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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CX-004198: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004198: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lurance Canyon Burn Site Soil and Groundwater Site Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/14/2010 Location(s): New Mexico Office(s): Sandia Site Office Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to conduct additional environmental site characterization work at the Lurance Canyon Burn Site (Burn Site). A commercial drilling company would be utilized to complete site environmental investigation activities. Site characterization activities would also be supported by Environmental Restoration (ER) and Environmental Management personnel. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004198.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-004196: Categorical Exclusion Determination

2

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory technical areas to see if any further environmental cleanup actions are needed. If not, the Laboratory can apply to have these sites removed permanently from LANL's Hazardous Waste Permit, meaning that no further actions are needed at those sites. Among the 115 sites included in the Upper LA Canyon Project, 54 have been

3

Burns Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burns Burns Burns can result from everyday things and activities in your home. The most common causes of burns are from scalds (steam, hot bath water, hot drinks and foods), fire, chemicals, electricity and overexposure to the sun. Some burns may be more serious than others. The severity of the burn is based on the depth of the burn. First degree burns are the least severe, and third degree burns are the most severe. Call 911 or seek medical attention if you are unsure of how severe your burn is. All burns are susceptible to tetanus (lockjaw). Get a tetanus shot every 10 years. If your last shot was 5 years ago, talk to your doctor - you may need a booster shot. Causes of Burns: Scalds Scalding injuries and burns are caused by hot tap water, hot beverages and food, and steam.

4

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

septic tanks, sanitary and industrial waste lines, storm drains, incinerators, transformer sites, and areas in which soil has been contaminated. The Upper Los Alamos Canyon...

5

California Nuclear Profile - Diablo Canyon  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diablo Canyon" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

6

New York Canyon Stimulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "????No Go"??? decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

Raemy, B. Principal Investigator, TGP Development Company, LLC

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

Post-project appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haltiner, Jeffery. 1997. Martin Canyon Stream Stabilization:Williams & Associates, Ltd. 1999. Martin Canyon Creek StreamPost-Project Appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek Restoration

Wagner, Wayne; Roseman, Jesse

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hudson Canyon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canyon Canyon Jump to: navigation, search Name Hudson Canyon Facility Hudson Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Deepwater Wind Long Island Developer Deepwater Wind Location Atlantic Ocean NY Coordinates 40.151°, -73.53° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.151,"lon":-73.53,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Juniper Canyon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Juniper Canyon Juniper Canyon Jump to: navigation, search Name Juniper Canyon Facility Juniper Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Developer Iberdrola Energy Purchaser Merchant Location In Klickitat County 4.6 miles Southeast of Goldendale Coordinates 45.910223°, -120.224317° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.910223,"lon":-120.224317,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

Internal Tides in Monterey Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The M2 internal tide in Monterey Submarine Canyon is simulated using a modified version of the Princeton Ocean Model. Most of the internal tide energy entering the canyon is generated to the south, on Sur Slope and at the head of Carmel Canyon. ...

Rob A. Hall; Glenn S. Carter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Intense, Variable Mixing near the Head of Monterey Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microstructure survey near the head of Monterey Submarine Canyon, the first in a canyon, confirmed earlier inferences that coastal submarine canyons are sites of intense mixing. The data collected during two weeks in August 1997 showed ...

Glenn S. Carter; Michael C. Gregg

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

15

Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

16

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Burro Canyon Disposal Cell...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Burro Canyon Disposal Cell (007) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

17

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bodo Canyon Cell - 006  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bodo Canyon Cell - 006 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bodo Canyon Cell (006) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition:...

18

EIS-0219: F-Canyon Plutonium Solutions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Plutonium Solutions Stored in the F-Canyon Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC December 1, 1994 EIS-0219: Final Environmental Impact Statement F-Canyon Plutonium...

19

The burning bush  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISSN 1948-6596 The burning bush Fire in Mediterraneandiscussion. Pre- scription burning is used in many forest

Schwilk, Dylan W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ACCELERATED PILOT PROJECT FOR U CANYON DEMOLITION  

SciTech Connect

At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is underway on a first-of-a-kind project with the decommissioning and demolition of the U Canyon. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision for the final remediation of the canyon, CH2M HILL is combining old and new technology and techniques to prepare U Canyon for demolition. The selected remedial action called first for consolidating and grouting equipment currently in the canyon into lower levels of the plant (openings called cells), after which the cell galleries, hot pipe trench, ventilation tunnel, drains and other voids below the operating deck and crane-way deck levels will be filled with approximately 20,000 cubic yards of grout and the canyon roof and walls demolished down to the approximate level of the canyon deck. The remaining canyon structure will then be buried beneath an engineered barrier designed to control potential contaminant migration for a 500-year life. Methods and lessons learned from this project will set the stage for the future demolition of Hanford's four other canyon-type processing facilities.

KEHLER KL

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canyon Geothermal Facility Canyon Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility General Information Name Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility Facility Bear Canyon Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Clear Lake, California, Coordinates 38.762851116528°, -122.69217967987° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.762851116528,"lon":-122.69217967987,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Burning plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Considerations for Prescribed Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerations for Prescribed Burning NEW M EX ICO S TAE U N I V E R SI T YT Cooperative Extension prescribed burns ...................... 1 Fire effects ................................................ 3 Justification for burning ......................................... 3 Reclamation versus

Castillo, Steven P.

24

Spring Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spring Canyon Wind Farm Spring Canyon Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spring Canyon Wind Farm Facility Spring Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Near Peetz CO Coordinates 40.95366°, -103.166993° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.95366,"lon":-103.166993,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Threemile Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Threemile Canyon Wind Farm Threemile Canyon Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Threemile Canyon Wind Farm Facility Threemile Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer John Deere Wind Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Morrow County OR Coordinates 45.837861°, -119.701286° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.837861,"lon":-119.701286,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Three Mile Canyon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mile Canyon Mile Canyon Jump to: navigation, search Name Three Mile Canyon Facility Three Mile Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer Momentum RE Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Morrow County OR Coordinates 45.717419°, -119.502258° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.717419,"lon":-119.502258,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Hay Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hay Canyon Wind Farm Hay Canyon Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Hay Canyon Wind Farm Facility Hay Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Snohomish Public Utility District Location Near Moro OR Coordinates 45.479548°, -120.741491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.479548,"lon":-120.741491,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Rectified Barotropic Flow over a Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of an isolated canyon interrupting a long continental shelf of constant cross section on the along-isobath, oscillatory motion of a homogeneous, incompressible fluid is considered by employing laboratory experiments (physical models) ...

Nicolas Pernne; Jacques Verron; Dominique Renouard; Don L. Boyer; Xiuzhang Zhang

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Internal Waves in Monterey Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocity, temperature, and salinity profile surveying in Monterey Submarine Canyon during spring tide reveals an internal wave field almost an order of magnitude more energetic than that in the open ocean. Semidiurnal fluctuations and their ...

Eric Kunze; Leslie K. Rosenfeld; Glenn S. Carter; Michael C. Gregg

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation in Barrow Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Water flows across the shallow Chukchi Sea before reaching the Arctic Ocean, where it is a source of heat, freshwater, nutrients, and carbon. A substantial portion of Pacific Water is routed through Barrow Canyon, located in the northeast ...

E. L. Shroyer

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Wintertime Boundary Layer Structure in the Grand Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wintertime temperature profiles in the Grand Canyon exhibit a neutral to isothermal stratification during both daytime and nighttime, with only rare instances of actual temperature inversions. The canyon warms during daytime and cools during ...

C. David Whiteman; Shiyuan Zhong; Xindi Bian

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Physical Modeling of Flow Field inside Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow characteristics inside urban street canyons were studied in a laboratory water channel. The approaching flow direction was horizontal and perpendicular to the street axis. The street width was adjusted to form street canyons of aspect ...

Xian-Xiang Li; Dennis Y. C. Leung; Chun-Ho Liu; K. M. Lam

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.938333333333°, -117.53916666667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.938333333333,"lon":-117.53916666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.723055555556°, -118.08027777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.723055555556,"lon":-118.08027777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Red Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Red Canyon Wind Farm Red Canyon Wind Farm Facility Red Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Florida Power & Light Co. Location Borden TX Coordinates 32.95326011°, -101.215539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.95326011,"lon":-101.215539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Biglow Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biglow Canyon Wind Farm Biglow Canyon Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion/Portland General Electric Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.629003°, -120.605607° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.629003,"lon":-120.605607,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

A Laboratory Model of Urban Street-Canyon Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A circulating water channel is constructed to examine urban street-canyon flow. In the cases of an even-notch street canyon in which model buildings on both sides of the street have equal heights, one vortex is observed in model canyons with ...

Jong-Jin Baik; Rae-Seol Park; Hye-Yeong Chun; Jae-Jin Kim

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Microsoft Word - Badger Canyon CXWEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEC-4 KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum David Tripp Project Manager - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Badger Canyon Substation Radio Communication Tower Project Budget Information: Work Order 00253262 Task 03 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021: B1.7 "Acquisition, installation, operation, and removal of communication systems..." B1.19 "Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities..." Location: Badger Canyon Substation, Benton County, Washington - Township 8 North, Range 28 East, Section 1 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace a 40-foot monopole communication

39

Spring Cleaning. Calorie Burning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spring Cleaning. Calorie Burning. Laundry: 73 Dusting: 85 Mopping the Floor: 153 Washing the Car Painting: 161 (Estimate based on 150 lb person per 30 minutes, more calories burned if weigh more, fewer calories burned if weigh less) Allergy Sufferers' Survival Guide > Wash your hair before bed to avoid

Acton, Scott

40

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area (Redirected from Coyote Canyon Geothermal Resource Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.927105,"lon":-117.927225,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

42

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Trail Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trail Canyon Geothermal Project Trail Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.325555555556°, -114.29388888889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.325555555556,"lon":-114.29388888889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Panther Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panther Canyon Geothermal Project Panther Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.549444444444°, -117.57666666667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.549444444444,"lon":-117.57666666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Blue Canyon VI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VI VI Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Canyon VI Facility Blue Canyon VI Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDP Renewables North America LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Lawton OK Coordinates 34.8582°, -98.54752° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.8582,"lon":-98.54752,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03 Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Acid/Pueblo Canyon, NM Alternate Name(s): Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Plant (TA-45) Acid/Pueblo and Los Alamos Canyon NM.03-3 Location: Canyons in the Pajarito Plateau Region in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos, NM NM.03-3 Historical Operations: Late 1943 or early 1944, head of the south fork of Acid Canyon received untreated liquid waste containing tritium and isotopes of strontium, cesium, uranium, plutonium, and americium discharged from main acid sewer lines and subsequently from the TA-3 plutonium treatment plant. NM.03-3 Eligibility Determination: Radiological Survey(s): Verification Surveys NM.03-5 NM.03-6 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis and Federal Register Notice NM.03-2

48

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.927105,"lon":-117.927225,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Bittersweet and Burning Bush  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bittersweet and Burning Bush Nature Bulletin No. 250 December 25, 1982 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation...

50

EIS-0427: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona 27: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona EIS-0427: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposed wind energy generation project in Coconino County, Arizona, on privately owned ranch lands and trust lands administered by the Arizona State Land Department. The proposed project includes a new transmission tie-line that would cross lands administered by Coconino National Forest and interconnect with DOE's Western Area Power Administration's existing Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak transmission lines. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 11, 2012 EIS-0427: Record of Decision Interconnection of the Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County,

51

Sun tanning/burning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun tanning/burning Sun tanning/burning Name: Richardo Cossyleon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why doesn't the sun affect or burn people with dark pigment in their skin? Replies: Good question! The pigment, melanin, is more toward the surface of the upper skin layer and absorbs ultraviolet rays from the Sun or artificial sources. This absorption protects the lower layers from damage and inflammation (burning). A very dark skinned person may have over a 1000X the protection from UV compared to a fair skinned person. Fair skinned people should use sun-block lotions especially early in the warm season AND keep exposure to the sun, particularly at midday, to less than 30 min. Even if a person gets a good tan, the sun's UV will age the skin over time. It will get wrinkled and develop age lines, etc. after many years of exposure. Moderation is the key!

52

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Figure 1 Proposed 230-kV Towers and Rights-of-Way Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Bonneville Power Administration Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-4 Figure 1, continued CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. 32 Figure 1. Region map of wind projects proposed for Sherman County. D e s c h u t e s Ri ver C a n y o n C o l u m b ia R i v e r Hwy 19 H w y 2 0 6 H w y 9 7 I 8 4 Grass Valley Moro Wasco Biggs Arlington Condon Fourmile Canyon McDonald Ferry Biggs Junction Deschutes River Crossing The Dalles Complex RM 15.9-16.8 RM 40 Sherman Co Wasco Co G i l l i a m C o Gilliam Co Morrow Co Rowena Plateau Historic Columbia River Highway John D a y R i v e r C a n y o n P:\B\BPAX00000324\0600INFO\GS\arcmap\figures\visiblity_tech_report\fig2_visual_resources_or.mxd January 9, 2006

53

Open Burning Permit Events Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Burning Permit Events Management Form Revision Date: 09/29/2010 OpenBurningPermit.docx A Use being burned: (check all that apply) [ ] Small logs (less than 16 in. long) [ ] Finished Lumber________________________________ As the individual responsible for this event, I have read the attached Regulations for Open Burning. The sponsoring

Manning, Sturt

54

Nine Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Facility Nine Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Location Benton County Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

Blue Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Facility Blue Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown/Horizon Developer Zilkha Renewable/Kirmart Corp. Energy Purchaser Western Farmers' Electric Cooperative Location North of Lawton OK Coordinates 34.852678°, -98.551807° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.852678,"lon":-98.551807,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Environmental Justice » Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Services » Environmental Justice » Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site The George Washington University Environmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone Project Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site Feasibility and Community Support for Photovoltaic Array May 2012 The George Washington University Environmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone Project was an analysis of LM's efforts to support the installation of a commercial solar photovoltaic system at the former uranium mill site near Durango, Colorado. Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site More Documents & Publications EA-1770: Final Environmental Assessment Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site

57

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area (Redirected from Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

58

Canyon Bloomers, Inc Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canyon Bloomers, Inc Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Canyon Bloomers, Inc Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Canyon Bloomers, Inc Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Canyon Bloomers, Inc Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Buhl, Idaho Coordinates 42.5990714°, -114.7594946° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

59

Tidal Motion in Submarine CanyonsA Laboratory Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reasons for the large-amplitude tidal motion observed in oceanic submarine canyons have been explored with a laboratory experiment. A barotropic tide was forced in a stratified tank, containing continental shelf-slope topography into which a ...

Peter G. Baines

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Observations of the Internal Tide in Monterey Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from two shipboard experiments in 1994, designed to observe the semidiurnal internal tide in Monterey Canyon, reveal semidiurnal currents of about 20 cm s?1, which is an order of magnitude larger than the estimated barotropic tidal currents. ...

Emil T. Petruncio; Leslie K. Rosenfeld; Jeffrey D. Paduan

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Flow Variability in a North American Downtown Street Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous field and laboratory studies have indicated that flow and turbulence inside urban areas and, in particular, in street canyons, is very complex and is associated with wakes and vortices developing near buildings. However, a number of open ...

Petra Klein; James V. Clark

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

H CANYON PROCESSING IN CORRELATION WITH FH ANALYTICAL LABS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of radioactive chemical waste can be a complicated business. H Canyon and F/H Analytical Labs are two facilities present at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC that are at the forefront. In fact H Canyon is the only large-scale radiochemical processing facility in the United States and this processing is only enhanced by the aid given from F/H Analytical Labs. As H Canyon processes incoming materials, F/H Labs provide support through a variety of chemical analyses. Necessary checks of the chemical makeup, processing, and accountability of the samples taken from H Canyon process tanks are performed at the labs along with further checks on waste leaving the canyon after processing. Used nuclear material taken in by the canyon is actually not waste. Only a small portion of the radioactive material itself is actually consumed in nuclear reactors. As a result various radioactive elements such as Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium are commonly found in waste and may be useful to recover. Specific processing is needed to allow for separation of these products from the waste. This is H Canyon's specialty. Furthermore, H Canyon has the capacity to initiate the process for weapons-grade nuclear material to be converted into nuclear fuel. This is one of the main campaigns being set up for the fall of 2012. Once usable material is separated and purified of impurities such as fission products, it can be converted to an oxide and ultimately turned into commercial fuel. The processing of weapons-grade material for commercial fuel is important in the necessary disposition of plutonium. Another processing campaign to start in the fall in H Canyon involves the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel for disposal in improved containment units. The importance of this campaign involves the proper disposal of nuclear waste in order to ensure the safety and well-being of future generations and the environment. As processing proceeds in the fall, H Canyon will have a substantial number of samples being sent to F/H Labs. All analyses of these samples are imperative to safe and efficient processing. The important campaigns to occur would be impossible without feedback from analyses such as chemical makeup of solutions, concentrations of dissolution acids and nuclear material, as well as nuclear isotopic data. The necessity of analysis for radiochemical processing is evident. Processing devoid of F/H Lab's feedback would go against the ideals of a safety-conscious and highly accomplished processing facility such as H Canyon.

Weinheimer, E.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

63

5, 27912831, 2005 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction measurements of trace gas and aerosol particle emissions from biomass burning in Amazonia P. Guyon1 , G. Frank1. 2791 #12;ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning E-1008 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning Extension #12;#12;Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning John R. Weir Research Associate Natural Resource

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

65

Burning Plasma Developments Presented to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Developments Dale Meade Presented to VLT Program Advisory Committee UCLA December 4 and Burning Plasma Issues · NSO PAC Activities First Meeting July 20-21, 2001 at GA Action Items and Status Second Meeting January 17-18, 2001 at MIT Agenda items · FuSAC Recommendation on a burning plasma

66

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 3150 of 28,905 results. 41 - 3150 of 28,905 results. Download Reference Buildings by Building Type: Outpatient health care In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. http://energy.gov/eere/downloads/reference-buildings-building-type-outpatient-health-care-0 Download CX-004198: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lurance Canyon Burn Site Soil and Groundwater Site Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/14/2010 Location(s): New Mexico Office(s): Sandia Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004198-categorical-exclusion-determination

68

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

69

Microsoft Word - Final_NineCanyon_CommunicationTowerInstall_CX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2013 1, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Kelly Gardner, PMP Project Manager, TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Nine Canyon Substation Communication Tower Addition: 331800 McNary Sub Bus Tie Relay Replacements and 310427 McNary-Badger Canyon Transfer Trip Install Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 - Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Kennewick, Benton County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a 60-foot communications tower and associated communication equipment at the Benton County Public Utility District's Nine Canyon Substation in Benton County, Washington. The upgrade would involve replacing the

70

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Facility Nine Canyon III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest/RES Americas Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Review of the Diablo Canyon probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report details the review of the Diablo Canyon Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DCPRA). The study was performed under contract from the Probabilistic Risk Analysis Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Research, USNRC by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The DCPRA is a full scope Level I effort and although the review touched on all aspects of the PRA, the internal events and seismic events received the vast majority of the review effort. The report includes a number of independent systems analyses sensitivity studies, importance analyses as well as conclusions on the adequacy of the DCPRA for use in the Diablo Canyon Long Term Seismic Program.

Bozoki, G.E.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Bohn, M.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sabek, M.G. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Regulatory and Safety Center, Cairo (Egypt); Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J. [EQE Engineering, San Francisco, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.6375°, -120.605278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6375,"lon":-120.605278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

Blue Canyon II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Canyon II Wind Farm Blue Canyon II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Canyon II Wind Farm Facility Blue Canyon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser American Electric Power Location North of Lawton OK Coordinates 34.8582°, -98.54752° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.8582,"lon":-98.54752,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

74

Thirty-five years at Pajarito Canyon Site  

SciTech Connect

A history of the research activities performed at the Pajarito Canyon Site from 1946 to 1981 is presented. Critical assemblies described include: the Topsy assembly; Lady Godiva; Godiva 2; Jezebel; Flattop; the Honeycomb assembly for Rover studies; Kiwi-TNT; PARKA reactor; Big Ten; and Plasma Cavity Assembly.

Paxton, H.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Properties of Saltstone Prepared Containing H-Canyon Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saltstone slurries were prepared from solutions made from H-Canyon waste and evaluated for processing properties. Salt solutions prepared with a 1:1 ratio of Tank 50H simulant and H-Canyon blended waste produced slurries that met the processing requirements in Table 2 of the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). Additions of set retarder and antifoam were necessary to meet these processing requirements. The water to premix ratio used to achieve acceptable processing properties was 0.63. Slurries prepared solely with H-Canyon blended waste as the salt solution met the gel time and bleed water requirements, but did not set in the allotted time. Compressive strength samples prepared from the mix with acceptable processing properties had an average compressive strength of 814 psi (Samples with a compressive strength value of >200 psi are acceptable.). Analysis for mercury of the leachate of samples analyzed by the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) indicated a concentration of mercury in the leachate <0.11 mg/L (The limit set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for mercury to require treatment is 0.2 mg/L.). It is recommended that without further testing; Tank 50H be limited to no more than 50 wt% H-Canyon material. It is also recommended that prior to the transfer of Tank 50H to the Saltstone Processing Facility; a sample of the Tank 50H waste be evaluated for processing properties.

Cozzi, A

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan EIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glen Canyon LTEMP EIS Glen Canyon LTEMP EIS Glen Canyon Dam, a 1,300-MW water-storage and hydroelectric facility is located on the Colorado River upstream of the Grand Canyon. EVS is evaluating the effects of dam operations on the Colorado River. A comprehensive evaluation of Glen Canyon Dam operations and their effects on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon is being conducted by the Department of the Interior with EVS assistance. The Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan (LTEMP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) - the first such evaluation in over 15 years - will examine flow regimes to meet the goals of supplying water for communities, agriculture, and industry and will protect the resources of the Grand Canyon, while providing clean hydropower. The LTEMP EIS, which is expected to be completed by the end of 2013, will

77

Bending Burning Matches and Crumpling Burning Paper Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bending Burning Matches and Crumpling Burning Paper Zeki Melek Texas A&M University Department burning. Specifically, we can simulate the bending of burning matches, and the folding of burning paper interactively. 1 Introduction We present a simple method to increase the realism of the simu- lation of burning

Keyser, John

78

BLM Burns District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name BLM Burns District Office Place Hines, Oregon References BLM Burns District Office1 This article is a stub. You can help...

79

INHIBITION EFFECTS ON EXTINCTION OF POLYMER BURNING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON EXTINCTION OF POLYMER BURNING* W.J. Pitz R.F. SawyerQuantitative determinations of burning rates, extinctionlayer at the surface of a burning polymer. The char l ayer

Pitz, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steam Plant Biomass Facility Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Facility Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

New York Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York Canyon Geothermal Project New York Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.056111111111°, -118.01083333333° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.056111111111,"lon":-118.01083333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Blue Canyon V Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

V Wind Farm V Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Canyon V Wind Farm Facility Blue Canyon V Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon-EDPR Developer Horizon-EDPR Energy Purchaser Public Service of Oklahoma Location Caddo & Comanche Counties OK Coordinates 34.8582°, -98.54752° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.8582,"lon":-98.54752,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

New York Canyon Stimulation Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stimulation Geothermal Project Stimulation Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title New York Canyon Stimulation Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal System Demonstrations Project Type / Topic 2 EGS Demonstration Project Description The projects expected outcomes and benefits are; - Demonstrated commercial viability of the EGS-stimulated reservoir by generating electricity using fluids produced from the reservoir at economic costs. - Significant job creation and preservation and economic development in support of the Recovery Act of 2009. State Nevada Objectives Demonstrate the commercial application of EGS techniques at the New York Canyon (NYC) site in a way that minimizes cost and maximizes opportunities for repeat applications elsewhere.

84

Box Canyon Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Box Canyon Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Box Canyon Motel Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

85

Harbison Canyon, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harbison Canyon, California: Energy Resources Harbison Canyon, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.8203296°, -116.8300236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8203296,"lon":-116.8300236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

86

New York Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New York Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New York Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Lovelock, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

87

American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility American Canyon Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Napa County, California Coordinates 38.5024689°, -122.2653887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5024689,"lon":-122.2653887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Burning Plasma Support Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Plasma Support Research Program on Alcator C-Mod Presented by: Stephen M. Wolfe Alcator C-Mod Five Year Proposal Review MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center Cambridge, MA May...

89

The Dissolution of Desicooler Residues in H-Canyon Dissolvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of dissolution and characterization studies has been performed to determine if FB-Line residues stored in desicooler containers will dissolve using a modified H-Canyon processing flowsheet. Samples of desicooler materials were used to evaluate dissolving characteristics in the low-molar nitric acid solutions used in H-Canyon dissolvers. The selection for the H-Canyon dissolution of desicooler residues was based on their high-enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results showed that almost all of the enriched uranium will dissolve from the desicooler materials after extended boiling in one molar nitric acid solutions. The residue that contained uranium after completion of the extended boiling cycle consisted of brown solids that had agglomerated into large pieces and were floating on top of the dissolver solution. Addition of tenth molar fluoride to a three molar nitric acid solution containing boron did not dissolve remaining uranium from the brown solids. Only after boiling in an eight molar nitric acid-tenth molar fluoride solution without boron did remaining uranium and aluminum dissolve from the brown solids. The amount of uranium associated with brown solids would be approximately 1.4 percent of the total uranium content of the desicooler materials. The brown solids that remain in the First Uranium Cycle feed will accumulate at the organic/aqueous interface during solvent extraction operations. Most of the undissolved white residue that remained after extended boiling was aluminum oxide containing additional trace quantities of impurities. However, the presence of mercury used in H-Canyon dissolvers should complete the dissolution of these aluminum compounds.

Gray, J.H.

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01 Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Bayo Canyon, NM Alternate Name(s): Bayo Canyon Area Bayo Canyon (TA-10) Site NM.01-2 Location: Canyon in the Pajarito Plateau Region in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos, NM NM.01-3 Historical Operations: Used in 1944-1961 by the MED and later AEC at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a firing site for conventional and high-explosives experiments involving natural and depleted uranium, strontium, and lanthanum as a radiation source for blast diagnosis. NM.01-3 NM.01-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NM.01-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey NM.01-3 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis NM.01-5 NM.01-6 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

92

Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II Facility Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Location Benton County Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Category:Burns, OR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns, OR Burns, OR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Burns, OR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVHospital Burns OR Pa... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeHotel Burns OR ... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeOffice Burns OR... 69 KB SVMediumOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMediumOffice Burns O... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMidriseApartment Bur... 72 KB SVOutPatient Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVOutPatient Burns OR ... 69 KB SVPrimarySchool Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png

94

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Oklahoma State University June 2013 #12;#12;Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

95

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health Kees Kolff, MD, MPH April 21, 2012 #12;OUR #12;PT COGENERATION LLC A wood-burning cogeneration power plant - Generates electricity (for sale off paper making process, black and white liquor , sludge #12;SLASH BURNING Slash burned in 2008: Jefferson

96

FROM YEARNING TO BURNING Marshall Rosenbluth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM YEARNING TO BURNING Marshall Rosenbluth Possible broad-brush guidelines for "burning plasma" thinking December 6, 2000 The "yearn to burn" is well motivated. Most of us came into the fusion program for many years, the point at which science and the fusion energy goal converge is in a burning plasma

97

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Oklahoma State University September 2007 #12;#12;Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote

Debinski, Diane M.

98

Simulating infiltration tests in fractured basalt at the Box Canyon Site, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the unsaturated zone at the Idaho National Engineeringzone: Box Canyon Site, Idaho. , Rep. LBNL-42925, Lawrencethe U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, DOE

Unger, Andre J.A.; Faybishenko, Boris; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Simmons, Ardyth M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

SUBCHAPTER D. OUTDOOR BURNING Sec. 352.081. REGULATION OF OUTDOOR BURNING. (a) In this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBCHAPTER D. OUTDOOR BURNING Sec. 352.081. REGULATION OF OUTDOOR BURNING. (a) In this section measurement that takes into consideration the burning index, spread component, or ignition component court of a county by order may prohibit or restrict outdoor burning in general or outdoor burning

100

Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon wasmeters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitableThe Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant site in San Luis

Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hydrogen Burning on Magnetar Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the rate of diffusive nuclear burning for hydrogen on the surface of a "magnetar" (Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater or Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar). We find that hydrogen at the photosphere will be burned on an extremely rapid timescale of hours to years, depending on composition of the underlying material. Improving on our previous studies, we explore the effect of a maximally thick "inert" helium layer, previously thought to slow down the burning rate. Since hydrogen diffuses faster in helium than through heavier elements, we find this helium buffer actually increases the burning rate for magnetars. We compute simple analytic scalings of the burning rate with temperature and magnetic field for a range of core temperature. We conclude that magnetar photospheres are very unlikely to contain hydrogen. This motivates theoretical work on heavy element atmospheres that are needed to measure effective temperature from the observed thermal emission and constrains models of AXPs that rely on magnetar cooling through thick light element envelopes.

P. Chang; P. Arras; L. Bildsten

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

102

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

103

Small mammal study of Sandia Canyon, 1994 and 1995  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilize water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to gather baseline data of small mammal populations and compare small mammal characteristics within three areas of Sandia Canyon, which receives outfall effluents from multiple sources. Three small mammal trapping webs were placed in the upper portion of Sandia Canyon, the first two were centered in a cattail-dominated marsh with a ponderosa pine overstory and the third web was placed in a much drier transition area with a ponderosa pine overstory. Webs 1 and 2 had the highest species diversity indices with deer mice the most commonly captured species in all webs. However, at Web 1, voles, shrews, and harvest mice, species more commonly found in moist habitats, made up a much greater overall percentage (65.6%) than did deer mice and brush mice (34.5%). The highest densities and biomass of animals were found in Web 1 with a continual decrease in density estimates in each web downstream. There is no statistical difference between the mean body weights of deer mice and brush mice between sites. Mean body length was also determined not to be statistically different between the webs (GLM [deer mouse], F = 0.89, p = 0.4117; GLM [brush mouse], F = 2.49, p = 0.0999). Furthermore, no statistical difference between webs was found for the mean lean body masses of deer and brush mice (GLM [deer mouse], F = 2.54, p = 0.0838; GLM [brush mouse], F = 1.60, p = 0.2229). Additional monitoring studies should be conducted in Sandia Canyon so comparisons over time can be made. In addition, rodent tissues should be sampled for contaminants and then compared to background or control populations elsewhere at the Laboratory or at an off-site location.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE/EA-1521; Environmental Assessment for Spring Canyon Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA, Spring Canyon Wind Project ix EA, Spring Canyon Wind Project ix TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED......................................................................................................... 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................... 1 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED............................................................................................. 3 1.2.1 Federal Agency Action ............................................................................... 3 1.2.2 Applicant's Purpose and Need .................................................................... 3 1.3 SCOPING .................................................................................................................. 3

105

Debris flow deposition and reworking by the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Debris flow deposition and reworking by the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona Brian J Canyon, Arizona, transport coarse-grained sediment onto debris fans adjacent to the Colorado River and Monument Creeks using photogrammetry of aerial photography taken from 1965 to 2000 and supplemented

106

Ice Climbing in Clear Creek Canyon A climbing trip report by Glenn Murray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice Climbing in Clear Creek Canyon A climbing trip report by Glenn Murray SUMMARY: I climb ice in to ask about local climbing. The guys there told me there was ice nearby, in Clear Creek Canyon. I. Four pitches? Five? It was time to find a partner. The only ice climber I knew in Denver was a friend

107

Wind-Flow Patterns in the Grand Canyon as Revealed by Doppler Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many interesting flow patterns were found in the Grand Canyon by a scanning Doppler lidar deployed to the south rim during the 1990 Wintertime Visibility Study. Three are analyzed in this study: 1) flow reversal in the canyon, where the flow in ...

Robert M. Banta; Lisa S. Darby; Pirmin Kaufmann; David H. Levinson; Cui-Juan Zhu

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Open Burning (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Program Info Start Date 2003 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The New Mexico Environment Department's Air Quality Bureau regulates the open burning rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board. These rules are established to protect public health and welfare by establishing controls on pollution produced by open burning. Open burning is allowed for recreational and ceremonial purposes, for barbecuing, for heating purposes in fireplaces, for the noncommercial cooking of food for human consumption and for warming by small wood fires at construction

109

Green Canyon Hot Springs Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Green Canyon Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Newdale, Idaho Coordinates 43.8832463°, -111.6063483° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

110

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry surveys were conducted along the stream beds in both Olowalu and Ukumehame Canyons and on the coastal alluvial fans (Cox and Cuff, 1981a). The results of these surveys indicated that a few minor -nomalies might be present. However, the extreme topographic relief in the area did not permit sufficient coverage of the

111

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal 20121120ballstatepresentation.pdf More Documents...

112

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects on cellular burning structures in lean premixedAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixedthe turbulence of the burning process with the distribution

Bremer, Peer-Timo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Practical tip: Precooling topical calcineurin inhibitors tube; reduces burning sensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inhibitors tube; reduces burning sensation Sultan Al-salkhenaizan@hotmail.com Abstract Burning sensation at theuse, does reduce the burning sensation and enable most

Al-Khenaizan, Sultan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Patterns in biodiversity and distribution of benthic Polychaeta in the Mississippi Canyon, Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution of benthic polychaetes in the Mississippi Canyon was examined to evaluate impacts of environmental variables on species assemblages. Environmental variables considered included depth, bathymetric slope, hydrographic features, sediment grain size, food availability and sediment contamination. Samples were collected using GOMEX boxcorer. Density decreased with increasing depth exponentially. Diversity exhibited a unimodal pattern with depth with a maximum value in the intermediate depth range (about 1269 m). Deposit feeders were the most abundant feeding guild. Both the feeding guilds and faunal composition could be divided into three groups along the depth gradient: shallow (300 ? 800 m), intermediate (800 ? 1500 m) and deep (> 1500 m). Results of statistical analyses revealed that depth was the most important determinant in organizing polychaete assemblages in the study area. The Mississippi Canyon and the Central Transect (a non-canyon area) were found not contaminated by trace metals or Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments, although the highest PAHs concentration occurred at the head of the Canyon, MT1. The mean density was higher in the Mississippi Canyon (1668 N/m2) than in the Central Transect (979 N/m2), while the mean diversity in the Canyon (ES(100) = 26.9 ) was lower than the Central Transect (ES(100) = 33.1). Large amounts of terrigenous input from the Mississippi River to the Canyon could enhance polychaete density and accelerate competitive exclusion, and thus lead to lower diversity. The faunal composition was significantly different between the two transects, with higher species richness in the Mississippi Canyon (301 species). This could be attributed to structure complexity in the Mississippi Canyon. The distribution of feeding guilds was similar between two transects. The differences observed in polychaete assemblages between two transects may be largely due to high terrigenous sediment and organic matter input to the Mississippi Canyon by the Mississippi River.

Wang, Yuning

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sediment transport in the Mississippi Canyon: the role of currents and storm events on optical variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two modes of sediment transport were found to exist in the Mississippi Canyon: the offshelf transport of material in intermediate nepheloid layers originating at depths of 50-175 m and the resuspension and transport of material within the canyon. Large- and small-particle intermediate nepheloid layers were consistently present in the canyon axis and were not observed on the slope to either side of the canyon. The temporal variability in currents, temperature, and particulate matter was measured at a station located at 300 m depth in the canyon axis during consecutive deployments in May-July and August-November 1998. Two moored current meters, one at 3.5 mab and one at 50 mab, recorded flow, while thermographs, a light-scattering sensor, and sediment traps gathered information about the characteristics of the flow and movement of particulate matter. Currents in the upper Mississippi Canyon were oscillatory, with alternating periods of up-canyon and down-canyon flow. Harmonic analysis revealed that the diurnal tidal signal was the dominant component of the flow. Currents were most intense at 3.5 mab. Mean current speed at this depth was approximately 8 cm s? during both deployments, reaching maximum speeds of over 50 cm s?. Current velocities generated sufficient shear stress to resuspend canyon floor sediments about 30% of the time during both deployments. During the second mooring deployment, Hurricane Georges passed 150 km NE of the study site. Near-bottom current velocities and temperature fluctuations were intensified. As the hurricane passed, maximum current speed reached 68 cm s? and a temperature decrease of approximately 7 degrees C occurred in less than 2 hours. Conditions were favorable for sediment resuspension approximately 50% of the time during the five days of hurricane influence. Further evidence for sediment resuspension was provided by similarities between canyon floor core samples and sediment trap collections.

Burden, Cheryl A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase II Wind Farm Phase II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.6375°, -120.605278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6375,"lon":-120.605278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

117

Biomass Burning: A Driver for Global Change!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning includes the burning of the world''s vegetation---forests, savannas, and agricultural lands---to clear the land and change its use. Only in the past decade have researchers realized the important contributions of biomass burning to the ...

Levine J. S.; III W. R. Cofer; Jr D. R. Cahoon; Winstead E. L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

7, 80178033, 2007 burning-tropopause  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 8017­8033, 2007 Biomass burning-tropopause mixing J. Brioude et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Mixing between a stratospheric intrusion and a biomass burning plume J. Brioude1 , O. R. Cooper1.brioude@noaa.gov) 8017 #12;ACPD 7, 8017­8033, 2007 Biomass burning-tropopause mixing J. Brioude et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

MFE Burning Plasmas Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFE Burning Plasmas and Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs) Bick Hooper LLNL Presentation power requires: · A burning plasma experiment · An advancing portfolio of ICCs · Plasma physics unified Improved Configurations Magnetic Configurations Knowledge Base Burning Plasma Phys. & Tech. Knowledge Base

120

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial and land use. MODIS active fire detections 2000-2006 for Southern California 2001-2004 mean annual burned (bottom), expressed as fraction of grid cell that burns each year. From Giglio et al. (2005), Atmos. Chem

Christian, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

122

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

123

Fish Passage Assessment: Big Canyon Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the fish passage assessment as outlined as part of the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project as detailed in the CY2003 Statement of Work (SOW). As part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP), this project is one of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) many efforts at off-site mitigation for damage to salmon and steelhead runs, their migration, and wildlife habitat caused by the construction and operation of federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The proposed restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed follow the watershed restoration approach mandated by the Fisheries and Watershed Program. Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program vision focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects. We strive toward maximizing historic ecosystem productive health, for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations. The Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program (NPTFWP) sponsors the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project. The NPTFWP has the authority to allocate funds under the provisions set forth in their contract with BPA. In the state of Idaho vast numbers of relatively small obstructions, such as road culverts, block thousands of miles of habitat suitable for a variety of fish species. To date, most agencies and land managers have not had sufficient, quantifiable data to adequately address these barrier sites. The ultimate objective of this comprehensive inventory and assessment was to identify all barrier crossings within the watershed. The barriers were then prioritized according to the amount of habitat blocked at each site and the fish life history stages impacted. This assessment protocol will hopefully prove useful to other agencies and become a model for use in other watersheds.

Christian, Richard

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microsoft Word - canyon disposition rpt 2 01 05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Efforts to Department of Energy Efforts to Dispose of Hanford's Chemical Separation Facilities DOE/IG-0672 February 2005 -2- benefits of using the facility as a disposal site. Instead, the study focused on characterizing and performing technical analysis on the structural integrity of the facility. In studying the merits of the Initiative, the Department did not ensure that the cost study was sufficient in scope, and once completed, never reviewed the study to determine whether it was accurate and complete or adequately supported the preferred alternative. As a result of not thoroughly evaluating the feasibility of using canyon facilities for waste disposal, the Department may not realize savings ranging up to $500 million. This report highlights the importance of the Department's oversight of its contractors' activities to

125

RECALIBRATION OF H CANYON ONLINE SPECTROPHOTOMETER AT EXTENDED URANIUM CONCENTRATION  

SciTech Connect

The H Canyon online spectrophotometers are calibrated for measurement of the uranium and nitric acid concentrations of several tanks in the 2nd Uranium Cycle.[1] The spectrometers, flow cells, and prediction models are currently optimized for a process in which uranium concentrations are expected to range from 0-15 g/L and nitric acid concentrations from 0.05-6 M. However, an upcoming processing campaign will involve 'Super Kukla' material, which has a lower than usual enrichment of fissionable uranium. Total uranium concentrations will be higher, spanning approximately 0-30 g/L U, with no change in the nitric acid concentrations. The new processing conditions require the installation of new flow cells with shorter path lengths. As the process solutions have a higher uranium concentration, the shorter path length is required to decrease the absorptivity to values closer to the optimal range for the instrument. Also, new uranium and nitric acid prediction models are required to span the extended uranium concentration range. The models will be developed for the 17.5 and 15.4 tanks, for which nitric acid concentrations will not exceed 1 M. The restricted acid range compared to the original models is anticipated to reduce the measurement uncertainty for both uranium and nitric acid. The online spectrophotometers in H Canyon Second Uranium Cycle were modified to allow measurement of uranium and nitric acid for the Super Kukla processing campaign. The expected uranium concentrations, which are higher than those that have been recently processed, required new flow cells with one-third the optical path length of the existing cells. Also, new uranium and nitric acid calibrations were made. The estimated reading uncertainties (2{sigma}) for Tanks 15.4 and 17.5 are {approx}5% for uranium and {approx}25% for nitric acid.

Lascola, R

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mercury Vapor At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mercury Vapor At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry surveys were conducted along the stream beds in both Olowalu and Ukumehame Canyons and on the coastal alluvial fans (Cox and Cuff, 1981a). The results of these surveys

127

Field Mapping At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Mapping At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic mapping (Diller, 1982) in this area has identified several trachitic and alkalic dikes, plugs, and vents within the area bounded by the canyons (Fig. 21). The frequency distribution of those dikes in the two

128

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

129

Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 January 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis H Canyon, above, and HB-Line are scheduled to soon begin dissolving and purifying plutonium currently stored at the Savannah River Site to demonstrate the capability to produce oxide material that meets the Mixed Oxide Facility (MOX) feedstock specifications. The production process at MOX, which is now under construction, will eventually create fuel pellets for U.S. commercial reactor fuel assemblies.

130

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

131

Micro-Earthquake At New York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At New York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location New York Canyon Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing

132

Record of Decision - Klondike III/ Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project - 10-25-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project DECISION The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE) 1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects,

133

Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon May 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Jim Giusti, DOE (803) 952-7697 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS (803) 646-6075 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov AIKEN, S.C. - The F Canyon box remediation program, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project at Savannah River Site (SRS), has come online to process legacy transuranic (TRU) waste for off-site shipment and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geological repository in New Mexico. The $40-million facility will process approximately 330 boxes containing TRU waste with a radiological risk higher than seen in the rest of the Site's original 5,000-cubic-meter

134

On Line Spectrophotometric Measurement of Uranium and Nitrate in H Canyon  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the on-line instrumentation developed by the Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center in support of Highly Enriched Uranium Blend Down processing in H Canyon.

Lascola, R.J.

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Impulsively Started Flow in a Submarine Canyon: Comparison of Results from Laboratory and Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intercomparisons have been made of results from laboratory experiments and a numerical model for the flow in the vicinity of an idealized submarine canyon located along an otherwise continuous shelf. Motion in the rotating and continuously ...

Nicolas Prenne; J. William Lavelle; David C. Smith IV; Don L. Boyer

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Numerical Study of Flow and Pollutant Dispersion Characteristics in Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow and pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons are investigated using a two-dimensional numerical model with the k? turbulent closure scheme. It is shown that the flow field is characterized mainly by the number and intensity of ...

Jong-Jin Baik; Jae-Jin Kim

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Transport of a Power Plant Tracer Plume over Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and air-quality data, as well as surface tracer concentration values, were collected during 1990 to assess the impacts of Navajo Generating Station (NGS) emissions on Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) air quality. These data have ...

Jun Chen; Robert Bornstein; Charles G. Lindsey

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

MSHA issues Crandall Canyon investigation report, fines owners $1.6 million  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper summarises the findings of the Mine Safety and Health Administration report (available at www.msha.gov) into the death of six people at the Crandall Canyon Mine on 6 August 2007.

NONE

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Internal Tides and Mixing in a Submarine Canyon with Time-Varying Stratification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time variability of the energetics and turbulent dissipation of internal tides in the upper Monterey Submarine Canyon (MSC) is examined with three moored profilers and five ADCP moorings spanning FebruaryApril 2009. Highly resolved time ...

Zhongxiang Zhao; Matthew H. Alford; Ren-Chieh Lien; Michael C. Gregg; Glenn S. Carter

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fire modeling for Building 221-T - T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared by Hughes Associates, Inc. to document the results of fire models for building 221-T Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel. Backup data is contained in document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-010, Rev. 0.

Oar, D.L.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Aspects of the Load Circulation at the Grand Canyon during the Fall Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmosphere and circulation of air within, above, and around the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River was studied from an instrumented aircraft and from ground-based instruments in September and October 1984. Several patterns were identified. ...

L. P. Stearns

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Numerical Study of Thermal Effects on Flow and Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates thermal effects on the flow and pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons. A two-dimensional numerical model with a k? turbulent closure scheme is developed, and the heat transfer between the air and the building wall ...

Jae-Jin Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sediment-Driven Downslope Flow in Submarine Canyons and Channels: Three-Dimensional Numerical Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of submarine canyons and channels in sediment-driven downslope flow (sediment plumes) is examined, using a three-dimensional, rotational numerical model that couples the hydrodynamics and sediment transport. The model domain consists of ...

Jochen Kmpf; Hermann Fohrmann

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Cross-Shelf Exchange Driven by Oscillatory Barotropic Currents at an Idealized Coastal Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are used to study on-shelf transport of dense water by oscillatory barotropic currents incident upon an isolated coastal canyon. The physical system is a laboratory-scale annulus in which forcing is provided by an ...

D. B. Haidvogel

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

LaboratoryNumerical Model Comparisons of Canyon Flows: A Parameter Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated set of laboratory and numerical-model experiments has been conducted to understand the development of residual circulation surrounding a coastal canyon and to explore further the degree to which laboratory experiments can provide ...

Don L. Boyer; Dale B. Haidvogel; Nicolas Prenne

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

147

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

In Situ Burning of Oil Spills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... burns, the Teflon filters were weighed and sealed in Petri dishes, while the ... terrain, solar heating and surface friction creates a tur- bulent wind field ...

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Performance Culture of Burning Man.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Theatre in the United States for the last twenty years has been evolving in scope by way of a cultural phenomenon known as Burning Man. (more)

Clupper, Wendy Ann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

AIAA 2001-0339 INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIAA 2001-0339 INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO PLATEAU BURNING OF COMPOSITE and Astronautics, Inc. with permission. INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO PLATEAU BURNING OF COMPOSITE; Fellow AIAA §Senior Research Engineer Abstract The plateau burning behavior of composite solid

Seitzman, Jerry M.

152

Tertiary oxidation in Westwater Canyon member of Morrison formation  

SciTech Connect

Hematitic oxidation in the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member of the Morrison Formation extends along the outcrop from the Pipeline fault northeast of Gallup, New Mexico, to the San Mateo fault north of Grants, New Mexico. The hematitic sandstone forms a broad lobe in the subsurface to a depth of 2,400 ft (730 m). The downdip edge of this sandstone arcs eastward from northeast Church Rock through Crownpoint, and southeastward to the west edge of the Ambrosia Lake district. The red sandstone is bordered on the downdip side by a band of limonitic oxidation, which interfingers with reduced sandstones basinward. The limonitic oxidation forms a relatively narrow band along the north and west sides of the hematitic lobe but expands progressively in an east and southeast direction. Weak limonitic oxidation, as indicated by the absence of pyrite and by a bleached to faint yellowish-gray color, appears to extend from the San Mateo fault eastward under Mount Taylor to the Rio Puerco of the east. The hematitic oxidation is epigenetic and is believed to be of early Miocene to late Pliocene age. The limonitic oxidation follows the present ground-water flow pattern and probably dates from late Pliocene to the Holocene. The oxidation patterns are important in uranium exploration because the hematitic area is essentially barren, whereas the limonitic areas contain ore deposits that are in the process of being destroyed by oxidation.

Saucier, A.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Explaining the relationship between prehistoric agriculture and environment at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chaco Canyon, the Pueblo settlement of New Mexico, represents one of the major cultural developments in the prehistoric Southwest. Between A.D. 900 and A.D. 1100 Chaco reached its peak of cultural florescence. This period was characterized by considerable building activities, appearance of Chaco outliers, and the construction of an extensive road system. After this period a dramatic decline in population and a cessation of building activity took place. Archaeologists call this phenomenon abandonment. In general, development and abandonment of Chaco Canyon coincided with changes in climatic conditions. Between A.D. 900 and A.D. 1100 there was a gradual increase in effective moisture and warmer temperature which proved favorable for agriculture there. With these optimal climatic conditions,development of Chaco Canyon witnessed a great increase in population. However, the Chaco Canyon region could not support a large population indefinitely because of its agricultural marginality. To solve this population-resource imbalance, Chacoan farmers of this period intensified their agricultural activities by constructing water control systems such as check dams, contour terraces, canals, and ditches. These measures worked for a while and the influence of Chaco Canyon was felt in the political, economic, and religious life of a broad geographic region. However, summer moisture began to decrease in the years between A.D. 1130 and A.D. 1180. This decrease became a full scale drought from A.D. 1157 to A.D. 1179 that seems to have severely affected agriculture and wild food resources available for the Chacoans. In addition, the Chacoan water control system designed to capture runoff probably proved to be inadequate as a buffering mechanism. Consequently, population at Chaco Canyon began to decrease and the region was abandoned after A.D. 1140. In an attempt at explaining the specific abandonment of Chaco Canyon, this thesis focuses on relationship between prehistoric agriculture and environment.

Gang, G-Young

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Visualizing Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning in Supernovae Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae bubble-s.jpeg Flame ignition in type Ia supernovae leads to isolated bubbles of burning buoyant fluid. As a...

155

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY AND VEGETATION IN INTERIOR ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY likely to change vegetation type. Finally, vegetation recovery, estimated using a remotely-sensed................................................................................6 Chapter 2. Mapping Burn Severity Using Satellite Remote Sensing..........................8

Ruess, Roger W.

156

FESAC Panel on Burning Plasmas 1.What scientific issues should be addressed by a burning plasma physics experiment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FESAC Panel on Burning Plasmas Charge 1.What scientific issues should be addressed by a burning of using various magnetic confinement concepts in studying burning plasma physics? As a part of your

157

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR),...

158

The QSE-Reduced Nuclear Reaction Network for Silicon Burning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Iron and neighboring nuclei are formed by silicon burning in massive stars before core collapse and during supernova outbursts. Complete and incomplete silicon burning is (more)

Parete-Koon, Suzanne T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

OLIGOMERIZATION OF LEVOGLUCOSAN IN PROXIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOLS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere and therefore, affect global climate. Biomass burning aerosols are generally (more)

Holmes, Bryan J.

160

UNCORRECTED 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCORRECTED PROOF 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial 3 and subsistence groups as: Lisa Naughton-Treves et al., Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Flow Patterns at the Ends of a Street Canyon: Measurements from the Joint Urban 2003 Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Joint Urban 2003 experiment held in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, an eastwest-running street canyon was heavily instrumented with wind sensors. In this paper, the flow patterns at the street canyon ends are investigated by looking at sonic ...

Suhas U. Pol; Michael J. Brown

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Microsoft Word - CX-BadgerCanyon-RichlandNo1_WoodPoles_FY13.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2013 7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Pasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Walker Miller Electrical Engineer - TPCF-W RICHLAND Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements on the Badger Canyon-Richland #1 transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2670 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities. Location: City of Richland, Benton County, WA Transmission Line/ROW Structure # Township Range Section County, State Badger Canyon-Richland #1 4/9 and 4/10 9N 28E 26 Benton, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA, at the expense of the City of Richland, proposes to raise structures 4/9 and 4/10 of the Badger Canyon-Richland #1 115-kilovolt transmission line to

163

Green Canyon Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Canyon Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Green Canyon Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Green Canyon Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Newdale, Idaho Coordinates 43.8832463°, -111.6063483° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

164

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.04) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

165

Attachments for fire modeling for Building 221-T, T Plant canyon deck and railroad tunnel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this attachment is to provide historical information and documentation for Document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-008 Rev 0, ``Fire Modeling for Building 221-T--T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel``, dated September 29, 1994. This data compilation contains the following: Resumes of the Technical Director, Senior Engineer and Junior Engineer; Review and Comment Record; Software Files; CFAST Input and Output Files; Calculation Control Sheets; and Estimating Sprinkler Actuation Time in the Canyon and Railroad Tunnel. The T Plant was originally a fuel reprocessing facility. It was modified later to decontaminate and repair PuRex process equipment.

Oar, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wood-Burning Heating System Deduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute allows individual taxpayers a deduction for the purchase and installation of a wood-burning heating system. The deduction is equal to the total cost of purchase and installation for...

167

Clean Burn Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

developer planning to build a 60m gallons per year (227.12m litres per year) bioethanol plant in Raeford, North Carolina. References Clean Burn Fuels LLC1 LinkedIn...

168

Canyon dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative to the FB-Line scrap recovery dissolver was desired for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) residues from the plutonium reduction process due to the potential generation of hydrogen gas concentrations above the lower flammability limit. To address this concern, a flowsheet was developed for the F-Canyon dissolvers. The dissolvers are continually purged with nominally 33 SCFM of air; therefore the generation of flammable gas concentrations should not be a concern. Following removal of crucible fragments, small batches of the remaining sand fines or slag chunks containing less than approximately 350 grams of plutonium can be dissolved using the center insert in each of the four annular dissolver ports to address nuclear criticality safety concerns. Complete dissolution of the sand fines and slag chunks was achieved in laboratory experiments by heating between 75 and 85 degrees Celsius in a 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M (hydrogen) fluoride solution. Under these conditions, the sand and slag samples dissolved between 1 and 3 hours. Complete dissolution of plutonium and calcium fluorides in the slag required adjusting the dissolver solution to 7.5 wt% aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN). Once ANN was added to a dissolver solution, further dissolution of any plutonium oxide (PuO2) in successive charges was not practical due to complexation of the fluoride by aluminum. During the laboratory experiments, well mixed solutions were necessary to achieve rapid dissolution rates. When agitation was not provided, sand fines dissolved very slowly. Measurement of the hydrogen gas generation rate during dissolution of slag samples was used to estimate the amount of metal in the chunks. Depending upon the yield of the reduction, the values ranged between approximately 1 (good yield) and 20% (poor yield). Aging of the slag will reduce the potential for hydrogen generation as calcium metal oxidizes over time. The potential for excessive corrosion in the dissolvers was evaluated using experimental data reported in the literature. Corrosion data at the exact flowsheet conditions were not available; however, the corrosion rate for 304L stainless steel (wrought material) corrosion coupons in 10M nitric acid/0.01M hydrofluoric acid at 95 degrees Celsius was reported as 21 mils per year. If the fluoride in the dissolver is complexed with aluminum, the corrosion rate will decrease to approximately 5 mils per year.

Rudisill, T.S.; Gray, J.H.; Karraker, D.G.; Chandler, G.T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Simulation of a Burning Plasma C. Kessel, PPPL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of a Burning Plasma Experiment C. Kessel, PPPL UFA Workshop on Burning Plasma Science, December 11-13, 2000 #12;FIRE Burning Plasma Discharge Simulation with TSC ELMy H-mode, N, R=2.0 m, Ip=6.5 MA #12;Burning Plasma Experiment Simultaneously Needs · L-H mode transition · Non

170

BURNING PLASMA NEXT STEPS: DISCUSSION OF KEY DEVELOPMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNING PLASMA NEXT STEPS: DISCUSSION OF KEY DEVELOPMENTS Gerald A. Navratil Columbia University/FESAC Burning Plasma Strategy Dec 2002 NRC/NAS Interim Report on Burning Plasmas Jan 30, 2003 DOE of the physics of burning plasma, advance fusion technology, and contribute to the development of fusion energy

171

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames P.-T. Bremer1, G. Weber2 flames subject to different levels of tur- bulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn to quantitatively correlate the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly

172

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

173

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames Peer-Timo Bremer, Member levels of turbulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn in cells separated by locally the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly segmented and selected

Pascucci, Valerio

174

Effects of Range Burning on Kansas Flint Hills Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Range Burning on Kansas Flint Hills Soil CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND JOHN BRUCE WYRILL, III Highlight: Two tallgrass prairie areas burned annually for 20 (grazed) nnd 48 (un. grazed) years ar-spring burned ungrared plots were generally higher in soil pH, organic ma~fer, and K than late-spring burned

Owensby, Clenton E.

175

Functional design criteria, Project W-059, B Plant Canyon ventilation upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the essential functions and requirements to be included in the design of the proposed B Plant canyon exhaust system upgrade. The project will provide a new exhaust air filter system and isolate the old filters from the airstream.

Roege, P.E.

1995-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

Observations of Thermally Driven Wind Jets at the Exit of Weber Canyon, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermally driven valley-exit jets were investigated at Utahs Weber Canyon, a main tributary of the Great Salt Lake basin. An intensive measurement campaign during JulySeptember 2010 supplemented longer-term measurements to characterize the wind ...

Morgan F. Chrust; C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Influence of Canyon Winds on Flow Fields near Colorado's Front Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A network of sodars was operated in the late summer and fall of 1993 to monitor the occurrence of nocturnal winds from a canyon in Colorado's Front Range near the Rocky Flats Plant and to determine the influence of those winds on the flow fields ...

J. C. Doran

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Dependence of Canyon Winds on Surface Cooling and External Forcing in Colorado's Front Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric katabatic flow in the foothills of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains has been monitored by a network of towers and sodars for several years as part of the ASCOT program. The dependence of the outflow from Coal Creek Canyon on ...

Richard L. Coulter; Paul Gudiksen

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Amphipods of the deep Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico: ecology and bioaccumulation of organic contaminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In five summer cruises during the period 2000-2004, seventy-four box cores were collected from eleven locations from the Mississippi Canyon (480- 2750m, northern Gulf of Mexico), and an adjacent transect (336-2920) to understand the community structure and trophic function of amphipods and for measuring the bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, (PAHs). Amphipods were discovered to be an important component of the macrofauna of the Mississippi Canyon (40 % of the total faunal abundance). Seventy two species, belonging to nineteen families, were collected from the study area with 61 species from the canyon and only 38 species from the non-Canyon transect. The head of the canyon (480m) was dominated by dense mats (15,880 ind/m2) of a new amphipod (Ampelisca mississippiana). The logarithm of the amphipod abundance decreased linearly with depth. The species diversity (H`) exhibited a parabolic pattern with a maximum at 1100m. The differences in amphipod abundances and biodiversities were correlated with the variation in the amount of available organic matter. The depression in diversity in the canyon head is thought to be competitive exclusion resulting from the dominance by A.mississippiana, but the high species richness is presumed to be a function of the structural complexity of the canyon. Annual secondary production of A. mississippiana was 6.93 g dry wt m-2, based on size-frequency method and corresponding to an estimated univoltine generation from a regression model. The production/biomass ratio (P/B) was 3.11. Production of this magnitude is comparable to shallow marine ampeliscids but are high for the depauperate northern Gulf of Mexico. The effect of the organic contaminants and the bioavailability to the amphipods was determined through measuring the bioaccumulation of the PAHs. The distribution of PAHs in sediments was different from the distribution in the organisms suggesting preferential uptake/depuration or uptake from pore or bottom waters. The average bioaccumulation factor (4.36 2.55) and the biota sediment accumulation factor (0.240.13) for the total PAHs by the ampeliscids were within the range reported for other benthic invertebrates. The average bioaccumulation factors were highest for dibenzothiophenes (up to 132) and alkylated PAHs and lowest for parent high molecular weight PAHs.

Soliman, Yousria Soliman

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biology Team of ESH-20 (the Ecology Group) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies measure water quality parameters and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from sampling sites within the upper canyon stream. Reports by Bennett and Cross discuss previous aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands the previous findings. The Biology Team collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates monthly at three sampling stations within Sandia Canyon in 1995. The two upstream stations occur near a cattail (Typha latifolia) dominated marsh downstream from outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. The third station is approximately 1.5 miles downstream from the outfalls within a mixed conifer forest. All water chemistry parameters measured in Sandia Canyon during 1995 fell within acceptable State limits and scored in the {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} ranges when compared to an Environmental Quality Index. However, aquatic macroinvertebrates habitats have been degraded by widespread erosion, channelization, loss of wetlands due to deposition and stream lowering, scour, limited acceptable substrates, LANL releases and spills, and other stressors. Macroinvertebrate communities at all the stations had low diversities, low densities, and erratic numbers of individuals. These results indicate that although the stream possesses acceptable water chemistry, it has reduced biotic potential. The best developed aquatic community occurs at the sampling station with the best habitat and whose downstream location partially mitigates the effects of upstream impairments.

Cross, S.; Nottelman, H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

182

Fire tests and analyses of a rail cask-sized calorimeter.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three large open pool fire experiments involving a calorimeter the size of a spent fuel rail cask were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories Lurance Canyon Burn Site. These experiments were performed to study the heat transfer between a very large fire and a large cask-like object. In all of the tests, the calorimeter was located at the center of a 7.93-meter diameter fuel pan, elevated 1 meter above the fuel pool. The relative pool size and positioning of the calorimeter conformed to the required positioning of a package undergoing certification fire testing. Approximately 2000 gallons of JP-8 aviation fuel were used in each test. The first two tests had relatively light winds and lasted 40 minutes, while the third had stronger winds and consumed the fuel in 25 minutes. Wind speed and direction, calorimeter temperature, fire envelop temperature, vertical gas plume speed, and radiant heat flux near the calorimeter were measured at several locations in all tests. Fuel regression rate data was also acquired. The experimental setup and certain fire characteristics that were observed during the test are described in this paper. Results from three-dimensional fire simulations performed with the Cask Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) fire code are also presented. Comparisons of the thermal response of the calorimeter as measured in each test to the results obtained from the CAFE simulations are presented and discussed.

Figueroa, Victor G.; Lopez, Carlos; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Computational Engineering Analysis LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Greiner, Miles (University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Thermal Effects on Turbulent Flow and Dispersion in and above a Street Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on turbulent flow and dispersion in and above an idealized street canyon with a street aspect ratio of 1 are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Each of upwind building wall, street ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Siegfried Raasch; Marcus Oliver Letzel

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Meteorological Processes Affecting the Transport of Emissions from the Navajo Generating Station to Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1990 Navajo Generating Station (NGS) Winter Visibility Study, a network of surface and upper-air meteorological measurement systems was operated in and around Grand Canyon National Park to investigate atmospheric processes in complex ...

Charles G. Lindsey; Jun Chen; Timothy S. Dye; L. Willard Richards; Donald L. Blumenthal

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Properties of the Wind Field within the Oklahoma City Park Avenue Street Canyon. Part I: Mean Flow and Turbulence Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocity data were obtained from sonic anemometer measurements within an eastwest-running street canyon located in the urban core of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign. These data were used to explore the ...

M. A. Nelson; E. R. Pardyjak; J. C. Klewicki; S. U. Pol; M. J. Brown

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Characterization of the Thermal Structure inside an Urban Canyon: Field Measurements and Validation of a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of measurement campaigns are analyzed to investigate the thermal structure in an urban canyon and to validate a simplified model simulating the air and surface temperatures from surface energy budgets. Starting from measurements at ...

Lorenzo Giovannini; Dino Zardi; Massimiliano de Franceschi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Observations of a Terrain-Forced Mesoscale Vortex and Canyon Drainage Flows along the Front Range of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations taken during the February 1991 Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Winter Validation Study are used to describe the wind field associated with a terrain-forced mesoscale vortex and thermally forced canyon drainage flows ...

David H. Levinson; Robert M. Banta

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratory measurements of biomass-burning emissions: 1.tar balls: Particles from biomass and biofuel burning, J.Eleuterio (2005), A review of biomass burning emissions part

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesia since 1960,variability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toand Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. Fig. 2 Comparisons of burning-velocity predictions withcurve), when an experimental burning velocity (points) of 53and calculated laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-

Grcar, Joseph F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept  

SciTech Connect

Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition and Growth concept, introduced by Lee and Tarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homogeneized burn rate needs to account for three mesoscale physical effects (i) the density of burnt hot spots, which depends on the lead shock strength; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by hot spots, which depends on the local deflagration speed; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent hot spots. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable {lambda}(t) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t)/{ell}{sub hs}, rather than by xpecifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale {ell}{sub hs} is the average distance between hot spots, which is proportional to [N{sub hs}(P{sub s})]{sup -1/3}, where N{sub hs} is the number density of hot spots activated by the lead shock. The reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t) = {line_integral}{sub 0}{sup t} D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single hot spot, where D is the deflagration speed and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. They have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Microsoft Word - CX-Franklin-BadgerCanyonGrandview-RedMtnsDisconnectSwitch_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2012 8, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Franklin-Badger Canyon and Grandview-Red Mountain switch replacements PP&A Project No.: 2,349 / 2,350 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Benton County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace disconnect switches and related equipment on the Franklin-Badger Canyon No.2 and Grandview-Red Mountain No.1 115- kilovolt transmission lines. The switch stands will be replaced in the same locations as the existing structures, and related load break equipment will be upgraded in-kind to existing. Both

194

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary S-1 Summary S-1 Summary In this Summary: * Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Affected Environment * Impacts This summary covers the major points of the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project proposed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project includes constructing a new double-circuit 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in northern Sherman County, Oregon. The new line would connect the Klondike III Wind Project and the Biglow Canyon Wind Farm to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. The project would also require expansion of BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation and a new 230-kV substation to integrate the two wind projects. As a federal agency, BPA is required by the National Environmental Policy Act

195

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Record of Decision, October 25, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE)1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects, BPA will build and operate a 12-mile long, 230-kilovolt (kV) double-circuit transmission line between the wind projects and BPA's new 230-kV John Day Substation in Sherman County, Oregon. BPA will also expand its existing 500-kV John Day Substation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

196

Potential of breccia pipes in the Mohawk Canyon Area, Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hualapai Indian Reservation is on the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona. Hundreds of solution-collapse breccia pipes crop out in the canyons and on the plateaus of northern Arizona. The pipes originated in the Mississippian Redwall Limestone and stoped their way upward through the upper Paleozoic strata, locally extending into the Triassic Moenkopi and Chinle Formations. The occurrence of high-grade U ore, associated with potentially economic concentrations of Cu, Ag, Pb, Zn, V, Co, and Ni in some of these pipes, has stimulated mining activity in northern Arizona despite the depressed market for most of these metals. Two breccia pipes, 241, and 242, have significant mineralized rock exposed on the Esplanade erosion surface; unfortunately, their economic potential is questionable because of their inaccessibility at the bottom of Mohawk Canyon. All warrant further exploration.

Wenrich, K.J.; Billingsley, G.H.; Van Gosen, B.S.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biomass Burning and the Production of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a source of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. In addition, biomass burning is a source of chemically active gases, including carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitric oxide. These gases, along ...

Levine J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and diesel fuel? About 19.64 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO 2) are produced from burning a gallon of gasoline ...

199

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

97 Fig 7.3 Cross shaped brass brand used for burnFig 7.21 3-D drawing of the brass brand used for controlledfor imaging burns[10]. A brass brand heated to 315C was

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Laser ignition for lean-burn engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory have successfully operated a laser-spark lean-burn natural gas reciprocating engine. Development of lean-burn engines is driven by demand for higher...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DISSOLUTION OF FB-LINE METAL RESIDUES CONTAINING BERYLLIUM IN H-CANYON  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scrap materials containing plutonium (Pu) metal from FB-Line vaults are currently being dissolved in HB-Line for subsequent disposition through the H-Canyon facility. However, milestone and schedule commitments may require the dissolution of material containing Pu and beryllium (Be) metals in H-Canyon. To support this option, a flowsheet for dissolving Pu and Be metals in H-Canyon was demonstrated using a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.3 M fluoride (F{sup -}). The F{sup -} was added as calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The dissolving solution also contained 2.5 g/L boron (B), a nuclear safety contingency for the H-Canyon dissolver, and 3.9 g/L iron (Fe) to represent the dissolution of carbon steel cans. The solution was heated to 90-95 C during the 8 h dissolution cycle. Dissolution of the Be metal appeared to begin as soon as the samples were added to the dissolver. Clear, colorless bubbles generated on the surface were observed and were attributed primarily to the generation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas. The generation of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas was also evident from the color of the solution. Essentially all of the Pu and Be dissolved during the first hour of the dissolution as the solution was heated to 90-95 C. The amount of residual solids collected following the dissolution was < 2% of the total metal charged to the dissolver. Examination of residual solids by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the largest dimension of the particles was less than 50 {micro}m with particles of smaller dimensions being more abundant. Energy dispersive spectra from spots on some of the particles showed the solids consisted of a small amount of undissolved material, corrosion products from the glassware, and dried salts from the dissolving solution.

Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Risk Assessment: Volume 2: Application to Diablo Canyon Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to steam generator tubing can impair its ability to adequately perform the required safety functions in terms of structural stability and leakage. This report describes the Diablo Canyon Power Plant application of a method for calculating risk for severe accidents involving steam generator tube failure. The method helps utilities determine risks associated with application of alternate repair criteria and/or operation with degraded tubing.

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dissolution of Plutonium Scrub Alloy and Anode Heel Materials in H-Canyon  

SciTech Connect

H-Canyon has a ''gap'' in dissolver operations during the last three months of FY03. One group of material to be processed during the gap is pre-existing scrub alloy material. There are 14 cans of material containing approximately 3.8 kilograms of plutonium. Of the 14 cans, it was anticipated that four cans contain salts, two cans contain anode heel materials, and eight cans contain scrub alloy buttons. H-Canyon desires to process the materials using a flowsheet similar to the SS and C (sand, slag and crucible) dissolution flowsheet used in F-Canyon. The materials will be loaded into carbon steel cans and then placed into aluminum metal charging bundles. Samples were sent to Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for characterization and flowsheet testing -- four MSE salts, two anode heels, and seven scrub alloy buttons. SRTC dissolved and characterized each of the samples. Two of them, originally thought to be MSE salts, were found to be graphite mold materials and were unsuitable for processing in H-Canyon. Characterization studies confirmed that the identification of the remaining items as MSE salts, scrub alloy buttons, and anode heel materials was correct. The MSE salts and anode heels solids are comprised primarily of plutonium, potassium, sodium and chloride. Both the MSE salts and anode heels left behind small amounts of residual solids. The scrub alloy buttons are comprised primarily of plutonium and aluminum. The solids dissolve readily with light, effervescent gas generation at the material surface and only trace amounts of NOx generation. Of the seven button samples, four dissolved completely. Two button samples contained small amounts of tantalum that did not dissolve. The last of the seven scrub alloy samples left a trace amount of residual plutonium solids. It is anticipated that the presence of undissolved fissile material is a function of where the sample was located relative to the button surface.

PIERCE, RA

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

Annotated bibliography for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) with emphasis on the Grand Canyon population.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Glen Canyon Dam is a hydroelectric facility located on the Colorado River in Arizona that is operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) for multiple purposes including water storage, flood control, power generation, recreation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife. Glen Canyon Dam operations have been managed for the last several years to improve conditions for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other ecosystem components. An extensive amount of literature has been produced on the humpback chub. We developed this annotated bibliography to assist managers and researchers in the Grand Canyon as they perform assessments, refine management strategies, and develop new studies to examine the factors affecting humpback chub. The U.S. Geological Survey recently created a multispecies bibliography (including references on the humpback chub) entitled Bibliography of Native Colorado River Big Fishes (available at www.fort.usgs.gov/Products/data/COFishBib). That bibliography, while quite extensive and broader in scope than ours, is not annotated, and, therefore, does not provide any of the information in the original literature. In developing this annotated bibliography, we have attempted to assemble abstracts from relevant published literature. We present here abstracts taken unmodified from individual reports and articles except where noted. The bibliography spans references from 1976 to 2009 and is organized in five broad topical areas, including: (1) biology, (2) ecology, (3) impacts of dam operations, (4) other impacts, and (5) conservation and management, and includes twenty subcategories. Within each subcategory, we present abstracts alphabetically by author and chronologically by year. We present relevant articles not specific to either the humpback chub or Glen Canyon Dam, but cited in other included reports, under the Supporting Articles subcategory. We provide all citations in alphabetical order in Section 7.

Goulet, C. T.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of Zinc Addition During Cycle 9 at Diablo Canyon Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies have shown that zinc addition to primary coolant can mitigate primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 and reduce radiation fields in PWRs. This report documents experience with zinc addition during Cycle 9 at Diablo Canyon Power Plant Unit 1 (DCPP-1), operated by Pacific Gas & Electric. This project evaluated the effect of zinc addition on PWSCC initiation and propagation. It also examined the impact of zinc addition on radiation fields and fuel cladding deposition...

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

Operational Readiness Review Final Report For F-Canyon Restart. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

An independent WSRC Operational Readiness Review was performed for the restart of Phase 1 processing in F-Canyon, Building 221-F. Readiness to restart the Second Plutonium Cycle process and solvent recovery was assessed. The ORR was conducted by an ORR board of ten members with the support of a subject matter expert. The chairman and four members were drawn from the Operational Safety Evaluation Department, ESH& QA Division; additional members were drawn from other WSRC divisions, independent of the F-Canyon operating division (NMPD). Based on the results of the readiness verification assessments performed according to the ORR plan and the validation of pre-restart corrective actions, the WSRC independent ORR Board has concluded that the facility has achieved the state of readiness committed to in the Restart Plan. Also, based on the scope of the ORR, it is the opinion of the board that F-Canyon Phase 1 processes can be restarted without undue risk to the safety of the public and onsite workers and without undue risk to the environment.

McFarlane, A.F.; Spangler, J.B.

1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

Environmenal analysis of the Bayo Canyon (TA-10) Site, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The radiological survey of the old TA-10 site in Bayo Canyon found low levels of surface contamination in the vicinity of the firing sites and subsurface contamination in the old waste disposal area. The three alternatives proposed for the site are: (1) to take no action; (2) to restrict usage of the area of subsurface contamination to activities that cause no subsurface disturbance (minimal action); and (3) to remove the subsurface conamination to levels below the working criteria. Dose calculations indicate that doses from surface contamination for recreational users of the canyon, permanent residents, and construction workers and doses for workers involved in excavation of contaminated soil under the clean up alternative are only small percentages of applicable guidelines. No environmental impacts are associated with either the no-action or minimal action alternatives. The impact associated with the cleanup alternative is small, especially considering that the area already has been affected by the original TA-10 decommissioning action, but nevertheless, the preferred alternative is the minimal action alternative, where 0.6 hectare of land is restricted to surface activities. This leaves the rest of the canyon available for development with up to 400 homes. The restricted area can be used for a park, tennis courts, etc., and the /sup 90/Sr activity will decay to levels permitting unrestricted usage in about 160 y.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Hansen, W.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, November 1993--October 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. Reports by Bennett (1994) and Cross (1994) discuss previous EST aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands those findings. EST collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon from November 1993 through October 1994. The two upstream stations are located below outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. Some water quality parameters are different at the first three stations from those expected of natural streams in the area, indicating degraded water quality due to effluent discharges. The aquatic habitat at the upper stations has also been degraded by sedimentation and channelization. The macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and unstable communities. In contrast, the two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. The two lower stations have increased macroinvertebrate diversity and stable communities, further indications of downstream water quality improvement.

Cross, S.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1 , J. B. Bell1 , S. Dong2 , and S. E. Woosley2 ABSTRACT We develop a one-dimensional theoretical model for thermals burning in Type Ia supernovae based for the burning and for the expansion of the thermal due to changes in the background stratification found

Bell, John B.

210

Burning Plasma Physics Technical Subgroup of the Magnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Burning Plasma Physics Technical Subgroup of the Magnetic Fusion Concepts Working Group 1999 Woolley, Stewart Zweben. #12;2 Contents 1. Introduction 3 2. Burning Plasma Physics Issues 8 2.1 Energetic and physics integration 22 3. Technical Readiness for a Burning Plasma Experiment 26 3.1 Background

211

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fusion). ARIES Group #12;Advanced Toroidal Physics Fusion Plasma Conditions Burning Plasma Physics 1.0 0.5 Alpha Energy #12;Magnetic Fusion Science Issues - Strongly Coupled in a Fusion (Burning) Plasma Improved

212

Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE D. Meade Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II General Atomics San Diego, CA May for a Next Step Experiment in Magnetic Fusion · Compact High Field Approach - General Parameters · Burning, Madison, WI · Charge for First and Second meetings Scientific value of a Burning Plasma experiment

213

Guanine tautomerism revealed by UVUV and IRUV hole burning spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guanine tautomerism revealed by UV­UV and IR­UV hole burning spectroscopy E. Nir Department spectroscopy. 1-methylguanine, in which the Keto­Enol tautomerism is blocked, shows hole burning spectra from hole burning SHB by using two counter- propagating dye laser pulses with a delay of about 150 ns

de Vries, Mattanjah S.

214

Stellar Burning Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar Burning and Mixing Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank Timmes (T-6); and Rob Hueckstaedt and Rob Coker (X-2); fherwig@lanl.gov D uring most phases of stellar evolution, nuclear burning nuclear burning in convective regions in which mixing and nuclear energy release proceeds on comparable

Herwig, Falk

215

Electromagnetically induced transparency over spectral hole-burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetically induced transparency over spectral hole-burning temperature in a rare the spectral hole-burning temperature. The transmission of the probe laser beam is increased by a factor of exp over the spectral hole-burning temperature in a rare-earth­doped solid represents important progress

Shahriar, Selim

216

Supercritical Burning of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Droplet with Detailed Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical Burning of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Droplet with Detailed Chemistry J. DAOU,* P with diameter less than I pm vaporize before burning. A quasi-steady-like diffusion flame is then established is considered; temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber have a weak influence on the burning time

Heil, Matthias

217

Burning of high Tc bridges M. E. Gaevski,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning of high Tc bridges M. E. Gaevski,a) T. H. Johansen, Yu. Galperin,a) and H. Bratsberg February 1997; accepted for publication 24 September 1997 Burning of superconducting thin film bridges containing extended defects magneto-optic investigation is sufficient to locate the incipient burning region

Johansen, Tom Henning

218

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT@nmsu.edu #12;i HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT OF BROOM both burning and spraying with herbicide. However, the broom snakeweed was not eradicated, and numbers

Johnson, Eric E.

219

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

220

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars By J OHN C. LATTANZ I O 1 , CHERYL A. FROST 1 state of knowledge about the phenomenon of Hot Bottom Burning as seen in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. This is illustrated with some results from new 6M fi stellar models. 1. Introduction and Motivation Hot Bottom Burning

Lattanzio, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas Robert Rosner The University of Chicago Dec. 12, 2000 Austin, TX (http://flash.uchicago.edu) #12;Burning Plasma Science Workshop Austin ¥ Plasma conditions ¥ Overview of plasma physics issues for astrophysics ¥ Specific examples #12;Burning

222

Greyscale Photograph Geometry Informed by Dodging and Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greyscale Photograph Geometry Informed by Dodging and Burning Carlos Phillips and Kaleem Siddiqi the same negative may vary in inten- sity values due, in part, to the liberal use of dodging and burning to linear dodging and burning. 1 Introduction Photographs are often used as test data in the computer vision

Siddiqi, Kaleem

223

Prescribed Burning in the Kings River Ecosystems Project Area: Lessons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prescribed Burning in the Kings River Ecosystems Project Area: Lessons Learned1 David S. Mc burning was initiated in 1994 in two 32,000-acre watersheds in the Kings River District of the Sierra various effects of these fires. Approximately 11,900 acres of prescription burns were completed by the end

Standiford, Richard B.

224

Burning Plasma Physics -The Next Frontier Three Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Physics - The Next Frontier Three Options (same scale) ITER-FEATFIRE IGNITOR US in Magnetic Fusion · Burning Plasma Performance Considerations · Compact High Field Approach - General for strengthening the base fusion sciences program 2. Directs DOE to submit a plan for a U.S. Burning Plasma

225

B. Gonalves, Workshop on "Burning Plasma" Physics and Simulation Tarragona, 3-4 July, 2005 Burning Plasma Diagnostics on JET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Gonçalves, Workshop on "Burning Plasma" Physics and Simulation Tarragona, 3-4 July, 2005 Burning;B. Gonçalves, Workshop on "Burning Plasma" Physics and Simulation Tarragona, 3-4 July, 2005 on "Burning Plasma" Physics and Simulation Tarragona, 3-4 July, 2005 3.5 MeV n 14 MeV DT 3.5 MeV n 14 MeV DT

226

An Interactive Simulation Framework for Burning Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simulation framework to integrate several aspects of the combustion and burning process in a unified and modular manner. A simple three gas flame model is used to simulate a combustion process, while air motion is simulated as a single moving fluid. Solid objects inside the simulation domain can catch fire and start burning. Heat information is transferred from the fluid simulator to a solid simulator, while the solid simulator injects fuel into the fluid simulation. We also present a simple yet effective method for modeling of object decomposition under combustion using level set methods. The interaction between modules is presented as well as a discussion of fluid-solid coupling. All simulation modules run together at interactive rates, enabling the user to tweak the simulation parameters and setup for desired behavior 1. 1

Zeki Melek; John Keyser

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Role of Fusion Product Measurements in Physics Understanding of a Burning Plasma (A25955)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of Int. Workshop On Burning Plasma Diagnostics, Varenna, Italy, 2007International Workshop on Burning Plasma Diagnostics Varenna, IT, 2007999614195

Boivin, R.L.

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

228

Operation Redwing. Project 4. 1. Chorioretinal burns  

SciTech Connect

This Redwing project was designed to furnish supplemental information on the requirements for protection against retinal burns, using both rabbits and monkeys as experimental animals. Chorioretinal burns were produced by various segments of the thermal pulse. This was accomplished by two series of time-fractionating shutters. The first group, the early closing shutters, were open at time zero and closed at increasing intervals of time. The second series, the delayed-opening shutters, were closed at time zero and subsequently opened for preselected time increments during the flash. The feasibility of protection by fixed-density optical filters was explored. Two types of protective electronic shutters were field tested. Additional objectives were to: (1) determine whether blink reflexes would prevent chorioretinal burns; (2) ascertain which portions of the time-intensity pulse can produce thermal injury to the retina and choroid of the eye; (3) determine the time required for blink reflex in rabbits and monkeys exposed to the extreme light intensity of the nuclear detonations; (4) explore the feasibility of ocular protection by means of fixed-density optical filters or combinations of filters; and (5) tests, under field conditions, protective shutter devices that are in the developmental state and are designed to close more rapidly than the blink reflex.

Fixott, R.; Pickering, J.E.; Williams, D.B.; Brown, D.V.L.; Rose, H.W.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

U.S. BURNING PLASMA ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The national U.S. Burning Plasma Organization (USBPO) was formed to provide an umbrella structure in the U.S. fusion science research community. Its main purpose is the coordination of research activities in the U.S. program relevant to burning plasma science and preparations for participation in the international ITER experiment. This grant provided support for the continuing development and operations of the USBPO in its first years of existence. A central feature of the USBPO is the requirement for broad community participation in and governance of this effort. We concentrated on five central areas of activity of the USBPO during this grant period. These included: 1) activities of the Director and support staff in continuing management and development of the USBPO activity; 2) activation of the advisory Council; 3) formation and initial research activities of the research community Topical Groups; 4) formation of Task Groups to perform specific burning plasma related research and development activities; 5) integration of the USBPO community with the ITER Project Office as needed to support ITER development in the U.S.

Raymond J. Fonck

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Agricultural Research l September 20114 ThreeyearsaftertheDeepFireBurn,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis. "The type of aerial survey we did can be repeated to keep checking on whether the pesticides Sagebrush Using this survey method, called Very Large Scale Aerial (VLSA) imagery, Agricultural Research in drainage areas and up canyon slopes. During a 2008 aerial survey of streamside vegetation in Nevada, Joe

231

BIOMASS BURNING IN THE AMAZON: LINKS BETWEEN BURNING, SCIAMACHY TRACE GASES, AND AEROSOL AND SURFACE PROPERTIES FROM THE ORAC-AATSR RETRIEVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS BURNING IN THE AMAZON: LINKS BETWEEN BURNING, SCIAMACHY TRACE GASES, AND AEROSOL@atm.ox.ac.uk AEROSOL AND GAS PROPERTIESSEASONALITY OF BURNING Biomass burning in the Amazon shows strong seasonal counts are generally highest up to 3 months after the burning of ground. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ESA

232

Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray  

SciTech Connect

This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Internal structure of the Kern Canyon Fault, California: a deeply exhumed strike-slip fault  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deformation and mineral alteration adjacent to a 2 km long segment of the Kern Canyon fault near Lake Isabella, California are studied to characterize the internal structure of the fault zone and to understand the development of fault structure and constitution and the mechanical and chemical processes responsible for them. The 140 km long Kern Canyon fault (KCF) is a fault of 15 km right-lateral separation exhumed from seismogenic depth that cuts batholithic and metamorphic rocks of the southern Sierra Nevada. The fault consists of at least three distinct phases: an early phase of lower-greenschist-grade ductile shear with an S-C' phyllonite, a subsequent, dominant phase of brittle faulting characterized by a through-going zone of cataclastic rock, and a late stage of minor faulting along discontinuous, thin, hematitic gouge zones. The S-C' fabric and subsidiary fault-slip data indicate that both the phyllonitic and cataclastic zones are approximately vertical and strike-slip; slip lineations within the hematitic gouge suggest oblique-slip. The phyllonite zone trends N20-40E and accommodated ~175 m of separation. The cataclastic zone cuts the phyllonite, trends N21E, and consists of foliated and non-foliated cataclasites; it accommodates the majority of displacement along the fault. Abundant veins and fluid-assisted alteration in the rock surrounding the fault zone attest to the presence of fluids of evolving chemistry during both ductile and brittle faulting. Mass balance calculations indicate quartz loss during phyllonite faulting and imply that the fault system was open and experienced a negative change in volume during phyllonite faulting. Mesoscale and microscale fracture intensities decrease with log distance from the foliated cataclasites and approach a relatively low level at approximately 500 m. The internal structure of the Kern Canyon fault is similar to other large displacement faults in that it consists of a broad zone of fractured and altered rock and a narrow zone of intense cataclasis.

Neal, Leslie Ann

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Seismic stratigraphy and salt tectonics of the Alaminos Canyon area, Gulf of Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alaminos Canyon region is located at the change in the bathymetric trend between the slope and rise. Over 6,435 km of migrated seismic reflection profiles were analyzed to produce two structure and two isopach maps. Maps of the seafloor morphology, salt structure, and suprasalt sediments indicate the majority of the slope is covered by a shallow salt canopy. The salt structure map indicates that the Alaminos Canyon study area represents a transition from a semi-continuous salt sheet in the east to a less continuous salt sheet in the western margin. Salt lobe canopies are located within the eastern and western margins of the study area, while the central region represents a transition zone between the two lobate canopies. The sediment isochron maps show that the salt has played an important role in the sediment deposition and the formation of intraslope basins. The salt sheet interacted with slope sediment deposition by acting as a barrier to downslope sediment transport and by influencing the direction of mass transport. The uplift of the salt has formed topographic lows in which sediment is transported from the shelf beyond the slope. Within the study area, intraslope basins consist of remnants of submarine canyons blocked by diapiric uplift and closed depressions formed by subsidence in response to salt withdrawal. These intraslope basins have trapped thick deposits of sediment, thereby reducing the sediment transport beyond the slope region. Pleistocene sealevel fluctuations appear to be the dominant force in the depostional record. As the lowering of relative sealevel ended, the transport of sandy material decreased and hemipelagic sedimentation increased. Eustatic sealevel fluctuations during the Pleistocene led to cyclic seismic depostional sequences throughout the study area.

Mechler, Suzanne Marie

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

SURVEY OF LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYON FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION AND RADIOASSAY TESTS RUN ON SEWER-WATER SAMPLES AND WATER AND SOIL SAMPLES TAKEN FROM LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYONS  

SciTech Connect

Chemical sewers and sanitary lines draining the Tech Area, D. P. Site, CMR-12 Laundry, and surrounding residential areas flow into Pueblo and Los Alamos Canyon streams. In order to determine the extent and sources of radioactive contamination in these localities, fluid samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from the ground surrounding the sewer exits, and water and soil samples from selected spots in or near each of the two canyon streams were collected and analyzed for polonium and . plutonium. (W.D.M.)

Kingsley, W.H.; Fox, A.; Tribby, J.F.

1947-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Toward Net Energy Buildings: Design, Construction, and Performance of the Grand Canyon House  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grand Canyon house is a joint project of the DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. National Park Service and is part of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 13 (Advanced Solar Low-Energy Buildings). Energy consumption of the house, designed using a whole-building low-energy approach, was reduced by 75% compared to an equivalent house built in accordance with American Building Officials Model Energy Code and the Home Energy Rating System criteria.

Balcomb, J. D.; Hancock, C. E.; Barker, G.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

B Plant canyon sample TK-21-1 analytical results for the final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for the TK-21-1 sample collected from the B Plant Canyon on February 18, 1998. The sample was analyzed in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan for B Plant Solutions (SAP) (Simmons, 1997) in support of the B Plant decommissioning project. Samples were analyzed to provide data both to describe the material which would remain in the tanks after the B Plant transition is complete and to determine Tank Farm compatibility. The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

Steen, F.H.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Neutrino-Accelerated Hot Hydrogen Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the effects of significant electron anti-neutrino fluxes on hydrogen burning. Specifically, we find that the bottleneck weak nuclear reactions in the traditional pp-chain and the hot CNO cycle can be accelerated by anti-neutrino capture, increasing the energy generation rate. We also discuss how anti-neutrino capture reactions can alter the conditions for break out into the rp-process. We speculate on the impact of these considerations for the evolution and dynamics of collapsing very- and super- massive compact objects.

Chad T. Kishimoto; George M. Fuller

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced reservoir characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The reservoir characterization, geologic modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

Murphy, M.B.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Mechanistic Reactive Burn Modeling of Solid Explosives  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a computational framework for reactive burn modeling of solid explosives and the development of a test case where physical mechanisms represent RDX or RDX-based materials. The report is a sequel to LA-13794-MS, ''A Unifying Framework for Hot Spots and the Ignition of Energetic Materials,'' where we proposed a new approach to the building of a general purpose model that captures the essential features of the three primary origins of hot-spot formation: void collapse, shear banding, friction. The purpose of the present report is to describe the continuing task of coupling the unifying hot-spot model to hydrodynamic calculations to develop a mechanistic reactive burn model. The key components of the coupling include energy localization, the growth of hot spots, overall hot-spot behavior, and a phase-averaged mixture equation of state (EOS) in a Mie-Grueneisen form. The nucleation and growth of locally heated regions is modeled by a phenomenological treatment as well as a statistical model based on an exponential size distribution. The Mie-Grueneisen form of the EOS is one of many possible choices and is not a critical selection for implementing the model. In this report, model calculations are limited to proof-of-concept illustrations for shock loading. Results include (1) shock ignition and growth-to-detonation, (2) double shock ignition, and (3) quenching and reignition. A comparative study of Pop-plots is discussed based on the statistical model.

Y.Horie; Y.Hamate; D.Greening

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modeling Deep Burn TRISO Particle Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. First principles calculations are being used to investigate the critical issue of fission product palladium attack on the SiC coating layer. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel. Kinetic Monte Carlo techniques are shedding light on transport of fission products, most notably silver, through the carbon and SiC coating layers. The diffusion of fission products through an alternative coating layer, ZrC, is being assessed via DFT methods. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Schuck, Paul C [ORNL; Rudin, Sven [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wills, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wirth, Brian D. [University of California, Berkeley; Kim, Sungtae [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Impact of biomass burning on the atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fire has played an important part in biogeochemical cycling throughout most of the history of our planet. Ice core studies have been very beneficial in paleoclimate studies and constraining the budgets of biogeochemical cycles through the past 160,000 years of the Vostok ice core. Although to date there has been no way of determining cause and effect, concentration of greenhouse gases directly correlates with temperature in ice core analyses. Recent ice core studies on Greenland have shown that significant climate change can be very rapid on the order of a decade. This chapter addresses the coupled evolution of our planet`s atmospheric composition and biomass burning. Special attention is paid to the chemical and climatic impacts of biomass burning on the atmosphere throughout the last century, specifically looking at the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Information from ice core measurements may be useful in understanding the history of fire and its historic affect on the composition of the atmosphere and climate.

Dignon, J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of injuries caused by flame/flash burns[23, 24]. OtherDeep partial IIb Deep III Flame, chemical, electrical, hotliquids with high viscosity Flame, electrical, chemical,

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Burns Harbor, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Burns Harbor, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

245

'Live Burns' in Spartanburg, SC, Will Benefit Research and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in Spartanburg, SC, battle a 'test burn' of an abandoned house in an ... organizations will turn abandoned wood-frame, single-family houses near ...

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Biomass burning : particle emissions, characteristics, and airborne measurements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning started to attract attention since the last decade because of its impacts on the atmosphere and the environmental air quality, as well as (more)

Wardoyo, Arinto Yudi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Concepts for Minor Actinide Burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, New fuel cycle strategies entail advanced nuclear fuel concepts. This especially applies for the burning of minor actinides in a fast reactor cycle...

248

Burning Man: Transforming Community through Countercultural Ritual Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis will examine the countercultural event called Burning Man through the lens of the ritual process. Through the personal narratives of six main collaborators (more)

McCaffrey, Jessica

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

C. Langton1, D. Kosson2 and H. Burns1  

G. Flach, R. Seitz, S. Marra, H. Burns, SRNL DOE-EM Project Manager: Pramod Mallick CBP Project Support Provided by EM-30 Contact Information

250

Detection of Gas Hydrates in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon from Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate is a potential energy source that has recently been the subject of much academic and industrial research. The search for deep-water gas hydrate involves many challenges that are especially apparent in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, where the sub-seafloor is a complex structure of shallow salt diapirs and sheets underlying heavily deformed shallow sediments and surrounding diverse minibasins. Here, we consider the effect these structural factors have on gas hydrate occurrence in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon blocks of the Gulf of Mexico. This was accomplished by first mapping the salt and shallow deformation structures throughout the region using a 2D grid of seismic reflection data. In addition, major deep-rooted faults and shallow-rooted faults were mapped throughout the area. A shallow sediment deformation map was generated that defined areas of significant faulting. We then quantified the thermal impact of shallow salt to better estimate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) thickness. The predicted base of the GHSZ was compared to the seismic data, which showed evidence for bottom simulating reflectors and gas chimneys. These BSRs and gas chimneys were used to ground-truth the calculated depth of the base of GHSZ. Finally, the calculated GHSZ thickness was used to estimate the volume of the gas hydrate reservoir in the area after determining the most reasonable gas hydrate concentrations in sediments within the GHSZ. An estimate of 5.5 trillion cubic meters of pure hydrate methane in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon was obtained.

Murad, Idris

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Carbon Steel and Magnesium Oxide Dissolution for H-Canyon Process Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H Area Operations is planning to process plutonium-contaminated uranium metal scrap in its efforts to de-inventory excess nuclear materials. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) performed flowsheet development to support the decision to process the scrap in H-Canyon using 2M nitric acid (HNO3) / 0.025M potassium fluoride (KF) and 2 g/L boron. The scrap will be charged to the H-Canyon dissolver via a stainless steel charging bundle with a carbon steel end cap that must dissolve in an appropriate time frame. Experimental work was performed with a range of potential materials to be used to fabricate the bundle end cap. Testing was conducted with samples of metal plate, wire, cans, rods, and rivets to assess their dissolution characteristics in 2M HNO3/ 0.025M KF and 2 g/L boron. Experiments also measured the amount of hydrogen gas generated during carbon steel dissolution using the above dissolver solution. Each material type and its associated dissolution characteristic relate to specific bundle end cap designs being considered. Supplemental studies were conducted to evaluate the behavior and effect of magnesium oxide (MgO) sand on dissolution of uranium metal in 2M HNO3/ 0.025M KF and 2 g/L boron. The potential exists for a small quantity of MgO to be introduced into the dissolution flowsheet due to the use of MgO sand to extinguish uranium metal fires.

PIERCE, RA

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

252

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammels, plants and sediments within Mortandad Canyon, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Small mammals, plants and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System outfall {number_sign}051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos County, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation ingestion, or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total U. With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Source Characterization of the August 6, 2007 Crandall Canyon Mine Seismic Event in Central Utah  

SciTech Connect

On August 6, 2007 a local magnitude 3.9 seismic event occurred at 08:48:40 UTC in central Utah. The epicenter is within the boundaries of the Crandall Canyon coal mine (c.f. Pechmann et al., this volume). We performed a moment tensor analysis with complete, three-component seismic recordings from stations operated by the USGS, the University of Utah, and EarthScope. The analysis method inverts the seismic records to retrieve the full seismic moment tensor, which allows for interpretation of both shearing (e.g., earthquakes) and volume-changing (e.g., explosions and collapses) seismic events. The results show that most of the recorded seismic wave energy is consistent with an underground collapse in the mine. We contrast the waveforms and moment tensor results of the Crandall Canyon Mine seismic event to a similar sized tectonic earthquake about 200 km away near Tremonton, Utah, that occurred on September 1, 2007. Our study does not address the actual cause of the mine collapse.

Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

On the burning behavior of pulverized coal chars  

SciTech Connect

A model that predicts the physical changes that pulverized coal char particles undergo during combustion has been developed. In the model, a burning particle is divided into a number of concentric annular volume elements. The mass loss rate, specific surface area, and apparent density in each volume element depend upon the local particle conditions, which vary as a consequence of the adsorbed oxygen and gas-phase oxygen concentration gradients inside the particle. The model predicts the particle's burning rate, temperature, diameter, apparent density, and specific surface area as combustion proceeds, given ambient conditions and initial char properties. A six-step heterogeneous reaction mechanism is used to describe carbon reactivity to oxygen. A distributed activation energy approach is used to account for the variation in desorption energies of adsorbed O-atoms on the carbonaceous surface. Model calculations support the three burning zones established for the oxidation of pulverized coal chars. The model indicates two types of zone II behavior, however. Under weak zone II burning conditions, constant-diameter burning occurs up to 30% to 50% conversion before burning commences with reductions in both size and apparent density. Under strong zone II conditions, particles burn with reductions in both size and apparent density after an initial short period (conversion) of constant-diameter burning. Model predictions reveal that early in the oxidation process, there is mass loss at constant diameter under all zone II burning conditions. Such weak and strong burning behavior cannot be predicted with the commonly used power-law model for the mode of burning employing a single value for the burning mode parameter. Model calculations also reveal how specific surface area evolves when oxidation occurs in the zone II burning regime. Based on the calculated results, a surface area submodel that accounts for the effects of pore growth and coalescence during combustion under zone I conditions was modified to permit the characterization of the variations in specific surface area that occur during char conversion under zones II conditions. The modified surface area model is applicable to all burning regimes. Calculations also indicate that the particle's effectiveness factor varies during conversion under zone II burning conditions. With the adsorption/desorption mechanism employed, a near first-order Thiele modulus-effectiveness factor relationship is obeyed over the particle's lifetime. (author)

Mitchell, Reginald E.; Ma, Liqiang; Kim, BumJick [Thermosciences Group, Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3032 (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Issues in "Burning Plasma Science" S. J. Zweben, D. S. Darrow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues in "Burning Plasma Science" S. J. Zweben, D. S. Darrow (with inputs from many people at PPPL) Burning Plasma Science Workshop Austin, Texas 12/11/00 · Burning plasma physics issues · Fusion energy development issues => big issue: local burn control in an AT · Our conclusions · Alternate path #12;Burning

257

Numerical model to characterize the thermal comfort in new ecodistricts: methodology and validation through the canyon street case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In built-up areas, the urban structures affect the radiative and thermal environment. The numerical simulation models provide informations about urban thermal performance for many ranges of urban configurations. This paper presents a validation of a ... Keywords: CFD model, building heat transfers, coupling model, street canyon, thermo-radiative model

Khaled Athamena; Jean Francois Sini; Julien Guilhot; Jerome Vinet; Maeva Sabre; Jean-Michel Rosant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Numerical model to characterize the thermal comfort in new eco-districts: methodology and validation through the canyon street case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In built-up areas, the urban structures affect the radiative and thermal environment. The numerical simulation models provide informations about urban thermal performance for many ranges of urban configurations. This paper presents a validation of a ... Keywords: CFD model, building heat transfers, coupling model, street canyon, thermo-radiative model

Khaled Athamena; Jean Francois Sini; Julien Guilhot; Jerome Vinet; Maeva Sabre; Jean-Michel Rosant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Challenges When Predicting Reservoir Quality in the Subsalt K2/K2-North Field, Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the K2/ K2-North Field, Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico, presents many challenges for planning primary for seismi- cally better-imaged deepwater reservoirs in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, we utilize well- log, we used depositional mod- els based on Gulf of Mexico shallow-seismic analogs of distributary channel

Greene, Todd J.

260

Microsoft PowerPoint - burns.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Low Evaluation of Low Tank Level Mixing Technologies for DOE High Level Waste Tank Retrieval (10516) Heather Burns Andrew Fellinger and Richard Minichan Savannah River National Laboratory March 7 - 11, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona Waste Management Symposia 2010 SRNL-STI-2010-00139 2 W A S T E M A N A G E M E N T S Y M P O S I A 2 0 1 0 Agenda Overview Background Why a retrieval knowledge center Initial objectives / goals Low Level Mixing Addressing a challenge through technology demonstration Evaluation criteria Instrumentation Test matrix HOW DID WE GET THERE? WHERE DID WE GO? "Building a Foundation" The challenges that lead to gaps in retrieval Development and mock-up of retrieval technologies 3 W A S T E M A N A G E M E N T S Y M P O S I A 2 0 1 0 Background -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Optimal Mechansim Design and Money Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanism design is now a standard tool in computer science for aligning the incentives of self-interested agents with the objectives of a system designer. There is, however, a fundamental disconnect between the traditional application domains of mechanism design (such as auctions) and those arising in computer science (such as networks): while monetary transfers (i.e., payments) are essential for most of the known positive results in mechanism design, they are undesirable or even technologically infeasible in many computer systems. Classical impossibility results imply that the reach of mechanisms without transfers is severely limited. Computer systems typically do have the ability to reduce service quality--routing systems can drop or delay traffic, scheduling protocols can delay the release of jobs, and computational payment schemes can require computational payments from users (e.g., in spam-fighting systems). Service degradation is tantamount to requiring that users burn money}, and such ``payments'' can...

Hartline, Jason D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas turbine combined cycle system that obtains its heat input from a high temperature, high pressure ceramic air heater burning wood waste products as a fuel. This paper presents the results of the design study including the cycle evaluation and a description of the major components of the power plant. The cycle configuration is based on maximum fuel efficiency with minimum capital equipment risk. The cycle discussion includes design point performance of the power plant. The design represents a significant step forward in wood-fueled power plants.

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Dynamic Optimization of Lean Burn Engine Aftertreatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The competition to deliver fuel e#cient and environmentally friendly vehicles is driving the 1 2 Submitted to Journal of Dynamics Systems, Measurement, & Control automotive industry to consider ever more complex powertrain systems. Adequate performance of these new highly interactive systems can no longer be obtained through traditional approaches, which are intensive in hardware use and #nal control software calibration. This paper explores the use of Dynamic Programming to make model-based design decisions for a lean burn, direct injection spark ignition engine, in combination with a three way catalyst and an additional threeway catalyst, often referred to as a lean NOx trap. The primary contribution is the development ofavery rapid method to evaluate the tradeo#s in fuel economy and emissions for this novel powertrain system, as a function of design parameters and controller structure, over a standard emission test cycle. 1 Introduction Designing a powertrain system to m...

Jun-Mo Kang; Ilya Kolmanovsky; J. W. Grizzle

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

265

Classification of burn degrees in grinding by neural nets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the problems found in the implementation of intelligent grinding process is the automatic detection of surface burn of the parts. Several systems of monitoring have been assessed by researchers in order to control the grinding process and guarantee ... Keywords: acoustic emission, burn, grinding, monitoring, neural network

Marcelo M. Spadotto; Paulo R. Aguiar; Carlos C. P. Souza; Eduardo C. Bianchi; Andr N. de Souza

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Tropical biomass burning smoke plume size, shape, reflectance, and age based on 2001??2009 MISR imagery of Borneo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. S. Zender et al. : Tropical biomass burning smoke plumeslaboratory measurements of biomass-burning emis- sions: 1.aerosol optical depth biomass burning events: a comparison

Zender, C. S.; Krolewski, A. G.; Tosca, M. G.; Randerson, J. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

PHOTOCHEMICAL AND NON-PHOTOCHEMICAL HOLE BURNING IN DIMETHYL-S-TETRAZINE IN A POLYVINYL CARBAZOLE FILM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND NON-PHOTOCHEMICAL HOLE BURNING IN DIMETHYL-S-TETRAZINE~ CA 95193 ABSTRACT Hole burning as well as uorescence lineamorphous organic hosts. burning. Evidence is presented for

Cuellar, E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Pre-burning wxperiments commence in August 2008. A controlled burning takes place late September 2008 and field observations continues untill at least  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-burning wxperiments commence in August 2008. A controlled burning takes place late September) and long-term (months to a years) effects of fires (burning) in macchia ecosystem on [i] soil emissions ecosystems, land use and land use change scenarios. October 29-30, 2007, Barcelona, Spain Effect of burning

271

Grande Ronde Model Watershed Project; Dark Canyon Riparian Exclosure, Completion Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baker Field Office, Vale District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) submitted a project proposal for funding in 2002 through the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP). The project consisted of constructing two riparian exclosures to prevent livestock grazing in the riparian areas of Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek. The BLM completed the NEPA documentation and supplied the fencing materials. Funding from BPA through the GRMWP was used to complete the construction of the two exclosures. This project was completed in the fall of 2002. The project area is located in Union County, Oregon on BLM managed land adjacent to Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek, T. 3. S., R. 35 E., Section 24 and 25. Section 24 is along Dark Canyon Creek and section 25 is along Meadow Creek. Approximately 0.4 miles of stream would be protected from grazing with the construction of the two exclosures. A two person crew was hired to construct a four-strand barbed wire fence. The fence enclosed the riparian area on both sides of each creek so that no grazing would occur within the riparian area on BLM managed land. Total fence length is approximately 1.25 miles. Materials consisted of metal fence posts, barbed wire, rockjacks, fence stays, and 2 x 4's. The fence was constructed in the fall of 2002. The riparian area is effectively excluded from livestock grazing at this time. The construction of the exclosures should enhance riparian vegetation, increase bank stability, and improve riparian and in-stream habitat by exclusion of livestock in the riparian areas. Monitoring will ensure that the exclosures continues to be effective. Annual monitoring will include photo-points and compliance checks during the grazing season by BLM personnel. The BLM will submit a monitoring report, which includes the results of the annual monitoring, to the GRMWP in years 2005 and 2007. The exclosures do cross the creeks so maintenance may be needed on occasion, especially after high flow events in the creeks. Material such as logs which are mobilized during high stream flows may damage the exclosures requiring maintenance to keep cattle from grazing in the riparian areas. The BLM spent approximately $4,000 on fencing materials and $1,375 on NEPA compliance. In addition, the estimated cost of the monitoring over five years is expected to be approximately $1,600. The $5,050 that the BLM received from the BPA for the project was used to hire two temporary employees to construct the exclosures.

Kuck, Todd

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.

McLeod, Bruce

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fall Chinook Aclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, and will ultimately work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Complete returns for all three acclimation facilities will not occur until the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish protected under the Endangered Species Act) from those returns will be returning for the next five years. In 2001, a total of 2,051,099 fish weighing 59,647 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 318,932 yearling fish weighing 31,128 pounds and 1,732,167 sub-yearling fish weighing 28,519 pounds. Yearling fish numbers were reduced by Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD) and sub-yearling acclimation time was limited by record low river water flows.

McLeod, Bruce

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Local Burn-Up Effects in the NBSR Fuel Element  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses the over-prediction of local power when the burn-up distribution in each half-element of the NBSR is assumed to be uniform. A single-element model was utilized to quantify the impact of axial and plate-wise burn-up on the power distribution within the NBSR fuel elements for both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. To validate this approach, key parameters in the single-element model were compared to parameters from an equilibrium core model, including neutron energy spectrum, power distribution, and integral U-235 vector. The power distribution changes significantly when incorporating local burn-up effects and has lower power peaking relative to the uniform burn-up case. In the uniform burn-up case, the axial relative power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 59% in the HEU single-element and 46% in the LEU single-element with uniform burn-up. In the uniform burn-up case, the plate-wise power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 23% in the HEU single-element and 18% in the LEU single-element. The degree of over-prediction increases as a function of burn-up cycle, with the greatest over-prediction at the end of Cycle 8. The thermal flux peak is always in the mid-plane gap; this causes the local cumulative burn-up near the mid-plane gap to be significantly higher than the fuel element average. Uniform burn-up distribution throughout a half-element also causes a bias in fuel element reactivity worth, due primarily to the neutronic importance of the fissile inventory in the mid-plane gap region.

Brown N. R.; Hanson A.; Diamond, D.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA

276

Uranium ore rolls in Westwater Canyon sandstone, San Juan Basin, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Recent relatively deep uranium-exploration drilling in the Nose Rock area, San Juan Basin, McKinley County, New Mexico, has resulted in the discovery of previously unrecognized uranium ore rolls in gray, unoxidized Westwater Canyon Sandstone of the Morrison Formation. Both the Nose Rock ores and the primary Ambrosia Lake uranium ores were emplaced during the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous erosional interval under the same geologic conditions by the same geochemical-cell process. The red, altered interior ground resulting from the geochemical-cell process has been re-reduced by the subsequent entry of reductants into the formation. The original roll form of the Ambrosia Lake orebodies has been obscured and modified by redistribution related to the present-day active redox interface interweaving with the Ambrosia Lake ores.

Clark, D.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Early Channel Evolution in the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation, West Texas, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submarine channels are important conduits for sediment in deep marine environments, and understanding their formation is critical to modeling basin fill processes. Most models describing channel evolution focus on turbidity currents as the erosive and constructive force in channel initiation. However, slope failure and slumping can be significant drivers of channelization, particularly in upper slope and ramp environments. Determining the relative roles of slumping and erosion by turbidity currents can provide important insight into the timing of channelization and the geometries of subsequent deposits. Samples were collected from Guadalupe Mountains National Park from two primary localities at Salt Flat Bench (Figure 2). Three vertical sections were measured at both locations. A total of 16 samples were collected for petrographic analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging. Spectacular outcrop quality makes the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation in Guadalupe Mountains National Park an ideal location for the study of early channel evolution. A detailed facies analysis of fine-grained channel deposits was conducted in the Upper Brushy Canyon Formation in the Salt Flat Bench outcrops. After channelization, an interval of relative condensation dominated by hemipelagic settling of organic matter and silt was followed by an interval of incomplete sediment bypass by turbidity currents. This sequence of events suggests that sea level was at a relative highstand at the time of channel inception, whereas channel inception by turbidity currents is expected during a lowstand. Slumping rather than erosion by turbidity currents is the most likely mechanism to have initiated a channel at the study area. There is no evidence for the existence for high energy currents until after the interval of condensation. However, the action of weak contour currents during early channel evolution is observed in outcrop and microtextural features. Early carbonate cementation of channel-lining silts may have stabilized the slump surface with respect to erosion by later turbidity currents.

Gunderson, Spencer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

CHARACTERIZATION OF H CANYON CONDUCTIVITY METER INDICATIONS WITH ELEVATED URANIUM IN NITRIC ACID  

SciTech Connect

Solution conductivity data from the 1CU conductivity meter in H-Canyon shows that uranium concentration in the 0 to 30 gram per liter (g/L) range has no statistically significant effect on the calibration of free nitric acid measurement. Based on these results, no additional actions are needed on the 1CU Conductivity Meter prior to or during the processing of uranium solutions in the 0 to 30 g/L range. A model based only on free nitric acid concentration is shown to be appropriate for explaining the data. Data uncertainties for the free acid measurement of uranium-bearing solutions are 8.5% or less at 95% confidence. The analytical uncertainty for calibrating solutions is an order of magnitude smaller only when uranium is not present, allowing use of a more accurate analytical procedure. Literature work shows that at a free nitric acid level of 0.33 M, uranium concentration of 30 g/L and 25 C, solution conductivity is 96.4% of that of a uranium-free solution. The level of uncertainties in the literature data and its fitting equation do not justify calibration changes based on this small depression in solution conductivity. This work supports preparation of H-Canyon processing of Super Kukla fuel; however, the results will be applicable to the processing of any similar concentration uranium and nitric acid solution. Super Kukla fuel processing will increase the uranium concentration above the nominal zero to 10 g/L level, though not above 30 g/L. This work examined free nitric acid levels ranging from 0.18 to 0.52 molar. Temperature ranged from 27.9 to 28.3 C during conductivity testing. The data indicates that sequential order of measurement is not a significant factor. The conductivity meter was thus flushed effectively between measurements as desired.

Nash, C

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: AVOIDING WRONG TURNS, ROACH MOTELS, AND BOX CANYONS  

SciTech Connect

This is the third of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. In this paper, we provide one example each of our judgments on what constitutes a box canyon, a roach motel, and a wrong turn: ? Wrong Turn: The Reliable Replacement Warhead ? Roach Motel: SRAM T vs the B61 ? A Possible Box Canyon: A Low-Yield Version of the W76 SLBM Warhead Recognizing that new nuclear missions or weapons are not demanded by current circumstances ? a development path that yields future capabilities similar to those of today, which are adequate if not always ideal, and a broader national-security strategy that supports nonproliferation and arms control by reducing the role for, and numbers, of nuclear weapons ? we briefly consider alternate, less desirable futures, and their possible effect on the complex problem of regional deterrence. In this regard, we discuss the issues posed by, and possible responses to, three example regional deterrence challenges: in-country defensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary; reassurance of U.S. allies with limited strategic depth threatened by an emergent nuclear power; and extraterritorial, non-strategic offensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary in support of limited military objectives against a U.S. ally.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Ex post power economic analysis of record of decision operational restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On October 9, 1996, Bruce Babbitt, then-Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed the Record of Decision (ROD) on operating criteria for the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). Criteria selected were based on the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) Alternative as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (Reclamation 1995). These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore its economic value. The EIS provided impact information to support the ROD, including an analysis of operating criteria alternatives on power system economics. This ex post study reevaluates ROD power economic impacts and compares these results to the economic analysis performed prior (ex ante) to the ROD for the MLFF Alternative. On the basis of the methodology used in the ex ante analysis, anticipated annual economic impacts of the ROD were estimated to range from approximately $15.1 million to $44.2 million in terms of 1991 dollars ($1991). This ex post analysis incorporates historical events that took place between 1997 and 2005, including the evolution of power markets in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council as reflected in market prices for capacity and energy. Prompted by ROD operational restrictions, this analysis also incorporates a decision made by the Western Area Power Administration to modify commitments that it made to its customers. Simulated operations of GCD were based on the premise that hourly production patterns would maximize the economic value of the hydropower resource. On the basis of this assumption, it was estimated that economic impacts were on average $26.3 million in $1991, or $39 million in $2009.

Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Furniture wood wastes: Experimental property characterisation and burning tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Referring to the industrial wood waste category (as dominant in the provincial district of Pesaro-Urbino, Marche Region, Italy), this paper deals with the experimental characterisation and the carrying out of non-controlled burning tests (at lab- and pilot-scale) for selected 'raw' and primarily 'engineered' ('composite') wood wastes. The property characterisation has primarily revealed the following aspects: potential influence on moisture content of local weather conditions at outdoor wood waste storage sites; generally, higher ash contents in 'engineered' wood wastes as compared with 'raw' wood wastes; and relatively high energy content values of 'engineered' wood wastes (ranging on the whole from 3675 to 5105 kcal kg{sup -1} for HHV, and from 3304 to 4634 kcal kg{sup -1} for LHV). The smoke qualitative analysis of non-controlled lab-scale burning tests has primarily revealed: the presence of specific organic compounds indicative of incomplete wood combustion; the presence exclusively in 'engineered' wood burning tests of pyrroles and amines, as well as the additional presence (as compared with 'raw' wood burning) of further phenolic and containing nitrogen compounds; and the potential environmental impact of incomplete industrial wood burning on the photochemical smog phenomenon. Finally, non-controlled pilot-scale burning tests have primarily given the following findings: emission presence of carbon monoxide indicative of incomplete wood combustion; higher nitrogen oxide emission values detected in 'engineered' wood burning tests as compared with 'raw' wood burning test; and considerable generation of the respirable PM{sub 1} fraction during incomplete industrial wood burning.

Tatano, Fabio [Faculty of Sciences and Technologies, University of Urbino 'Carlo Bo', Campus Scientifico - Sogesta, 61029 Urbino (Italy)], E-mail: fabio.tatano@uniurb.it; Barbadoro, Luca; Mangani, Giovanna; Pretelli, Silvia; Tombari, Lucia; Mangani, Filippo [Faculty of Sciences and Technologies, University of Urbino 'Carlo Bo', Campus Scientifico - Sogesta, 61029 Urbino (Italy)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, Carol T. (Orinda, CA); Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Bowman, Barry R. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Comfort, III, William J. (Livermore, CA); Guymon, Lloyd G. (Livermore, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Pedersen, Knud B. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA); Strauch, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R. [and others

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

Can Consumers Escape the Market? Emancipatory Illuminations from Burning Man  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This ethnography explores the emancipatory dynamics of the Burning Man project, a one-week-long antimarket event. Practices used at Burning Man to distance consumers from the market include discourses supporting communality and disparaging market logics, alternative exchange practices, and positioning consumption as self-expressive art. Findings reveal several communal practices that distance consumption from broader rhetorics of efficiency and rationality. Although Burning Mans participants materially support the market, they successfully construct a temporary hypercommunity from which to practice divergent social logics. Escape from the market, if possible at all, must be conceived of as similarly temporary and local.

Robert V. Kozinets

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Spectral hole burning for stopping light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel protocol for storage and retrieval of photon wave packets in a $\\Lambda$-type atomic medium. This protocol derives from spectral hole burning and takes advantages of the specific properties of solid state systems at low temperature, such as rare earth ion doped crystals. The signal pulse is tuned to the center of the hole that has been burnt previously within the inhomogeneously broadened absorption band. The group velocity is strongly reduced, being proportional to the hole width. This way the optically carried information and energy is carried over to the off-resonance optical dipoles. Storage and retrieval are performed by conversion to and from ground state Raman coherence by using brief $\\pi$-pulses. The protocol exhibits some resemblance with the well known electromagnetically induced transparency process. It also presents distinctive features such as the absence of coupling beam. In this paper we detail the various steps of the protocol, summarize the critical parameters and theoretically examine the recovery efficiency.

R. Lauro; T. Chaneliere; J. -L. Le Gouet

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP Campaign Links BNL BBOP Website ARM Aerial Facility Payload Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP 2013.07.01 - 2013.10.24 Website : http://campaign.arm.gov/bbop/ Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description This field campaign will address multiple uncertainties in aerosol intensive properties, which are poorly represented in climate models, by means of aircraft measurements in biomass burning plumes. Key topics to be investigated are: Aerosol mixing state and morphology Mass absorption coefficients (MACs) Chemical composition of non-refractory material associated with

289

The Way We Burn: Combustion, Climate, and Carbonaceous Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Way We Burn: Combustion, Climate, and Carbonaceous Particles Speaker(s): Tami Bond Date: June 5, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Carbonaceous particles-- which engineers...

290

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burning of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, optical and thermal-optical analysis methods Title Evaluation of the...

291

Study of Buoyancy-Driven Turbulent Nuclear Burning and Validation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of Buoyancy-Driven Turbulent Nuclear Burning and Validation of Type Ia Supernova Models PI Name: Don Lamb PI Email: lamb@oddjob.uchicago.edu Institution: ASCAlliance Flash...

292

Study of Buoyancy-Driven Turbulent Nuclear Burning and Validation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

created from a simulation run on the Blue GeneP at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility in 2009. Study of Buoyancy-Driven Turbulent Nuclear Burning and Validation of Type Ia...

293

Transuranic Burning Issues Related to a Second Geologic Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines issues that need to be addressed by a development program recently initiated to establish the viability of a transuranic burning concept application that would achieve a substantial delay to the need date for a second geologic repository. The visualized transuranic burning concept application is one in which spent fuel created after a date in the 2010 time frame or later would be processed and the separated plutonium used to start up liquid metal reactors (LMRs).

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Prognostic Prediction of Tracer Dispersion for the Diablo Canyon Experiments on August 31, September 2, and September 4, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

COAMPS/LODI simulations of the tracer experiments at Diablo Canyon on August 31, September 2, and September 4, 1986 had mixed results. Simulated tracer concentrations on August 31 differed significantly from the measured concentrations. The model transported SF{sub 6} too far south and did not predict transport of SF{sub 6} north along highway 101 or into See Canyon. Early in the day the model rapidly transported SF{sub 6} away from the release point while observations suggested the tracer stayed close to Diablo Canyon for 1-2 hours. For September 2, simulations agreed very well with the measurements. The model accurately predicted the change of wind direction from north northwest to east northeast at the release point. It also predicted the advection of tracer over Mot-r-0 Bay and through the Los Osos Valley toward San Luis Obispo in excellent agreement with the observations. On September 4, the calculated transport of SF{sub 6} from Diablo Canyon had defects similar to those on August 31, a trajectory too far south and limited intrusion of tracer north along highway 101. Conversely, simulations of the Freon release from Los Osos Cemetery on September 4 corresponded well with observations. Since the simulations used only global meteorological data and no local winds for input, even the limited success of COAMPS/LODI is a favorable result. COAMPS's inability to generate southerly winds through the highway 101 corridor on August 31 and September 4 is a symptom of its underestimate of the sea breeze. The weak sea breeze correlates with a small diurnal range of air temperature possibly associated with underestimates of surface solar heating and/or overestimates of surface wetness. Improvement of COAMPS/LODI simulations requires development of new data assimilation techniques to use the local surface and low altitude wind and temperature measurements. Also, quantitative methods are needed to assess the accuracy of the models.

Molenkamp, C.R.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

McLeod, Bruce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

PETROPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE SECONDARY RECOVERY POTENTIAL IN THE CHERRY CANYON FORMATION NE LEA FIELD LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read and Stevens has proposed the evaluation of the waterflood potential from the Cherry Canyon formation in the NE Lea Field in lea County, New Mexico. Much of the development in this area is approaching primary recovery limitations; additional recovery of remaining oil reserves by waterflood needs to be evaluated. The Cherry Canyon formation is composed of fine grained sandstone, containing clay material which results in high water saturation, and also has the tendency to swell and reduce reservoir permeability--the ability of fluid to flow through the rock pores and fractures. There are also abundant organic materials that interfere with obtaining reliable well logs. These complications have limited oil in place calculations and identification of net pay zones, presenting a challenge to the planned waterflood. Core analysis of the Cherry Canyon should improve the understanding of existing well logs and possibly indicate secondary recovery measures, such as waterflood, to enhance field recovery. Lacking truly representative core to provide accurate analyses, Read and Stevens will obtain and preserve fresh core. The consulting firm of T. Scott Hickman and Associates will then collaborate on special core analyses and obtain additional well logs for a more detailed analysis of reservoir properties. The log interpretation will be compared to the core analysis results, and the entire collected data set will be used to assess the potential and economic viability of successfully waterflooding the identified oil zones. Successful results from the project will improve accuracy of log interpretation and establish a methodology for evaluating secondary recovery by waterflood.

T. Scott Hickman

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

I I Green, Lisle R. Burning by prescriptionin chaparral. Berkeley, Calif.: Pacific Southwest Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;I I I I I Green, Lisle R. Burning.S. Dep. Agric.: 1981; Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-51. 36 p. 1 I Prescribed burning is frequently suggested for reducing conflagration costs in chaparral. Prepara- tion for a prescribed burn includes environmental

Standiford, Richard B.

298

THE BURNING ISSUES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE BURNING ISSUES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ­ WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T By: Jack D devil burns and the Lord recycles." Perhaps these negative references to waste burning come from, the Valley of Hinnom south of ancient Jerusalem. This was the site of a foul, smoking, open burning garbage

Columbia University

299

Patch-Burning: "Rotational Grazing Without Fences" Using Fire and Grazing to Restore Diversity on Grasslands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patch-Burning: "Rotational Grazing Without Fences" Using Fire and Grazing to Restore Diversity characteristics. Patch Burning and Grazing Can Promote Diversity The objective of patch burning is to create State University burn portions of unfenced landscapes each year. Livestock focus grazing on recently

Debinski, Diane M.

300

Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium Implementation of a Thinning and Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Burning Study in Tanoak-Redwood Stands in Santa Cruz and Mendocino Counties1 Kevin L. O'Hara2 and Kristen the effects of thinning and prescribed burning on infection and spread of Phytophthora ramorum. Study sites burning. Introduction Thinning and burning effects on infection by and spread of Phytophthora ramorum

Standiford, Richard B.

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301

Fertilizing and Burning Flint Hills Bluestem CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND ED F. SMITH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fertilizing and Burning Flint Hills Bluestem CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND ED F. SMITH Abstract Burned of nitrogen applied more than 80 lb N/acre did. Maintenance of good quality range was favored by burning and 0 and 40 lb N/acre compared to not burning and the same fertilizer rates. Eighty lb N/acre produced poor

Owensby, Clenton E.

302

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement, September 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA has been asked by PPM Energy, Inc. to interconnect 300 megawatts (MW) of electricity generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. (Portland General Electric recently bought the rights to develop the proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm from Orion Energy, LLC.) Both wind projects received Site Certificates from the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council on June 30, 2006. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA 230-kV substation next to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. BPA is also considering a No Action Alternative in which BPA would not build the transmission line and would not interconnect the wind projects. The proposed BPA and wind projects would be located on private land, mainly used for agriculture. If BPA decides to interconnect the wind projects, construction of the BPA transmission line and substation(s) could commence as early as the winter of 2006-07. Both wind projects would operate for much of each year for at least 20 years. The proposed projects would generally create no or low impacts. Wildlife resources and local visual resources are the only resources to receive an impact rating other than ''none'' or ''low''. The low to moderate impacts to wildlife are from the expected bird and bat mortality and the cumulative impact of this project on wildlife when combined with other proposed wind projects in the region. The low to high impacts to visual resources reflect the effect that the transmission line and the turbine strings from both wind projects would have on viewers in the local area, but this impact diminishes with distance from the project.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Program Info Start Date 09/07/2012 State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Stick Burning Stove: $500 Pellet Burning Stove: $700 The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) now offers the Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program as part of its Residential Clean Energy Grant Program. The Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program offers a flat grant award of $500 for stick burning wood stoves and $700 for pellet burning wood stoves that meet program eligibility requirements. Basic requirements for grant funding include: *The property must serve as primary residence *Clean burning wood stove must replace existing electric or non-natural gas

304

Electromagnetic (EM-60) survey in the Panther Canyon Area, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight frequency domain electromagnetic soundings were measured over the Panther Canyon thermal anomaly in Grass Valley, Nevada. The data were collected with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's large moment horizontal loop system (EM-60). At the transmitter site located near the center of the thermal anomaly, square wave currents of up to 70 A were impressed into a fourturn 50 m radius coil at frequencies from 0.033 to 500 Hz. At the eight receiver sites, 0.5 to 1.5 km from the loop, magnetic fields were detected with a three-component SQUID magnetometer and vertical and radial magnetic field spectra were calculated. Data were interpreted with a computer program which fit filled spectra and associated ellipse polarization data to one-dimensional resistivity models and results were compared to interpretations from earlier dipole-dipole resistivity measurements. Comparison of these interpretations indicates fairly close agreement between the two, with both models clearly indicating the presence and dimensions of the conductivity anomaly associated with the thermal zone. Although the dc data was better able to resolve the high resistivity bedrock, the EM-data were able to resolve all major features without distortion at shorter transmitter receiver separations and in about one-third of the field time.

Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.; Stark, M.; Haught, R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: RECOVERY AND DOWN BLEND URANIUM FOR BENEFICIAL USE  

SciTech Connect

For over fifty years, the H Canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has performed remotely operated radiochemical separations of irradiated targets to produce materials for national defense. Although the materials production mission has ended, the facility continues to play an important role in the stabilization and safe disposition of proliferable nuclear materials. As part of the US HEU Disposition Program, SRS has been down blending off-specification (off-spec) HEU to produce LEU since 2003. Off-spec HEU contains fission products not amenable to meeting the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM) commercial fuel standards prior to purification. This down blended HEU material produced 301 MT of ~5% enriched LEU which has been fabricated into light water reactor fuel being utilized in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors in Tennessee and Alabama producing economic power. There is still in excess of ~10 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for beneficial use as either ~5% enriched LEU, or for use in subsequent LEU reactors requiring ~19.75% enriched LEU fuel.

Magoulas, V.

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

306

Treating high pressure zones in one trip in Canyon Reef area of Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Canyon Reef area near Snyder, Texas, Chevron U.S.A. Inc. is employing ratchet operated, packer type retrievable bridge plugs which have allowed operators to test, treat, or squeeze high pressure zones over a 35-day period on a single trip of the workstring. More zones could have been treated if necessary. The bridge plug was moved and set 31 times while treating the zones. Elapsed time is shown in days starting with T-date being the day tools were first run in for the treatment. The job was run with an average treating pressure of 1,000 psi, and a differential pressure of 2,500 psi that alternated from above the bridge plug to below and back each time the plug was moved to a new zone. The bridge plug used for the job seals by the action of a patented ratcheting mechanism which requires relatively light weight to set. Design of the ratchet enables the sealing elements to hold a seal against the casing wall while the hold-down slips are being set.

Cooley, G.; Mccowen, D.; Fore, M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Flowsheet modifications for dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues in the F-canyon dissolvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial flowsheet for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) was developed for the F- Canyon dissolvers as an alternative to dissolution in FB-Line. In that flowsheet, the sand fines were separated from the slag chunks and crucible fragments. Those two SS{ampersand}C streams were packaged separately in mild-steel cans for dissolution in the 6.4D dissolver. Nuclear safety constraints limited the dissolver charge to approximately 350 grams of plutonium in two of the three wells of the dissolver insert and required 0.23M (molar) boron as a soluble neutron poison in the 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M fluoride dissolver solution. During the first dissolution of SS{ampersand}C fines, it became apparent that a significant amount of the plutonium charged to the 6.4D dissolver did not dissolve in the time predicted by previous laboratory experiments. The extended dissolution time was attributed to fluoride complexation by boron. An extensive research and development (R{ampersand}D) program was initiated to investigate the dissolution chemistry and the physical configuration of the dissolver insert to understand what flowsheet modifications were needed to achieve a viable dissolution process.

Rudisill, T.S.; Karraker, D.G.; Graham, F.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Topical Area MFE Title: Burning Plasma Science_____________________________________________ Description Fusion energy is released by burning light elements using nuclear reactions which consume mass and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Topical Area MFE Title: Burning Plasma Science_____________________________________________ · Description Fusion energy is released by burning light elements using nuclear reactions which consume mass-sustained purely by its alpha particle heating. The science of burning plasmas consists of: (1) the physics

309

Topical Area: MFE Title: Burning Plasma Experimental Options______________________________ Description The options for a Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment are defined by the overall strategic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Topical Area: MFE Title: Burning Plasma Experimental Options______________________________ · Description The options for a Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment are defined by the overall strategic of developing and integrating burning plasma physics, long pulse physics and technology, and fusion technologies

310

On burning regimes and long duration X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen and helium accreted onto a neutron star undergo thermonuclear burning. Explosive burning is observed as a type I X-ray burst. We describe the different burning regimes and focus on some of the current inconsistencies between theory and observations. Of special interest are the rare kinds of X-ray bursts such as carbon-fueled superbursts and helium-fueled intermediately long X-ray bursts. These bursts are thought to originate deeper in the neutron star envelope, such that they are probes of the thermal properties of the crust. We investigate the possibility of observing superbursts with the wide-field instruments INTEGRAL-ISGRI and Swift-BAT. We find that only the brightest bursts are detectable.

L. Keek; J. J. M. in 't Zand

2008-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

Hayes, A C; Nieto, Michael Martin; WIlson, W B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Thermal regimes of high burn-up nuclear fuel rod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature distribution in the nuclear fuel rods for high burn-up is studied. We use the numerical and analytical approaches. It is shown that the time taken to have the stationary thermal regime of nuclear fuel rod is less than one minute. We can make the inference that the behavior of the nuclear fuel rod can be considered as a stationary task. Exact solutions of the temperature distribution in the fuel rods in the stationary case are found. Thermal regimes of high burn-up the nuclear fuel rods are analyzed.

Kudryashov, Nikolai A; Chmykhov, Mikhail A; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2009.05.063

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

A. C. Hayes; H. R. Trellue; Michael Martin Nieto; W. B. WIlson

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY TO EVALUATE CORROSION OF THE F-CANYON DISSOLVER DURING THEUNIRRADIATED MARK-42 CAMPAIGN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes are to be dissolved in an upcoming campaign in F-canyon. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC)/Chemical & Hydrogen Technology Section (CHTS) identified a flow sheet for the dissolution of these Mark 42 fuel tubes which required a more aggressive dissolver solution than previously required for irradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes. Subsequently, SRTC/MTS was requested to develop and perform a corrosion testing program to assess the impact of new flow sheets on corrosion of the dissolver wall. The two primary variables evaluated were the fluoride and aluminum concentrations of the dissolver solution. Fluoride was added as Calcium Fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) while the aluminum was added either as metallic aluminum, which was subsequently dissolved, or as the chemical aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}). The dissolved aluminum metal was used to simulate the dissolution of the aluminum from the Mark 42 cladding and fuel matrix. Solution composition for the corrosion tests bracketed the flow sheet for the Mark 42. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni. The corrosion rates, which ranged between 2.7 and 32.5 mpy, were calculated from both the one day and the one week weight losses. These corrosion rates indicated a relatively mild corrosion on the dissolver vessel. The welded coupons consistently had a higher corrosion rate than the non-welded coupons. The difference between the two decreased as the solution aggressiveness decreased. In these test solutions, aggressiveness corresponded with the fluoride concentration. Based on the results of this study, any corrosion occurring during the Mark 42 Campaign is not expected to have a deleterious effect on the dissolver vessel.

Mickalonis, J; Kerry Dunn, K

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases conducted in water year 2011 resulted only in financial costs; the total cost of all experimental releases was about $622,000.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration)

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

More than words : a biography of Daniel Francis Burns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daniel Francis Burns was born in Ireland in 1888 and immigrated to the United States in 1912. He married Mary O'Neill in 1923 and had a family of seven children. He worked as a police officer in the Boston Police Department ...

Burns, Matthew R. (Matthew Robert)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Burning Man at Google: a cultural infrastructure for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Man at Google: a cultural infrastructure for new media production FRED TURNER Stanford's bohemian ethos supports new forms of production emerging in SiliconValley and especially at Google to shape and legitimate the collaborative manufacturing processes driving the growth of Google and other

Straight, Aaron

319

BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY JEFFREY S. DUKES Department of as a vast store of solar energy from which society meets >80% of its current energy needs. Here, using of ancient solar energy decline, humans are likely to use an increasing share of modern solar resources. I

Dukes, Jeffrey

320

Sodium and sulfur release and recapture during black liquor burning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide data on sulfur and sodium volatilization during black liquor burning, and on SO2 capture by solid sodium carbonate and sodium chloride. This data was interpreted and modeled into rate equations suitable for use in computational models for recovery boilers.

Frederick, W.J.; Iisa, K.; Wag, K.; Reis, V.V.; Boonsongsup, L.; Forssen, M.; Hupa, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

Gus'kov, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Open Questions in Stellar Helium Burning Addressed With Real Photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The outcome of helium burning is the formation of the two elements, carbon and oxygen. The ratio of carbon to oxygen at the end of helium burning is crucial for understanding the final fate of a progenitor star and the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in Type II supernova, with oxygen rich star predicted to collapse to a black hole, and a carbon rich star to a neutron star. Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) are used as standard candles for measuring cosmological distances with the use of an empirical light curve-luminosity stretching factor. It is essential to understand helium burning that yields the carbon/oxygen white dwarf and thus the initial stage of SNeIa. Since the triple alpha-particle capture reaction, $^{8}Be(\\alpha,\\gamma)^{12}C$, the first burning stage in helium burning, is well understood, one must extract the cross section of the $^{12}C(\\alpha,\\gamma)^{16}O$ reaction at the Gamow window (300 keV) with high accuracy of approximately 10% or better. This goal has not been achieved despite repeated strong statements that appeared in the literature. In particular constraint from the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of $^{16}N$ were shown to not sufficiently restrict the p-wave cross section factor; e.g. a low value of $S_{E1}(300)$ can not be ruled out. Measurements at low energies, are thus mandatory for determining the elusive cross section factor for the $^{12}C(\\alpha,\\gamma)^{16}O$ reaction. We are constructing a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for use with high intensity photon beams extracted from the HI$\\gamma$S/TUNL facility at Duke University to study the $^{16}O(\\gamma,\\alpha)^{12}C$ reaction, and thus the direct reaction at energies as low as 0.7 MeV. This work is in progress.

Moshe Gai

2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

Activities of the US Burning Plasma Organization Vice-Chair of Council,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the principal coordinating body for MFE burning plasma research · It exists to advance the scientific to advance burning plasma research · Began with the 2006-7 ITER Design Review ­ US MFE community contributed

324

Ac#vi#es of the US Burning Plasma Organiza#on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

=ons · USBPO ­ Coordinates US burning plasma research, to advance scien=fic understanding USBPO organizes the US Fusion Energy Science community to support burning plasma research 5 Charles Greenfield (Director) Amanda Hubbard (Deputy Director) Nermin

325

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory, J.J. R. , and Veres, P. : Biomass burning in Siberia andOpen burning of agricultural biomass: Physical and chemical

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Spatial hole burning in actively mode-locked quantum cascade lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical study of active mode-locking in quantum cascade lasers including spatial hole-burning is presented. It is found that spatial hole-burning reduces the pulse duration at the expense of slight pulse instability ...

Kartner, Franz X.

327

Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Fall 2012 Automation of Test Sample Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sample Burning Overview ArcelorMittal Steelton produces multiple grades of steel rail. Their operators's burning station by creating a safer process for cutting test-sample premium rails To design a system

Demirel, Melik C.

328

MODIS Reflectance and Active Fire Data for Burn Mapping in Colombia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-based strategies for burned area mapping may rely on two types of remotely sensed data: postfire reflectance images and active fire detection. This study uses both methods in a synergistic way. In particular, burned area mapping is ...

Silvia Merino-de-Miguel; Federico Gonzlez-Alonso; Margarita Huesca; Dolors Armenteras; Carol Franco

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

SIDA DemoEast programme in Estonia. Supply, delivery and installation of wood pellet burning equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

burning equipment SUMMARY DemoEast programme is a part of Baltic Billion Fund 2 with the overall aim and Kiltsi light oil fired boilers have been converted to wood pellets burning. The supplier

330

Electron Dynamics of Silicon Surface States: Second-Harmonic Hole Burning on Si(111)7x7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States: Second-Harmonic Hole Burning on Si(111) 7 7 John A.transient spectral hole burning. Spectral holes induced by atransient spectral hole burning, i.e. , the surface-speci?c

McGuire, John A.; Raschke, Markus B.; Shen, Yuen-Ron

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Major Conclusions of the MFE Study 1. Why a burning plasma Navratil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of scientific maturity that we are ready to undertake the essential step of burning plasma research. · Present

332

Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

Effects of hydropower operations on recreational use and nonuse values at Glen Canyon and Flaming Gorge Dams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in streamflows are generally positively related to the use values of angling and white-water boating, and constant flows tend to increase the use values more than fluctuating flows. In most instances, however, increases in streamflows beyond some threshold level cause the use values to decrease. Expenditures related to angling and white-water boating account for about $24 million of activity in the local economy around Glen Canyon Dam and $24.8 million in the local economy around flaming Gorge Dam. The range of operational scenarios being considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, when use rates are held constant, could change the combined use value of angling and white-water boating below Glen Canyon Dam, increasing it by as much as 50%, depending on prevailing hydrological conditions. Changes in the combined use value below Flaming Gorge Dam could range from a decrease of 9% to an increase of 26%. Nonuse values, such as existence and bequest values, could also make a significant contribution to the total value of each site included in this study; however, methodological and data limitations prevented estimating how each operational scenario could change nonuse values.

Carlson, J.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Structural fabric of the Palisades Monocline: a study of positive inversion, Grand Canyon, Arizona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field study of positive inversion is conducted to describe associated structural fabrics and to infer kinematic development of the Palisades Monocline, Grand Canyon, Arizona. These features are then compared to sand, clay and solid rock models of positive inversion to test model results and improve understanding of inversion processes. The N40W 90 oriented Palisades fault underlying the monocline has experienced northeast-southwest Precambrian extension and subsequent northeastsouthwest Laramide contraction. The magnitude of inversion is estimated to be 25% based on vertical offset across the fault, although this does not account for flexure or horizontal shortening. The preferred N50W 90 joint and vein orientation and N50W 68 NE and SW conjugate normal faults are consistent with the Palisades fault and northeastsouthwest extension. The N45E 90 joint orientation and approximately N40W 28 NE and SW conjugate thrust faults are consistent with northeast-southwest contraction. The deformation is characterized by three domains across the fault zone: 1) the hanging wall, 2) the footwall, and 3) an interior, fault-bounded zone between the hanging wall and footwall. Extensional features are preserved and dominate the hanging wall, contractional features define footwall deformation, and the interior, fault-bounded zone is marked by the co-existence of extensional and contractional features. Extension caused a master normal fault and hanging wall roll-over with distributed joints, veinsand normal faults. During inversion, contraction induced reverse reactivation of existing hanging wall faults, footwall folding and footwall thrust-faulting. Precambrian normal slip along the master normal fault and subsequent Laramide reverse slip along the new footwall bounding fault created an uplifted domain of relatively oldest strata between the hanging wall and footwall. Physical models of co-axial inversion suggest consistent development of the three domains of deformation described at the Palisades fault, however the models often require magnitudes of inversion greater than 50%. Although vertical block motion during horizontal compression is not predicted directly by the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, physical models and analytical solutions (incorporating Mohr- Coulomb criterion) suggest maximum stress trajectories and near vertical failure above high angle basement faults that compare favorably with the Palisades fault zone.

Orofino, James Cory

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.  

SciTech Connect

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center)

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Integrated reservoir study of the 8 reservoir of the Green Canyon 18 field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The move into deeper waters in the Gulf of Mexico has produced new opportunities for petroleum production, but it also has produced new challenges as different reservoir problems are encountered. This integrated reservoir characterization effort has provided useful information about the behavior and characteristics of a typical unconsolidated, overpressured, fine-grained, turbidite reservoir, which constitutes the majority of the reservoirs present in the Outer Continental Shelf of the Gulf of Mexico. Reservoirs in the Green Canyon 18 (GC 18) field constitute part of a turbidite package with reservoir quality typically increasing with depth. Characterization of the relatively shallow 8 reservoir had hitherto been hindered by the difficulty in resolving its complex architecture and stratigraphy. Furthermore, the combination of its unconsolidated rock matrix and abnormal pore pressure has resulted in severe production-induced compaction. The reservoir's complex geology had previously obfuscated the delineation of its hydrocarbon accumulation and determination of its different resource volumes. Geological and architectural alterations caused by post-accumulation salt tectonic activities had previously undermined the determination of the reservoir's active drive mechanisms and their chronology. Seismic interpretation has provided the reservoir geometry and topography. The reservoir stratigraphy has been defined using log, core and seismic data. With well data as pilot points, the spatial distribution of the reservoir properties has been defined using geostatistics. The resulting geological model was used to construct a dynamic flow model that matched historical production and pressure data.. The reservoir's pressure and production behavior indicates a dominant compaction drive mechanism. The results of this work show that the reservoir performance is influenced not only by the available drive energy, but also by the spatial distribution of the different facies relative to well locations. The study has delineated the hydrocarbon bearing reservoir, quantified the different resource categories as STOIIP/GIIP = 19.8/26.2 mmstb/Bscf, ultimate recovery = 9.92/16.01 mmstb/Bscf, and reserves (as of 9/2001) = 1.74/5.99 mmstb/Bscf of oil and gas, respectively. There does not appear to be significant benefit to infill drilling or enhanced recovery operations.

Aniekwena, Anthony Udegbunam

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Predictability of carbon emissions from biomass burning in Indonesia from 1997 to 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictability of carbon emissions from biomass burning in Indonesia from 1997 to 2006 Robert D biomass burning C emissions in Indonesia for 1997­2006, obtained from the Global Fire Emissions Database), Predictability of carbon emissions from biomass burning in Indonesia from 1997 to 2006, J. Geophys. Res., 113, G

Field, Robert

338

SAE Paper 2004-01-2936 Molecular Structure Effects On Laminar Burning Velocities At  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SAE Paper 2004-01-2936 Molecular Structure Effects On Laminar Burning Velocities At Elevated and Engineering Copyright © 2004 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc ABSTRACT The laminar burning velocities and pressure of 304 kPa. Data have been acquired over the stoichiometry range of 0.55 1.4. The burning

Androulakis, Ioannis (Yannis)

339

Biomass burning emission inventory with daily resolution: Application to aircraft observations of Asian outflow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass burning emission inventory with daily resolution: Application to aircraft observations for biomass burning using AVHRR satellite observations of fire activity corrected for data gaps and scan angle biomass burning in SE Asia was a major contributor to the outflow of Asian pollution observed in TRACE

Palmer, Paul

340

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification, including those burning lean hydrogen at both at atmospheric and elevated pressures [6]. The low

Bell, John B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Abstract The savannas (cerrado) of south-central Brazil are currently subjected to frequent anthropogenic burning,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic burning, causing widespread reduction in tree density. Increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 could reduce the im- pact of such frequent burning by increasing the availabili- ty CO2 and at two nutrient levels. To simulate burning, the plants were either clipped at 15 weeks

Jackson, Robert B.

342

CANDLE BURNING IN AN INVERTED JAR OVER WATER IN A TROUGH EXPERIMENT: SCIENCE TEACHERS' CONCEPTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANDLE BURNING IN AN INVERTED JAR OVER WATER IN A TROUGH EXPERIMENT: SCIENCE TEACHERS' CONCEPTIONS contains about 20% oxygen despite our knowledge that burning in a closed environment does not consume during burning of carbon in oxygen (air) and the solubility rate of carbon dioxide in water

Knill, Oliver

343

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa Steven Met Office C-130 within a distinct biomass burning plume during the Southern AFricAn Regional science, and P. R. Buseck, Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern

Highwood, Ellie

344

IEA Workshop (W60) on Burning Plasmas and Simulation Name Institute Speaker/ C Title talk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEA Workshop (W60) on Burning Plasmas and Simulation Name Institute Speaker/ C Title talk Start End 04-Jul-05 Session 1 Transport and Confinement in Burning Plasmas 8.30 8.40 Miura Y. JAERI- Naka chair Experiments on JET 10.00 10.20 Peng M. PPPL speaker NSTX Results relevant for Burning Plasmas 10.20 10

345

1 | Barbecues and Open Burning, September 2010 UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 | Barbecues and Open Burning, September 2010 UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE Barbecues and Open Burning Contact: Environmental Health and Safety, Campus Fire Marshal/Designee Updated: September 2, 2010 Supersedes: Burning and Open Fires on UCSB Property, February 1, 1985 Pages: 2 BARBECUES

346

Burning Forest Residues231 Corstorphine Road www.forestry.gov.uk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Burning Forest Residues231 Corstorphine Road Edinburgh EH12 7AT www.forestry.gov.uk S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 2 FCTN004 SUMMARY Burning forest residues is a traditional method of ground clearance following harvesting operations. Guidance is given on suitable types of cut material for burning, equipment

347

A HYPOTHETICAL BURNING-VELOCITY FORMULA FOR VERY LEAN HYDROGEN-AIR MIXTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A HYPOTHETICAL BURNING-VELOCITY FORMULA FOR VERY LEAN HYDROGEN-AIR MIXTURES by Forman A. Williams experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

348

Affordable Near-Term Burning-Plasma Experiments Dale M. Meade and Robert D. Woolley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Affordable Near-Term Burning-Plasma Experiments Dale M. Meade and Robert D. Woolley Princeton more than one, where the dynamics of a burning plasma can be studied, optimized and understood so must be developed within the next decade that will lead to an Affordable Burning Plasma Experiment

349

Tundra burning in Alaska: Linkages to climatic change and sea ice retreat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tundra burning in Alaska: Linkages to climatic change and sea ice retreat Feng Sheng Hu,1 Philip E record. Tundra burning is potentially one such component. Here we report paleoecological evidence showing that recent tundra burning is unprecedented in the central Alaskan Arctic within the last 5000 years. Analysis

Hu, Feng Sheng

350

Nuclear quadrupole resonance of an electronically excited state from high-resolution hole-burning spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear quadrupole resonance of an electronically excited state from high-resolution hole-burning 2003; published 5 May 2003 Hole-burning spectroscopy can eliminate inhomogeneous broadening and thereby, the homogeneous linewidth is often small compared to the splittings due to nuclear-spin interactions. Hole-burning

Suter, Dieter

351

RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Note on Non-parametric and Semi-parametric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Note on Non-parametric and Semi-parametric Modeling for comparative purposes in order to assess the predictive performance of the Burning Index. 1 Department including the Burning Index (BI) at each of various Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) in the United

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

352

Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1 David A. Cleaves,2 Service's National Forest System prescribed burning activity and costs are examined. Fuels management officers from 95 National Forests reported costs and acreage burned for 4 types of prescribed fire

Standiford, Richard B.

353

Mass burning rate of premixed stretched flames: integral analysis versus large activation energy asymptotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass burning rate of premixed stretched flames: integral analysis versus large activation energy, The Netherlands Abstract. New expressions for the mass burning rate are derived from a recently introduced burning rate. The consequences for experimental and numerical studies are investigated. Keywords: premixed

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

354

A Compact Advanced Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade and Robert D. Woolley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Compact Advanced Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade and Robert D. Woolley Princeton Plasma and optimization of a burning plasma. The achievement of an ignited (Q # 10) plasma will allow these scientific OBJECTIVES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ADVANCED BURNING PLASMA PHYSICS EXPERIMENT The primary physics objectives

355

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

356

Thank you for your interest in Fire Prevention! Burning Ban Flags  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you for your interest in Fire Prevention! Burning Ban Flags Texas A&M Forest Service image to the public, a signal to stop outdoor burning and begin conserving water. They are sold on outdoor burning as a wildfire prevention tool. To support this prevention effort, TFS posts a list

357

Forest Service -U.S. Department of Agriculture Prescribed Burning in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Service - U.S. Department of Agriculture Prescribed Burning in the Interior Ponderosa Pine, California 94701 #12;Gordon, Donald T. 1967. Prescribed burning in the interior ponderosa pine type., illus. (U. S. Forest Serv. Res. Paper PSW- 45 ) Three prescribed burns, made in 1959-62, in the in

Standiford, Richard B.

358

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

359

Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame S. E structure which, de- pending on density, may involve separate regions of carbon, oxygen and silicon burning, all propagating in a self-similar, subsonic front. The separation between these three burning regions

360

Impact of prescribed burning on endophytic insect communities of prairie perennials (Asteraceae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of prescribed burning on endophytic insect communities of prairie perennials (Asteraceae, Eurytomidae, Fire, Mordellidae, Population dynamics Abstract. Prescribed burning currently is used to preserve changes in plant communities brought about by burning, other species that are endemic to prairies may

Hanks, Lawrence M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Second UFA Workshop on Burning Plasmas Experimental Approaches, Issues and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Second UFA Workshop on Burning Plasmas Experimental Approaches, Issues and Opportunities R. Parker UFA Burning Plasma Workshop 1 May 2001 Why Are We Here? R. Parker Program Committee Chairman #12;Second UFA Workshop on Burning Plasmas Experimental Approaches, Issues and Opportunities R. Parker UFA

362

Chengdu 10/18/2006 Theory of Alfvn waves and energetic particle physics in burning plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chengdu 10/18/2006 Theory of Alfvén waves and energetic particle physics in burning plasmas 1 IAEA FEC 2006 Liu Chen Theory of Alfvén waves and energetic particle physics in burning plasmas* 21.st IAEA and energetic particle physics in burning plasmas 2 IAEA FEC 2006 Liu Chen Outlines (I) Introduction (II) Linear

363

A Compact Advanced Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade and Robert D. Woolley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Compact Advanced Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade and Robert D. Woolley Princeton Plasma and optimization of a burning plasma. The achievement of an ignited (Q 10) plasma will allow these scientific OBJECTIVES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ADVANCED BURNING PLASMA PHYSICS EXPERIMENT The primary physics objectives

364

Bulk Burning Rate in Passive Reactive Diffusion. Peter Constantin Alexander Kiselev Adam Oberman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk Burning Rate in Passive ­ Reactive Diffusion. Peter Constantin Alexander Kiselev Adam Oberman, diffuses, and reacts according to a KPP­type nonlinear reaction. We introduce a quantity, the bulk burning­defined notion of front speed. We establish rigorous lower bounds for the bulk burning rate that are linear

Ryzhik, Lenya

365

Large-Eddy Simulation of Flow and Pollutant Transport in Street Canyons of Different Building-Height-to-Street-Width Ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study employs a large-eddy simulation technique to investigate the flow, turbulence structure, and pollutant transport in street canyons of building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratios of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 at a Reynolds number of 12 000 ...

Chun-Ho Liu; Mary C. Barth; Dennis Y. C. Leung

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Near-Surface Currents in DeSoto Canyon (199799): Comparison of Current Meters, Satellite Observation, and Model Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates a data-assimilated model simulation of near-surface circulation in DeSoto Canyon (DSC), Gulf of Mexico, with emphasis on analyzing moored current-meter observations and comparing them with satellite data and model results. ...

Dong-Ping Wang; Lie-Yauw Oey; Tal Ezer; Peter Hamilton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Kleinman 2013 Biomass Burn Plan B.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

if There are Few Fires? if There are Few Fires? Fire Plan Major focus is to sample fires in near-field where there are rapid changes, with a particular emphasis on soot, brown carbon, and SOA This includes sampling other sources for contrast Urban, Long range transport Plan B Same instruments can be used for multiple purposes Year to Year Burn Variability Fire Data from FINN version 1.0, courtesy of Christine Wiedinmyer Areas are ~ 1000 km by 1000 km centered on Pasco, WA and Little Rock, AK Year to year variability in Monthly Fire Emissions ~ factor of 10. Year to Year Burn Variability Fire Data from FINN version 1.0, courtesy of Christine Wiedinmyer Large year to year variability in Fire Counts Sometimes, 2 week periods between fire activity Other Soot/Brown Carbon Sources

368

NETL: News Release - Combustion Optimization Systems - Cleaner Coal Burning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Combustion Optimization System" - Cleaner Coal Burning at Lower Costs "Combustion Optimization System" - Cleaner Coal Burning at Lower Costs DOE Joins with Sunflower Electric to Outfit Kansas Coal Plant with Lower Cost System to Cut Air Emissions FINNEY COUNTY, KS - A unique combination of high-tech combustion modifications and sophisticated control systems will be tested on a Kansas coal-fired power plant as part of the federal government's efforts to show how new technology can reduce air emissions and save costs for ratepayers. - Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station - Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station will be outfitted with a combination of innovative hardware and software to further reduce air emissions. - The U.S. Department of Energy and Sunflower Electric Power Corporation have signed an agreement to use the utility's Holcomb Station power plant in

369

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Combustion, Franklin, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 The Polk Power Station near Mulberry, Florida, is an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle gasification plant. It is capable of generating 313 megawatts of electricity - 250 megawatts of which are supplied to the electric grid. The plant's gas cleaning technology removes more than 98 percent of the sulfur in coal, converting it to a commercial product. Nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by more than 90 percent. (Photo courtesy of DOE-NETL) Approximately half of all electricity used in the United States comes from

370

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

SciTech Connect

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

372

Type Ia Supernova: Burning and Detonation in the Distributed Regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple, semi-analytic representation is developed for nuclear burning in Type Ia supernovae in the special case where turbulent eddies completely disrupt the flame. The speed and width of the ``distributed'' flame front are derived. For the conditions considered, the burning front can be considered as a turbulent flame brush composed of corrugated sheets of well-mixed flames. These flames are assumed to have a quasi-steady-state structure similar to the laminar flame structure, but controlled by turbulent diffusion. Detonations cannot appear in the system as long as distributed flames are still quasi-steady-state, but this condition is violated when the distributed flame width becomes comparable to the size of largest turbulent eddies. When this happens, a transition to detonation may occur. For current best estimates of the turbulent energy, the most likely density for the transition to detonation is in the range 0.5 - 1.5 x 10^7 g cm^{-3}.

S. E. Woosley

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Affordable Near-term Burning-plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy is a potential energy source for the future with plentiful fuel supplies and is expected to have benign environmental impact. The issue with fusion energy has been the scientific feasibility, and recently the cost of this approach. The key technical milestone for fusion is the achievement of a self-sustained fusion fire, ignition, in the laboratory. Despite 40 years of research and the expenditure of almost $20B worldwide, a self-sustained fusion fire has not yet been produced in the laboratory. The fusion program needs a test bed, preferably more than one, where the dynamics of a burning plasma can be studied, optimized and understood so that the engineering requirements for an engineering test reactor can be determined. Engineering and physics concepts must be developed within the next decade that will lead to an Affordable Burning Plasma Experiment if fusion is going to be perceived as making progress toward a potential long-range energy source.

D.M. Meade; R.D. Wooley

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Uniform DT 3T burn: computations and sensitivities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical model was developed in C to integrate the nonlinear deutrium-tritium (DT) burn equations in a three temperature (3T) approximation for spatially uniform test problems relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Base model results are in excellent agreement with standard 3T results. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different fits (e.g., TOPS versus SESAME opacity data, higher order polynomial fits ofNDI data for the reaction rate parameter) were explored, and sensitivity to several model inputs are presented including: opacity data base, Coulomb logarithm, and Bremsstrahlung. Sensitivity to numerical integration time step size, and the relative insensitivity to the discretized numerics and numerical integration method was demonstrated. Variations in the IC for densities and temperatures were explored, showing similar DT burn profiles in most cases once ignition occurs. A coefficient multiplying the Compton coupling term (default, A = 1) can be adjusted to approximate results from more sophisticated models. The coefficient was reset (A = 0.4) to match the maximum temperatures resulting from standard multi-group simulations of the base case test problem. Setting the coefficient to a larger value, (A = 0.6) matches maximum ion temperatures in a kinetic simulation of a high density ICF-like regime. Matching peak temperatures does not match entire temperature-time profiles, indicating the Compton coefficient is density and time dependent as the photon distribution evolves. In the early time burn during the ignition of the DT, the present model with modified Compton coupling provides a very simple method to obtain a much improved match to the more accurate solution from the multi-group radiation model for these DT burn regimes.

Vold, Erik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hryniw, Natalia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Jon A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kesler, Leigh A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents topology-based methods to robustly extract, analyze, and track features defined as subsets of isosurfaces. First, we demonstrate how features identified by thresholding isosurfaces can be defined in terms of the Morse complex. Second, we present a specialized hierarchy that encodes the feature segmentation independent of the threshold while still providing a flexible multi-resolution representation. Third, for a given parameter selection we create detailed tracking graphs representing the complete evolution of all features in a combustion simulation over several hundred time steps. Finally, we discuss a user interface that correlates the tracking information with interactive rendering of the segmented isosurfaces enabling an in-depth analysis of the temporal behavior. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different levels of turbulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn in cells separated by locally extinguished regions. The number, area, and evolution over time of these cells provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. Utilizing the hierarchy we can perform an extensive parameter study without re-processing the data for each set of parameters. The resulting statistics enable scientist to select appropriate parameters and provide insight into the sensitivity of the results wrt. to the choice of parameters. Our method allows for the first time to quantitatively correlate the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly segmented and selected. In particular, our analysis shows that counter-intuitively stronger turbulence leads to larger cell structures, which burn more intensely than expected. This behavior suggests that flames could be stabilized under much leaner conditions than previously anticipated.

Bremer, Peer-Timo; Weber, Gunther; Pascucci, Valerio; Day, Marc; Bell, John

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Superheater Corrosion in Plants Burning High-Chlorine Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion caused by molten alkali sulfates can cause premature failure in superheaters and reheaters of coal-fired boilers. Coals with a high chlorine content are more likely to cause molten sulfate corrosion than those with a low chlorine content. Tests in a boiler burning coal with 0.37% chlorine and 1.3% sulfur show that stainless steels with at least 35% chromium are very corrosion resistant, while steels containing less than 20% chromium have high corrosion rates.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evolution of the First Stars with Dark Matter Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent theoretical studies have revealed the possibly important role of the capture and annihilation process of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) for the first stars. Using new evolutionary models of metal-free massive stars, we investigate the impact of such ``dark matter burning'' for the first stars in different environments of dark matter (DM) halos, in terms of the ambient WIMP density (rho_chi). We find that, in agreement with existing literature, stellar life times can be significantly prolonged for a certain range of rho_\\chi (i.e., 10^{10} ~ 2*10^{11} GeV/cm3 may not undergo nuclear burning stages, confirming the previous work, and that ionizing photon fluxes from such DM supported stars are very weak. Delayed metal enrichment and slow reionization in the early universe would have resulted if most of the first stars had been born in DM halos with such high rho_\\chi, unless it had been lowered significantly below the threshold for efficient DM burning on a short time scale.

Sung-Chul Yoon; Fabio Iocco; Shizuka Akiyama

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

378

PULSATIONS IN HYDROGEN BURNING LOW-MASS HELIUM WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect

Helium core white dwarfs (WDs) with mass M {approx}< 0.20 M {sub sun} undergo several Gyr of stable hydrogen burning as they evolve. We show that in a certain range of WD and hydrogen envelope masses, these WDs may exhibit g-mode pulsations similar to their passively cooling, more massive carbon/oxygen core counterparts, the ZZ Cetis. Our models with stably burning hydrogen envelopes on helium cores yield g-mode periods and period spacings longer than the canonical ZZ Cetis by nearly a factor of 2. We show that core composition and structure can be probed using seismology since the g-mode eigenfunctions predominantly reside in the helium core. Though we have not carried out a fully nonadiabatic stability analysis, the scaling of the thermal time in the convective zone with surface gravity highlights several low-mass helium WDs that should be observed in search of pulsations: NLTT 11748, SDSS J0822+2753, and the companion to PSR J1012+5307. Seismological studies of these He core WDs may prove especially fruitful, as their luminosity is related (via stable hydrogen burning) to the hydrogen envelope mass, which eliminates one model parameter.

Steinfadt, Justin D. R. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Arras, Phil, E-mail: jdrs@physics.ucsb.ed, E-mail: bildsten@kitp.ucsb.ed, E-mail: arras@virginia.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nuclear fusion in dense matter: Reaction rate and carbon burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the nuclear fusion rate between equal nuclei for all five different nuclear burning regimes in dense matter (two thermonuclear regimes, two pycnonuclear ones, and the intermediate regime). The rate is determined by Coulomb barrier penetration in dense environments and by the astrophysical S-factor at low energies. We evaluate previous studies of the Coulomb barrier problem and propose a simple phenomenological formula for the reaction rate which covers all cases. The parameters of this formula can be varied, taking into account current theoretical uncertainties in the reaction rate. The results are illustrated for the example of the ^{12}C+^{12}C fusion reaction. This reaction is very important for the understanding of nuclear burning in evolved stars, in exploding white dwarfs producing type Ia supernovae, and in accreting neutron stars. The S-factor at stellar energies depends on a reliable fit and extrapolation of the experimental data. We calculate the energy dependence of the S-factor using a recently developed parameter-free model for the nuclear interaction, taking into account the effects of the Pauli nonlocality. For illustration, we analyze the efficiency of carbon burning in a wide range of densities and temperatures of stellar matter with the emphasis on carbon ignition at densities rho > 10^9 g/cc.

L. R. Gasques; A. V. Afanasjev; E. F. Aguilera; M. Beard; L. C. Chamon; P. Ring; M. Wiescher; D. G. Yakovlev

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

380

High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon Formation, East-Central Idaho: Implications for Regional and Global Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly 550 samples of fine grained carbonates, collected every 0.5 to 1.0 m from the Bloom Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation at Gallagher Peak, Idaho, were analyzed to determine the high-resolution carbon isotope stratigraphy. To constrain for diagenesis, thin sections were petrographically analyzed and viewed using cathodoluminescence microscopy. Chemical analyses were performed using an electron microprobe. Average delta18O and delta13C values from the Bloom Member are -4.5% +/- 1.6% (1 sigma) and 2.1% +/- 1.1%, respectively. Maximum delta13C values are about 1% higher for the Desmoinesian and Missourian than the Morrowan and Atokan, similar to results from the Yukon Territory. delta18O and delta13C values are lowest for crystalline mosaic limestones and siltstones, moderate for packstones, wackestones, and mudstones, and highest for boundstones and grainstones. The delta13C profile from Gallagher Peak consists of high frequency 1% oscillations with several larger excursions. No large delta13C increase at the base of the section suggests the Mid-Carboniferous boundary is in the underlying Bluebird Mountain formation. delta13C of Gallagher Peak and Arrow Canyon, NV, correlate well from 318 to 310 Ma, but correlation becomes more difficult around 310 Ma. This may result from increased restriction of the Snaky Canyon platform beginning in the Desmoinesian. Most of the short term (<1 Ma) isotopic excursions are the result of diagenesis. Two of the largest negative excursions at Gallagher Peak correlate with two large negative excursions at Big Hatchet Peak, NM, possibly due to sea level lowstands of the Desmoinesian. Phylloid algal mounds at Gallagher Peak are associated with positive excursions because of original aragonite composition and increased open marine influence. Positive excursions related to other facies characteristics also result from increased marine influence. The delta13C curve for the upper half of Gallagher Peak contains three repeated cycles of increasing delta13C over 1-1.5 Ma, which are possibly related to long-term sea level fluctuations. Given the complexity of each local environment, without detailed biostratigraphy, detailed rock descriptions, and analysis of the various rock components, delta13C stratigraphy of whole rocks can be misinterpreted.

Jolley, Casey

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Underground Infrastructure Impacts Due to a Surface Burst Nuclear Device in an Urban Canyon Environment  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of the effects of a nuclear device exploded in a urban environment such as the Chicago studied for this particular report have shown the importance on the effects from the urban canyons so typical of today's urban environment as compared to nuclear test event effects observed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Pacific Testing Area on which many of the typical legacy empirical codes are based on. This report first looks at the some of the data from nuclear testing that can give an indication of the damage levels that might be experienced due to a nuclear event. While it is well known that a above ground blast, even a ground burst, very poorly transmits energy into the ground ( < 1%) and the experimental results discussed here are for fully coupled detonations, these results do indicate a useful measure of the damage that might be expected. The second part of the report looks at effects of layering of different materials that typically would make up the near ground below surface environment that a shock would propagate through. As these simulations support and is widely known in the community, the effects of different material compositions in these layers modify the shock behavior and especially modify the energy dispersal and coupling into the basement structures. The third part of the report looks at the modification of the underground shock effects from a surface burst 1 KT device due to the presence of basements under the Chicago buildings. Without direct knowledge of the basement structure, a simulated footprint of a uniform 20m depth was assumed underneath each of the NGI defined buildings in the above ground environment. In the above ground case, the underground basement structures channel the energy along the line of site streets keeping the shock levels from falling off as rapidly as has been observed in unobstructed detonations. These simulations indicate a falloff of factors of 2 per scaled length as compared to 10 for the unobstructed case. Again, as in the above ground case, the basements create significant shielding causing the shock profile to become more square and reducing the potential for damage diagonal to the line of sight streets. The results for a 1KT device is that the heavily damaged zone (complete destruction) will extend out to 50m from the detonation ({approx}100m for 10KT). The heavily to moderately damaged zone will extend out to 100m ({approx}200m for 10KT). Since the destruction will depend on geometric angle from the detonation and also the variability of response for various critical infrastructure, for planning purposes the area out to 100m from the detonation should be assumed to be non-operational. Specifically for subway tunnels, while not operational, they could be human passable for human egress in the moderately damaged area. The results of the simulations presented in this report indicate only the general underground infrastructure impact. Simulations done with the actual basement geometry would be an important improvement. Equally as important or even more so, knowing the actual underground material configurations and material composition would be critical information to refine the calculations. Coupling of the shock data into structural codes would help inform the emergency planning and first response communities on the impact to underground structures and the state of buildings after the detonation.

Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dey, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runnels, Scott R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

382

Decreasing Slip Rates From12.8 Ma to Present on the Solitario Canyon Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solitario Canyon fault, which bounds the west side of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is the closest fault with Quaternary offset adjacent to the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository. Dip-slip offset between 12.8 and 10.7 Ma is determined from lithostratigraphic displacement in boreholes USW H-3 and USW WT-7, drilled in the footwall and hanging wall, respectively. The base of the 12.8-Ma Topopah Spring Tuff is interpreted to have 463.3 m of separation across the fault, an average dip slip rate of 0.036 mm/yr. Previous researchers identified a geothermal system active from 11.5 to 10.0 Ma with peak activity at 10.7 Ma that resulted in pervasive alteration of vitric rock to zeolitic minerals where the rocks were in the ground-water saturated zone. The contact between vitric (V) and pervasively zeolitic (Z) rocks cuts across the lithostratigraphic section and offset of this V-Z boundary can be used to measure slip rates between 12.8 and 10.7 Ma. In H-3, the V-Z boundary is 138.4 m below the base of the vitric, densely welded subzone of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tptpv3). In WT-7, although the V-Z boundary is identified at the base of the Tptpv3, borehole video, cuttings, and geophysical log data indicate the Tptpv3 has well-developed zeolitic alteration along fractures, and this implies 19.5 m of the total thickness of Tptpv3 (and probably additional overlying crystallized rocks) also were in the saturated zone by 10.7 Ma. The V-Z relations across the Solitario Canyon fault in H-3 and WT-7 indicate a minimum of 157.9 m of separation before 10.7 Ma, which is 34.1 percent of the total slip of the Topopah Spring Tuff, and a minimum dip slip rate of 0.075 mm/yr from 12.8 to 10.7 Ma. These data are consistent with the broader structural history of the area near Yucca Mountain. Previous workers used angular unconformities, tilting of structural blocks, and paleomagnetic data to constrain the main period of extensional faulting between 12.7 and 8.5 Ma. Paleoseismic studies in Quaternary deposits documented slip rates on the Solitario Canyon fault from 0.01 to 0.02 mm/yr since 0.077 and 0.20 Ma. The decrease of extensional activity slip rates data on the Solitario Canyon fault provide evidence of decreasing tectonic activity from the middle Miocene to present.

D. Buesch

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

Mark B. Murphy

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Microsoft Word - Deep-Burn awardee team members _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DEEP-BURN AWARDEES RECIPIENTS RECIPIENT TEAM MEMBERS Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capability R&D for $1 million University of Chicago Argonne Argonne National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Lab University of Michigan Transuranic Management Capabilities R&D for $6.3 million Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Idaho National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley University of Wisconsin University of Tennessee University of Nevada Las Vegas North Carolina State University Georgia Institute of Technology Pennsylvania State University Idaho State University Texas A&M University Logos Technologies

385

Employing the EPRI Vista Program for Test Burn Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drive to use fuel switching as a means to meet more stringent SO2 and NOX emissions requirements has in many cases led to both a reduction in power station efficiency and a poorer net plant heat rate (NPHR) at the power station, as well as significant reductions in operating margins and increases in the risk of unit derates. One excellent method to manage or mitigate this risk is a comprehensive test burn for fuels under consideration. The objectives of this technical report are to demonstrate how th...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hydrogen-burn survival: preliminary thermal model and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents preliminary Hydrogen Burn Survival (HBS) Program experimental and analytical work conducted through February 1982. The effects of hydrogen deflagrations on safety-related equipment in nuclear power plant containment buildings are considered. Preliminary results from hydrogen deflagration experiments in the Sandia Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES) are presented and analytical predictions for these tests are compared and discussed. Analytical estimates of component thermal responses to hydrogen deflagrations in the upper and lower compartments of an ice condenser, pressurized water reactor are also presented.

McCulloch, W.H.; Ratzel, A.C.; Kempka, S.N.; Furgal, D.T.; Aragon, J.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Testing of the Burns-Milwaukee`s Sun Oven  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Burns-Milwaukee Sun Oven was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 160{degrees}C (320{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperatures to 80{degrees}C, (175{degrees}F), in 75 minutes. Observations were also made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on operation of the solar oven was also noted.

Moss, T.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nonphotochemical hole burning of the reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis  

SciTech Connect

Reddy et al. (Science, accepted) have reported persistent, nonphotochemical hole-burned (NPHB) spectra for the Q[sub y] states of the reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The photoinduced structural transformation was shown to be highly localized on the special pair. This transformation leads to a red shift of the special pair's lowest-energy absorption band, P960, of 150 cm[sup [minus]1] and a comparable blue shift for a state at 850 nm, which, as a consequence, could be assigned as being most closely associated with the upper dimer component. Additional experimental results are presented here together with a theoretical analysis of the extent to which the NPHB spectra provide information on the contribution from the bacteriochlorophyll monomers of the special pair to the Q[sub y] states that absorb higher in energy than P960. Structured photochemical hole-burned (PHB) spectra of P960 are also presented that underscore the importance of strong electron-phonon coupling from a broad distribution of modes with a mean frequency of 30 cm[sup [minus]1] for an understanding of the P960 absorption profile. These spectra also identify the zero-phonon hole of the strongly damped special pair marker mode (145 cm[sup [minus]1]) and its associated phonon sideband structure. Calculated spectra are presented which are in good agreement with the experimental PHB spectra. 30 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Reddy, N.R.S.; Kolaczkowski, S.V.; Small, G.J. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Testing of the Burns-Milwaukee's Sun Oven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Burns-Milwaukee Sun Oven was tested at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 160 o C (320 o F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80 o C, (175 o F), in 75 minutes. Observations were also made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on operation of the solar oven was also noted. ii 1 The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories evaluated a Sun Oven from Burns-Milwaukee at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque NM. It was designed for single family household cooking. It is targeting developing countries' alternative energy markets where conventional fuels are not available and wood is the primary fuel used for cooking. Because of the wide variety and types of solar...

Moss Solar Thermal; T. A. Moss

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Biogenic and biomass burning sources of acetone to the troposphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Acetone may be an important source of reactive odd hydrogen in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. This source of odd hydrogen may affect the concentration of a number of species, including ozone, nitrogen oxides, methane, and others. Traditional, acetone had been considered a by-product of the photochemical oxidation of other species, and had not entered models as a primary emission. However, recent work estimates a global source term of 40-60 Tg acetone/year. Of this, 25% is directly emitted during biomass burning, and 20% is directly emitted by evergreens and other plants. Only 3% is due to anthropogenic/industrial emissions. The bulk of the remainder, 51% of the acetone source, is a secondary product from the oxidation of propane, isobutane, and isobutene. Also, while it is speculated that the oxidation of pinene (a biogenic emission) may also contribute about 6 Tg/year, this term is highly uncertain. Thus, the two largest primary sources of acetone are biogenic emission and biomass burning, with industrial/anthropogenic emissions very small in comparison.

Atherton, C.S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Solar Proton Burning Process Revisited within a Covariant Model Based on the Bethe-Salpeter Formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A covariant model based on the Bethe-Salpeter formalism is proposed for investigating the solar proton burning process $pp\\to De^+\

L. P. Kaptari; B. Kmpfer; E. Grosse

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

An analysis of terrain roughness: Generating a GIS application for prescribed burning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Prescribed burning is a technique used to rejuvenate pastures by enhancing wildlife habitat, brush control, and removing old growth. The technique has become a science (more)

Crawford, Matthew Allan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

"Burning Man was better next year:" a phenomenology of community identity in the Black Rock counterculture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study illustrates and explains communal identity performance and maintenance as manifested by the participants in the counterculture community at Burning Man. This community is (more)

Kehoe, Kara Leeann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effects of prescribed burning on undesirable plant species and soil physical properties on tallgrass prairies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Prescribed burning has been a common conservation practice on native prairie dating back to the days of pioneer settlement. Advantages include increased forage quality, reduction (more)

Ungerer, James L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

O-1: Using of Spent Moulding Sands for Production of Burned ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurements of exhaust gases emissions performed during burning the products containing spent moulding sands as well as during the normal...

397

INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Late Pleistocene to Recent sediment transport pathways of the Green Canyon OCS area, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses some of the complexities of sediment transport systems on the continental slope of the Green Canyon OCS area south of the Louisiana coast. Five Late Pleistocene to Recent sedimentary sequences are identified using a combination of seismic and well data. Sediments are transported through pathways characterized by erosional surfaces and numerous channels which form as sediments remobilize and become transported downslope. Pathway margins are constricted by physiographic highs. Several processes are identified as means of carrying fine-grained sediments to and across the continental slope. The most important of these are mass movements (slumps and slides), debris flows, and turbidity currents. Faulting and/or slumping at the shelf edge remobilizes sediments which are then carried further downslope. These remobilized sediments may be transported as debris flows or other undifferentiated high-density flows, or may develop into turbidity currents which deposit graded sediments in response to decreases in slope gradient. Slumps and slides off salt uplifts also deposit large volumes of sediments into adjacent intraslope basins and sediment transport pathways, where they may contribute significant amounts of material to the downslope transport of sediments. Discrete channels are not often observed in the pathways due to multiple episodes of channel formation and erosion which occurred during a single sea level lowstand. These multiple episodes tend to remove or obscure prominent channel features. Sedimentation is cyclic. During one sea level lowstand a sequence is deposited in and along narrow pathways which successively fill intraslope basins from the shelf edge downslope. As each basin is filled, sediments spill over and continue downslope to a lower basin. Sedimentation during the next sea level lowstand occurs in broader pathways. Less sediments are deposited in the intraslope basin areas because they remain filled from the previous sequence. By the time of deposition of the next sequence, movement of underlying salt sheets has changed the shape of the pathway. The sedimentation pattern repeats as lower depressions fill and sediments spill over. Pathways transport slope sediments in the Green canyon area. Discrete channels are not often observed in the pathways. This is a result of two mechanisms: 1) multiple episodes of erosion during a sea level lowstand tend to remove or obscure prominent channel features, and 2) most sediments deposited within the pathways are mass transport deposits which do not often become channelized. The pathways are characterized by erosional surfaces and numerous conduits which form as sediments remobilize and become transported downslope. They are laterally relatively persistent, being constricted by structural highs,

Swanson, John Patrick

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Analyzing the connectivity potential of landscape geomorphic systems: a radar remote sensing and GIS approach, Estufa Canyon, Texas, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connectivity is considered one of the fundamental aspects that influences the rate of mass movement in the landscape. The connectivity aspect has been acknowledged from various conceptual geomorphic frameworks. None of these provided a developmental methodology for studying the connectivity of geomorphic systems, especially at the scale of the fluvial system. The emphasis in this research is placed on defining variables of the geomorphic systems that influence the connectivity potential of these systems. The landscape gradient, which is extracted from the Digital Elevation Model (DEM), and the surface roughness, which is extracted from radar images, are used to analyze the connectivity potential of geomorphic systems in the landscape. Integration of these variables produces a connectivity potential index of the various geomorphic systems that compose the fluvial system. High values of the connectivity potential index indicate high potential of the geomorphic system to transport mass whereas the low values indicate low potential of the geomorphic system to transport mass in the landscape. Using the mean values of the connectivity potential index, the geomorphic systems in the landscape can be classified into geomorphic systems of low connectivity potential, geomorphic systems of intermediate connectivity potential and geomorphic systems of high connectivity potential. In addition to the determination of the relative connectivity potential of various geomorphic systems, the connectivity potential index is used to analyze the system-wide connectivity. The ratios between the connectivity potential index of the upstream geomorphic systems and the connectivity potential index of the downstream geomorphic systems define system-wide connectivity in the landscape. High ratios reflect the high potential of the upstream geomorphic systems to transport mass in the downstream direction. Low ratios indicate the influence of the downstream geomorphic systems in maximizing mass movement in the upstream geomorphic systems. The presence of high and low ratios suggests the presence of a high system-wide connectivity. As the ratio approaches unity, mass movement is minimized in the landscape indicating low system-wide connectivity. Applying the above approach to Estufa Canyon, Texas, illustrated that Estufa Canyon is a dynamic fluvial system with high system-wide connectivity.

Ibrahim, ElSayed Ali Hermas

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Experiments for the Measurement of LNG Mass Burning Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is a commonly used flammable fuel that has safety concerns associated with vapor dispersion and radiation emitted from pool fires. The main objective of this effort is to advance the knowledge of pool fires and to expand the data that is commonly used to validate semi-empirical models. This includes evaluation of the methods that are utilized to obtain experimental values of mass burning rates, which are used in models where semi-empirical correlations cannot be applied. A total of three small-size experiments designed to study the radiative characteristics of LNG pool fires were carried out at Texas A & M University's Brayton Fire Training Field (BFTF). This set of experiments was designed to study how the heat feedback from the fire to the pool surface is subsequently distributed through the liquid volume and the validity of different methods for measuring burning rates. In this work, a number of semi-empirical correlations were used to predict the characteristics of the flame and examine the predictive accuracy of these correlations when compared to the values obtained experimentally. In addition, the heat transferred from the energy received at the pool's surface to the surroundings was investigated. Finally, the parameters that influenced the measurement of radiative head feedback to the liquid pool were analyzed to investigate potential causes of calibration drift in the instrumentation. The results of this work provided information regarding the validity of certain techniques for the measurement of mass burning rates and the use of correlations to predict the characteristics of an LNG pool fire on a small-scale. The findings from this work indicate that the energy received at the liquid surface was used entirely for evaporation and no indications of transmission to the surroundings were observed. Lastly, it was found that during the experiments, the sink temperature of the sensor was not constant, and therefore, the readings of the radiative heat were unreliable. This was due to the insufficient cooling effect of the water circulated. It was later shown in the laboratory that through a series of qualitative tests, a change of 20C in the cooling water resulted in a calibration drift.

Herrera Gomez, Lady Carolina

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program : Facilty Location Evaluation for Franklin-Badger Canyon 230-kV Line and Badger Canyon Substation Study Area 74-6B.  

SciTech Connect

Proposed is the construction of a 15-mile, 230-kV double-circuit transmission line from Franklin Substation near Pasco, Washington, to a proposed new Badger Canyon Substation to be constructed 5 miles west of Kennewick, Washington. Depending on the final route location chosen, approximately 15 miles of 230-kV double circuit transmission line requiring 5.6 miles of new and 9.4 miles of existing right-of-way would be needed as well as approximately 2500 feet of new access road. Land use affected includes crossing Sacajawea State Park and passig through irrigated cropland and grassland on existing right-of-way, and depending on the alternative route chosen, could cross land proposed for residential development and a proposed interstate highway. An additional 10 to 11 acres of potential cropland would be required for the proposed substation. Disturbance to wildlife during construction would occur and habitat associated with the above land uses would be eliminated. Some erosion and sedimentation would occur. Visual impacts would affect Sacajawea State Park, a proposed highway, and potential residential development land. Noise and other disturbances to residents will occur, primarily during construction.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1974-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Lignite Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury control technologies for Mercury control technologies for electric utilities Burning lignite coal Background In partnership with a number of key stakeholders, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE), through its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has been carrying out a comprehensive research program since the mid-1990s focused on the development of advanced, cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for coal-fired power plants. Mercury is a poisonous metal found in coal, which can be harmful and even toxic when absorbed from the environment and concentrated in animal tissues. Mercury is present as an unwanted by-product of combustion in power plant flue gases, and is found in varying percentages in three basic chemical forms(known as speciation): particulate-bound mercury, oxidized

403

Exhaust gas purification system for lean burn engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust gas purification system for a lean burn engine includes a thermal mass unit and a NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit downstream of the thermal mass unit. The NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit includes at least one catalyst section. Each catalyst section includes a catalytic layer for converting NO.sub.x coupled to a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger portion of the catalyst section acts to maintain the catalytic layer substantially at a desired temperature and cools the exhaust gas flowing from the catalytic layer into the next catalytic section in the series. In a further aspect of the invention, the exhaust gas purification system includes a dual length exhaust pipe upstream of the NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit. The dual length exhaust pipe includes a second heat exchanger which functions to maintain the temperature of the exhaust gas flowing into the thermal mass downstream near a desired average temperature.

Haines, Leland Milburn (Northville, MI)

2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Approximate Dynamic Programming Solutions for Lean Burn Engine Aftertreatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The competition to deliver fuel e#cient and environmentally friendly vehicles is driving the automotive industry to consider ever more complex powertrain systems. Adequate performance of these new highly interactive systems can no longer be obtained through traditional approaches, which are intensive in hardware use and #nal control software calibration. This paper explores the use of dynamic programming to make model-based design decisions for a lean burn, direct injection spark ignition engine, in combination with a three way catalyst and lean NOx trap aftertreatment system. The primary contribution is the development ofavery rapid method to evaluate the tradeo#s in fuel economy and emissions for this novel powertrain system, as a function of design parameters and controller structure, over a standard emission test cycle. 1 Introduction Designing a powertrain system to meet drivability, fuel economy and emissions performance requirements is a complicated task. There are many tradeo...

Jun-Mo Kang; Ilya Kolmanovsky; J.W. Grizzle

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Explosive hydrogen burning during type I X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Explosive hydrogen burning in type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) comprise charged particle reactions creating isotopes with masses up to A~100. Since charged particle reactions in a stellar environment are very temperature sensitive, we use a realistic time-dependent general relativistic and self-consistent model of type I x-ray bursts to provide accurate values of the burst temperatures and densities. This allows a detailed and accurate time-dependent identification of the reaction flow from the surface layers through the convective region and the ignition region to the neutron star ocean. Using this, we determine the relative importance of specific nuclear reactions in the X-ray burst.

Jacob Lund Fisker; Hendrik Schatz; Friedrich-Karl Thielemann

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

Systems Analysis of a Compact Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new burning plasma systems code (BPSC) has been developed for analysis of a next step compact burning plasma experiment with copper-alloy magnet technology. We consider two classes of configurations: Type A, with the toroidal field (TF) coils and ohmic heating (OH) coils unlinked, and Type B, with the TF and OH coils linked. We obtain curves of the minimizing major radius as a function of aspect ratio R(A) for each configuration type for typical parameters. These curves represent, to first order, cost minimizing curves, assuming that device cost is a function of major radius. The Type B curves always lie below the Type A curves for the same physics parameters, indicating that they lead to a more compact design. This follows from that fact that a high fraction of the inner region, r < R-a, contains electrical conductor material. However, the fact that the Type A OH and TF magnets are not linked presents fewer engineering challenges and should lead to a more reliable design. Both the Type A and Type B curves have a minimum in major radius R at a minimizing aspect ratio A typically above 2.8 and at high values of magnetic field B above 10 T. The minimizing A occurs at larger values for longer pulse and higher performance devices. The larger A and higher B design points also have the feature that the ratio of the discharge time to the current redistribution time is largest so that steady-state operation can be more realistically prototyped. A sensitivity study is presented for the baseline Type A configuration showing the dependence of the results on the parameters held fixed for the minimization study.

S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; D. Meade; C. Neumeyer

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

407

Structured hole-burned spectra of reaction centers of rhodopseudomonas viridis  

SciTech Connect

Structured hole-burned spectra for P960 of Rps, viridis are reported which, for appropriate burn wavelengths, exhibit four holes (including a zero-phonon hole). The data indicate that two electronic states contribute significantly to P960 and suggest that the primary electron-transfer step should be modeled in terms of coupled adiabatic trimer states.

Tang, D.; Jankowiak, R.; Gillie, J.K.; Small, G.J.; Tiede, D.M.

1988-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global warming Researchers ScienceDaily (July 30, 2010) -- Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels biofuels, such as wood, manure, dung, and other solid biomass used for home heating and cooking in many

411

Burning state recognition of rotary kiln using ELMs with heterogeneous features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image based burning state recognition plays an important role in sintering process control of rotary kiln. Although many efforts on dealing with this problem have been made over the past years, the recognition performance cannot be satisfactory due to ... Keywords: Burning state, ELM, Eigen-flame image, Latent semantic analysis, Multivariate image analysis

Weitao Li; Dianhui Wang; Tianyou Chai

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

FLAMES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA: DEFLAGRATION-DETONATION TRANSITION IN THE OXYGEN-BURNING FLAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flame in a Type Ia supernova is a conglomerate structure that, depending on density, may involve separate regions of carbon, oxygen, and silicon burning, all propagating in a self-similar, subsonic front. The separation between these three burning regions increases as the density declines until eventually, below about 2 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, only carbon burning remains active, the other two burning phases having 'frozen out' on stellar scales. Between 2 and 3 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, however, there remains an energetic oxygen-burning region that trails the carbon burning by an amount that is sensitive to the turbulence intensity. As the carbon flame makes a transition to the distributed regime (Karlovitz number {approx}> 10), the characteristic separation between the carbon- and oxygen-burning regions increases dramatically, from a fraction of a meter to many kilometers. The oxygen-rich mixture between the two flames is created at a nearly constant temperature, and turbulence helps to maintain islands of well-mixed isothermal fuel as the temperature increases. The delayed burning of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation.

Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kerstein, A. R. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Aspden, A. J., E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: arkerst@sandia.gov, E-mail: ajaspden@lbl.gov [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Burning Issue By Alyssa A. Lappen and Jack D. Lauber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Burning Issue By Alyssa A. Lappen and Jack D. Lauber FrontPageMagazine.com | March 1, 2006 in the U.S. By 1999, Japan was burning more than 74 percent of its municipal waste and landfilling only 20

Columbia University

414

A MODIS assessment of the summer 2007 extent burned in Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devastating fires affected Greece in the summer 2007, with the loss of more than 60 human lives, the destruction of more than 100 villages and hundreds of square kilometres of forest burned. This Letter presents a map of the extent burned and the approximate ...

Luigi Boschetti; David Roy; Paulo Barbosa; Roberto Boca; Chris Justice

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Use of Modeling for Prevention of Solids Formation During Canyon Processing of Legacy Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Management (EM) nuclear material stabilization program includes the dissolution and processing of legacy materials from various DOE sites. The SRS canyon facilities were designed to dissolve and process spent nuclear fuel and targets. As the processing of typical materials is completed, unusual and exotic nuclear materials are being targeted for stabilization. These unusual materials are often difficult to dissolve using historical flowsheet conditions and require more aggressive dissolver solutions. Solids must be prevented in the dissolver to avoid expensive delays associated with the build-up of insoluble material in downstream process equipment. Moreover, it is vital to prevent precipitation of all solids, especially plutonium-bearing solids, since their presence in dissolver solutions raises criticality safety issues. To prevent precipitation of undesirable solids in aqueous process solutions, the accuracy of computer models to predict precipitate formation requires incorporation of plant specific fundamental data. These data are incorporated into a previously developed thermodynamic computer program that applies the Pitzer correlation to derive activity coefficient parameters. This improved predictive model will reduce unwanted precipitation in process solutions at DOE sites working with EM nuclear materials in aqueous solutions.

Rhodes, W. D.; Crooks III, W. J.; Christian, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Outdoor Fire Range Upgrades at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement actions in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is partially located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to upgrade the existing outdoor shooting range facilities at TA-72. These upgrades will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel. In order to remain current on training requirements, the firing ranges at TA-72 will be upgraded which will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel (Figure 1). These upgrades will allow for an increase in class size and more people to be qualified at the ranges. Some of these upgrades will be built within the 100-year floodplain. The upgrades include: concrete pads for turning target systems and shooting positions, new lighting to illuminate the firing range for night fire, a new speaker system for range operations, canopies at two locations, an impact berm at the far end of the 300-yard mark, and a block wall for road protection.

Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

417

Structural restoration of Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continental margin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is suited for seismic stratigraphic analysis and salt tectonism analysis. Jurassic strata include the Louann Salt on the continental shelf and upper slope of the Destin Dome OCS area, northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sediments were deposited in a slowly subsiding, stable tectonic environment. Two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data, supplemented with well log, paleontologic and velocity information were used to infer structural and stratigraphic features, especially small faults in the deep part of the De Soto Canyon Salt Basin area. Six sequence boundaries or correlative paleohorizons were interpreted on Landmark seismic interpretation workstation. They are Base of Salt or Equivalent, Top of Salt, Top of Smackover Formation, Top of Cotton Valley Group, Middle Cretaceous sequence boundary, and Top of Upper Cretaceous. Information generated from structural and stratigraphic analysis are used to analyze the evolution of salt movement and salt mechanism in this area. I used a software package Restore (Dan Schultz-Ela and Ken Duncan, 1991) for structural restoration. This program is suitable for extensional terrane. The restoration of one depth section was achieved through steps introduced by Restore. Regional extension, gravity spreading, and gliding are the most important mechanism of salt flow, buoyancy and differential loading mainly contribute to the vertical development of salt structure in this area.

Guo, Mengdong

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Biomass burning sources of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Biomass burning is an important source of many key tropospheric species, including aerosols, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub {times}}=NO+NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and other species. These emissions and their subsequent products act as pollutants and affect greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. One important by-product of biomass burning is tropospheric ozone, which is a pollutant that also absorbs infrared radiation. Ozone is formed when CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHCs react in the presence of NO{sub {times}} and sunlight. Ozone concentrations in tropical regions (where the bulk of biomass burning occurs) may increase due to biomass burning. Additionally, biomass burning can increase the concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), a key component of acid rain.

Atherton, C.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Biomass burning in Asia : annual and seasonal estimates and atmospheric emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of biomass burning in Asia are developed to facilitate the modeling of Asian and global air quality. A survey of national, regional, and international publications on biomass burning is conducted to yield consensus estimates of 'typical' (i.e., non-year-specific) estimates of open burning (excluding biofuels). We conclude that 730 Tg of biomass are burned in a typical year from both anthropogenic and natural causes. Forest burning comprises 45% of the total, the burning of crop residues in the field comprises 34%, and 20% comes from the burning of grassland and savanna. China contributes 25% of the total, India 18%, Indonesia 13%, and Myanmar 8%. Regionally, forest burning in Southeast Asia dominates. National, annual totals are converted to daily and monthly estimates at 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} spatial resolution using distributions based on AVHRR fire counts for 1999--2000. Several adjustment schemes are applied to correct for the deficiencies of AVHRR data, including the use of moving averages, normalization, TOMS Aerosol Index, and masks for dust, clouds, landcover, and other fire sources. Good agreement between the national estimates of biomass burning and adjusted fire counts is obtained (R{sup 2} = 0.71--0.78). Biomass burning amounts are converted to atmospheric emissions, yielding the following estimates: 0.37 Tg of SO{sub 2}, 2.8 Tg of NO{sub x}, 1100 Tg of CO{sub 2}, 67 Tg of CO, 3.1 Tg of CH{sub 4}, 12 Tg of NMVOC, 0.45 Tg of BC, 3.3 Tg of OC, and 0.92 Tg of NH{sub 3}. Uncertainties in the emission estimates, measured as 95% confidence intervals, range from a low of {+-}65% for CO{sub 2} emissions in Japan to a high of {+-}700% for BC emissions in India.

Streets, D. G.; Yarber, K. F.; Woo, J.-H.; Carmichael, G. R.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Iowa

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

A Study of the Relation of Meteorological Variables to Monthly Provincial Area Burned by Wildfire in Canada (195380)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relation between meteorological variables and the monthly area burned by wildfire from May to August 195380 in nine Canadian provinces was investigated. A purely statistical approach to estimating the monthly provincial area burned, using ...

M. D. Flannigan; J. B. Harrington

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Persistent infrared spectral hole burning of NO; ions in potassium halide crystals. I. Priric9ple and satellite.holle generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Persistent infrared spectral hole burning of NO; ions in potassium halide crystals. I. Priric9ple spectroscopyand persistentinfrared spectralhole (PIRSH) burning separatelyand together. With interferometry cm --'and, with PIRSH burning, it has beendemijnstratedthat the narrowestlinesare

Sethna, James P.

422

Volume159,number 1 CHEMICALPHYSICS LETTERS 30 June 1989 TIME EVOLUTION OF NON-PHOTOCHEMICAL HOLE BURNING LINEWIDTHS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNING LINEWIDTHS: OBSERVATION OF SPECTRAL DIFFUSION AT LONG TIMES K.A. LITTAU, Y.S. BAI and M.D. FAYER 18 April 1989 Time-dependent non-photochemical hole burning linewidths for cresyl violet in ethanol of experimental techniques used to measure op- tical dephasing in glasses e.g. hole burning [ 12 1,two- pulse

Fayer, Michael D.

423

Hole-burning techniques for isolation and study of individual hyperfine transitions in inhomogeneously broadened solids demonstrated in Pr3+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hole-burning techniques for isolation and study of individual hyperfine transitions been limited. However, here we present spectroscopic techniques, based on spectral hole burning of hole-burning pulses is used to isolate selected transitions between hyperfine levels, which makes

Suter, Dieter

424

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 5 DECEMBER 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1027 Recent acceleration of biomass burning and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

burning and carbon losses in Alaskan forests and peatlands Merritt R. Turetsky1 *, Evan S. Kane2 in burned area and fire frequency are expected to stimulate boreal carbon losses3­5 . However, the impact of wildfires on carbon emissions is also affected by the severity of burning. How climate change influences

Ruess, Roger W.

425

D. Moreau IEA W60 Burning Plasma Physics and Simulation, Tarragona, July 2005 INTEGRATED REAL-TIME CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Moreau IEA W60 Burning Plasma Physics and Simulation, Tarragona, July 2005 INTEGRATED REAL-TIME CONTROL FOR ADVANCED STEADY STATE SCENARIOS AND APPLICATIONS TO BURNING PLASMAS EFDA-JET CSU, Culham. Sartori, and many other JET-EFDA Contributors D. Moreau #12;D. Moreau IEA W60 Burning Plasma Physics

426

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME burning events. It is found that the regional AAI data follow the regional tropospheric NO2 data well sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

Tilstra, Gijsbert

427

Burning A Disc Using InfraRecorder On the PC desktop, double click on the Accessories and Utilities folder.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning A Disc Using InfraRecorder On the PC desktop, double click on the Accessories and Utilities to burn. For Word, Excel, PDFs, etc., select Data Disc and CD or DVD as appropriate. At the next screen the pane to the upper left allows you to maneuver to the location of the file(s) you wish to burn. The pane

Kim, Duck O.

428

Texas A&M AgriLife Research Procedures 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M AgriLife Research Procedures 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning Approved: October 5, 2000: August 27, 2014 Texas A&M AgriLife Research Procedure 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning Page 1 of 2 PROCEDURE STATEMENT The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) regulates outdoor burning (30 TAC

429

Measurement of adiabatic burning velocity in natural gas-like mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Experimental measurements of the adiabatic burning velocities were carried out for natural gas-like mixtures burning in air over a range of equivalence ratios at atmospheric pressure. Effect of CO{sub 2} dilution up to 60%, N{sub 2} dilution up to 40% and 25% enrichment of ethane on burning velocity of methane-air flames were studied. Heat flux method with setup similar to that of [K.J. Bosschaart, L.P.H. de Goey, Detailed analysis of the heat flux method for measuring burning velocity, Combustion and Flame 132 (2003) 170-180] was used for measurement of burning velocities. Initially experiments were done for methane-air and ethane-air mixtures at various equivalence ratios and the results were in good agreement with published data in the literature. Computations were performed using PREMIX code with GRI 3.0 reaction mechanism for all the mixtures. Predicted flame structures were used to the explain the effect of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} dilution on burning velocity of methane-air flames. Peak burning velocity for CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2}-air mixtures occur near to {phi} = 1.0. (author)

Ratna Kishore, V.; Duhan, Nipun; Ravi, M.R.; Ray, Anjan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Interaction of the burning spherical droplets in oxygen-enriched turbulent environment  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional numerical studies on the interaction of vaporizing and burning droplets were conducted to understand the burning characteristics of multiple droplets in a turbulent environment. The burning droplets characteristics, such as lifetime, surface temperature, vaporization, reaction, and burning rate were examined for various oxygen mole-fractions and geometrical arrangements of droplets. Results from a single droplet combustion test were first verified and validated against existing experimental data. Results indicate that turbulent intensity has a moderate effect on droplet burning rate, but not as prominent an effect as the oxygen mole-fraction. At high oxygen mole-fractions, droplet lifetime was short due to enhanced burning. It is shown that evaporation processes of multiple droplets are notably affected by the inter-space distance between droplets both in streamwise and spanwise directions. The burning rate as a function of oxygen mole-fraction and inter-space distance is determined and can be used as a guideline for future studies on spray combustion. (author)

Cho, Chong Pyo [Automobile Energy and Environment Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 71-2 Jangdong, Yuseonggu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea); Kim, Ho Young; Yoon, Sam S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anamdong, 5-Ga, Sungbukgu, Seoul, 136-701 (Korea)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Addendum to High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a small follow-on study, the burn rate of the ammonium perchlorate (AP) based material TAL-1503 was studied at a relatively mild pressure. The goal of this final experiment was to burn TAL-1503 at the lowest pressures possible using the LLNL High Pressure Strand Burner (LLNL-HPSB). The following is a description of the experiment and the results with a brief discussion of data and a comparison to the higher pressure data. This is not meant to be a stand-alone report and readers should refer to the main report for experimental details and discussion. High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique AP/HTPB based material (TAL-1503) were performed using the LLNL high pressure strand burner apparatus. The material burns in a well behaved, laminar fashion between 20 and 300 MPa with a burn law of B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} that was calculated based on the best data available from the experiments. In the pressure range of 2 and 10 MPa the material burned laminarly with a burn law of B = (2.0 {+-} 0.2) x P{sup (0.66{+-}0.05)}. In these results, B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is the pressure in units of MPa. Comparison of the TAL-1503 results with similar propellants that contain micrometer sized aluminum indicate that the burn rates are relatively unaffected by the aluminum. However, the pressure change is significantly larger when aluminum is present, most likely due to the high temperatures achieved from burning aluminum.

Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

432

Improved accountability method for measuring enriched uranium in H-Canyon dissolver solution at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), accountability measurement of enriched uranium dissolved in H-Canyon is performed using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In the IDMS analytical method, a known quantity of uranium{sup 233} is added to the sample solution containing enriched uranium and fission products. The resulting uranium mixture must first be purified using a separation technique in the shielded analytical(``hot``) cells to lower radioactivity levels by removing fission products. Following this purification, the sample is analyzed by mass spectrometry to determine the total uranium content and isotopic abundance. The magnitude of the response of each uranium isotope in the sample solution and the response of the U{sup 233} spike is measured. By ratioing these responses, relative to the known quantity of the U{sup 233} spike, the uranium content can be determined. A hexane solvent extraction technique, used for years at SRS to remove fission products prior to the mass spectrometry analysis of uranium, has several problems. The hexone method is tedious, requires additional sample clean-up after the purified sample is removed from the shielded cells and requires the use of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-listed hazardous materials (hexone and chromium compounds). A new high speed separation method that enables a rapid removal of fission products in a shielded cells environment has been developed by the SRS Central Laboratory to replace the hexone method. The new high speed column extraction chromatography technique employs applied vacuum and columns containing tri (2-ethyl-hexyl) phosphate (TEHP) solvent coated on a small particle inert support (SM-7 Bio Beads). The new separation is rapid, user friendly, eliminates the use of the RCA-listed hazardous chemicals and reduces the amount of solid waste generated by the separation method. 2 tabs. 4 figs.

Maxwell, S.L. III; Satkowski, J.; Mahannah, R.N.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Improved accountability method for measuring enriched uranium in H-Canyon dissolver solution at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), accountability measurement of enriched uranium dissolved in H-Canyon is performed using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In the IDMS analytical method, a known quantity of uranium{sup 233} is added to the sample solution containing enriched uranium and fission products. The resulting uranium mixture must first be purified using a separation technique in the shielded analytical( hot'') cells to lower radioactivity levels by removing fission products. Following this purification, the sample is analyzed by mass spectrometry to determine the total uranium content and isotopic abundance. The magnitude of the response of each uranium isotope in the sample solution and the response of the U{sup 233} spike is measured. By ratioing these responses, relative to the known quantity of the U{sup 233} spike, the uranium content can be determined. A hexane solvent extraction technique, used for years at SRS to remove fission products prior to the mass spectrometry analysis of uranium, has several problems. The hexone method is tedious, requires additional sample clean-up after the purified sample is removed from the shielded cells and requires the use of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-listed hazardous materials (hexone and chromium compounds). A new high speed separation method that enables a rapid removal of fission products in a shielded cells environment has been developed by the SRS Central Laboratory to replace the hexone method. The new high speed column extraction chromatography technique employs applied vacuum and columns containing tri (2-ethyl-hexyl) phosphate (TEHP) solvent coated on a small particle inert support (SM-7 Bio Beads). The new separation is rapid, user friendly, eliminates the use of the RCA-listed hazardous chemicals and reduces the amount of solid waste generated by the separation method. 2 tabs. 4 figs.

Maxwell, S.L. III; Satkowski, J.; Mahannah, R.N.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Emission and transport of cesium-137 from boreal biomass burning in the summer of 2010  

SciTech Connect

While atmospheric concentrations of cesium-137 have decreased since the nuclear testing era, resuspension of Cs-137 during biomass burning provides an ongoing emission source. The summer of 2010 was an intense biomass burning season in western Russia, with high levels of particulate matter impacting air quality and visibility. A radionuclide monitoring station in western Russia shows enhanced airborne Cs-137 concentrations during the wildfire period. Since Cs-137 binds to aerosols, satellite observations of aerosols and fire occurrences can provide a global-scale context for Cs-137 emissions and transport during biomass burning events.

Strode, S.; Ott, Lesley E.; Pawson, Steven; Bowyer, Ted W.

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

435

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effects of actinide burning on waste disposal at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Release rates of 15 radionuclides from waste packages expected to result from partitioning and transmutation of Light-Water Reactor (LWR) and Actinide-Burning Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) spent fuel are calculated and compared to release rates from standard LWR spent fuel packages. The release rates are input to a model for radionuclide transport from the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to the water table. Discharge rates at the water table are calculated and used in a model for transport to the accessible environment, defined to be five kilometers from the repository edge. Concentrations and dose rates at the accessible environment from spent fuel and wastes from reprocessing, with partitioning and transmutation, are calculated. Partitioning and transmutation of LWR and ALMR spent fuel reduces the inventories of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium in the high-level waste by factors of 40 to 500. However, because release rates of all of the actinides except curium are limited by solubility and are independent of package inventory, they are not reduced correspondingly. Only for curium is the repository release rate much lower for reprocessing wastes.

Hirschfelder, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Project in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts Sandra Reategui Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 January 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2760 Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 2 Report Overview ......................................................................................................................... 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lurance canyon burn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

442

Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Historical Global Estimates Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860-1982 (NDP-006) DOI: 10.3334CDIACffe.ndp006 image Data image...

443

Modeling the impacts of biomass burning on air quality in and around Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The local and regional impacts of open fires and trash burning on ground-level ozone (O[subscript 3]) and fine carbonaceous aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and surrounding region during two high fire ...

Lei, W.

444

Climate effects of seasonally varying Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The climate impact of the seasonality of Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA) is studied using an aerosol-climate model coupled with a slab ocean model in a set of 60-year long simulations, driven by BBCA ...

Jeong, Gill-Ran

445

Estimation of Shortwave Direct Radiative Forcing of Biomass-Burning Aerosols Using New Angular Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a new angular distribution model (ADM) for smoke aerosols, the instantaneous top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) is calculated for selected days over biomass-burning regions in South America. The visible and ...

Xiang Li; Sundar A. Christopher; Joyce Chou; Ronald M. Welch

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fossil Fuel and Biomass Burning Effect on ClimateHeating or Cooling?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission from burning of fossil fuels and biomass (associated with deforestation) generates a radiative forcing on the atmosphere and a possible climate chaw. Emitted trace gases heat the atmosphere through their greenhouse effect, while ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser; Robert L. Mahoney

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.W. Shefer, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 28 (2003) 1131-1141. P.burning velocities of lean hydrogen-air flames at 1 atm andFORMULA FOR VERY LEAN HYDROGEN-AIR MIXTURES by Forman A.

Grcar, Joseph F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Contribution of garbage burning to chloride and PM[subscript 2.5] in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contribution of garbage burning (GB) emissions to chloride and PM[subscript 2.5] in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) has been investigated for the period of 24 to 29 March during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign using ...

Li, G.

450

Effects of Moisture Released during Forest Burning on Fog Formation and Implications for Visibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke from wildland burning in association with fog has been implicated as a visibility hazard over roadways in the United States. Visibilities at accident sites have been estimated in the range from 1 to 3 m (extinction coefficients between 1000 ...

Gary L. Achtemeier

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

In Situ Chemical Characterization of Aged Biomass-Burning Aerosols Impacting Cold Wave Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Ice in Clouds ExperimentLayer Clouds (ICE-L), aged biomass-burning particles were identified within two orographic wave cloud regions over Wyoming using single-particle mass spectrometry and electron microscopy. Using a suite of ...

Kerri A. Pratt; Andrew J. Heymsfield; Cynthia H. Twohy; Shane M. Murphy; Paul J. DeMott; James G. Hudson; R. Subramanian; Zhien Wang; John H. Seinfeld; Kimberly A. Prather

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Case study analysis of biomass burning plumes observed over Brazil during SAMBBA, September 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a huge source of atmospheric aerosols and is poorly understood leading to large uncertainties in estimates of radiative forcing of climate. Aerosols have both a direct effect on climate by reflecting and absorbing solar radiation and an indirect effect by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN). Biomass burning aerosols are produced from burning of vegetation with the vast majority occurring in the tropics. This research presents data collected during the aircraft campaign of the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) project during September and October 2012. A smouldering rainforest fire and a flaming savannah-like fire were selected for in-depth case studies of the atmospheric plume constituents and provide a comparison between the two fire types. The physiochemical characterization of the two plumes are identified

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

General analysis of breed-and-burn reactors and limited-separations fuel cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new theoretical framework is introduced, the "neutron excess" concept, which is useful for analyzing breed-and-burn (B&B) reactors and their fuel cycles. Based on this concept, a set of methods has been developed which ...

Petroski, Robert C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Agricultural burning monitored for air pollutants in Imperial County; exposure reduction recommendations developed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook. Sacramento, CA. http://infohouse.p2ric.org/E-BAM Evaluation. Sacramento, CA. www.arb.ca.gov/carpa/Burning Methodology. Sacramento, CA. www.arb. ca.gov/ei/

Harnly, Martha; Naik-Patel, Kinnery; Wall, Stephen; Quintana, Penelope J. E.; Pon, Diamon; Wagner, Jeff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect on flame instability is observed for the isomers of butanol. Critical flame radii are the same for the isomers of butanol. Peclet number decreases with the increase in equivalence ratio. (author)

Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

High Burn-Up Properties of the Fuel Variants Irradiated in IFA-649  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "standard product" uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel pellet has remained unchanged for many years and provides excellent performance in all but the most extreme reactor operation. The requirement to prolong fuel residence in commercial reactors, thus increasing discharge levels of burn-up, has led to a need for detailed measurements of high burn-up properties under a variety of normal and off-normal conditions. The changes in fuel material properties, such as density and swelling, ...

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Fire safety for your wood-burning appliance: tips for proper installation, operation, and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dramatic increase in house fires caused by wood-burning appliances has accompanied the rediscovery of wood as an alternative heating fuel. The National Bureau of Standards attributed the majority of these fires to conditions related to the installation, operation or maintenance of the appliances rather than malfunctions or construction defects. This publication presents guidelines for the proper installation, use, and maintenance of wood-burning appliances in the home. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Lessons learned from hydrogen generation and burning during the TMI-2 event  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes what has been learned from generation of hydrogen in the reactor core and the hydrogen burn that occurred in the containment building of the Three Mile Island Unit No. 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant on March 28, 1979. During the TMI-2 loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), a large quantity of hydrogen was generated by a zirconium-water reaction. The hydrogen burn that occurred 9 h and 50 min after the initiation of the TMI-2 accident went essentially unnoticed for the first few days. Even through the burn increased the containment gas temperature and pressure to 1200/sup 0/F (650/sup 0/C) and 29 lb/in/sup 2/ (200 kPa) gage, there was no serious threat to the containment building. The processes, rates, and quantities of hydrogen gas generated and removed during and following the LOCA are described in this report. In addition, the methods which were used to define the conditions that existed in the containment building before, during, and after the hydrogen burn are described. The results of data evaluations and engineering calculations are presented to show the pressure and temperature histories of the atmosphere in various containment segments during and after the burn. Material and equipment in reactor containment buildings can be protected from burn damage by the use of relatively simple enclosures or insulation.

Henrie, J.O.; Postma, A.K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Predicted effects of prescribed burning and harvesting on forest recovery and sustainability in southwest Georgia, USA  

SciTech Connect

A model-based analysis of the effect of prescribed burning and forest thinning or clear-cutting on stand recovery and sustainability was conducted at Fort Benning, GA, in the southeastern USA. Two experiments were performed with the model. In the first experiment, forest recovery from degraded soils was predicted for 100 years with or without prescribed burning. In the second experiment simulations began with 100 years of predicted stand growth, then forest sustainability was predicted for an additional 100 years under different combinations of prescribed burning and forest harvesting. Three levels of fire intensity (low, medium, and high), that corresponded to 17%, 33%, and 50% consumption of the forest floor C stock by fire, were evaluated at 1-, 2-, and 3-year fire return intervals. Relative to the control (no fire), prescribed burning with a 2- or 3-year return interval caused only a small reduction in predicted steady state soil C stocks ({le} 25%) and had no effect on steady state tree wood biomass, regardless of fire intensity. Annual high intensity burns did adversely impact forest recovery and sustainability (after harvesting) on less sandy soils, but not on more sandy soils that had greater N availability. Higher intensity and frequency of ground fires increased the chance that tree biomass would not return to pre-harvest levels. Soil N limitation was indicated as the cause of unsustainable forests when prescribed burns were too frequent or too intense to permit stand recovery.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Impacts of Nuclear Burning on Reviving Weak Shocks of Neutrino-Driven Supernova Explosions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore potential impacts of nuclear burning on assisting an onset of the neutrino-driven explosions of core-collapse supernovae. By changing the neutrino luminosity and its decay time to obtain parametric explosions in 1D and 2D models with or without a 13-isotope alpha network, we study how the inclusion of nuclear burning could affect the postbounce dynamics for four progenitor models. We find that the energy supply due to nuclear burning of infalling material behind the shock can energize the shock expansion especially for models that produce only marginal explosions in the absence of nuclear burning. These models enjoy the assistance from nuclear burning typically in the following two ways, whether the shock front passes through the silicon-rich layer, or later it touches to the oxygen-rich layer. Depending on the neutrino luminosity and its decay time, the explosion energy increases up to a few times 10^50 erg for models with nuclear burning compared to the corresponding models without. The differenc...

Nakamura, Ko; Kotake, Kei; Nishimura, Nobuya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462