of seal stacks including flexible rigid rings and elastomeric rings are placed on load bearing members within the coaxial cable. The current invention is adapted to seal the annular space between the coaxial cable and an electrical contact passing there through. The coaxial cable is disposed within drilling components to transmit electrical signals between drilling components within a drill string. During oil and gas exploration, a drill string can see a range of pressures and temperatures thus resulting in multiple combinations of temperature and pressure and increasing the difficulty of creating a robust seal for all combinations. The seal system can be used in a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2004-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

International Freshwater Agreements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Distribution ..................................................... 16 Population Density per, circa 1995............................................... 20 Dam Density per International River Basin ............................ 25 Africa ................................................................

Wolf, Aaron

114

International Commitments Primer | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Commitments International Commitments Primer International Commitments Primer Overview of International Commitment Process DOE pursues a variety of science and...

115

International Student Guide Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Student Guide Mathematics www.swansea.ac.uk/maths www.swansea.ac.uk/science/international #12;Reasons to study at Swansea University Mathematics at Swansea University Established in 1920, 36th and more Over 15,000 students / Over 2,000 International students Strongest in Wales for Mathematics

Harman, Neal.A.

116

Wood Resources International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood Resources International Wood Raw Material Consumption on the Rise Despite Weak Global Economy UNECE Timber Committee Meeting October 7-8, 2003 Geneva, Switzerland Håkan Ekström Wood Resources International #12;Wood Resources International Outline · Roundwood Removals · Roundwood Consumption · Raw

117

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

Goldberg, Bennett

118

Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Processing of Activated Core Components  

SciTech Connect

Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Perceptual-components architecture for digital video  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A perceptual-components architecture for digital video partitions the image stream into signal components in a manner analogous to that used in the human visual system. These...

Watson, Andrew B

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems performance studies - HIL components testing Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

123

Model-based software component testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] Software component testing (SCT) is a proven software engineering approach to evaluating, improving and demonstrating component reliability and quality for producing trusted software… (more)

Zheng, Weiqun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

125

Fusion-component lifetime analysis  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional computer code has been developed to examine the lifetime of first-wall and impurity-control components. The code incorporates the operating and design parameters, the material characteristics, and the appropriate failure criteria for the individual components. The major emphasis of the modeling effort has been to calculate the temperature-stress-strain-radiation effects history of a component so that the synergystic effects between sputtering erosion, swelling, creep, fatigue, and crack growth can be examined. The general forms of the property equations are the same for all materials in order to provide the greatest flexibility for materials selection in the code. The individual coefficients within the equations are different for each material. The code is capable of determining the behavior of a plate, composed of either a single or dual material structure, that is either totally constrained or constrained from bending but not from expansion. The code has been utilized to analyze the first walls for FED/INTOR and DEMO and to analyze the limiter for FED/INTOR.

Mattas, R.F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Rancho Seco-Planning for Large Components  

SciTech Connect

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of Safestor to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful work to date, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and the Auxiliary Building and should be completed by mid 2003. The Spent Fuel is currently being moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion scheduled for late 2002. The personnel resources on site are currently assigned to support both the dry fuel project and the dismantlement of the facility. Once fuel movement is complete more resources will be provided for dismantlement. Characterization of major components other than the vessel is complete and planning for their removal is in progress with various cut-up and/or shipping options being evaluated. Planning for the vessel and internals removal is being performed. The relatively slow pace of the work allows careful evaluation of cost-effective options as they become available in the industry.

Gardiner, D. E.; Newey, J. M; Snyder, M. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

Anthony International: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5357) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anthony International: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5357) Anthony International: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5357) Anthony International: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5357) March 26, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Anthony International failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Anthony International: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5357) More Documents & Publications Anthony International: Order (2013-CE-5357)

128

International Rectifier Power Control Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rectifier Power Control Systems Rectifier Power Control Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name International Rectifier Power Control Systems Place El Segundo, California Zip 90245 Product Originally a division of International Rectifier Corporation manufacturing semiconductor and module components for power management products. References International Rectifier Power Control Systems[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. International Rectifier Power Control Systems is a company located in El Segundo, California . References ↑ "International Rectifier Power Control Systems" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Rectifier_Power_Control_Systems&oldid=347055"

129

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to guarantee that the system's behavior is preserved across a component replacement. If automated logical

Liskov, Barbara

130

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. ... Keywords: Reconfiguration, model checking, stateful components

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A component-based collaboration infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-through in building reusable sys- tems. The popularity of di?erent component models in industry has demonstrated the attractions and power of CBD. Further more, modern object-oriented languages 18 such as Java and .Net provide direct support on component... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 B. Shared Component Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1. Modeling Shared Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2. Java Embodiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 a. Shared Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 b...

Yang, Yi

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

132

Simple thermodynamics of strongly coupled one-component-plasma in two and three dimensions  

SciTech Connect

Simple analytical approximations for the internal energy of the strongly coupled one-component-plasma in two and three dimensions are discussed. As a result, new practical expressions for the internal energy in the fluid phase are proposed. Their accuracy is checked by evaluating the location of the fluid-solid phase transition from the free energy consideration. Possible applications to other related systems are briefly discussed.

Khrapak, Sergey A., E-mail: Sergey.Khrapak@dlr.de [Forschungsgruppe Komplexe Plasmen, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khrapak, Alexey G. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Improvements in Low-Frequency, Ultrasonic Phased-Array Evaluation for Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Components  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor (LWR) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This particular study focused on the evaluation of custom-designed, low-frequency (500 kHz) phased-array (PA) probes for examining welds in thick-section cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping. In addition, research was conducted to observe ultrasonic sound field propagation effects from known coarse-grained microstructures found in parent CASS material. The study was conducted on a variety of thick-wall, coarse-grained CASS specimens that were previously inspected by an older generation 500-kHz PA-UT probe and acquisition instrument configuration. This comparative study describes the impact of the new PA probe design on flaw detection and sizing in a low signal-to-noise environment. The set of Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) CASS specimens examined in this study are greater than 50.8-mm (2.0-in.) thick with documented flaws and microstructures. These specimens are on loan to PNNL from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. The flaws contained within these specimens are thermal fatigue cracks (TFC) or mechanical fatigue cracks (MFC) and range from 13% to 42% in through-wall extent. In addition, ultrasonic signal continuity was evaluated on two CASS parent material ring sections by examining the edge-of-pipe response (corner geometry) for regions of signal loss.

Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

THE INTERNATIONAL GEOLOGICAL CONGRESS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , sections, plans, models in relief, c., to be found in the Exposition Universelle, will realise the expectations expressed in the circular of the International Committee, of an ...

T. STERRY HUNT

1878-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

HydroVision International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The HydroVision International Conference and Exhibition offers attendees countless opportunities to network, share best practices, meet with product and service providers, and more.  Held over five...

136

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on current international petroleum production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil demand and OECD demand data are presented for the years 1970 thru 1995.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Internal Controls Evaluations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

assurance reviews need to be completed prior to the submission of quarterly and annual reports. Page | 6 Table 1: DOE Internal Controls Assessment Process Important Dates Date...

138

International Programs in Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

139

International for Advanced Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Technology at the University of Ulm ICAS-Affiliations The International Center for Advanced Studies in Health in medical technology and pharma- ceutical industry. The International Advisory Panel of ICAS consists, transfer of state-of-the-art clinical technologies, and utilization of methodologies appropriate

Pfeifer, Holger

140

International Conference Water Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Conference Water Efficiency in Urban Areas Concepts, Technologies, Socio Economics for PostersRegistration via Fax: +49 941 29688-17 Yes, I will participate International Conference Water of the invoice. Payment must be received no later than 14 days before the conference begins (it has to be sett

Wehrli, Bernhard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

STUDENT HANDBOOK INTERNATIONAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDENT HANDBOOK INTERNATIONAL 2011-12 #12;2 International Student Handbook 2011-12 Contents Volunteering 30 Sport and physical activity 31 Local transport 32 Exploring Leeds and the UK 36 Families to start a new period in your life. We hope this handbook will help you to make the most of your time

Haase, Markus

142

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

143

Renewable Energy Resources Inc formerly Internal Hydro International Inc |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Internal Hydro International Inc Internal Hydro International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc) Place Tampa, Florida Zip 33603 Sector Hydro Product Internal Hydro's technology takes waste, pumped pressures of fluids, gases or the constantly available natural flows of water and extracts power from them via a turbine. References Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc) is a company located in Tampa, Florida . References ↑ "Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro

144

Building Component Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Component Library Building Component Library Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Component Library Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: bcl.nrel.gov Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): buildings, nrel, data, component Language: English Building Component Library Screenshot References: Buildings Component Library[1] The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The data are broken down into separate

145

Predicting problems caused by component upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new, automatic technique to assess whether replacing a component of a software system by a purportedly compatible component may change the behavior of the system. The technique operates before ...

McCamant, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS Performance, durability and sustainability of advanced windows and solar components for building envelopes Energy Performance Assessment Methodology Starting................................................................................................................................................. 3 2 Concepts of Energy Performance Assessment of Building Envelopes

147

Advanced filters and components for power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the high frequency performance of components and filters by better compensating the parasitic effects of practical components. The main application for this improvement is in ...

Neugebauer, Timothy Carl, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tools to Implement MPDV Component Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents work on photonic Doppler velocimetry multiplexing techniques, particularly as regards measurements on components.

Pena, M; Daykin, E; Emmit, R; Garza, A; Gibo, M; Hutchins, M; Perez, C; Teel, M

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. If automated logical comparison indicates that the new component does not make all the guarantees that the old

Liskov, Barbara

150

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2012 ... Keywords: Tensor; Principal Component Analysis; Low Rank; Nuclear Norm; Semidefinite Programming Relaxation. Category 1: Convex and ...

Bo Jiang

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity  

SciTech Connect

Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Safety implementation of adaptive embedded control components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with dynamic reconfigurations of component-based adaptive embedded control systems to be automatically handled at run-time by intelligent agents. We define a Control Component as a software unit supporting control tasks of the system ... Keywords: adaptive embedded control system, dynamic reconfiguration, intelligent agent, semaphore, software control component

Atef Gharbi; Mohamed Khalgui; Samir Ben Ahmed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture of Robot Controllers R. Passama, D. Andreu, C component approaches and robot control architectures. This methodology defines a process that guides architecture, useful for analysis and integration, and a dedicated component-based language, focusing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

154

International Energy Statistics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics > Countries > International Energy Statistics International Energy Statistics Petroleum Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Capacity | Bunker Fuels | Stocks | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Reserves | Imports | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Exports | CO2 Emissions | Heat Content Natural Gas All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Coal All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Electricity Generation | Consumption | Capacity | Imports | Net Imports | Exports | Distribution Losses | Heat Content Renewables Electricity Generation| Electricity Consumption | Biofuels Production | Biofuels Consumption | Heat Content Total Energy

155

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Financing of New Nuclear Projects International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Financing of New Nuclear Projects December 15, 2009 - 1:09pm Addthis VIENNA, AUSTRIA - The multi-nation Infrastructure Development Working Group (IDWG) held its fifth meeting and also a workshop on the financing of international nuclear power projects in Vienna, Austria, on December 9-10, 2009. An official from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) led the working group meeting. "As a key component of the international Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program, the Infrastructure Development Working Group supports the safe, secure and responsible use of nuclear energy," said

157

NUCLEAR ISLANDS International Leasing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISLANDS ISLANDS International Leasing of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Sites to Provide Enduring Assurance of Peaceful Use Christopher E. Paine and Thomas B. Cochran Current International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards do not provide adequate protection against the diversion to military use of materials or technology from certain types of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In view of highly enriched uranium's relatively greater ease of use as a nuclear explosive material than plutonium and the significant diseconomies of commercial spent fuel reprocessing, this article focuses on the need for improved international controls over uranium enrichment facilities as the proximate justification for creation of an International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Association (INFCA). In principle, the proposal is equally applicable to alleviating the proliferation concerns provoked by nuclear fuel

158

admission guide International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2015/ 2016 admission guide International First-Year Students #12;2 3 WORLDWIDE RECOGNITION (2008 and Digital Media Critical Studies* Integrated Critical Practice* Production* German Studies Global Economics Networks Computer Science Computer Science: Computer Game Design Electrical Engineering Communications

California at Santa Cruz, University of

159

International Summer School2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Summer Camp 11 Session 3 Intensive Training on Chinese Language 15 About Dalian 19 #12;#12;About a century, and having gone through the persistent efforts of several generations, DUT has developed

Haviland, David

160

International Energy Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The International Energy Agency (IEA) provides a mechanism for member countries to task- and cost-share research activities through two agreements—one supporting hydrogen activities and another...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

CCPPolicyBriefing International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ Modelling international wind energy diffusion: www.uea.ac.uk/ccp T: +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ

Feigon, Brooke

164

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix F Internal Dose Estimates from NTS Fallout F-1 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population;TABLE OF CONTENTS Page F- Part I. Estimates of Dose...........................................................................................40 Comparison to dose estimates from global fallout

165

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER APRIL 2004­MARCH 2005 REPORT SCHOOL OF OCEAN AND EARTH RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate Pacific Research Center Design by: Susan Yamamoto Printed by: Hagadone Printing Company Photo: Waikiki

Wang, Yuqing

166

INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a heat pump cooling system, thereby alleviating peak electricity consumption and associated emissions substituting for banned fluorocarbon refrigerants, coping with carbon costing and reducing water consumptionINTERNATIONAL ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT FOUNDATION Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling

167

Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

international | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Activity in Gasification and Coal to Liquids Development News Gasifipedia Coal-Biomass Feed Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses International Activity Project...

169

SRI International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SRI International Jump to: navigation, search Name: SRI International Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:www.sri.com This company is listed in...

170

Greenlife International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Francisco, California Zip: 94111 Product: GreenLife International is a biodiesel manufacturer and equipment saler References: Greenlife International1 This article is a stub....

171

SWAT Goes International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#1; tx H2O | pg. 18 International researchers and program managers in 90 countries around the world use the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Germany, the first country interested in SWAT, uses it to model its large watersheds, said... Laboratory. To answer this expanding interest worldwide, the research team organized the first international SWAT conference in 2001 in Germany with 35 participants from 16 countries and five continents presenting 20 papers. ?This conference gave us a...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This monthly publication provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

International Energy Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's market transformation efforts have reached to European and other countries who are part of the international distributed and decentralized energy community. Through its partnership with DOE, the combined heat and power (CHP) program of the International Energy Agency (IEA) conducts research and analysis of CHP markets and deployment efforts around the world and has used lessons learned from U.S. research, development, and deployment efforts to recommend market transformation activities and policies that will lead to new CHP installations worldwide.

174

International Energy Agency  

SciTech Connect

The growing need for international cooperation in energy led to the establishment of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 1974 as a forum for the 21 participating countries to coordinate their energy planning. The IEA provides a framework within the cooperating efforts of its participating countries which reinforce one another and improve the overall energy situation. This brief report reviews the objectives of the IEA and the activities of the Advisory Council.

Taylor, N.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

GRB 060218: The nature of the optical-UV component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical-UV component in GRB 060218 is assumed to be due to optically thick cyclotron emission. The key aspect of this model is the high temperature of the absorbing electrons. The heat input derives from nuclei accelerated in semi-relativistic internal shocks, like in ordinary gamma-ray bursts. Coulomb collisions transfer part of that energy to electrons. Inverse Compton cooling on the X-ray photons leads to electron temperatures around 100 keV. Such a high brightness temperature for the optical-UV emission implies an emitting area roughly equal to that of the thermal X-ray component. This suggests a model in which the radio, optical-UV and thermal X-ray emission are closely related: Although the optical-UV and thermal X-ray emission are two separate spectral components, it is argued that they both come from the photosphere of a quasi-spherical, continuous outflow, whose interaction with the circumstellar medium gives rise to the radio emission. The properties of GRB 060218, as measured in the co-moving f...

Björnsson, C I

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

GRB 060218: The nature of the optical-UV component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical-UV component in GRB 060218 is assumed to be due to optically thick cyclotron emission. The key aspect of this model is the high temperature of the absorbing electrons. The heat input derives from nuclei accelerated in semi-relativistic internal shocks, like in ordinary gamma-ray bursts. Coulomb collisions transfer part of that energy to electrons. Inverse Compton cooling on the X-ray photons leads to electron temperatures around 100 keV. Such a high brightness temperature for the optical-UV emission implies an emitting area roughly equal to that of the thermal X-ray component. This suggests a model in which the radio, optical-UV and thermal X-ray emission are closely related: Although the optical-UV and thermal X-ray emission are two separate spectral components, it is argued that they both come from the photosphere of a quasi-spherical, continuous outflow, whose interaction with the circumstellar medium gives rise to the radio emission. The properties of GRB 060218, as measured in the co-moving frame, are similar to those of ordinary gamma-ray burst; i.e., the main difference is the much lower value of the bulk Lorentz factor in GRB 060218. The cyclotron absorption implies a magnetic field in rough equipartition with the matter energy density in the outflow. Hence, the magnetic field could have a dynamically important role, possibly with a magnetar as the central engine.

C. -I. Björnsson

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

177

The international biological program and the science of ecology.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analysis have attracted personnel proficient in computer...is also evident that selection factors involve more...its programs for the training of foreign scientists...international exchange of personnel. We are ex- ploring...components that must be operating, since a synthesis...

F E Smith

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

International Symposium Transport and Air Pollution Session 6: Biofuels 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1Sth International Symposium Transport and Air Pollution Session 6: Biofuels 2 Determination of VOC components in the exhaust of light vehicles fuelled with different biofuels F. Gazier 1,4*, A. De/bende 1 of the emissions shows changes with the composition of the biofuel in the levels of hydrocarbons, aromatic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

179

Assessor Training Internal Audits and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NVLAP Assessor Training Internal Audits and Management Reviews #12;Assessor Training 2009, quarterly, etc., schedule throughout the year #12;Assessor Training 2009: Internal Audits and Management a copy of the full internal audit schedule. #12;Assessor Training 2009: Internal Audits and Management

180

Charles Darwin University 1 INTERNATIONAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Australia; to safeguard Australia's international reputation as a provider of high quality education

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

International Energy Outlook - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2004 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2004 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2004 projections are based on U.S. and foreign government laws in effect on October 1, 2003.

182

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

International Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Activities International Activities International Activities International Activities The International Program assists the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in identifying technologies and strategies for waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, spent nuclear fuel and surplus nuclear material disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning. The International Program seeks to transform advances in science and engineering into practical solutions for environmental remediation. Collaboration with governmental, academic, and industrial organizations in other countries expands the technical depth of the EM program. Working with the international community offers the opportunity to develop consensus on approaches to science, technology and policy for environmental

184

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

186

NDE DEVELOPMENT FOR ACERT ENGINE COMPONENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barrier Coating (TBC) 12 PM024 TBCs applied on engine exhaust components reduce heat loss so improve efficiency; they also replace the use of expensive high-temperature...

187

Component and System Qualification Workshop Proceedings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proceedings from the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop, held at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore, CA, on November 4, 2010.

188

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE (a User Guide) For GATE version 3 beta 1 (July.3 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.4 [D] Get Started

Maynard, Diana

189

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), and the U.S. projections that appear in the IEO are consistent with those published in the AEO. World energy consumption in this year's IEO2000 is projected to

190

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in IEO99 are consistent with those published in AEO99. IEO99 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private

191

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 with projections to 2020 March 16, 2000 Jay E. Hakes Energy Information Administration Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO),

192

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 23 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes world oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into

193

international | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

international international Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from the best available solar resource datasets available to NREL by country. These vary in spatial resolution from 1 km to 1 degree (approximately 100 km) depending on the data source. High spatial resolution datasets (1 km to 40 km cells) were modeled to support country or regional projects. Where high resolution datasets were not available, data from NASA's Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) version 6 database were used. The data represents total potential solar energy per year as a function of land area per solar class (KWh/m²/day). Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity clean energy energy international

194

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into the United States by export region. Changes in the oil price (WTI), which is defined as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered to Cushing, Oklahoma in

195

International energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline  

SciTech Connect

Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

SciTech Connect

The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repairs and for fiber-reinforced composite repair. To date, all of the experimental work pertaining to the evaluation of potential repair methods has focused on fiber-reinforced composite repairs. Hydrostatic testing was also conducted on four pipeline sections with simulated corrosion damage: two with composite liners and two without.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

INTERNATIONAL DESIGN STRUCTURE MATRIX CONFERENCE, DSM'09 12 13 OCTOBER 2009, GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DSM'09 11 TH INTERNATIONAL DESIGN STRUCTURE MATRIX CONFERENCE, DSM'09 12 ­ 13 OCTOBER 2009, GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA, USA DISTRIBUTED MODELING OF COMPONENT DSM Andrew Tilstra1 , 1 and 1 1 The University of Texas at Austin Keywords: Component DSM, HD-DSM, interaction types, distributed modeling

Seepersad, Carolyn Conner

200

Hybrid solar lighting systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

202

LBNL Windows & Daylighting Software -- THERM Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components Components THERM has three basic components: Graphic User Interface: a graphic user interface that allows you to draw a cross section of the product or component for which you are performing thermal calculations. Heat Transfer Analysis: a heat-transfer analysis component that includes: an automatic mesh generator to create the elements for the finite-element analysis, a finite-element solver, an optional error estimator and adaptive mesh generator, and an optional view-factor radiation model. Results: a results displayer. Graphic User Interface THERM has standard graphic capabilities associated with the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. For example, THERM allows you to use: Both mouse and cursor operations; Standard editing features, such as Cut, Copy, Paste, Select All, and Delete;

203

Hot gas path component cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. We present a procedure to conduct reconfiguration in systems of concurrent, stateful components that interferes as little as possible with unchanged subsystems. Reconfiguration is described by a plan for adding, deleting and reconnecting components. A plan is executed by a sequence of simple, local steps, which are suitable for implementation in a programming language. We prove that plan execution is indistinguishable from atomic reconfiguration and use this fact for state-space reduction for verifying properties by model checking.

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Components and Mixtures under Engine Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, an improved version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multicomponent gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines (3-50 atm, 650-1200K, stoichiometric fuel/air mixtures). Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

Mehl, M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Curran, H J

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Task 39 Exhibition – Assembly of Polymeric Components for a New Generation of Solar Thermal Energy Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract IEA SHC Task 39 is dedicated to the development, optimization and deployment of materials and designs for polymer based solar thermal systems and components. To increase the confidence in polymeric solar thermal applications, Task 39 actively supports international research activities and seeks to promote successful applications and state-of-the-art products. For the SHC conference 2013, different polymeric components suitable for domestic hot water preparation and space heating were singled out for an exhibition. Promising polymeric collectors, air collectors, thermosiphons, storage tanks and other components from industrial partners all over the world were brought to Freiburg and assembled at the Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE. The resulting SHC Task 39 Exhibition of polymeric components shows the feasibility of all-polymeric solar thermal systems and highlights their potential, especially as scalable and modular applications for building integration or as export products to sunny regions.

Michael Koehl; Sandrin Saile; Andreas Piekarczyk; Stephan Fischer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Disilane Internal Rotation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disilane Internal Rotation ... Energetics of hindered rotation in disilane are analyzed and compared to ethane. ... In disilane weakened (rotationally governed) hyperconjugative interactions, paramount in controlling the ethane barrier, leave the nonrotational part of the torsional coordinate as the primary contribution to disilane barrier energetics. ...

Vojislava Pophristic; Lionel Goodman; Cheryl T. Wu

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

208

Telecommunications International Cell Phone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Telecommunications International Cell Phone 1. Fax completed form to 979.847.1111. 2. If you do will be charged. Date Cell Phone Needed Cell Phone Pick-Up Date Cell Phone User Travel Destination(s) United States Number Destination Country Number Cell Phone Type Digital Satellite Cell Phone Return Date Notes

209

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given the Energy Information Administration in Public Law 95-91. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

International energy outlook 1996  

SciTech Connect

This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Internal Control Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To ensure sound internal controls and overall consistency in exercising the statutory authorities that vest in the Secretary, the Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and Department's Chief Financial Officer (CFO), and to implement the Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act of 1982 and related central agency guidance. Cancels DOE O 413.1A.

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix H Internal Dose Estimates from Global Fallout H-1 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population. 263-MQ-008090 September 30, 2000 H-2 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population of the Continental United Site Part I. Estimates of Dose Lynn R. Anspaugh Lynn R. Anspaugh, Consulting Salt Lake City, UT Report

213

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the African Climate System (VACS) Panel 13 and15 July 2006 Tanzanian Meteorology Agency, Dar es Salaam Workshop (see workshop report no. XXXXX). The first day was held jointly with the workshop at the Dar es Salaam International Conference Centre. The rest of the meeting was kindly hosted at the Tanzania

Quartly, Graham

214

International Studies Degree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Business Administration Foreign Affairs Specialist US Department of Energy Lead Case Advocate Houston AreaBGSU® n n n What I did with my International Studies Degree Bowing Green State University 103 Shatzel Hall Bowling Green, OH 43403-0001 n n n isp@bgsu.edu http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/isp n n n

Moore, Paul A.

215

International Jordan Expedition 1966  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN 1963 and 1965 British expeditions visited the Azraq oasis and surrounding desert in Jordan arid reported on the favour-ability of the area as a ... in Jordan arid reported on the favour-ability of the area as a Desert National Park and site for an International Biological Station dealing with oasis and ...

J. MORTON BOYD

1966-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

216

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER APRIL 2005­MARCH 2006 REPORT SCHOOL OF OCEAN AND EARTH Center 1 The Year's Highlights 3 Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Influences 10 Asian Ocean Climate: To understand climate variations in the Pacific and Indian oceans on interannual

Wang, Yuqing

217

International Pacific Research Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Pacific Research Center APRIL 2007­MARCH 2008 REPORT School of Ocean and Earth Center i Foreword ii iv Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 1 Regional-Ocean Influences 13 Asian by the following broad research themes and goals of the IPRC Science Plan. Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate

Wang, Yuqing

218

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER Annual Report April 2006 ­ March 2007 School of Ocean Research Center 1 2 The Year's Highlights 3 Research Accomplishments Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Ocean Climate: To understand climate variations in the Pacific and Indian oceans on inter- annual

Wang, Yuqing

219

Equity in international agreements  

SciTech Connect

Approaches to establishing equitable greenhouse gas emission policies among different nations are briefly discussed. The impact of energy efficiency is proposed as an aid to equitable resource distribution. A comprehensive approach which would account for changes in net greenhouse gases is discussed. In addition, international trading of net greenhouse gas emissions reduction credits is proposed.

Stewart, R. [Georgetown Univ. Law Center, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Turbine component casting core with high resolution region  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

United States and International Partners Initial ITER Agreement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Partners Initial ITER Agreement International Partners Initial ITER Agreement United States and International Partners Initial ITER Agreement May 24, 2006 - 10:48am Addthis Paves the Way for Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project BRUSSELS, BELGIUM - Representing the United States, Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, joined counterparts from China, the European Union, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the Russian Federation today to initial an agreement to construct ITER, an international fusion energy project. Fusion energy is an important component of President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI), given fusion's potential to become an attractive long-range option for the U.S. clean energy portfolio. In FY 2006, DOE allocated $25

222

Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal structure, hygroscopic and Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Print Friday, 13 May 2011 00:00 Scientists recently combined experimental approaches and molecular dynamics modeling to gain new insights into the internal structure of sea salt particles and relate it to their fundamental chemical reactivity in the atmosphere. This research shows that surface enhancement or depletion of chemical components in marine particles can occur because of the difference in the chemical nature of the species. Because the atmospheric chemistry of the salt particles takes place at the gas-particle interface, understanding their complex surfaces provides new insights about their effect on the environment and climate change. Article Link.

223

On the electrostatic component of protein-protein binding free energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entries at 95% sequence identity level. To avoid the bias toward overrepresented com- plexes, the entries were purged with CD-hit[55] at 40% sequence identity level for all components of the hetero-complexes, including monomers that belong to the same... of the internal dielectric con- stant within the range 1.0–8.0 cause dramatic changes in the mean of the energy distributions for all types of complexes. In contrast, an increasing the magnitude of the internal dielectric constant above 8.0 does not cause much...

Talley, Kemper; Ng, Carmen; Shoppell, Michael; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Alexov, Emil

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

224

International Student Guide www.swansea.ac.uk/international  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanotechnology l MSc Petroleum Engineering (subject to validation) l Product Design l Sports Science Environment Business l International Trade l International Commercial l Law and Globalisation Medicine Biochemistry l million Institute of Life Science, Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, Institute of Environmental

Martin, Ralph R.

225

Property:Component Integration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Component Integration Component Integration Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Customer Assembled Factory Integrated Pages using the property "Component Integration" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + Factory Integrated + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Factory Integrated +

226

International milk genomics consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA c University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA d University of Colorado. The general goals of the Milk Genomics Consortium are to link the scientific community through milk and geno value of milk's components is known (German, Dillard, & Ward, 2002). The scientific challenge, therefore

Rocke, David M.

227

Formula Hybrid International Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jack Ratta Media Center Acceleration Runs NASCAR Oval - Main Straight Tech. Inspection North Garage:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 Design Finals Group Photo NASCAR Oval - Main Straight Barbeque Hosted of the hybrid gasoline engine, there are more components to a hybrid drivetrain, including the electric motor

Carver, Jeffrey C.

228

International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

Miyashita, Yasushi

229

International Relations and Development Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Anthropology and Languages (choice of French, Arabic, German, Italian or Spanish) The International Relations Economy, Languages (French, Spanish, Arabic, German, Italian), International Trade, Middle East Politics experience a broad range of opportunities outside the classroom: - Explore exchange opportunities with dozens

230

International migration within Latin America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International migration within Latin America ·Mostly labor circulation flows ·Industrial and urban;Example of International migration: Mexicans to US ·1920s revolution and post- revolution chaos in Mexico

Lopez-Carr, David

231

A classification scheme for LWR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

With over 100 light water nuclear reactors operating nationwide, representing designs by four primary vendors, and with reload fuel manufactured by these vendors and additional suppliers, a wide variety of fuel assembly types are in existence. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, both the Systems Integration Program and the Characteristics Data Base project required a classification scheme for these fuels. This scheme can be applied to other areas and is expected to be of value to many Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management programs. To develop the classification scheme, extensive information on the fuel assemblies that have been and are being manufactured by the various nuclear fuel vendors was compiled, reviewed, and evaluated. It was determined that it is possible to characterize assemblies in a systematic manner, using a combination of physical factors. A two-stage scheme was developed consisting of 79 assembly types, which are grouped into 22 assembly classes. The assembly classes are determined by the general design of the reactor cores in which the assemblies are, or were, used. The general BWR and PWR classes are divided differently but both are based on reactor core configuration. 2 refs., 15 tabs.

Moore, R.S.; Williamson, D.A.; Notz, K.J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Analysis of ANS LWR physics benchmark problems.  

SciTech Connect

Various Monte Carlo and deterministic solutions to the three PWR Lattice Benchmark Problems recently defined by the ANS Ad Hoc Committee on Reactor Physics Benchmarks are presented. These solutions were obtained using the VIM continuous-energy Monte Carlo code and the DIF3D/WIMS-D4M code package implemented at the Argonne National Laboratory. The code results for the K{sub eff} and relative pin power distribution are compared to measured values. Additionally, code results for the three benchmark-prescribed infinite lattice configurations are also intercompared. The results demonstrate that the codes produce very good estimates of both the K{sub eff} and power distribution for the critical core and the lattice parameters of the infinite lattice configuration.

Taiwo, T. A.

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Admin- istration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). Projections in IEO2007 are divided according to Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and non-members (non-OECD). There are

234

International Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1997 April 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

235

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administra- tion (EIA) of the outlook for international energy mar- kets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). IEO2006 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Non- marketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included

236

International Energy Outlook 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1995 May 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

237

International Energy Outlook - Electicity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2004 Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2004 projections. Developing nations in Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 60. World Net Electricity Consumptin, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 61. World Net Electricity Consumptin by Region, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World net electricity consumption is expected nearly double to over the next two decades, according to the International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) reference case forecast. Total demand for electricity is projected to increase on average by 2.3 percent per year, from 13,290

238

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contacts.gif (2957 bytes) contacts.gif (2957 bytes) The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen, Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: Report Contact World Energy Consumption Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041 linda.doman@eia.doe.gov World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler - 202/586-9503 gbutler@eia.doe.gov Stacy MacIntyre - 202/586-9795- (Consumption) stacy.macintyre@eia.doe.gov Natural Gas Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041

239

Internal Resources Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Budget Budget Proposals Human Resources Administration Internal Resources Administration--Includes an Administrative Services Directory and an A-Z index. Budget - Contacts Employee Talent Profile System--A system, launched by Jay Keasling in late 2012, populated with profiles of both scientists and non-scientists, meant to be a resource for the creation of teams across the Biosciences Area and the persue of collective funding opportunities both internal and external to the Laboratory. Complete your profile and look for more system enhancements in the coming year. Equipment List (viewable by Berkeley Lab staff only) -- A list of equipment used in the Life Sciences Division. Several equipment needs training prior to use, therefore, please always contact the person responsible if interested in using the equipment. If listed as a contact on

240

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John Conti, Director, International, Economic and Greenhouse Gases Division (202/586-4430). Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041 or linda.doman@eia.doe.gov) or the following analysts: Macroeconomic Assumptions Nasir Khilji (nasir.khilji@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1294) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Natural Gas Phyllis Martin (phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9592) Justine Bardin (justine.baren@eia.doe.gov 202/586-3508) Coal Michael Mellish (michael.mellish@eia.doe.gov,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred toLinda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Arthur Andersen (art.andersen@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441) Linda E. Doman (linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Perry Lindstrom (perry.lindstrom@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-0934) Reformulated Gasoline

242

International Nuclear Security  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR.

Luk, K.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

245

Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm08kia.pdf More Documents & Publications Structural Automotive Components from Composite...

246

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges Claudia Loebbecke University of Cologne Kevin Crowston Syracuse University School of Information Studies Abstract Knowledge Portals (KPs) are highly integrative Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) that promise to synthesize widely

Crowston, Kevin

247

Artificial Vision A vital component of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Vision A vital component of transhumanism #12;Machinehead · Merger of human and machine. · Transhumanism ­ Our design is flawed. · Blind spot · Blinking #12;Beyond the blind spot · Eventually plug

La Rosa, Andres H.

248

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thresholding Multivariate Regression and Generalized Principal Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the high-dimensional data matrices have been extensively researched for uncorrelated and independent situations, they are much less so for the transposable data matrices. A generalization of principal component analysis and the related weighted least...

Sun, Ranye

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Polarized internal target apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

Holt, R.J.

1984-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production, oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a monthly publication which provides current data on international oil production,demand,imports and stocks. This report has four sections which contain time series data on world oil production and oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Also included is oil supply/demand balance information for the world, and data on oil imports and trade by OECD countries.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Polarized internal target apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

Holt, Roy J. (Downers Grove, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

International markets for CCTs  

SciTech Connect

The paper begins by describing the role of the International Energy Agency, the importance of coal, what the IEA is doing in the area of clean coal technology, and the role of the IEA Coal Industry Advisory Board. The paper then discusses which coal technologies will be chosen, what the problem areas are, and what can be done to accelerate the take-up of clean coal technologies.

Ferriter, J.P. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hanford internal dosimetry program manual  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Component of variance estimation based on synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Component of Variance Estimation based on. Synthesis. (August lg (2) Jocelyn Anthea Tommerup, B. Sc. , B. Econ. , University of Queenslsnd Directed. by: Dr. H. 0. Hartley Analysis of variance, widely used in the study of statistical variation.... Essentially the problem is to find these coefficients so that, estimstes of the components may be computed. Hartley [1967] hss proposed a method which gives these coef'ficients directly for sry design, balanced of' unbalanced. It is the objective...

Tommerup, Jocelyn Anthea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

RDCDS Meteorologoical Component Quick Installation Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for the deployment of one of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) weather stations and central control system. Instructions for the deployment and operation of the Atmospheric Systems Corporation miniSODAR™ (SOnic Detection and Ranging) can be found in accompanying manuals developed by Atmospheric Systems Corporation. A detailed description of the system and its components can be found in the manual entitled Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An analysis of multiple component mooring lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE COMPONENT MOORING LINES A Thesis by THOMAS ROBERT NALTERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major...'595 ABSTRACT An Analysis Of Multiple Component Mooring Lines (December 1977) Thomas Robert Walters, B. E. , Vanderbilt University Co-Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ts ung- Chow Su Co- Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard Domi nguez...

Walters, Thomas Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international data. The report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent 12 months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

International Finance and Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

Zhang, Junshan

264

MENTAL HEALTH and INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MENTAL HEALTH and INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS: What Educators Need to Know Ingle International cares not adequately researched, it is well accepted by health care professionals that early intervention could about you and your students www.studyinsured.com #12;www.studyinsured.comMental Health and International

265

Third International Congress on Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Third International Congress on Glass was held in Venice during June 29-July 2, associated with the International Commission ... was held in Venice during June 29-July 2, associated with the International Commission on Glass, the annual meeting of which was held on July 3. 179 delegates attended from ...

1953-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

International Phenomenological Society On Nominalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Phenomenological Society On Nominalism Author(s): Geoffrey Hellman Source: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 62, No. 3 (May, 2001), pp. 691-705 Published by: International Phenomenological contact support@jstor.org. . International Phenomenological Society is collaborating with JSTOR

Hellman, Geoffrey

267

International Workshop on Small Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name International Workshop on Small Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization Risoe DTU Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Wind Topics Implementation, Technology characterizations Resource Type Workshop, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.risoe.dtu.dk/~/medi References International Workshop on Small Scale Wind Energy for Developing Countries[1] Background "The workshop covers the following main themes: Wind energy technologies, their perspectives and applications in developing countries. Reliability of wind turbines, lifetime and strength of wind turbine components. Low cost and natural materials for wind turbines.

268

International Electricity Trade - Open Access | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Electricity Trade - Open Access International Electricity Trade - Open Access DOE has consistently expressed its policy that international electricity trade should be...

269

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement The Office of International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation...

270

Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

Malony, Allen D.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Study on Oil Prices’ Effect on International Gas Prices Based on Using Wavelet Based Boltzmann Cooperative Neural Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we build up WBNNK model based on wavelet-based cooperative Boltzmann neural network and kernel density estimation. The international oil prices time series is decomposed into approximate components...

Xiazi Yi; Zhen Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

273

International Truck | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truck Truck Jump to: navigation, search Name International Truck Place Atlanta, GA Website http://www.internationaltruck. References International Truck[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2007 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! International Truck is a company located in Atlanta, GA. References ↑ "International Truck" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Truck&oldid=381698" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

274

International | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International | National Nuclear Security Administration International | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > International International U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

275

International Team | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Team International Team International Team The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) International Team advances the progress of EERE's domestic programs and accelerates global deployment of U.S. clean energy products and services through international collaboration. To realize the benefits of international collaboration, we coordinate with other offices in the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. government agencies to identify, negotiate and actively manage targeted partnerships and projects that help advance our strategic goals. The collaborative research we support is either in the "pre-competitive" space or includes intellectual property issues that have been agreed upon in advance. All funds support U.S.-based project performers or international organizations

276

International Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Programs International Programs International Programs The Office of Environmental Management (EM) International Program seeks out international technical experts to support EM's mission of accelerated risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. To achieve this, EM pursues collaborations with foreign government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify technologies that can address the site cleanup needs of the U.S. Department of Energy. The EM International Program currently works with the Russian Federation and Ukraine through cooperative bilateral arrangements to support EM's accelerated cleanup and closure mission. The EM International Program is also currently evaluating the potential benefits

277

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

SciTech Connect

The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite liner repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repair and for fiber-reinforced composite liner repair. Evaluation trials have been conducted using a modified fiber-reinforced composite liner provided by RolaTube and pipe sections without liners. All pipe section specimens failed in areas of simulated damage. Pipe sections containing fiber-reinforced composite liners failed at pressures marginally greater than the pipe sections without liners. The next step is to evaluate a liner material with a modulus of elasticity approximately 95% of the modulus of elasticity for steel. Preliminary welding parameters were developed for deposited weld metal repair in preparation of the receipt of Pacific Gas & Electric's internal pipeline welding repair system (that was designed specifically for 559 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe) and the receipt of 559 mm (22 in.) pipe sections from Panhandle Eastern. The next steps are to transfer welding parameters to the PG&E system and to pressure test repaired pipe sections to failure. A survey of pipeline operators was conducted to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. Completed surveys contained the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) Pipe diameter sizes range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.). The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. An evaluation of potential repair methods clearly indicates that the project should continue to focus on the development of a repair process involving the use of GMAW welding and on the development of a repair process involving the use of fiber-reinforced composite liners.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

Internal absorber solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

Sletten, Carlyle J. (106 Nagog Hill Rd., Acton, MA 01720); Herskovitz, Sheldon B. (88 Hammond St., Acton, MA 01720); Holt, F. S. (46 Emerson Rd., Winchester, MA 01890); Sletten, E. J. (Chestnut Hill Rd. R.F.D. Rte. #4, Amherst, NH 03031)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B B World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal-computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product [GDP]) and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and

280

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This monthly publication provides international oil data for January 1998. The report presents data on oil production, demand, imports, and stocks in four sections. Section 1 containes time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 containes annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

International energy annual, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 200 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy includes hydroelectric, geothermal, solar and wind electric power and alcohol for fuel. The data were largely derived from published sources and reports from US Embassy personnel in foreign posts. EIA also used data from reputable secondary sources, industry reports, etc.

NONE

1995-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

Metered Mail Form International Mail Only  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metered Mail Form International Mail Only Charge to Department USPS First Class Mail International International Metered Mail Form and must be kept separate from all other domestic mail. · International mail

Palmeri, Thomas

283

2010 International SWAT Conference Proceedings Conference Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 International SWAT Conference Proceedings Conference Proceedings #12;#12;Conference ProceedingsConference Proceedings #12;#12;2010 International SWAT Conference Proceedings Contents Conference-490 #12;2010 International SWAT Conference Proceedings 2010 International SWAT Conference Proceedings

284

ENERGY RESOURCES INTERNATIONAL, INC. ERI-2142.16-1301  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16-1301 16-1301 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory During Calendar Year 2013 ENERGY RESOURCES INTERNATIONAL, INC. 1015 18 th Street, NW, Suite 650 Washington, DC 20036 USA Telephone: (202) 785-8833 Facsimile: (202) 785-8834 ERI-2142.16-1301 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory During Calendar Year 2013 Prepared For: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Prepared By: Thomas B. Meade Eileen M. Supko January 28, 2013 NOTICE ERI-2142.16-1301/January 2013 iii Energy Resources International, Inc.

285

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Photo of a man checking out an advanced battery using testing equipment that includes a long metal tube on a table top. NREL's researchers test new batteries developed for hybrid electric vehicles. Credit: Warren Gretz Researchers and engineers at the NREL work closely with those in the automotive industry to develop new technologies, such as advanced batteries, for storing energy in cars, trucks, and buses. They also help to develop and test new technologies for using that energy more efficiently. And they work on finding new, energy-efficient ways to reduce the amount of fuel needed to heat and cool the interiors, or cabins, of vehicles. To help develop these new technologies, NREL's researchers are improving the efficiency of vehicle systems and components like these:

286

Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.  

SciTech Connect

The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

288

Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen Infrastructure...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges NOW, DOE, and NEDO Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges...

289

Florida International University Science and Technology Workforce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us Jobs & Internships Florida International University Science and Technology Workforce Development Program Florida International University Science and Technology...

290

Interested Parties - Organization for International Investment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization for International Investment Interested Parties - Organization for International Investment PI.pdf More Documents & Publications Interested Parties - Morgan Wright...

291

International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO, and DOE International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO, and DOE...

292

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H13. World net liquids-fired electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 93 74 68 66 64 62 60 -1.5 United States a 37 20 17 18 18 18 18 -2.3 Canada 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 -1.0 Mexico/Chile 49 47 45 42 40 38 36 -1.0 OECD Europe 77 73 70 66 63 60 57 -1.0 OECD Asia 112 157 102 97 92 87 83 -1.0 Japan 92 137 83 79 75 71 68 -1.0 South Korea 18 17 16 15 15 14 13 -1.0 Australia/New Zealand 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 -1.0 Total OECD 282 303 239 229 219 209 200 -1.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

293

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 894 899 932 978 1,032 1,054 1,030 1,066 0.6 United States a 799 807 820 885 912 908 875 903 0.4 Canada 86 86 99 81 99 117 118 118 1.0 Mexico/Chile 10 6 12 12 21 29 37 46 7.3 OECD Europe 840 867 892 929 1,045 1,065 1,077 1,073 0.7 OECD Asia 406 415 301 447 490 551 557 576 1.1 Japan 266 274 103 192 200 206 209 209 -0.9 South Korea 140 141 198 255 291 346 348 367 3.2 Australia/NewZealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 2,140 2,181 2,124 2,354 2,567 2,670 2,664 2,715 0.7 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 272 274 344 414 475 533 592 630 2.8 Russia

294

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,511 1,563 1,686 1,793 1,888 1,987 2,114 2,233 1.2 United States a 1,222 1,266 1,357 1,404 1,431 1,468 1,528 1,570 0.7 Canada 170 162 171 199 223 240 255 271 1.7 Mexico/Chile 119 135 158 190 234 279 331 392 3.6 OECD Europe 1,024 1,082 1,086 1,123 1,144 1,215 1,277 1,348 0.7 OECD Asia 347 377 408 438 478 505 539 561 1.3 Japan 205 215 242 257 276 288 293 293 1.0 South Korea 72 90 91 98 110 117 136 148 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 70 71 75 83 91 101 110 119 1.7 Total OECD 2,882 3,022 3,180 3,353 3,510

295

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1084 through 1994.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. Word oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

International energy indicators  

SciTech Connect

Extensive data are compiled for energy on the international scene and for the US. Data are indicated from the date given and into 1980 as far as available. Data are given for the international scene on: world crude oil production, 1975-to date; Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; Saudi Arabia: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973-to date; petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973-to date; USSR crude oil production, 1974-to date; Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973-to date. Data are supplied specifically for the US on US gross imports of crude oil and products, 1973-to date; landed cost of Saudi crude in current and 1974 dollars; US trade in bituminous coal, 1973-to date; summary of US merchandise trade, 1976-to date; and energy/GNP ratio.

Bauer, E.K. (ed.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

1991 international petroleum encyclopedia  

SciTech Connect

There is no other petroleum industry publication quite like the International Petroleum Encyclopedia. With a timely, accurate combination of global industry coverage and analysis, detailed statistical surveys, cutting-edge reports on technological advancements and the ever-popular atlas maps, the 1991 International Petroleum Encyclopedia is a smart buy for professionals whose business is oil and gas, as well as for those whose business is affected by the industry's trends and developments. Written by a professional staff of Oil and Gas Journal petroleum experts, the 1991 IPE gives you the all important global perspective for constructing sound business strategies for the 90's. The petroleum industry is scrambling for information that will help it survive this volitile period. This book reports on the topics in the petroleum industry the latest developments in horizontal drilling, world refining (the latest information on reformulated fuels), and predictions about the post-war Persian Gulf industry. PULS, discussions on changes in the Gulf of Mexico, developments in the LNG trade, and crude oil tanker supply/.demand curves.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News CONTACT US card file image ASIC Custom Solutions email: ASIC Custom Solutions Biological Microsensor Technologies Biosensors and Nanomaterials email: Biosensors and Nanomaterials Chemical Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems Chemical sensors and integrated sensor-based microsystems email: Chemical Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems Custom Components COTS, Capacitors, Magnetics, Cables and Interconnects email: Custom Components Failure Analysis Root Cause and Failure Analysis email: Failure Analysis Integrated Photonics Photonic Crystals, Nano Photonics, Micro Optics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Five-quark components in baryons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence has been accumulating for the existence of significant intrinsic non-perturbative five-quark components in various baryons. The inclusion of the five-quark components gives a natural explanation of the excess of $\\bar d$ over $\\bar u$, significant quark orbital angular momentum in the proton, the problematic mass and decay pattern of the lowest $1/2^-$ baryon nonet, etc.. A breathing mode of $qqq\\leftrightarrow qqqq\\bar q$ is suggested for the lowest $1/2^-$ baryon octet. Evidence of a predicted member of the new scheme, $\\Sigma^*(1/2^-)$ around 1380 MeV, is introduced.

B. S. Zou

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability  

SciTech Connect

Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

304

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

SciTech Connect

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. In lieu of a field installation on an abandoned pipeline, a preliminary nondestructive testing protocol is being developed to determine the success or failure of the fiber-reinforced liner pipeline repairs. Optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repair methods are ongoing.

Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

SciTech Connect

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. The first round of optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repairs are complete. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

SciTech Connect

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financing of New Nuclear Projects Financing of New Nuclear Projects International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Financing of New Nuclear Projects December 15, 2009 - 1:09pm Addthis VIENNA, AUSTRIA - The multi-nation Infrastructure Development Working Group (IDWG) held its fifth meeting and also a workshop on the financing of international nuclear power projects in Vienna, Austria, on December 9-10, 2009. An official from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) led the working group meeting. "As a key component of the international Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program, the Infrastructure Development Working Group supports the safe, secure and responsible use of nuclear energy," said Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Warren F. Miller, Jr. "The group

308

International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Needs Needs International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Needs June 2, 2010 - 12:02pm Addthis VIENNA, Austria - The multi-nation Infrastructure Development Working Group (IDWG) of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) held its sixth meeting on May 26-27, 2010, in Vienna, Austria. The two-day event included workshops on nuclear energy regulatory agency engagement and the infrastructure needs for international nuclear fuel service frameworks. Officials from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.K. Nuclear Decommissioning Authority co-chaired the working group meeting. "As a key component of the international Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the Infrastructure Development Working Group focuses

309

Washington International Renewable Energy Conference | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Renewable Energy Conference International Renewable Energy Conference Washington International Renewable Energy Conference March 4, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis Remarks as Prepared For Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you very much, Hermann, for that kind introduction. I'm quite pleased to be a part of this important conference, and I want to thank everyone who worked so hard to put it together. Renewable energy is helping us bring about a new energy future, one that is cleaner, more sustainable, more affordable, more secure and less reliant on carbon-based fossil fuels. While there is no "silver bullet" that will solve the world's energy problems, it is clear that renewable energy and efficiency technologies are an indispensable component of the solution. We must continue to aggressively pursue their development and widespread

310

Washington International Renewable Energy Conference | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington International Renewable Energy Conference Washington International Renewable Energy Conference Washington International Renewable Energy Conference March 4, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis Remarks as Prepared For Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you very much, Hermann, for that kind introduction. I'm quite pleased to be a part of this important conference, and I want to thank everyone who worked so hard to put it together. Renewable energy is helping us bring about a new energy future, one that is cleaner, more sustainable, more affordable, more secure and less reliant on carbon-based fossil fuels. While there is no "silver bullet" that will solve the world's energy problems, it is clear that renewable energy and efficiency technologies are an indispensable component of the solution. We must continue to aggressively pursue their development and widespread

311

Evaluation of SWAT streamflow components for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

passes: forward, backward, forward, with a decreasing baseflow rate at each pass [Arnold et al. (1995 from physically based equations) A reliable simulation of streamflow components is an important step any reference to the underlying physical processes #12;Application of two separation techniques

312

Software reuse strategies and component markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black-box reuse with component markets could be the silver bullet solution that makes software reuse a reality, and advances software development to a robust industrial process---but only if market makers address the growing pains plaguing this immature ...

T. Ravichandran; Marcus A. Rothenberger

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

SCADA architecture with mobile remote components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the advent of new technologies, the demand of connecting IT systems to the Internet is increasing. This is also the case for Control systems specifically SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) systems. Traditional SCADA systems are connected ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, mobility, remote components

Tai-Hoon Kim

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Architecture for SCADA with mobile remote components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the advent of new technologies, the demand of connecting IT systems to the Internet is increasing. This is also the case for Control systems specifically SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems. Traditional SCADA systems are connected ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, mobility, remote components

Rosslin John Robles; Tai-Hoon Kim

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Non-Negative Risk Components Jeremy Staum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Depending on the purpose of risk attribution, it may or may not be acceptable to get negative riskNon-Negative Risk Components Jeremy Staum j-staum@northwestern.edu Department of Industrial the risk of a portfolio or system to its compo- nents, when it is required to produce non-negative risk

Staum, Jeremy

316

Development of an International Electric Cooperative Initiative on Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

NRECA conceived of the International Electric Cooperative Initiative on Energy Efficiency (IECIEE) in order to provide an ongoing means of contributing voluntary actions on greenhouse gas emissions mitigation as an integral component of its international programs and projects. This required designing the IECIEE to be integrated directly with the core interests and attributes of participating cooperatives in the U.S. and Latin America, which was the initial focus area selected for the IECIEE. In the case of NRECA International, the core interests related to promoting and strengthening the electric cooperative model, which has proved highly successful in maximizing operational efficiencies in electric power generation, distribution and retailing, as compared to government-owned entities. The approach involved three basic components: (i) establishing the IECIEE mechanism, which involved setting up a functioning organizational vehicle providing for investment, management, and emissions credit accounting; (ii) developing a portfolio of projects in countries where NRECA International could effectively implement the broader mandate of cooperative development as energy efficient suppliers and distributors of electrical energy; and (iii) conducting outreach to obtain the commitment of participants and resources from U.S. and Latin American cooperatives and partnering agencies in the development financing community.

Paul Clark; David South

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Beamline standard component designs for the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) has initiated a design standardization and modularization activity for the APS synchrotron radiation beamline components. These standard components are included in components library, sub-components library and experimental station library. This paper briefly describes these standard components using both technical specifications and side view drawings.

Shu, D.; Barraza, J.; Brite, C.; Chang, J.; Sanchez, T.; Tcheskidov, V.; Kuzay, T.M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data Graphic Data International Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2003-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Use by Energy Type, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. Fuel Shares of World Marketed Energy Use, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

319

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

320

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal's share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 199.0 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 54). Coal consumption increases by 2.6 per- cent per year on average from 2004 to 2015, then slows to an average increase of 1.8 percent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and primary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is projected to continue. Although total world consumption of coal in 2001, at 5.26 billion short tons,12 was more than 27 percent higher than the total in 1980, it was 1 percent below the 1989 peak of 5.31 billion short tons (Figure 56). The International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 2001 and 2025, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent (on a tonnage basis), but with considerable variation among regions.

322

International Energy Outlook 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 4 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222),

323

International Agreements Comments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ITRATIOAL ITRATIOAL AGREE MENT~S/ MITMES SEREARY SAME W. BDAN JANUARY 205-EEME 2008o Page 1 of 1 Matthews, Carol From: Morman, Laurie Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 2:52 PM To: Nicoll, Eric; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements Attachments: Agreements - 1979 to Present.pdf Here's on electronic version of what PI provided............. From: Nicoll, Eric Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 11:40 AM To: Morman, Laurie; Kolb, Ingrid; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements OK then we will not include the ones which have come up here. Thanks. Did they organize it by year? From: Morman, Laurie Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 11:38 AM To: Nicoll, Eric; Kolb, Ingrid; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements PI has already provided the International agreements.

324

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 7 May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office of

325

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

326

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparisons With Other Forecasts, and Performance of Past IEO Forecasts for 1990, 1995, and 2000 Forecast Comparisons Energy Consumption by Region Three organizations provide forecasts comparable with the projections in IEO2006, which extend to 2030 for the first time. The International Energy Agency (IEA) pro- vides "business as usual" projections to 2030 in its World Energy Outlook 2004; Petroleum Economics, Ltd. (PEL) publishes world energy projections to 2025; and Petro- leum Industry Research Associates (PIRA) provides projections to 2020. For comparison, 2002 is used as the base year for all the projections. Comparisons between IEO2006 and IEO2005 extend only to 2025, the last year of the IEO2005 projections. Regional breakouts vary among the different projec- tions, complicating the comparisons. For example, IEO2006, PIRA, and IEA

327

Internal Program Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Synchrophasor Initiative (NASPI) and Synchrophasor Initiative (NASPI) and Advanced Applications Research & Development (AARD) Internal Program Review 27-28 June 2013 Washington, DC Joe Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Lab DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program 2 Management Review Topics  Project objective  Major technical accomplishments that will be completed this year  Deliverables and schedule for activities to be completed under FY13 funding  Risk factors affecting timely completion of planned activities as well as movement through RD&D cycle  Early thoughts on follow-on work that should be considered for funding in FY14 3 Management Review Issues  RD&D stage of the project: - Theoretical study-proof of concept - Modeling/simulation-using real data?

328

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) The projections of world energy consumption appearing in IEO2006 are based on EIA's international energy modeling tool, SAGE. SAGE is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Pro- jections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

329

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 6 June 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov,

330

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

331

Florida International University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Spotlight Archive Spotlight Archive Contact Florida International University Professors and Faculty of Interest Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle against Neuro-AIDS Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Exceptional Students and Alumnus DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional De DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional Development Corps

332

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Growth in energy use is projected worldwide through 2020. The demand for electricity in homes, business, and industry is growing in all regions, as is the demand for petroleum-powered personal transportation. The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) reference case forecast indicates that by 2020, the world will consume three times the energy it consumed 28 years ago in 1970 (Figure 2). Much of the projected growth in energy consumption is attributed to expectations of rapid increases in energy use in the developing world—especially in Asia. Although the economic downturn in Asia that began in mid-1997 and continues into 1998 has lowered expectations for near-term growth in the region, the forecast still suggests that almost half the world’s projected increase in energy

333

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix C Appendix C A Status Report on Developing Transportation for Caspian Basin Oil and Gas Production Prior to the breakup of the Soviet Union, the petroleum transportation networks in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan were designed to provide petroleum to the internal Soviet economy and, in particular, to meet the Soviet militaryÂ’s need for petroleum [1]. Investment in the Caspian Basin petroleum transportation system was, however, severely deficient. In order for the producers in the Caspian Sea area to become major petroleum exporters, existing petroleum transport lines, which generally head northward into Russia, will need upgrading. More importantly, new lines will need to be built to transport Caspian Sea oil to export markets, in some combination of westward to the Mediterranean,

334

International Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 3 May 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director,

335

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

336

International Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 8 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office

337

seventh international cough symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Twenty six papers were presented as posters in the Seventh International Symposium on Cough; 12 papers were presented in the Basic Science of Cough session, and 14 papers presented in the Clinical Science of Cough session. These papers explored a wide spectrum of cough-related areas including pathophysiological mechanisms, treatment and detection of cough, and symptom assessment and perception, and were grouped into several general themes for facilitate the discussion. Studies presented in these posters have provided new information that should improve our knowledge on the basic physiology and pharmacology of cough, and the peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in the generation of the cough motor pattern. In addition, in the clinical science section, studies reporting potential new anti-tussive agents and further characterisation of cough symptoms and perception have provided a base for the fruitful strategies for the development of novel anti-tussive therapies and cough management.

Peter V Dicpinigaitis; Giovanni A Fontana; Lu-yuan Lee; Milos Tatar

338

International District Energy Association  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since its formation in 1909, the International District Energy Association (IDEA) has served as a principal industry advocate and management resource for owners, operators, developers, and suppliers of district heating and cooling systems in cities, campuses, bases, and healthcare facilities. Today, with over 1,400 members in 26 countries, IDEA continues to organize high-quality technical conferences that inform, connect, and advance the industry toward higher energy efficiency and lower carbon emissions through innovation and investment in scalable sustainable solutions. With the support of DOE, IDEA performs industry research and market analysis to foster high impact projects and help transform the U.S. energy industry. IDEA was an active participant in the original Vision and Roadmap process and has continued to partner with DOE on combined heat and power (CHP) efforts across the country.

339

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2001 forecast. The use of natural gas is projected to nearly double between 1999 and 2020, providing a relatively clean fuel for efficient new gas turbine power plants. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world energy consumption in the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case. Gas use is projected to almost double, to 162 trillion cubic feet in 2020 from 84 trillion cubic feet in 1999 (Figure 38). With an average annual growth rate of 3.2 percent, the share of natural gas in total primary energy consumption is projected to grow to 28 percent from 23 percent. The largest increments in gas use are expected in Central and

340

international | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Activity in Gasification and Coal to Liquids Development News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

International Quality Assurance Standards (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Tests to make quantitative predictions about photovoltaic (PV) modules are needed. This presentation proposes the creation of international quality assurance standards for PV modules.

Kurtz, S.; Hacke, P.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Yamamichi, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

European Union Internal Energy Market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project is based on the investigations of internal energy market which is one of the common European strategies contributing for creation of more secure… (more)

Gulbinaite Simona, Leonaite Augustina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

International Marine Renewable Energy Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The International Marine Renewable Energy Conference (IMREC) offers researchers, technology developers, policy makers, NGOs, and industry representatives the opportunity to discuss financing...

344

Honeywell International ESCO Qualification Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document outlines the energy service company (ESCO) qualifications for Honeywell International in relation to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOEs) energy savings performance contracts (ESPC).

345

Procceedings IFIP IEEE International Workshop on Distributed Systems: Operations and Management, October 15-16 1991, Santa Barbara, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procceedings IFIP IEEE International Workshop on Distributed Systems: Operations and Management that the security o cer of each component system has discretion regarding the trust invested in other component points of security control. #12;2 THE SCHEMATIC PROTECTION MODEL GMU researchers have been active

Sandhu, Ravi

346

Master of Arts in International Tourism International Tourism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master of Arts in International Tourism International Tourism Goals and Contents Having developed very rapidly in recent decades, interna- tional tourism has become one of the world economy's major industries. The World Travel and Tourism Council projects that between now and 2013, the tourism

Krause, Rolf

347

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

SciTech Connect

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 June 29, 2011 Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement (HSS CRAD 45-12, Rev....

349

THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY – A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Between 1995 and 2020, the worldÂ’s annual consumption of electricity is projected to rise from 12 trillion kilowatthours to 23 trillion kilowatthours. The greatest increases are expected in developing Asia and in Central and South America. Primary Fuel Use The Financing of Electric Power Expansion Public Policy Reform in the Electricity Industry Regional Highlights Throughout the world, electricity is and will continue to be the fastest growing component of energy demand. Between 1995 and 2020, total world electricity demand is expected to rise from 12 trillion kilowatthours to 23 trillion kilowatthours (Table 25). Demand growth will be slowest in the industrialized countries; but even in the advanced economies, which currently account for about 60 percent of world electricity use, absolute

351

From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation of CO Separation of CO 2 From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity Research is active on the patent-pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Process for the Separation of Gases Using Supersonic Expansion and Oblique Shock Wave Compression." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The separation of a gaseous mixture into constituent gases has proven to be useful for a variety of industrial and commercial applications. Currently CO 2 can be separated from multi- component gas streams using compression and refrigeration techniques in order to condense the CO 2 out of a vapor phase so that it can be mechanically separated from the stream.

352

Coatings for hot section gas turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Components in the hot section of gas turbines are protected from the environment by oxidation-resistant coatings while thermal barrier coatings are applied to reduce the metal operating temperature of blades and vanes. The integrity of these protective coatings is an issue of major concern in current gas turbine designs. Premature cracking of the protective layer in oxidation-resistant coatings and of the interface in thermal barrier coating systems has become one of the life limiting factors of coated components in gas turbines. Following a brief overview of the state-of-the-art of coated material systems with respect to coating types and their status of application, the fracture mechanisms and mechanics of coated systems are presented and discussed.

J. Bressers; S. Peteves; M. Steen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

System for inspecting large size structural components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

Birks, Albert S. (Columbus, OH); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Proceedings: 7th International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants  

SciTech Connect

The purity of boiler water, feedwater, and steam is central to ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil-fired plants. These proceedings of EPRI's Seventh International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address the state of the art in fossil plant and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry as well as international practices for corrosion control and water preparation and purification.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Lightweight Valve Train Components Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

357

Durability of ACERT Engine Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Washington D.C. pmp11lin.pdf More Documents & Publications Durability of ACERT Engine Components Durability of ACERT Engine Components Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train...

358

Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd Place: Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Sector:...

359

New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes multicomponent.pdf More...

360

AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Component Cost Model AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...

362

DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells This document describes test protocols...

363

Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

364

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a...

365

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit:...

366

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen System Component...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

other hydrogen system components. Reliable components are needed to ensure the success of hydrogen fueling stations and support the commercial deployment of fuel cell electric...

367

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components As recommended by the 2004 National Research Council report, the program continues to increase its support...

368

International Spin Physics 2014 Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Stern-Gerlach experiment and the origin of electron spin are described in historical context. SPIN 2014 occurs on the fortieth anniversary of the first International High Energy Spin Physics Symposium at Argonne in 1974. A brief history of the international spin conference series is presented.

Milner, Richard G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

International Spin Physics 2014 Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Stern-Gerlach experiment and the origin of electron spin are described in historical context. SPIN 2014 occurs on the fortieth anniversary of the first International High Energy Spin Physics Symposium at Argonne in 1974. A brief history of the international spin conference series is presented.

Richard G. Milner

2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

enGineerinG INTERNATIONAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is Australia's largest city and its centre of finance and commerce. The Harbour Bridge, Opera House and Sydney close links with many international institutions, particularly in Asia. ENGINEERING IN SYDNEY Sydney Tower are internationally recognised icons, which represent both Sydney and its rich engineering

University of Technology, Sydney

371

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012 -2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012 - 2013 #12;2 International Student Handbook 2012-13 Contents 27 Social life 28 Volunteering 30 Sport and physical activity 32 Travel in Leeds and around the UK 33 and preparation you are finally here and ready to start a new period in your life. We hope this handbook will help

Haase, Markus

372

International Potato Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Potato Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Ref: 13-51 AVCS/IRS/SSA Agriculture Value Chain Specialist for Mozambique The International Potato Center (CIP) is seeking an Agricultural Value Chain research-for-development organization with a focus on potato, sweetpotato, and Andean roots and tubers. Its

373

Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

1.2 - Chondrites and Their Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chondrites are extraordinary mixtures of materials with diverse origins that formed around other stars, in the solar nebula, and in their parent asteroids. Most chondrites were so severely altered by aqueous fluids, thermal metamorphism, and impacts that the original characteristics of their components have been largely erased. But a few pristine chondrites have preserved an exquisite mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, and chronological record of the first few million years of solar system history. The properties of diverse types of carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites focusing on the most pristine samples are reviewed to establish the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical properties and origins of their components and to elucidate the asteroidal processes that modified them. Refractory inclusions – amoeboid olivine aggregates and Ca–Al-rich inclusions – were the first solids to form in the solar nebula near to the protosun. Chondrules and associated metallic Fe–Ni grains were still forming several million years later when the earliest planetesimals, which melted due to heat from 26Al decay, were colliding. In the least-altered chondrites, matrix material, which coats chondrules and other components, is largely composed of micrometer-sized silicates and amorphous materials, which formed at high temperatures, plus small amounts (up to 200 ppm) of presolar oxides and silicates.

E.R.D. Scott; A.N. Krot

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8 16.5 18.6 21.3 24.3 27.5 31.1 2.5 Total 28.9 30.8 33.6 37.1 40.9 44.8 49.0 1.8 Industrial Liquids 57.2 61.6 66.4 70.1 74.2 78.2 82.1 1.2 Natural gas 45.5 48.8 54.3 59.0 63.4

376

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.0 Total 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1.1 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 1.6 Total 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 1.2 Industrial Liquids 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.4 Natural gas 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.4 Coal 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Electricity

377

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D4. World liquids consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 23.4 23.5 23.2 22.9 22.9 23.5 0.0 United States a 18.6 18.9 18.7 18.8 18.4 17.7 17.4 17.5 -0.3 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.4 0.2 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 1.4 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 13.2 13.1 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 -0.3 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.0 7.7 7.6 7.6 7.6 7.4 -0.1 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.2 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.6 -0.7 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 0.5 Australia/NewZealand 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.3 Total OECD 45.8 46.0 44.6 44.3 43.8 43.6 43.8 44.3 -0.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

378

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6 Electricity 4.9 4.7 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 0.7 Total 11.4 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.2 11.4 11.6 0.1 Commercial Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 -0.3 Natural gas 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 0.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.7 Electricity 4.5 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 0.8 Total 8.6 8.8 8.9 9.2 9.5 9.9 10.2 0.6 Industrial Liquids 8.4 8.2 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.7 0.1 Natural gas 8.0 8.7 9.6 9.8 9.9 10.1 10.4 0.9 Coal 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6

379

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2 Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Total 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 2.4 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 5.5 Total 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Industrial Liquids 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 Natural gas 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.2 2.6 3.0 2.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 3.1 Electricity

380

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A6. World natural gas consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.2 29.2 31.3 33.4 35.1 37.0 39.4 41.6 1.2 United States a 22.9 23.8 25.3 26.3 26.9 27.6 28.7 29.5 0.7 Canada 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.6 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 1.7 Mexico/Chile 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.5 4.3 5.1 6.1 7.2 3.6 OECD Europe 18.8 19.8 19.7 20.4 20.8 22.1 23.2 24.5 0.7 OECD Asia 6.1 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.5 9.0 9.5 9.9 1.3 Japan 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.1 5.2 5.2 1.0 South Korea 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.3 2.5 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 1.7 Total OECD 53.2 55.6 58.2 61.5 64.4 68.0 72.1 76.0 1.0 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 19.8 21.8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8 2.7 3.8 5.0 6.3 7.8 9.2 5.7 Total 6.9 8.3 10.3 12.5 15.0 17.7 20.0 3.6 Commercial Liquids 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 -0.8 Natural gas 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.8 7.1 Coal 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.1 Electricity 0.7 1.0 1.4 1.9 2.6 3.5 4.4 6.5 Total 2.5 2.8 3.5 4.3 5.3 6.4 7.6 3.8 Industrial Liquids 8.4 10.2 11.4 12.2 12.7 13.0 13.0 1.5 Natural gas 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.8 4.2 4.5

382

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 121.3 126.1 129.7 132.9 137.2 143.6 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.3 100.5 101.8 102.3 103.9 107.2 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.8 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.9 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.2 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.5 88.6 90.9 92.8 94.6 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.6 43.0 44.3 45.4 46.1 46.4 0.5 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.7 22.5 23.0 23.0 22.9 22.2 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 13.0 13.8 14.7 15.3 15.9 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.5 7.7 8.0 8.2 0.7 Total OECD 234.7 242.3 244.1 254.6 262.7

383

Evaluation of component integrity by non-destructive testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-destructive methods achieve an ever-increasing role in the inspection of structural components. However, restricting NDT to its classical domain, the detection of flaws, one takes only limited advantage of its possibilities. Non-destructive testing pro- vides the ability to differentiate different structures of materials or to measure internal and induced stresses, thus providing data for the calculation of reliability and potential lifetime. To reach this goal, NDT data must be combined with results of destructive testing. Here, a closer monitoring of fast processes like crack propagation, especially under an impact load, may provide a better understanding of materials behaviour. Again, inertia-free NDT methods with high time-resolution are especially suited to the task. The potentials of NDT are further increased by the development of automatic data acquisition and processing. Computerization provides highly discriminative evaluation methods, as cross-correlation or cluster analysis. To demonstrate the potentials of NDT, a variety of examples will be presented, including fast sensitive tests which allow a more accurate localization and appropriate description of flaws, structures and stresses by different optical, electromagnetic, radiographic and acoustic methods.

H.-A. Crostack; W. Reimers

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

International Cooperation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Cooperation International Cooperation International Cooperation Members at a meeting of the international Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF). The Office of Fossil Energy is the Secretariat for the CSLF. Members at a meeting of the international Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF). The Office of Fossil Energy is the Secretariat for the CSLF. Key Bilateral Activities US-India Energy Dialogue: Coal Working Group The Office of Fossil Energy and India's Ministry of Coal jointly chair the Coal Working Group initiative to exchange information on policies, programs and technologies to promote the efficient and environmentally responsible production and use of coal. US-China Collaboration in Fossil Energy R&D The Office of Fossil Energy and China's Ministry of Science and Technology

385

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2006 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

386

Putting 'international' back in IPEC.  

SciTech Connect

During the previous six annual sessions of the International Petroleum Environmental Conference (IPEC), little attention has been given to international issues. Although the US is clearly a leader in oil field research and regulatory development information is available on interesting projects throughout the world Many participants in IPEC have little exposure to international oil and gas environmental problems and solutions. Beginning with the 7th IPEC, a stronger effort is being made to include international issues in the confidence. This paper describes some of the author's experiences in working with international oil and gas environmental issues in North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Among the topics to be discussed are the issues that developing oil and gas-producing nations face and the need for sensitivity to other nation's cultures and legal systems.

Veil, J. A.

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

387

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H5. World installed nuclear generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 115 119 123 130 133 130 135 0.5 United States a 101 104 111 114 114 109 113 0.4 Canada 13 13 11 13 16 16 16 0.7 Mexico/Chile 1 2 2 3 4 5 6 5.1 OECD Europe 132 124 128 142 143 143 142 0.3 OECD Asia 67 45 65 71 79 80 82 0.7 Japan 49 20 34 35 36 37 37 -0.9 South Korea 18 25 32 36 43 43 45 3.2 Australia/New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 314 288 316 343 355 352 359 0.5 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 42 49 58 65 73 80 85 2.4 Russia 24 28 35 40 45 50 55 2.8 Other 17 20 23 25 27 29 29 1.8 Non-OECD Asia 21

388

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H21. World net solar electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 4 33 38 42 48 63 101 11.1 United States a 4 32 37 40 46 62 99 11.2 Canada 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 -- Mexico/Chile 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 -- OECD Europe 23 78 85 89 94 98 102 5.1 OECD Asia 5 12 22 33 39 50 50 8.1 Japan 4 7 14 23 29 39 39 8.1 South Korea 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3.6 Australia/New Zealand 0 4 6 8 8 9 9 -- Total OECD 32 123 145 165 181 211 253 7.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Russia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Other 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Non-OECD Asia 1 31 76 94 107 120 129 17.2 China 1 26 67 79 90 100 105 17.0 India 0 3 7 13 14 17

389

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H11. World installed other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 38 40 41 42 43 45 47 0.7 United States a 35 38 39 39 40 41 43 0.7 Canada 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.6 Mexico/Chile 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1.3 OECD Europe 73 75 76 77 78 79 80 0.3 OECD Asia 33 36 36 36 36 36 37 0.3 Japan 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 0.1 South Korea 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 1.2 Australia/New Zealand 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 1.4 Total OECD 144 151 153 155 158 160 163 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 0.2 Russia 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.3 Other 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0.2 Non-OECD Asia 26 36 45 54 63 69 73 3.4 China 20 27 36 45 53 59 61 3.9 India 3 4 4 4

390

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

391

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H7. World installed hydroelectric generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 170 177 181 190 201 214 228 1.0 United States a 78 78 79 79 79 80 81 0.1 Canada 75 78 80 85 93 101 109 1.3 Mexico/Chile 17 20 22 25 29 33 38 2.8 OECD Europe 151 155 169 176 183 189 195 0.9 OECD Asia 37 39 40 40 40 40 41 0.3 Japan 22 24 24 24 24 25 25 0.3 South Korea 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.3 Australia/New Zealand 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 0.3 Total OECD 358 371 389 405 424 443 464 0.9 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 87 91 99 103 110 118 125 1.2 Russia 47 49 54 58 62 66 69 1.3 Other 41 42 45 45 48 52 56 1.1 Non-OECD Asia

392

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections for Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel This page inTenTionally lefT blank 259 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H1. World total installed generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,248 1,316 1,324 1,379 1,456 1,546 1,669 1.0 United States a 1,033 1,080 1,068 1,098 1,147 1,206 1,293 0.8 Canada 137 144 152 163 174 185 198 1.2 Mexico/Chile 78 93 104 118 135 155 177 2.8 OECD Europe 946 1,028 1,096 1,133 1,159 1,185 1,211 0.8 OECD Asia 441 444 473 489 501 516 524 0.6 Japan 287 275 293 300 304 309 306 0.2 South Korea 85 93 100 107 114

393

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H3. World installed natural-gas-fired generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 402 435 461 505 568 631 697 1.9 United States a 350 379 390 420 472 519 566 1.6 Canada 20 19 26 28 29 32 35 1.9 Mexico/Chile 31 36 45 56 68 80 95 3.8 OECD Europe 217 219 213 204 218 234 252 0.5 OECD Asia 128 134 140 144 148 157 163 0.8 Japan 83 90 96 97 100 101 101 0.7 South Korea 27 26 26 28 29 35 38 1.1 Australia/New Zealand 18 18 18 19 20 22 23 1.0 Total OECD 746 787 814

394

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J3. World gross domestic product (GDP) per capita by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2009-2040 (2005 dollars per person) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 32,959 33,559 36,264 39,848 43,145 46,824 51,175 56,306 1.7 United States a 41,478 42,130 45,224 49,521 53,259 57,343 62,044 67,452 1.6 Canada 34,582 35,285 37,485 40,040 41,910 43,909 46,715 50,028 1.2 Mexico/Chile 12,215 12,750 14,862 16,996 19,460 22,324 25,830 30,192 2.9 OECD Europe 25,770 26,269 27,363 29,924 32,694 35,369 38,368 41,753 1.6 OECD Asia 28,623 29,875 32,912 36,117 39,347 42,264 45,505 48,961 1.7 Japan 29,469 30,827 33,255

395

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A14. World population by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (millions) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 470 475 499 523 547 569 591 612 0.8 United States a 308 310 325 340 356 372 388 404 0.9 Canada 34 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 1.0 Mexico/Chile 129 131 138 144 150 155 159 162 0.7 OECD Europe 553 556 570 580 588 594 598 601 0.3 OECD Asia 202 203 204 205 204 203 201 199 -0.1 Japan 128 128 127 125 122 119 117 114 -0.4 South Korea 48 48 49 50 50 50 50 49 0.1 Australia/NewZealand 26 27 28 30 32 33 34 35 0.9 Total OECD 1,226 1,234 1,273 1,307 1,339 1,366 1,390 1,411 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 338 338 342 342 342 340 337 334 0.0 Russia 141 140 142 141 139 136 134 131 -0.2 Other 197

396

International energy outlook 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Spring 2013 International Peer Advisor Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spring 2013 International Peer Advisor Application Are you interested in being a part of the Spring 2013 New International Student Orientations as an International Peer Advisor? Complete the attached Arrival Orientation Duties of an International Peer Advisor: · Meet new international students · Help

Texas at Arlington, University of

398

On the predictability of mode-1 internal tides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A frequency–wavenumber tidal analysis for deriving internal-tide harmonic constants from TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) has been developed, taking advantage of the evident temporal and spatial coherence and the weak dissipation of internal tides. Previous analyses consisted of simple tidal analysis at individual points, which gave inconsistent harmonic constants at altimeter track crossover points. Such analyses have difficulty in distinguishing between the effects of interference, incoherence, and dissipation. The frequency–wavenumber analysis provides an objective way to interpolate the internal tides measured along altimetry tracks to any arbitrary point, while leveraging all available data for optimal tidal estimates. Tidal analysis of T/P data from 2000 to 2007 is used to predict in situ time series measured during the 2001–2002 Hawaiian Ocean mixing experiment (HOME), the 1987 reciprocal tomography experiment (RTE87), and the 1991 acoustic mid-ocean dynamics experiment (AMODE), demonstrating both the temporal coherence and the lack of incoherent elements to this wave propagation. It has been conjectured that significant energy would be lost from mode-1 internal tides as they cross the 28.9°N critical latitude of parametric subharmonic instability (PSI). No apparent change in amplitude at 28.9°N was detected by this analysis, however. Further, after correcting for changes in background stratification, the amplitude of the mode-1 internal tide was found to decrease by less than 20% over the 2000 km between the Hawaiian Ridge and 40°N. A significant fraction of the variability of internal waves, that component associated with mode-1 internal tides, appears to be predictable over most of the world's oceans, using harmonic constants derived from satellite altimetry.

Brian D. Dushaw; Peter F. Worcester; Matthew A. Dzieciuch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Life prediction methodology for ceramic components of advanced vehicular heat engines: Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

One of the major challenges involved in the use of ceramic materials is ensuring adequate strength and durability. This activity has developed methodology which can be used during the design phase to predict the structural behavior of ceramic components. The effort involved the characterization of injection molded and hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) PY-6 silicon nitride, the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology, and the development of analytical life prediction methodology. Four failure modes are addressed: fast fracture, slow crack growth, creep, and oxidation. The techniques deal with failures initiating at the surface as well as internal to the component. The life prediction methodology for fast fracture and slow crack growth have been verified using a variety of confirmatory tests. The verification tests were conducted at room and elevated temperatures up to a maximum of 1371 {degrees}C. The tests involved (1) flat circular disks subjected to bending stresses and (2) high speed rotating spin disks. Reasonable correlation was achieved for a variety of test conditions and failure mechanisms. The predictions associated with surface failures proved to be optimistic, requiring re-evaluation of the components` initial fast fracture strengths. Correlation was achieved for the spin disks which failed in fast fracture from internal flaws. Time dependent elevated temperature slow crack growth spin disk failures were also successfully predicted.

Khandelwal, P.K.; Provenzano, N.J.; Schneider, W.E. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A10. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6,448 6,657 6,480 6,627 6,762 6,880 7,070 7,283 0.3 United States a 5,418 5,608 5,381 5,454 5,501 5,523 5,607 5,691 0.0 Canada 548 546 551 574 593 609 628 654 0.6 Mexico/Chile 482 503 548 599 668 748 835 937 2.1 OECD Europe 4,147 4,223 4,054 4,097 4,097 4,151 4,202 4,257 0.0 OECD Asia 2,085 2,200 2,287 2,296 2,329 2,341 2,365 2,358 0.2 Japan 1,105 1,176 1,243 1,220 1,223 1,215 1,194 1,150 -0.1 South Korea 531 581 600 627 653 666 703 730 0.8 Australia/NewZealand 449 443 444 449 452 460 468 478 0.3 Total OECD 12,680

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections Reference case projections for natural gas production This page inTenTionally lefT blank 283 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.4 30.4 33.5 36.1 38.2 41.1 44.4 1.5 United States a 21.2 23.9 26.5 28.4 29.7 31.3 33.1 1.5 Canada 5.4 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 1.1 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.1 2.8 3.5 2.3 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.7 OECD Europe 10.4 9.0 8.1 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.9 -0.2 North Europe 10.1 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 -0.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.7 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel

402

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0 -0.2 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.5 12.5 13.3 14.2 14.9 15.7 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.8 0.5 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

403

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E E Low Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 217 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9

404

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9 22.3 22.5 22.6 22.4 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.8 14.8 15.6 16.6 1.4 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.3 7.4 7.6 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD

405

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth case projections Low Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 203 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6

406

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6 22.2 21.4 -0.1 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.1 15.8 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD 234.7

407

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G7. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.9 35.1 37.6 43.9 47.5 50.7 56.3 61.5 1.9 Middle East 23.8 25.4 25.5 30.7 33.6 36.1 40.5 44.7 2.1 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.7 3.7 3.9 4.0 4.4 4.6 0.7 West Africa 4.4 4.3 5.2 5.8 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.1 1.6 South America 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.6 5.1 2.0 Non-OPEC 51.6 51.6 55.5 56.8 57.8 59.2 58.9 59.6 0.5 OECD 21.2 21.2 23.5 23.2 22.5 22.0 21.6 22.0 0.1

408

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G1. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.9 35.1 36.1 38.4 40.0 42.5 45.7 48.9 1.1 Middle East 23.8 25.4 24.5 26.7 28.2 30.4 33.1 35.8 1.4 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.5 3.3 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 0.2 West Africa 4.4 4.3 5.1 5.3 5.5 5.6 5.8 5.9 0.9 South America 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.3 0.4 Non-OPEC 51.8 51.7 55.8 58.2 60.3 61.9 63.7 66.0 0.8 OECD 21.4 21.4 23.9 23.9 23.4 23.0 23.8 24.8 0.5 OECD Americas

409

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G3.World nonpetroleum liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 12.5 Biofuels b 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Gas-to-liquids 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 12.5 Non-OPEC 1.6 1.6 1.9 2.3 2.8 3.3 3.8 4.3 3.5 OECD 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.4 Biofuels b 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.8 Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 15.0 Gas-to-liquids

410

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

D D High Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 209 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0

411

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan 52.7 53.2 57.2 54.1 53.3 52.8 52.2 51.8 -0.1 South Korea 52.8 53.7 50.7 48.1 47.2 45.4 46.0 45.8 -0.5 Australia/NewZealand 67.1 66.3 63.1 60.9 60.1 59.5 58.7 58.0 -0.4

412

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth case projections High Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 197 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9

413

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kaya Identity factor projections Kaya Identity factor projections * Carbon dioxide intensity * Energy intensity * GDP per capita * Population This page inTenTionally lefT blank 289 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan

414

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9 0.3 South Korea 10.1 10.8 12.1 13.6 14.7 15.7 16.5 17.4 1.6 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.5 7.6 7.9 8.1 8.4 0.8 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

415

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G5. World petroleum production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.8 35.0 33.9 34.2 36.5 39.3 42.8 45.3 0.9 Middle East 23.8 25.3 23.0 23.6 25.4 27.9 30.8 33.0 1.1 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.7 -0.1 West Africa 4.4 4.3 4.7 4.7 5.0 5.1 5.3 5.3 0.6 South America 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.3 0.4 Non-OPEC 50.1 50.0 54.1 55.9 56.8 59.5 62.2 65.7 0.9 OECD 20.4 20.3 23.1 23.6 23.4 23.4 24.2 25.2 0.7 OECD Americas 15.2

416

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F F Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping This page inTenTionally lefT blank 225 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8

417

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

St Andrews, University of

418

Comparison of component frameworks for real-time embedded systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of components significantly helps in development of real-time embedded systems. There have been a number of component frameworks developed for this purpose, and some of them have already became well established in this area. Even though these ... Keywords: Component frameworks, Component-based development, Real-time and embedded systems

Tomáš Pop, Petr Hn?tynka, Petr Hošek, Michal Malohlava, Tomáš Bureš

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Trusted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trusted Microsystems Trusted Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News Trusted Microsystems for National Security Customers Trusted R&D Trusted Design Trusted Fabrication Trusted BEOL Trusted Custom Electronic Components Trusted Microsystems "Trusted Microsystems" encompasses the entire product development cycle. Sandia's Microsystems Center affords access to trusted people and facilities for research and development, design, layout, fabrication, characterization, packaging, and test. Trusted Design Secure design facility with disciplined and trusted design flow and methodologies Trusted Structured ASIC

420

RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Thermal Study of Inverter Components: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Thermal histories of inverter components were collected from operating inverters from several manufacturers and three locations. The data were analyzed to determine thermal profiles, the dependence on local conditions, and to assess the effect on inverter reliability. Inverter temperatures were shown to increase with the power dissipation of the inverters, follow diurnal and annual cycles, and have a dependence on wind speed. An accumulated damage model was applied to the temperature profiles and an example of using these data to predict reliability was explored.

Sorensen, N. R.; Thomas, E. V.; Quintana, M. A.; Barkaszi, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Zhang, Z.; Kurtz, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Intern experience at Rockwell International: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intern Supervisor Dr. Howard E. Chamberlain Dr. Thomas W. Comstock Member College of Engineering... International UCS Venture is reviewed. This report is submitted in order to document the experience and ind icate how i t f u l f i l l s the requirements fo r a Doctor of Engineering Internship. The assignments which were accomplished during...

Talley, Thomas James, 1945-

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sharon Kurek, CPA, CFE Director of Internal Audit Definition of Internal Auditing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharon Kurek, CPA, CFE ­ Director of Internal Audit #12;· Definition of Internal Auditing · Scope

Buehrer, R. Michael

424

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Installation of Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

425

Review: International Handbook of Research on Environmental Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: International Handbook of Research on Environmentaleditors. International Handbook of Research on Environmentalenormous International Handbook of Research on Environmental

Laberge, Yves

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Defining food literacy and its components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Food literacy has emerged as a term to describe the everyday practicalities associated with healthy eating. The term is increasingly used in policy, practice, research and by the public; however, there is no shared understanding of its meaning. The purpose of this research was to develop a definition of food literacy which was informed by the identification of its components. This was considered from two perspectives: that of food experts which aimed to reflect the intention of existing policy and investment, and that of individuals, who could be considered experts in the everyday practicalities of food provisioning and consumption. Given that food literacy is likely to be highly contextual, this second study focused on disadvantaged young people living in an urban area who were responsible for feeding themselves. The Expert Study used a Delphi methodology (round one n = 43). The Young People’s Study used semi-structured, life-course interviews (n = 37). Constructivist Grounded Theory was used to analyse results. This included constant comparison of data within and between studies. From this, eleven components of food literacy were identified which fell into the domains of: planning and management; selection; preparation; and eating. These were used to develop a definition for the term “food literacy”.

Helen Anna Vidgen; Danielle Gallegos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Anodizing of High Electrically Stressed Components  

SciTech Connect

Anodizing creates an aluminum oxide coating that penetrates into the surface as well as builds above the surface of aluminum creating a very hard ceramic-type coating with good dielectric properties. Over time and use, the electrical carrying components (or spools in this case) experience electrical breakdown, yielding undesirable x-ray dosages or failure. The spool is located in the high vacuum region of a rod pinch diode section of an x-ray producing machine. Machine operators have recorded decreases in x-ray dosages over numerous shots using the reusable spool component, and re-anodizing the interior surface of the spool does not provide the expected improvement. A machine operation subject matter expert coated the anodized surface with diffusion pump oil to eliminate electrical breakdown as a temporary fix. It is known that an anodized surface is very porous, and it is because of this porosity that the surface may trap air that becomes a catalyst for electrical breakdown. In this paper we present a solution of mitigating electrical breakdown by oiling. We will also present results of surface anodizing improvements achieved by surface finish preparation and surface sealing. We conclude that oiling the anodized surface and using anodized hot dip sealing processes will have similar results.

Flores, P. [NSTec; Henderson, D. J. [NSTec; Good, D. E. [NSTec; Hogge, K. [NSTec; Mitton, C. V. [NSTec; Molina, I. [NSTec; Naffziger, C. [NSTec; Codova, S. R. [SNL; Ormond, E. U. [SNL

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.4 30.4 33.5 36.1 38.2 41.1 44.4 1.5 United States a 21.2 23.9 26.5 28.4 29.7 31.3 33.1 1.5 Canada 5.4 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 1.1 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.1 2.8 3.5 2.3 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.7 OECD Europe 10.4 9.0 8.1 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.9 -0.2 North Europe 10.1 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 -0.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.7 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 4.5 OECD Asia 2.1 2.8 4.0 5.0 5.7 6.3 6.9 4.0 Japan 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

429

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F15. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Asia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.7 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Electricity 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.8 3.2 Total 2.1 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.6 2.7 Commercial Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.7 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 -- Electricity 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.9 Total 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.3 Industrial Liquids 4.8 4.7 5.5 6.2 7.1 8.2 9.6 2.4 Natural gas 3.3 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.6 5.2

430

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F19. Delivered energy consumption in Other Central and South America by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 3.2 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.9 Total 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.0 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.5 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 2.4 Total 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 2.2 Industrial Liquids 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 0.5 Natural gas 2.6 2.7

431

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E4. World liquids consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 24.2 25.1 25.2 25.2 25.7 26.7 0.4 United States a 18.6 18.9 19.4 20.0 19.8 19.6 19.7 20.2 0.2 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.5 0.4 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.6 4.0 1.7 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 13.7 14.5 14.7 15.1 15.4 15.8 0.2 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.3 8.7 8.9 8.9 9.0 9.1 0.5 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.7 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.5 0.1 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.2 1.2 Australia/NewZealand 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 0.8 Total OECD 45.8 46.0 46.2 48.3 48.8 49.2 50.2 51.5 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

432

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I3. World other natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 13.0 11.3 10.7 10.4 10.0 10.1 9.8 -1.0 United States a 8.3 7.5 7.3 7.4 7.1 7.2 6.9 -0.6 Canada 2.9 2.2 1.8 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.2 -2.9 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 -0.4 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 OECD Europe 10.4 8.9 7.6 6.6 6.1 5.7 5.6 -2.0 North Europe 10.0 8.3 6.9 6.0 5.5 5.1 5.0 -2.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1.0 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 -- OECD Asia 1.9 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 1.8 Japan 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.0

433

COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT NEEDS FOR THE HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal year 2008 studies in electrolyzer component development have focused on the characterization of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) after performance tests in the single cell electrolyzer, evaluation of electrocatalysts and membranes using a small scale electrolyzer and evaluating the contribution of individual cell components to the overall electrochemical performance. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies of samples taken from MEAs testing in the SRNL single cell electrolyzer test station indicates a sulfur-rich layer forms between the cathode catalyst layer and the membrane. Based on a review of operating conditions for each of the MEAs evaluated, we conclude that the formation of the layer results from the reduction of sulfur dioxide as it passes through the MEA and reaches the catalyst layer at the cathode-membrane interface. Formation of the sulfur rich layer results in partial delamination of the cathode catalyst layer leading to diminished performance. Furthermore we believe that operating the electrolyzer at elevated pressure significantly increases the rate of formation due to increased adsorption of hydrogen on the internal catalyst surface. Thus, identification of a membrane that exhibits much lower transport of sulfur dioxide is needed to reduce the quantity of sulfur dioxide that reaches the cathode catalyst and is reduced to produce the sulfur-rich layer. Three candidate membranes are currently being evaluated that have shown promise from preliminary studies, (1) modified Nafion{reg_sign}, (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI), and (3) sulfonated Diels Alder polyphenylene (SDAPP). Testing examined the activity for the sulfur dioxide oxidation of platinum (Pt) and platinum-alloy catalysts in 30 wt% sulfuric acid solution. Linear sweep voltammetry showed an increase in activity when catalysts in which Pt is alloyed with non-noble transition metals such as cobalt and chromium. However when Pt is alloyed with noble metals, such as iridium or ruthenium, the kinetic activity decreases. We recommend further testing to determine if these binary alloys will provide the increased reaction kinetic needed to meet the targets. We also plan to test the performance of these catalyst materials for both proton and sulfur dioxide reduction. The latter may provide another parameter by which we can control the reduction of sulfur dioxide upon transport to the cathode catalyst surface. A small scale electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2}) has been fabricated and successfully installed as an additional tool to evaluate the effect of different operating conditions on electrolyzer and MEA performance. Currently this electrolyzer is limited to testing at temperatures up to 80 C and at atmospheric pressure. Selected electrochemical performance data from the single cell sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer were analyzed with the aid of an empirical equation which takes into account the overpotential of each of the components. By using the empirical equation, the performance data was broken down into its components and a comparison of the potential losses was made. The results indicated that for the testing conditions of 80 C and 30 wt% sulfuric acid, the major overpotential contribution ({approx}70 % of all losses) arise from the slow reaction rate of oxidation of sulfur dioxide. The results indicate that in order to meet the target of hydrogen production at 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} at 0.6 V and 50 wt% sulfuric acid, identification of a better catalyst for sulfur dioxide oxidation will provide the largest gain in electrolyzer performance.

Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Mark Elvington, M

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

International Energy-Efficiency Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 International Energy-Efficiency Standards Two cost-effective approaches to reducing energy use in buildings are minimum energy standards for appliances and incorporating energy-efficiency principles in building codes. More than two dozen nations already have adopted, will soon adopt, or are considering the adoption of energy-efficiency standards and codes. The Environmental Energy Technologies Division has pooled its resources in the field of energy-efficiency standards with its international activities to create the International Building and Appliance Standards team. The IBAS team convenes regularly to discuss progress in existing international standards activities as well as to identify possible new Berkeley Lab opportunities to support efficiency standards the world over.

435

Iteknowledgies International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iteknowledgies International Iteknowledgies International Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Iteknowledgies International Name Iteknowledgies International Place Scottsdale, Arizona Zip 85259 Sector Services Year founded 2002 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 480-205-0881 Website http://www.iteknowledgies.com Coordinates 33.6978967°, -111.7376178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6978967,"lon":-111.7376178,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

436

ICF International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ICF International ICF International Jump to: navigation, search Name ICF International Address 9300 Lee Highway, Fairfax, VA 22031-1207 USA Place Washington, District of Columbia Stock Symbol NASDAQ:ICFI Year founded 1969 Number of employees 1001-5000 References http://www.icfi.com/ No information has been entered for this organization. Add Organization Contents 1 Organization Overview 1.1 Markets 2 Resources 2.1 Programs 3 References Organization Overview "ICF International partners with government and commercial clients to deliver professional services and technology solutions in the energy, environment, and infrastructure; health, social programs, and consumer/financial; and public safety and defense markets." Markets Aviation Climate Community Development Defense Education

437

FRA, LLC Internal Audit Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I. In I. In A. M policies a office wh Laborator FRA Aud the Board performan Prime Co B. O FRA and Practice Auditors, 1 2 3 4 5 C. A the FRA access to their miss full and p concerns nternal Aud Mission. All and controls hich reports a ry, works in dit Committe d of Directo nce of the in ontract betwe Objectives. T d Laboratory of Internal , that: . Internal a protecting . Internal ac unallowab . Operation i.e., opera . Appropria . Internal co assure effi security. Authority. Th President an all FRA per sion to the ex private acces and findings dit Charter: Fermi Resea are subject t administrativ consultation ee. This prov ors, with an nternal contro een FRA and The objective managemen Auditing an accounting c g the assets of ccounting co ble costs.

438

Internal dissipation of a polymer  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of flexible polymer molecules are often assumed to be governed by hydrodynamics of the solvent. However there is considerable evidence that internal dissipation of a polymer contributes as well. Here we investigate the dynamics of a single chain in the absence of solvent to characterize the nature of this internal friction. We model the chains as freely hinged but with localized bond angles and threefold symmetric dihedral angles. We show that the damping is close but not identical to Kelvin damping, which depends on the first temporal and second spatial derivative of monomer position. With no internal potential between monomers, the magnitude of the damping is small for long wavelengths and weakly damped oscillatory time dependent behavior is seen for a large range of spatial modes. When the size of the internal potential is increased, such oscillations persist, but the damping becomes larger. However underdamped motion is present even with quite strong dihedral barriers for long enough wavelengths.

Deutsch, J. M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

international | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

440

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZING John Priscu (Chair)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE John Priscu (Chair) Montana State University, USA Nina Gunde, USA Laurie Connell University of Maine, USA Hugh Ducklow MBL- Woods Hole, USA Beat Frey Swiss Federal

Wall, Diana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EVALUATION FORM (Internal Libraries Document)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION FORM (Internal Libraries Document) FACULTY MEMBER COMPLETES TOP Date: Rank/Title: Name, Research and Service, respectively for tenure track; 70%-10%-20% for non-tenure track) has been in effect

Stowell, Michael

442

MGM International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MGM International MGM International Jump to: navigation, search Name MGM International Place Miami, Florida Zip 33131 Product MGM International is a CDM project development, investment and commercialisation firm. Coordinates 25.728985°, -80.237419° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.728985,"lon":-80.237419,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive ComponentEmissionsEmissionsEmissions Todd Hubing Mi h li P f f V hi l El t iMichelin Professor of Vehicular Electronics Clemson University

Stuart, Steven J.

444

International Commitments Primer | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Commitments » International International Commitments » International Commitments Primer International Commitments Primer Overview of International Commitment Process DOE pursues a variety of science and technology goals with other governments and international organizations, like sharing scientific data, cooperating research and development of common interest, and sharing scientific expertise, methodologies, and facilities, all of which motivate establishing relationships through agreements with foreign counterparts. International science and technology agreements have two forms, legally binding (including intergovernmental treaties approved by Congress and executive-type government-to-government or agency-level agreements) and informal arrangements with no legally binding effect. Agreements of both

445

Sustainable Technology International STA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology International STA Technology International STA Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Technology International (STA) Place Queanbeyan, Australia Sector Solar Product Sustainable Technologies International (STI) is the first company in the world to commercially manufacture Dye-sensitised Solar Cell (DSC) solar modules. References Sustainable Technology International (STA)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sustainable Technology International (STA) is a company located in Queanbeyan, Australia . References ↑ "Sustainable Technology International (STA)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sustainable_Technology_International_STA&oldid=351923

446

International Solar Consulting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Solar Consulting Place: Newport Beach, California Zip: 92660 Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar Product: International Solar Consulting works with large commercial and...

447

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation (INEPC) collaborates with international partners to support the safe, secure, and peaceful use of nuclear energy. It works both...

448

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

nuclear energy Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum...

449

National Science Foundation International Science Activities Office  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AN Office of International ... of International Science Activities, headed by Dr. Arthur Roe, has been established by the U.S. ...

1962-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

International Refrigeration: Order (2012-CE-1510) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refrigeration: Order (2012-CE-1510) July 20, 2012 DOE ordered International Refrigeration Products to pay an 8,000 civil penalty after finding International Refrigeration had...

451

Wardell Armstrong International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wardell Armstrong International Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wardell Armstrong International Place: Cornwall, United Kingdom Zip: TR3 6EH Sector: Biomass, Geothermal energy,...

452

Detection of the internal corrosion in pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of the internal corrosion in pipeline. Hyeonbae Kang. In this talk I will explain our new methods to detect internal corrosions in pipelines.

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

453

Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy...

454

International Labor Organization (ILO) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"The ILO is the international organization responsible for drawing up and overseeing international labour standards. It is the only 'tripartite' United Nations agency that...

455

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation Recent Events 6th US-India Civil Nuclear Energy Working Group Meeting 6th...

456

Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW, DOE, and NEDO Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW, DOE, and NEDO December 16, 2013 1:00PM EST...

457

NIST Special Publication 1038 The International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Special Publication 1038 The International System of Units (SI) ­ Conversion Factors Services #12;NIST Special Publication 1038 The International System of Units (SI) - Conversion Factors

458

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Expands an International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECAbout ECFacilitiesCRFSandia Expands an International Collaboration and Web Database on Engine Fuel Spray Combustion Research Sandia Expands an International Collaboration...

459

Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Baxter International Inc...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Baxter International Inc. Baxter International Inc. is committed to advancing sustainability in its workplaces and local communities. The company has a legacy of sustainable...

460

. . . . . 85 . . . . . International Deep Drawing Research Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . 85 . . . . . International Deep Drawing Research Group IDDRG 2009 International 20899-855 USA e-mail: mark.iadicola@nist.gov, Web page: www

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

International Space Station Program Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Space Station Program Overview 1 #12;BerthingDock MRM1 / FGB Nadir DC1 / MLM / RS Node SM Aft MRM2 / SM-Zenith Node 1 Nadir Node 2 Nadir Node 2 Zenith 2013 2014 2015 May Jun Jul Aug Sep the line (Dock on 5/1/13) HTV4 (7/20/13 ­ 8/19/13) Pre-Decisional, For Internal Use Only Date Color Key

462

Internally Displaced Persons in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peace and Democracy in South Asia, Volume 1, Issue 2, 2005. Bandana Shrestha has been volunteering with the Nepal Institute of Peace, Kathmandu, as Programme Coordinator. Her email ID is: shrestha_bandana@yahoo.com. Som Niroula is Programme... Officer of the Nepal Institute of Peace. Email: niroulasom@yahoo.com. Internally Displaced Persons in Nepal BANDANA SHRESTHA & SOM NIROULA Background Nepal has been in an internal armed conflict since 1996 between the Communist Party...

Shrestha, Bandana; Niroula, Som

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Component failure data handbook. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Modeling the Phillips curve with unobserved components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are imposed on the underlying level (core in?ation), since #25;t = (1#0; #11;L)#0;1#22;t + (1#0; #11;L)#0;1"t; t = 1; :::; T 5 1960 1980 2000 ­0.05 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 INFLATION Level 1960 1980 2000 ­0.01 0.00 0.01 INFLATION­Seasonal 1960 1980 2000 ­0.05 0... .8 9.0 9.2 log_GDP Level 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 ­0.025 0.000 0.025 0.050 0.0 75 INFLATION Level+Cycle 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 ­0.02 ­0.01 0.00 0.01 0.02 0.0 3 log_GDP­Cycle Figure 5: Smoothed components from a bivariate model for GDP and in?a- tion A...

Harvey, Andrew C

467

Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

468

Tritium Removal from Carbon Plasma Facing Components  

SciTech Connect

Tritium removal is a major unsolved development task for next-step devices with carbon plasma-facing components. The 2-3 order of magnitude increase in duty cycle and associated tritium accumulation rate in a next-step tokamak will place unprecedented demands on tritium removal technology. The associated technical risk can be mitigated only if suitable removal techniques are demonstrated on tokamaks before the construction of a next-step device. This article reviews the history of codeposition, the tritium experience of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) and the tritium removal rate required to support ITER's planned operational schedule. The merits and shortcomings of various tritium removal techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on oxidation and laser surface heating.

C.H. Skinner; J.P. Coad; G. Federici

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

469

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 1998 RANGE AND POSE ESTIMATION FOR VISUAL SERVOING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 1998 RANGE AND POSE ESTIMATION FOR VISUAL SERVOING OF A MOBILE ROBOT David Jung, Jochen Heinzmann and Alexander Zelinsky Robotic Systems for real-time visual servoing on a mobile robot. The behaviour is a component of a multi-robot cleaning

472

International Journal of Production Research Vol. 48, No. 4, 15 February 2010, 933955  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conserves a considerable portion of the energy utilised in production of those components. This hasInternational Journal of Production Research Vol. 48, No. 4, 15 February 2010, 933­955 RESEARCH ARTICLE A machine learning approach to optimise the usage of recycled material in a remanufacturing

Gosavi, Abhijit

473

2004 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME) Robust Mesh-based Hashing for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME) Robust Mesh-based Hashing for Copy digests of digital images were created by projections of DCT coefficients to key-dependent random patterns developed a soft hash algorithm based on Radon transform and principal component analysis. Again, resistance

Chang, Pao-Chi

474

Towards a history of the international industrial gases industry Ray Stokes, Ralf Banken, and Matthias Phl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial revolution" and their component companies. From David Landes's classic study, The Unbound of the industries of the second industrial revolution has been virtually ignored in this scholarship to date1 Towards a history of the international industrial gases industry Ray Stokes, Ralf Banken

Guo, Zaoyang

475

Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

476

Fermilab | Directorate | Internal Audit Services | Internal Audit Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Audit Process Internal Audit Process What happens during an internal audit? Announcement Before an audit begins, we distribute an announcement letter to those who will serve as our primary audit contacts. The letter briefly outlines the preliminary audit objectives, and the general audit process. Planning Planning is the first phase of the audit. During planning, we review policies and procedures in order to gain an understanding of how work is accomplished. We typically conduct several transaction walk-throughs by tracing transactions from beginning to end. Policies, procedures, walk-throughs, and discussions with personnel enable us to identify controls and assess associated risks. The planning phase helps us fine-tune our approach and finalize our work program. It is our goal to use electronic data whenever possible. Frequently we

477

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

478

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

479

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Illinois Institute of Technology International Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Transferring from the Illinois Institute of Technology to: Program Number of New School (ask InternationalIllinois Institute of Technology International Center 3201 S. State St. MTCC Room 203 Chicago, IL). Meet with an International Advisor at the International Center to discuss your intent to transfer

Heller, Barbara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lwr internal components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94  

SciTech Connect

This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

International aspects of Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The national laboratories of the Department of Energy can rightly claim to be called international laboratories because of their role in international research and development activities. These laboratories have staff that pursue internationally acclaimed research with both national and international colleagues and have facilities that support these endeavors.

Trivelpiece, A.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Student Intern Evaluation Form Geography 484  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Intern Evaluation Form Geography 484 Student Intern Name: Student Intern Position: Name poor, 5 being proficient and, 10 being exceeds expectations, please rate the Student Intern reliable would you consider this student? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 3. How well did the student comply

484

Ynfiniti Engineering Services International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ynfiniti Engineering Services International Ynfiniti Engineering Services International Jump to: navigation, search Name Ynfiniti Engineering Services International Place Spain Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Company that specializes in the installation and maintenance of wind farms and solar plants. References Ynfiniti Engineering Services International[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ynfiniti Engineering Services International is a company located in Spain . References ↑ "Ynfiniti Engineering Services International" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ynfiniti_Engineering_Services_International&oldid=353364" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

485

NREL: Wind Research - International Research Collaboratives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Collaboratives Research Collaboratives Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) leverage U.S. research dollars by participating in multi-lateral research collaborations with many international organizations. NWTC collaborates with several of the world's most respected institutions, including the national research institutions of other countries. NREL also works through international agencies dedicated to the common interests of energy research and applications such as the International Energy Agency (IEA), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Underwriters Laboratory, and the International Measuring Network of Wind Energy Institutes (MEASNET). International Energy Agency NREL supports international research efforts through its participation in

486

A Model-Driven Engineering Framework for Component Models Interoperability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multitude of component models exist today, characterized by slightly different conceptual architectural elements, focusing on a specific operational domain, covering different phases of component life-cycle, or supporting analysis of different quality ...

Ivica Crnkovi?; Ivano Malavolta; Henry Muccini

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Development of three-dimensional passive components for power electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As component and power densities have increased, printed circuit boards (PCBs) have taken on additional functionality including heatsinking and forming constituent parts of electrical components. PCBs are not well suited ...

Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Feeding of Small Components Using the Surface Tension of Fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feeding of components smaller than 1mm2 is a high challenge in an automated manufacturing line. The surface forces affecting these micro components are getting more important and cause problems when handled. ...

Matthias Burgard; Nabih Othman; Uwe Mai…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

490

Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

Stickney, R.G.

1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

491

Dalu International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International International Jump to: navigation, search Name Dalu International Place Pasadena, California Zip 91101 Product California-based project development arm of Chinese conglomerate. Coordinates 29.690847°, -95.196308° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.690847,"lon":-95.196308,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

492

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

493

EM International Program Action Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM] October, 2012 EM INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM] October, 2012 E M I n t e r n a t i o n a l P r o g r a m s Page 1 ACTION TABLE Subject Lead Office Engaging Country Meeting Location Purpose Status Date of Event 3 rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and Operations N. Buschman, EM-22 Germany Albuquerque & Carlsbad, NM Continue collaboration with Germans on salt repository research, design and operations. Draft agenda prepared. October 8-12, 2012 International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Ministerial R. Elmetti, EM- 2.1 Multilateral Marrakech, Morocco To support the development of nuclear energy infrastructure globally through workforce training, information sharing, and approaches related to the safe, secure and responsible use of

494

Canergy International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canergy International Canergy International Jump to: navigation, search Name Canergy International Place Pasadena, California Zip 91101 Sector Solar Product California-based solar project developer. Coordinates 29.690847°, -95.196308° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.690847,"lon":-95.196308,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

495

Vectron International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vectron International Vectron International Jump to: navigation, search Name Vectron International Place Hudson, New Hampshire Zip 3051 Sector Solar Product Designs, manufactures and markets frequency control, sensor and hybrid product solutions, such as solar inverters. Coordinates 42.905035°, -108.583653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.905035,"lon":-108.583653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

496

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of the EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in the IEO2001 are consistent with those published in the AEO2001. IEO2001 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in

497

Mastervolt International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mastervolt International Mastervolt International Jump to: navigation, search Name Mastervolt International Place Amsterdam, Netherlands Zip 1105AN Sector Solar Product Headquartered in the Netherlands, it manufactures electrical power solutions such as solar inverters and monitoring equipments. Coordinates 52.37312°, 4.893195° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.37312,"lon":4.893195,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

498

INTERNATIONAL OPEN GOVERNMENT DATA CONFERENCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPEN GOVERNMENT DATA CONFERENCE July 10 - 12, 2012 http://www.data.gov/conference Sponsored by Data.gov and the World Bank EMPOWERING PEOPLE "Sunlight is the best disinfectant." - Justice Louis Brandeis THE WORLD B ANK data.worldbank.org | @worldbankdata Welcome Attendees From Five Continents Around The World to the International Open Government Data Conference We Will Make History Together Thank You to our Speakers, International Guests Table of Contents: Conference Agenda Speakers Parking & Directions Restaurants Attractions p.02 p.08 p.37 p.38 p.39 InternatIonal open Government Data ConferenCe | 01 What to Know Meet Up and Make Connections Did you hear an interesting speaker? Find someone doing similar work? See a solution that you want to find out more about? Take

499

Neety International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Neety International Neety International Jump to: navigation, search Name Neety International Place Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India Zip 380014 Sector Solar Product Distributes solar products such as water heaters, power packs, lights and water purifiers. Coordinates 26.93077°, 80.66416° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.93077,"lon":80.66416,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

500

DEK International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DEK International DEK International Jump to: navigation, search Name DEK International Place Flemington, New Jersey Zip 8822 Product Electronics deposition company, whose technology has applications for PV. Coordinates 39.266175°, -80.132549° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.266175,"lon":-80.132549,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}