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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Conservation Trust Funds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than $50,000, such as Suriname's Forest People's Fund, "levels. 94 For example, the Suriname trust fund operates at

Guerin-McManus, Marianne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--22000000 34 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c ancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer L ung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung can cer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lun g cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cance r Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer

Paxton, Anthony T.

3

Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Trust: A Collision of Paradigms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we survey the findings in social psychology and philosophy with respect to trust. We introduce three

Camp, L. Jean

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield www.anthem.com BlueAdvantage Point of Service Plan (HMO/POS) Prime Health Plan (PPO) and Custom Plus Health Plan Phone.................................................................................................................1-800-542-9402 Provider Directories Health and Dental www.anthem.com HMO Chiropractic Landmark

6

Trust Anchor Fact Sheet.cdr  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection Cryptographically secure software providing independent testing, monitoring, and control of energy...

7

LEEDS PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6469 ABOUT THIS CASE STUDY Leeds Partnerships NHS Foundation Trust worked with the University of Leeds untoward incidents (SUIs) occurring within the Trust to achieve a sustained improvement in patient safety of the North of England to work together to improve the sustainable economic development of the North towards

Berzins, M.

8

Information For Disabled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information For Disabled And Dyslexic Students. #12;1. What is the Disability and Dyslexia Support and advice. WHAt iS tHe DiSAbility AnD DySlexiA SuppOrt Service (DDSS)? Information for disabledStreet Western Bank The Disability and Dyslexia Support Service University of Sheffield Tram Stop Postal Address

Oakley, Jeremy

9

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal...

10

Disability Action Plan Establishment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, TAFE and students with disabilities on the University's access programs and general services Learning Centre, Careers & Employer Liaison Centre and Health, Counselling & Disability Service. · Continue with disabilities (e.g. Auslan interpreters). · Ensure that students with disabilities are regularly consulted

11

MobiTrust: Trust Management System in Mobile Social Computing Computer Science Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MobiTrust: Trust Management System in Mobile Social Computing Juan Li Computer Science Department technology and social network service, mobile social network emerges as a new network paradigm, which characteristics. This paper presents a novel trust management system, termed MobileTrust, to establish secure

Li, Juan "Jen"

12

Fully Distributed Trust Model based on Trust Graph for Mobile Ad hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully Distributed Trust Model based on Trust Graph for Mobile Ad hoc Networks Mawloud Omar, Yacine University of Technology, France. bouabdal@hds.utc.fr Abstract A mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a wireless that defines who trusts who and how. Our work aims to provide a fully distributed trust model for mobile ad hoc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

account of in workforce planning. The importance of integrating academic training with clinical trainingCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce of the Healthcare Science Workforce Modernising Scientific Careers: The Next Steps Response by the Wellcome Trust

Rambaut, Andrew

14

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2013 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report For the year ended 30 September 2013 Report of the Directors

Rambaut, Andrew

15

Annual Report Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements 2011 #12;#12;Wellcome Trust Finance plc | | 01 Contents Directors' Report 02 Independent Auditors' Report 05 Profit Administrative Details 15 #12;02 | Wellcome Trust Finance plc | Directors' Report Directors' Report for the year

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

16

Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2010 Details 16 Wellcome Trust Finance plc | Contents | 1 #12;Activities The principal activity of Wellcome Trust Finance plc (the "Company") is to issue and invest in financial instruments e.g. shares, bonds

Rambaut, Andrew

17

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2012 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report for the year ended 30 September 2012 Report of the Directors

Rambaut, Andrew

18

Designing Trust into Online Experiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are needed to enhance cooperative behaviors in electronic environments supporting e-commerce, e merchant, designers must develop strategies for facilitat- ing e-commerce and auctions. Since users can- reputable business practices. Political scientist Eric Uslaner of the University of Maryland calls trust

Shneiderman, Ben

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing trust perceptions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trust perceptions Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analyzing trust perceptions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 What is Trust? Trust...

20

Information For Disabled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;1. What is the Disability and Dyslexia Support Service? 2. How to contact us 3. Applying to the University to provide additional information and advice. WHAt iS tHe DiSAbility AnD DySlexiA SUppOrt Service (DDSS Hounsfield Road Durham Road ClarksonStreet Western Bank The Disability and Dyslexia Support Service

Dixon, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

WELLCOME TRUST CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELLCOME TRUST CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England April 2013 1 Department for Education: Reform of the National Curriculum in England CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England April 2013 2

Rambaut, Andrew

22

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Ofqual's GCSE reform consultation -August 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Ofqual's GCSE reform consultation - August 2013 1 Ofqual: GCSE reform consultation Response by the Wellcome Trust August 2013 Key points and indirect practical assessment in its reform proposals. The total contribution of direct and indirect

Rambaut, Andrew

23

T:\\PTSData\\ParkingRequest\\Disabled Permit Disabled Student Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T:\\PTSData\\ParkingRequest\\Disabled Permit Disabled Student Services Temporary Disabled Person Parking Permit Request Form Parking & Transportation Services (657) 278-3082 / Fax (657) 278-4533 Temporary Disabled Person permits will be issued after completion of Section II by Disabled Student Services

de Lijser, Peter

24

A Retrospective Filter Trust Region Algorithm For Unconstrained ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a retrospective filter trust re- gion algorithm for .... [33] present the self-adaptive trust region methods and give some discussions about

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

City of Pittsburgh Implementation Model: Green Initiatives Trust...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Model: Green Initiatives Trust Fund City of Pittsburgh implementation model, Green initiatives trust fund. Author: U. S. Department of Energy City of Pittsburgh...

26

DualTrust: A Distributed Trust Model for Swarm-Based Autonomic Computing Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For autonomic computing systems that utilize mobile agents and ant colony algorithms for their sensor layer, trust management is important for the acceptance of the mobile agent sensors and to protect the system from malicious behavior by insiders and entities that have penetrated network defenses. This paper examines the trust relationships, evidence, and decisions in a representative system and finds that by monitoring the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers rather than the swarming sensors, the trust management problem becomes much more scalable and still serves to protect the swarm. We then propose the DualTrust conceptual trust model. By addressing the autonomic managers bi-directional primary relationships in the ACS architecture, DualTrust is able to monitor the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers, protect the sensor swarm in a scalable manner, and provide global trust awareness for the orchestrating autonomic manager.

Maiden, Wendy M.; Dionysiou, Ioanna; Frincke, Deborah A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Bakken, David E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

City of Pittsburgh Implementation Model: Green Initiatives Trust Fund  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City of Pittsburgh implementation model, Green initiatives trust fund. Author: U. S. Department of Energy

28

Information For Disabled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Disability and Dyslexia Support Service. The Service facilitates students' full inclusion in academic life and Dyslexia Support Service? 3 2. How to contact us 4 3. Applying to the university and accessing support 5 a/from the University 30 l. Securing personal care support 31 Index 32 #12;3 1. What is the Disability and Dyslexia

Li, Yi

29

American Disabilities Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment.

30

DualTrust: A Trust Management Model for Swarm-Based Autonomic Computing Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trust management techniques must be adapted to the unique needs of the application architectures and problem domains to which they are applied. For autonomic computing systems that utilize mobile agents and ant colony algorithms for their sensor layer, certain characteristics of the mobile agent ant swarm -- their lightweight, ephemeral nature and indirect communication -- make this adaptation especially challenging. This thesis looks at the trust issues and opportunities in swarm-based autonomic computing systems and finds that by monitoring the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers rather than the swarming sensors, the trust management problem becomes much more scalable and still serves to protect the swarm. After analyzing the applicability of trust management research as it has been applied to architectures with similar characteristics, this thesis specifies the required characteristics for trust management mechanisms used to monitor the trustworthiness of entities in a swarm-based autonomic computing system and describes a trust model that meets these requirements.

Maiden, Wendy M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund Program, coordinated by the Empire State Development program, is operated in six regions by nonprofit organizations and provides working capital loans (up to ...

32

Student Trust: Impacting High School Outcomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and validating a measure of student trust. In W. K. Hoy & M.Perseus. Bidwell, C. E. (1970). Students and schools: Somesocial capital perspective on students' chances of academic

Romero, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Spent Fuel Disposal Trust Fund (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any licensee operating a nuclear power plant in this State shall establish a segregated Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Trust Fund in accordance with this subchapter for the eventual disposal of spent...

34

DYER ISLAND CONSERVATION TRUST LETTER OF CONCERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................................................................8 4 GENERAL POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF THE NPS ON THE MARINE ENVIRONMENTDYER ISLAND CONSERVATION TRUST LETTER OF CONCERN ASSOCIATED WITH THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NUCLEAR....................................................................................................................................6 3 THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT SURROUNDING BANTAMSKLIP

de Villiers, Marienne

35

Disability Employment Awareness Month  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Utilizing the talents of all Americans is essential for our Nation to out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world. During National Disability Employment Awareness Month, we...

36

Wellcome Trust SUBMISSION OF EVIDENCE Wellcome Trust response to Inquiry into education, training and workforce planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and workforce planning December 2011 1 House of Commons Health Committee: Inquiry into education, training and workforce planning Response by the Wellcome Trust December 2011 Key Points 1. The Wellcome Trust funds and workforce planning December 2011 2 4. Improvements to the education and training system for healthcare

Rambaut, Andrew

37

Corporate Governance & The UK Split Capital Investment Trust Crisis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of corporate governance issues. This paper draws on the results of a survey of investment trust directors and other investment professionals connected with the investment trust industry to examine the lessons to be learned from the crisis. The regulatory...

Adams, Andrew T; Angus, Robin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Establishing End to End Trust By Scott Charney*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Establishing End to End Trust By Scott Charney* Corporate Vice President Trustworthy Computing herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners. #12;Contents I. Introduction ......................................................................................................................13 E. Trusted Data

Bernstein, Phil

39

Welcome trust finance plc annual report and financial statements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welcome trust finance plc annual report and financial statements 2007 company number 5857955 #12 of the Directors the Directors of Wellcome trust Finance plc (the "Company") present their report and the audited

Rambaut, Andrew

40

Essays on disability and employment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation consists of three essays which examine the impact of public policy on labor market outcomes of those with disabilities. The first essay analyzes a microlending program for people with disabilities in ...

Thompkins, Allison V. (Allison Victoria)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A study of English primary care trusts Research report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Setting priorities in health A study of English primary care trusts Research report Suzanne priorities in health: a study of English primary care trusts Contents List of figures and tables 4 Glossary 6 priorities in health: a study of English primary care trusts 3. Priority setting: the national picture 21

Birmingham, University of

42

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap December 2007 Page 1 of 4 RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap Response by the Wellcome Trust December 2007 1. The Wellcome Trust is pleased to have the opportunity to feed into the process of prioritising the RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap

Rambaut, Andrew

43

Center for Cyber-Security, Information Privacy, and Trust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Cyber-Security, Information Privacy, and Trust http://cybersecurity.ist.psu.edu Dr. Peng Liu, Director cai@ist.psu.edu Center for Cyber-Security, Information Privacy, and Trust 16802-6822 The Center for Cyber-Security, Information Privacy, and Trust, aka Lions Center

Squicciarini, Anna Cinzia

44

Center for Cyber-Security, Information Privacy, and Trust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Cyber-Security, Information Privacy, and Trust http://cybersecurity.ist.psu.edu Dr. Peng Liu, Director pliu@ist.psu.edu Center for Cyber-Security, Information Privacy, and Trust 16802-6822 The Center for Cyber-Security, Information Privacy, and Trust, aka Lions Center

Giles, C. Lee

45

Forestry Commission Disability Equality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duty Statistics The FC's employment monitoring statistics for 1 April 2007 until 31 March 2008 provides details of how the FC will address the requirements of the Disability Equality Employment Duties, to provide annual monitoring statistics of the FC's staff and to highlight examples of good practice through

46

Private Information Retrieval Using Trusted Hardware  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute for Infocomm Research, Singapore baofeng@i2r.a-star.edu.sg Abstract. Many theoretical PIR (Private and computation complexity. The re- cent trend in outsourcing databases fuels the research on practical PIR schemes. In this paper, we propose a new PIR system by making use of trusted hardware. Our system

47

Does aluminum smelting cause lung disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evidence concerning a relationship between work in the aluminum industry and lung disease has been reviewed using epidemiologic criteria. Adequate data on environmental exposure are rarely presented. Case series on aluminum potroom workers over the past 50 years have identified an asthmalike syndrome that appears to be due to an irritant rather than an allergic mechanism. These studies have been supported by evidence of within shift variability of measures of lung function. However, to date, there is inadequate evidence to resolve the question of whether potroom exposure initiates asthma or merely precipitates asthmalike symptoms in a predisposed individual. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated evidence of reduced lung function, consistent with chronic airflow limitation. In exposed aluminum smelter workers compared to unexposed control subjects. Cigarette smoking, the major potential confounding variable, has been measured and accounted for in multivariate analyses. To date, evidence is lacking from longitudinal studies about the development of disabling chronic obstructive lung disease. Exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles in the production and consumption of anodes has biologic plausibility for an association of lung cancer with work in an aluminum smelter. Although retrospective mortality studies have failed to account for the probable high prevalence of smoking in blue collar workers, the relative risk of lung cancer is very low if present at all. Pulmonary fibrosis has not been shown to be a significant problem in aluminum smelter workers. Future research in the aluminum industry needs to concentrate on longitudinal studies, preferably with an inception cohort for the investigation of potroom asthma. 92 references.

Abramson, M.J.; Wlodarczyk, J.H.; Saunders, N.A.; Hensley, M.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

AmericanLungAssociationStateofLungDiseaseinDiverseCommunities2010 55 Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AmericanLungAssociationStateofLungDiseaseinDiverseCommunities2010 55 Lung Cancer Lung cancer of cancer cells (tumors) then form and grow . Besides interfering with how the lung functions, cancer cells organs . Causes Cigarette smoking is by far the most important cause of lung cancer, and the risk from

Kaski, Samuel

49

On fast trust region methods for quadratic models with linear ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

employs conjugate gradients with termination at the trust region boundary. In particular, we ... An extension to the conjugate gradient method for searching round.

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

ITERATIVE METHODS FOR FINDING A TRUST-REGION STEP? 1 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computed by applying the conjugate-gradient method to a positive-definite ... Large-scale unconstrained optimization, trust-region methods, conjugate-

2007-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

City of Pittsburgh Implementation Model: Green Initiatives Trust...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City of Pittsburgh implementation model, Green initiatives trust fund. Author: U. S. Department of Energy City of Pittsburgh Implementation Model Website More Documents &...

52

Weekly Address: Time to Create the Energy Security Trust | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

approach to American energy -- including a proposal to establish an Energy Security Trust, which invests in research that will help shift our cars and trucks off of...

53

Americans with Disabilities Act Signed (1990)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment, State and local government services, public...

54

Student Handbook SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Handbook SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES #12;Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Services for Students with Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Step students should take

Texas at Austin, University of

55

Welcoming and Supporting Disabled Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

points in providing written material 19 Web links 20 6 Preparing the physical environment 21 6Concept4:DisclosureofDisability 37 1 Opportunities for disclosure 37 2 Positive action 38 3 Confidentiality 39 4 Level of disclosure 40 5 Barriers to disclosure 40 6 Non - identification with `disability' 42 7

56

Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities Students, faculty, staff, and campus guests wishing to request accommodations due to learning disabilities should refer to the following documentation of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated, signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

57

Interpersonal Action Across Organizational Boundaries: Threat and Trust in the Context of Social Network Diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article integrates strategic factors influencing trust with social contextual factors to create a broader understanding of interpersonal trust across organizational boundaries. ...

Williams, Michele

2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

58

Who do you trust? Information Sharing, Privacy Concerns and Trust in an online Social Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Avinash P. Nayak* , Raissa M. D`Souza+ * Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science + Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of California, Davis Davis, United States of a popular social network site, Facebook, which measured perceptions of trust, privacy concerns

Islam, M. Saif

59

Carbon Trust CECIC JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacility | OpenCarboPur Technologies JumpJungle JumpLLCCarbon Trust

60

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Ofqual: A level Reform Consultation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Ofqual: A level Reform Consultation September 2012 1 Ofqual: A Level Reform Consultation Response by the Wellcome Trust September 2012 Key Points National Subject to university. We are therefore pleased to respond to this consultation on reforming A levels. Our comments

Rambaut, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DIUS Science and Society Consultation Response from the Wellcome Trust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIUS Science and Society Consultation Response from the Wellcome Trust December 2007 1) informal consultation on science and society. The Wellcome Trust is the largest charity in the UK which biomedical science can flourish' and is one of the major funders of public engagement activities

Rambaut, Andrew

62

Establishing and Sustaining System Integrity via Root of Trust Installation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

integrity. The TPM-based integrity measurement approaches are effective for measuring well-known, staticEstablishing and Sustaining System Integrity via Root of Trust Installation Abstract Integrity the management of a system's integrity, we propose a Root of Trust Installation (ROTI) as a foundation for high

McDaniel, Patrick Drew

63

Trust Model for Security Automation Data 1.0 (TMSAD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trust Model for Security Automation Data 1.0 (TMSAD) HaroldBooth AdamHalbardier NIST Interagency Report 7802 #12;NIST Interagency Report 7802 Trust Model for Security Automation Data 1.0 (TMSAD) Harold FOR SECURITY AUTOMATION DATA 1.0 (TMSAD) iii Reports on Computer Systems Technology The Information Technology

64

Participant Name:_____________________________ Canadian Access Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TAD) 1. Purpose A fundamental requirement of Participants in the Canadian Access Federation Access Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD) CANARIE Inc. - Canadian Access Federation Service Page Greg.Condon@unbc.ca (250) 960-5289 #12;Canadian Access Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD

Northern British Columbia, University of

65

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food March 2011 Page 1 of 2 House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee: Sustainable Food Inquiry Response by the Wellcome Trust March 2011 solutions for the production of healthy and sustainable food. As a research funder dedicated to improving

Rambaut, Andrew

66

Fluid blade disablement tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos (Albuquerque, NM); Hughs, Chance G. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Disability Services | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle BatteryofDisability Services Disability Services

68

Participant Name: McGill University Canadian Access Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Participant Name: McGill University Canadian Access Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD) 1-to-date Trust Assertion Document. #12; Canadian Access Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD) CANARIE Inc Federation: Trust Assertion Document (TAD) CANARIE Inc. - Canadian Access Federation Service Page 3 of 8

Shoubridge, Eric

69

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Copyright in the Knowledge Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Copyright in the Knowledge Economy Wellcome Trust response to Copyright in the Knowledge Economy November 2008 Page 1 of 8 European Commission: Copyright in the Knowledge Economy Response by the Wellcome Trust November 2008 1. The Wellcome Trust is pleased to have

Rambaut, Andrew

70

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT LUNG CANCER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT LUNG CANCER Q: What are the early signs of lung cancer? How would I know I have it? A: Some of the early warning signs of lung cancer are: · A cough that doesn't go away what may be causing these symptoms. Q: How is lung cancer diagnosed? A: Your doctor may do one or more

71

Trust Management Considerations For the Cooperative Infrastructure Defense Framework: Trust Relationships, Evidence, and Decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooperative Infrastructure Defense (CID) is a hierarchical, agent-based, adaptive, cyber-security framework designed to collaboratively protect multiple enclaves or organizations participating in a complex infrastructure. CID employs a swarm of lightweight, mobile agents called Sensors designed to roam hosts throughout a security enclave to find indications of anomalies and report them to host-based Sentinels. The Sensors findings become pieces of a larger puzzle, which the Sentinel puts together to determine the problem and respond per policy as given by the enclave-level Sergeant agent. Horizontally across multiple enclaves and vertically within each enclave, authentication and access control technologies are necessary but insufficient authorization mechanisms to ensure that CID agents continue to fulfill their roles in a trustworthy manner. Trust management fills the gap, providing mechanisms to detect malicious agents and offering more robust mechanisms for authorization. This paper identifies the trust relationships throughout the CID hierarchy, the types of trust evidence that could be gathered, and the actions that the CID system could take if an entity is determined to be untrustworthy.

Maiden, Wendy M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Building Stakeholder Trust: Defensible Government Decisions - 13110  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Administrative decisions must be grounded in reasonable expectations, founded on sound principles, and bounded by societal norms. Without these first principles, attaining and retaining public trust is a Herculean task. Decisions made by governmental administrators must be both transparent and defensible: without the former the agency will lose the public's trust and support (possibly prompting a legal challenge to the decision) and without the latter the decision may fail to withstand judicial scrutiny. This presentation and accompanying paper delves into the process by which governmental decisions can achieve both defensibility and openness through building stakeholder trust with transparency. Achieving and maintaining stakeholder trust is crucial, especially in the environs of nuclear waste management. Proving confidence, stability, and security to the surrounding citizenry as well as those throughout the country is the goal of governmental nuclear waste remediation. Guiding administrative decision-making processes and maintaining a broad bandwidth of communication are of incalculable importance to all those charged with serving the public, but are especially essential to those whose decisional impacts will be felt for millennia. A strong, clear, and concise administrative record documenting discrete decisions and overarching policy choices is the strongest defense to a decisional challenge. However, this can be accomplished using transparency as the fundamental building block. This documentation allows the decision-makers to demonstrate the synthesis of legal and technical challenges and fortifies the ground from which challenges will be defended when necessary. Further, administrative actions which capture the public's interest and captivate that interest throughout the process will result in a better-informed, more deeply-involved, and more heavily-invested group of interested parties. Management of information, involvement, and investment on the front-end of the process reaps rewards far more efficiently than attempts to assuage and mitigate the concerns of those parties after the fact and there are a number of tools Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has deployed that render transparency an ally in this context. The makers, applicators, and beneficiaries of policies and decisions will all benefit from strong administrative records which document decisional choices in an open and transparent manner and from timely, up-front management of concerns of interested parties. The strongest defense to decisional challenges is an ability to demonstrate the basis of the decision and the reason(s) that the decision was chosen over other alternatives. Providing a sound basis for defending challenges rather than avoiding or fighting over them allows the deciding entity the greatest opportunity to produce value for its customer. Often, a transparent process that invites public participation and is open for public review and comment will thwart challenge genesis. An entity that has to devote resources to defending its choices obviously cannot utilize those resources to further its mission. (authors)

Franklin, Victor A. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Optimization Online - On fast trust region methods for quadratic ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 29, 2014 ... Trust region methods include a bound of the form ||x_{k+1}-x_k|| .leq. ... Conjugate gradient and Krylov subspace methods are addressed for...

M.J.D. Powell

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

War Signals: A Theory of Trade, Trust and Conflict  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

business relationships, cooperation in agricultural production associations and mixed rotating savings groups involving both Hutus and Tutsis (Ingelaere, 2007; Pinchotti and Verwimp, 2007). Survey data indicate that trust plunged as of October 1990, after...

Rohner, Dominic; Thoenig, Mathias; Zilibotti, Fabrizio

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Trust based app marketing : design, implementation and evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A trust-based marketing application is a web or mobile app which provides a utility to the consumer that is not directly linked to purchasing products or services from the company. In this thesis, I explore the efficacy ...

Hon, Keone D. (Keone David)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cryptographic Trust Management Requirements Specification: Version 1.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cryptographic Trust Management (CTM) Project is being developed for Department of Energy, OE-10 by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). It is a component project of the NSTB Control Systems Security R&D Program.

Edgar, Thomas W.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Automated Validation of Trusted Digital Repository Assessment Criteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The RLG/NARA trusted digital repository (TDR) certification checklist defines a set of assessment criteria for preservation environments. The criteria can be mapped into data management policies that define how a digital ...

Smith, MacKenzie

78

MAINE MULTIFAMILY BUILDING OWNERS TRUST IN EFFICIENCY | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MAINE MULTIFAMILY BUILDING OWNERS TRUST IN EFFICIENCY Nearly 70% of households in Maine rely on fuel oil as their primary energy source for home heating, more than any other state....

79

GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSTRUCTION, TRUST, REIMBURSABLE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSTRUCTION, TRUST, REIMBURSABLE ( IN THOUSANDS) BUDGET FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 TOTAL ACTIVITY ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR...

80

Lung pair phantom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

Olsen, Peter C. (West Richland, WA); Gordon, N. Ross (Kennewick, WA); Simmons, Kevin L. (Kennewick, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Awards for Sabbatical Study The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust (OMT) awards a limited number of grants each year to support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Awards for Sabbatical Study The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust (OMT) awards a limited number of grants with the Trust's reporting procedures. The Manager Oppenheimer Memorial Trust First Floor, No. 9 St. David's Park

82

Principles of Faithful Execution in the implementation of trusted objects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We begin with the following definitions: Definition: A trusted volume is the computing machinery (including communication lines) within which data is assumed to be physically protected from an adversary. A trusted volume provides both integrity and privacy. Definition: Program integrity consists of the protection necessary to enable the detection of changes in the bits comprising a program as specified by the developer, for the entire time that the program is outside a trusted volume. For ease of discussion we consider program integrity to be the aggregation of two elements: instruction integrity (detection of changes in the bits within an instruction or block of instructions), and sequence integrity (detection of changes in the locations of instructions within a program). Definition: Faithful Execution (FE) is a type of software protection that begins when the software leaves the control of the developer and ends within the trusted volume of a target processor. That is, FE provides program integrity, even while the program is in execution. (As we will show below, FE schemes are a function of trusted volume size.) FE is a necessary quality for computing. Without it we cannot trust computations. In the early days of computing FE came for free since the software never left a trusted volume. At that time the execution environment was the same as the development environment. In some circles that environment was referred to as a ''closed shop:'' all of the software that was used there was developed there. When an organization bought a large computer from a vendor the organization would run its own operating system on that computer, use only its own editors, only its own compilers, only its own debuggers, and so on. However, with the continuing maturity of computing technology, FE becomes increasingly difficult to achieve

Tarman, Thomas David; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Pierson, Lyndon George

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Forestry Commission Disability Equality Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forestry Commission Disability Equality Scheme 2009-2012 #12;CONTENTS Page · Foreword by the Forestry Commissioners 3 · Introduction 4 · The Forestry Commission's Structure 9 · Legal Obligations 12 20 · The Forestry Commission as a Service Provider 22 · The Forestry Commission as an Employer 23

84

Early Lung Cancer Detection Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer.

85

Determinants and Role of Trust in E-Business: A Large Scale Empirical Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research investigates the determinants and role of consumer trust in e-business. It examines consumer perceptions of trust in a Web site and addresses the following key ...

Sultan, Fareena

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Roadmap to a Sustainable Structured Trusted Employee Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organizations (facility, regulatory agency, or country) have a compelling interest in ensuring that individuals who occupy sensitive positions affording access to chemical biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) materials facilities and programs are functioning at their highest level of reliability. Human reliability and human performance relate not only to security but also focus on safety. Reliability has a logical and direct relationship to trustworthiness for the organization is placing trust in their employees to conduct themselves in a secure, safe, and dependable manner. This document focuses on providing an organization with a roadmap to implementing a successful and sustainable Structured Trusted Employee Program (STEP).

Coates, Cameron W [ORNL; Eisele, Gerhard R [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Disability Employment | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles » AlternativeUp HomeHorseDOECybersecurity andDisability Employment

88

MYTHS AND FACTS REGARDING HIRING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Providing accommodations for people with disabilities is expensive.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MYTHS AND FACTS REGARDING HIRING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES MYTH: Providing accommodations for people, with many costing nothing at all. MYTH: The ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) forces employers to hire

Tsien, Roger Y.

89

Wellcome Trust response to > Page 1 of 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measures for UN reform. 4. As a research funder, we appreciate the "Health is Global" report's recognition to see the Government-Wide strategy give careful consideration to the importance of health researchWellcome Trust response to Health is Global" consultation>> May 2007 Page 1 of 5 Health

Rambaut, Andrew

90

Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher Yongdae Kim players. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many companies are hesitating to outsource their storage due to security concerns. The success of storage outsourcing is highly dependent on how well

Minnesota, University of

91

Trust of Medical Devices, Applications, and Users in Pervasive Healthcare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to receive health care through the use of pervasive medical devices, sensors, and applications, even outside. This paper shows how the Solar Trust Model can be used to evaluate the trustworthiness of data and data sources in networks of pervasive healthcare devices, sensors, and applications. Categories and Subject

Bishop, Matt

92

Enabling Trust with Behavior Metamodels Scott A. Wallace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by behavior metamodels (i.e., abstract models of how the agent behaves). Our argument is 1) basedEnabling Trust with Behavior Metamodels Scott A. Wallace Washington State University Vancouver simple tasks (e.g., paying reoccurring bills) intelligent software as- sistants that perform complex

Yorke-Smith, Neil

93

Trust Evaluation in Anarchy: A Case Study on Autonomous Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trust Evaluation in Anarchy: A Case Study on Autonomous Networks Tao Jiang Institute for Systems- ments on networked services. All those networks are autonomous networks, because they are distributed ­ to understand and analyze the behavior and properties of these "anarchical" autonomous networks. We propose

Baras, John S.

94

Augmenting Internet-based Card Not Present Transactions with Trusted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.2 TNC Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 4 Applications of Trusted - Server-Side Wallets . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 6 Comparison with Related Work 25 7 Conclusions and Future-enabled platforms can integrate with SSL, 3-D Secure and server-side SET. We high- light how the use of TPM

Dent, Alexander W.

95

Trusted End Host Monitors for Securing Cloud Datacenters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trusted End Host Monitors for Securing Cloud Datacenters Alan Shieh Srikanth Kandula Albert Greenberg #12;Cloud workload is dynamic and hostile Traditional datacenters Infrastructure supports small to audit app code Cloud datacenters Infrastructure is shared among many untrusted tenants ­ Rapidly

Keinan, Alon

96

Security and Trust Convergence: Attributes, Relations and Provenance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-World Impact! State of Cyber Security Cyber should be "controllable" Nuclear, chemical, biological have beenSecurity and Trust Convergence: Attributes, Relations and Provenance Prof. Ravi Sandhu Executive Director, Institute for Cyber Security Lutcher Brown Endowed Chair in Cyber Security University of Texas

Sandhu, Ravi

97

Security and Trust Convergence: Attributes, Relations and Provenance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-World Impact! State of Cyber Security Cyber should be "controllable" Nuclear, chemical, biological have been1 Security and Trust Convergence: Attributes, Relations and Provenance Prof. Ravi Sandhu Executive Director, Institute for Cyber Security Lutcher Brown Endowed Chair in Cyber Security University of Texas

Sandhu, Ravi

98

Securing Trusted Execution Environments with PUF Generated Secret Keys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of New Mexico Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA mareno@ece.unm.edu Jim Plusquellic University of New Mexico Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA jimp@ece.unm.edu Abstract--Trusted Execution Environments are quickly becom- ing

Plusquellic, James

99

EDIC RESEARCH PROPOSAL 1 Trust Modeling and Evaluation in Collaborative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environments, aiming at expertise assessment and quality assurance. The notion of trust is a complex social thereby tends to have a positive effect on the quality of interaction in online communities, transferable, dynamic, context- dependent and can be influenced by various factors, such as social rules

100

BUILD Program bridge to university for individuals with learning disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ·Discovertheuniquechallenges faced by students with learning disabilities in their transition to university ·Developtime-management.uwindsor.ca/disability If you are a student with a learning disability, making a successful transition

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Disability & Dyslexia Support Service (DDSS) Consent to Share Information Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disability & Dyslexia Support Service (DDSS) Consent to Share Information Form Please print By registering with the Disability and Dyslexia Support Service (DDSS) I understand that I am subscribed

Li, Yi

102

STEM Career Showcase for Students with Disabilities - North Carolina...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STEM Career Showcase for Students with Disabilities - North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences STEM Career Showcase for Students with Disabilities - North Carolina Museum of...

103

(P0607-1797) Disability Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(P0607-1797) Disability Office University Policy on Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia) #12. What is Dyslexia? 3 4. Recording Lectures 4 5. Assessment and Examination Provision 4 5.1. Marking from students with disabilities. Dyslexia, a Specific Learning Difficulty (SpLD), is a registered

Harman, Neal.A.

104

(P0607-1796) Disability Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(P0607-1796) Disability Office Dyslexia and Specific Learning Difficulties A Document on Good Practice, including Marking Guidelines Dr. Margaret Meehan, Dyslexia Tutor May 2007 Disability Office. What is Dyslexia? 4 4. How is a Student Officially Assessed as Dyslexic? 6 5. Problems Encountered

Harman, Neal.A.

105

Student Disability Transportation Policies and Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Disability Transportation Policies and Procedures Enrolled students with a permanent or temporary disability that require transportation while on-campus, should submit an application form through the University Health Service office. If approved through UHS, the transportation coordinator will contact you

Portman, Douglas

106

Disability Guide We are here to help  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Library Disability Guide #12;We are here to help The library team is here to make sure everyone can: for help with borrowing and requesting books, registration and general enquiries All contact details and support To help deliver bespoke support we work closely with the College Disability Advisory Service

107

Trust in automation and meta-cognitive accuracy in NPP operating crews  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power plant operators can over-trust or under-trust automation. Operator trust in automation is said to be mis-calibrated when the level of trust is not corresponding to the actual level of automation reliability. A possible consequence of mis-calibrated trust is degraded meta-cognitive accuracy. Meta-cognitive accuracy is the ability to correctly monitor the effectiveness of ones own performance while engaged in complex tasks. When operators misjudge their own performance, human control actions will be poorly regulated and safety and/or efficiency may suffer. An analysis of simulator data showed that meta-cognitive accuracy and trust in automation were highly correlated for knowledge-based scenarios, but uncorrelated for rule-based scenarios. In the knowledge-based scenarios, the operators overestimated their performance effectiveness under high levels of trust, they underestimated performance under low levels of trust, but showed realistic self-assessment under intermediate levels of trust in automation. The result was interpreted to suggest that trust in automation impact the meta-cognitive accuracy of the operators. (authors)

Skraaning Jr, G.; Miberg Skjerve, A. B. [OECD Halden Reactor Project, PO Box 173, 1751 Halden (Norway)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Cyber Security and Trust Research & DevelopmentCyber Security and Trust Research & Development http://www.ISTS.dartmouth.eduhttp://www.ISTS.dartmouth.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyber Security and Trust Research & DevelopmentCyber Security and Trust Research & Development http of a discrete distribution: www.ISTS.dartmouth.edu Entropy reminder INSTITUTE FOR SECURITY TECHNOLOGY STUDIES to packets & provide a visual summary? www.ISTS.dartmouth.edu Motivation INSTITUTE FOR SECURITY

Pellacini, Fabio

109

A Filter Active-Set Trust-Region Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 10, 2007 ... where x ? Rn, f : IRn ? IR and ci : IRn ? IR are twice continuously differentiable. ... by a trust-region or a proximal-point term, and we can either use the RLP step if the EQP has no solution, or usa a piecewise line-search along an arc. ..... abandon any attempt to reduce f(x) and instead enter a restoration.

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Density-based Globally Convergent Trust-Region Methods for Self ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduction of the trust region is performed by a strategy that uses the ... approximation that was based on the energy as a function of the coefficient matrix

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

A trust-region derivative-free algorithm for constrained optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 26, 2014 ... A trust-region derivative-free algorithm for constrained optimization. Paulo Conejo(paulo.conejo ***at*** unioeste.br) Elizabeth Karas(ewkaras...

Paulo Conejo

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

ANNUAL ACCOMPLISHMENT PLAN UPDATE FOR DISABLED VETERANS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

more disabled comprise 4.7%. *Data current as of September 22, 2012 FY 2012 NNSA DVAAP Report 5 Organizational Structure FY 2012 NNSA DVAAP Report 6 o Agency Mission Overview The...

113

Preconditioning a product of matrices arising in trust region subproblems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In solving large scale optimization problems, we find it advantageous to use iterative methods to solve the sparse linear systems that arise. In the ETR software for solving equality constrained optimization problems, we use a conjugate gradient method to approximately solve the trust region subproblems. To speed up the convergence of the conjugate gradient routine, we need to precondition matrices of the form Z{sup T} W Z, which are not explicitly stored. Four preconditioners were implemented and the results for each are given.

Hribar, M.E.; Plantenga, T.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Leasing State Trust Lands in Washington | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN)Lauderhill,5. ItLeaIncentives 2 ReferencesTrust

115

Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust MRET | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a townLoading map...(Redirected25.Trust MRET Jump to:

116

Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyTheDepartment of Energy and MilitaryTrust Anchor

117

Energy Trust of Oregon Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformation Contracts (ESPC) Webinar Jump to:S ADataTrust of

118

Trust Formation in a C2C Market: Effect of Reputation Management System Hitoshi Yamamoto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for online transactions. 1. Introduction The e-commerce market is growing rapidly, thanks in part to the ease system can promote trust in transactions in an online consumer-to-consumer (C2C) market. The reputationTrust Formation in a C2C Market: Effect of Reputation Management System Hitoshi Yamamoto University

Yamamoto, Hitoshi

119

A Trustful Authentication and Key Exchange Scheme (TAKES) for Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Trustful Authentication and Key Exchange Scheme (TAKES) for Ad Hoc Networks Tony Cheneau National public key distribution scheme adapted to ad hoc networks called TAKES for Trustful Authentication, or even implementing a light naming system can be enabled on top of ad hoc networks. TAKES is formally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

120

Information Theoretic Framework of Trust Modeling and Evaluation for Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Information Theoretic Framework of Trust Modeling and Evaluation for Ad Hoc Networks Yan Lindsay-- The performance of ad hoc networks depends on co- operation and trust among distributed nodes. To enhance security in ad hoc networks, it is important to evaluate trustworthiness of other nodes without centralized

Sun, Yan Lindsay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An example of trust-based marketing and customer advocacy in e-commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professor Glen L. Urban at MIT Sloan advocates a new style of marketing based on trust-building. One way to build this trust is to use an advisor to have a conversation with the customer rather than talking at the customer. ...

Zhang, Min, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Impact of Fuel Use Trends on the Highway Trust Fund's Present and Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Impact of Fuel Use Trends on the Highway Trust Fund's Present and Future Devin;2 The Impact of Fuel Use Trends on the Highway Trust Fund's Present and Future Devin Braun Ryan Endorf Stephen.3. Historical and Projected Fuel Use and Vehicle Miles Traveled Trends Section 2. Methodology Section 2

Lewis, Robert Michael

123

EFFECT OF SHARED INFORMATION ON TRUST AND RELIANCE IN A DEMAND FORECASTING TASK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF SHARED INFORMATION ON TRUST AND RELIANCE IN A DEMAND FORECASTING TASK Ji Gao1 , John D's trust and reliance. A simulated demand forecasting task required participants to provide an initial. INTRODUCTION Demand forecasting is a task that strongly influences success in supply chains. Inappropriate

Lee, John D.

124

PET: A PErsonalized Trust Model with Reputation and Risk Evaluation for P2P Resource Sharing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PET: A PErsonalized Trust Model with Reputation and Risk Evaluation for P2P Resource Sharing the construction of a good cooperation, especially in the context of economic-based solutions for the P2P resource sharing. The trust model consists of two parts: reputation evaluation and risk evaluation. Reputation

Shi, Weisong

125

Nanotechnology-Based Trusted Remote Sensing James B. Wendt and Miodrag Potkonjak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanotechnology-Based Trusted Remote Sensing James B. Wendt and Miodrag Potkonjak Computer Science nanotechnology PPUF-based architecture for trusted remote sensing. Current public physical unclonable function the authentication process. Our novel nanotechnology- based architecture ensures fast authentication through partial

Potkonjak, Miodrag

126

How to Trust Robots Further than We Can Throw Them David Bruemmer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in mobile robot applications and offers unique insight on how we can help build trust for a future generation of mobile robots. Panelists have been drawn from defense, entertainment, industry, transportation1 How to Trust Robots Further than We Can Throw Them David Bruemmer Idaho National Laboratory

Smart, William

127

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Liberating the NHS: Developing the Healthcare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the planning and provision of education. 3. Research scientists in the healthcare workforce are a unique Workforce March 2011 Page 1 of 3 Department of Health: Liberating the NHS: Developing the Healthcare Workforce Response by the Wellcome Trust March 2011 Introduction 1. The Wellcome Trust is pleased to have

Rambaut, Andrew

128

TRIESTE: A Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 TRIESTE: A Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes Wenyuan Xu Pandurang presents a framework, known as TRIESTE (Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes), which can ensure that radio devices are only able to access/use the spectrum in a manner that conforms

Xu, Wenyuan

129

Trust: A Collision of Paradigms L. Jean Camp Helen Nissenbaum Cathleen McGrath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to these attacks may be either a loss of trust or a willingness to tolerate increasing risk having weathered one examined. In this work we survey the findings in social psychology and philosophy with respect to trust. We that these assumptions conflict with results and arguments found in theoretical and empirical work in philosophy

Camp, L. Jean

130

Colorado Cattlemen's Agricultural Land Trust 8833 Ralston Road Arvada, Colorado 80002 303-225-8677 www.ccalt.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Cattlemen's Agricultural Land Trust 8833 Ralston Road · Arvada, Colorado 80002 · 303-225-8677 · www.ccalt.org About Colorado Cattlemen's Agricultural Land Trust The Colorado Cattlemen's Agricultural Land Trust (CCALT) was formed in 1995 by the membership of the Colorado Cattlemen's Association (CCA

Lawrence, Rick L.

131

PROTECT: Proximity-based Trust-advisor using Encounters for Mobile Societies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many interactions between network users rely on trust, which is becoming particularly important given the security breaches in the Internet today. These problems are further exacerbated by the dynamics in wireless mobile networks. In this paper we address the issue of trust advisory and establishment in mobile networks, with application to ad hoc networks, including DTNs. We utilize encounters in mobile societies in novel ways, noticing that mobility provides opportunities to build proximity, location and similarity based trust. Four new trust advisor filters are introduced - including encounter frequency, duration, behavior vectors and behavior matrices - and evaluated over an extensive set of real-world traces collected from a major university. Two sets of statistical analyses are performed; the first examines the underlying encounter relationships in mobile societies, and the second evaluates DTN routing in mobile peer-to-peer networks using trust and selfishness models. We find that for the analyzed trace...

Kumar, Udayan; Helmy, Ahmed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.

Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Hughes, Richard John; Peterson, Charles Glen

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

133

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Asthma A sthma is a chronic Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Web site at www.nhlbi.nih.gov (under Health Information

Bandettini, Peter A.

134

FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING STUDIES OF READING AND READING DISABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING STUDIES OF READING AND READING DISABILITY (DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA) Kenneth in develop- mental dyslexia. Reading disabled readers, relative to nonimpaired readers, demonstrate Reviews 2000;6:207­213. Key Words: dyslexia; neuroimaging; reading; lexical processing; phonol- ogy R

135

CIGNA Study Uncovers Relationship of Disabilities to Total Benefits Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The findings of a new study reveal an interesting trend. Integrating disability programs with health care programs can potentially lower employers' total benefits costs and help disabled employees get back to work sooner and stay at work.

136

Contrasting Adult Literacy Learners With and Without Specific Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrasting adult literacy learners with and without specific learning disabilities This study of 311 adult education (AE) learners found 29% self-reported having a specific learning disability (SLD). Significant differences ...

Patterson, Margaret; Mellard, Daryl

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

EasyVoice: Breaking barriers for people with voice disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disabilities. With the advances in computing power, new applications have been developed for helping peopleEasyVoice: Breaking barriers for people with voice disabilities Paulo A. Condado and Fernando G,flobo}@ualg.pt Abstract. Text-to-speech technology has been broadly used to help people with voice disabilities

Condado, Paulo

138

Richard L. Wiener Steven L. Willborn Disability and Aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

federal retirement program (Costa, 1998). The post-Civil War shift toward the classification of disability the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and as amended in 2008. In a program of study, my colleagues and I, and others

Raina, Ramesh

139

Decloaking disability : images of disability and technology in science fiction media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work examines how images of disability are used to frame cultural narratives regarding technology. As advances in biotechnology ensure that more people will be living with technological prosthetics against and beneath ...

Verlager, Alicia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Library Services for Users with Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Library Services for Users with Disabilities Welcome to the University of Bath Library. In support to the Library Your Subject Librarian will be happy to introduce you to the Library and to show you how to use the Library Catalogue and other subject-specific databases. You can find contact details for your librarian

Burton, Geoffrey R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Trust Region Sequential Quadratic Programming method applied to two-aircraft acoustic optimal control problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Trust Region Sequential Quadratic Programming method applied to two-aircraft acoustic optimal of the environmental pollution and noise impact, ACARE requires a 50% reduction of perceived noise for 2020. This goal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

Exploiting KeyNote in WebCom: Architecture Neutral Glue for Trust Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploiting KeyNote in WebCom: Architecture Neutral Glue for Trust Management Simon N. Foley, Thomas B. Quillinan, John P. Morrison, David A. Power, James J. Kennedy. Department of Computer Science

Foley, Simon

143

LSTRS: MATLAB Software for Large-Scale Trust-Region Subproblems and Regularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-9120008, the Research Council of Norway, and the Science Research Fund of Wake Forest University of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. 1 #12;LSTRS: Trust Regions and Regularization 2

144

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to House of Commons International Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

universities ­ such as Imperial Innovations: Imperial College's technology transfer vehicle; · Private sectorCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to House of Commons International Development Committee's Inquiry into the Department of International Development's Bilateral Programme in India November

Rambaut, Andrew

145

Integrative Innovation Strategy : a case study of Guaranty Trust Bank plc (GTBank)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since starting in 1990, Guaranty Trust Bank plc (GTBank) has emerged as one of the strongest players in the African Banking space despite the challenging business climate. Firms operating in similar conditions - geographies, ...

Adeyeri, Modupe Oludare

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Service Oriented Architecture for Monitoring Cargo in Motion Along Trusted Corridors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A KTEC Center of Excellence 1 Service Oriented Architecture for Monitoring Cargo in Motion Along Trusted Corridors Martin Kuehnhausen Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Master's Thesis Defense July 1, 2009 Committee Dr. Victor...Service Oriented Architecture for Monitoring Cargo in Motion Along Trusted Corridors c 2009 Martin Kuehnhausen Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial...

Kuehnhausen, Martin

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

THE ROLE OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY IN ORGANIZATIONAL TRUST, AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE ORGANIZATIONAL RESULTS 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Today, trust in work environment is one of important sources of competitive advantage. While today organizations, strongly need organizational trust for their success, development of it get one of the main concerns of today organizations management. On the other hand, according to scientists opinions, management of occupational safety can enhance organizational trust. Positive and effective relationship between occupational safety and organizational trust, increase and simplify organizational relations, and as a result, will improve working operation and efficiency. Purpose of this study was operational study, and method of gathering data was scientific-comparative. Statistical population of this research is TV and Radio staffs of Markazi province. Iran, and analyzed statistical model participants are 160 persons. Information gathering method of this research is questionnaire and operativeadmission analyze test, used to data analyzing, and finally all of study hypothesizes admitted. Results of research hypothesis examination suggested that occupational safety has positive effect on organizational trust. In addition, occupational safety also has effects on organizational working outcome, and finally, organizational trust has positive effect on organizational working outcome.

Habibollah Javanmard; Sahar Havasi; Islamic Azad

148

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Disaster case management and individuals with disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

following the 9/11 Twin Towers disaster. Individuals receiving disability- related services were found to require case management for a longer length of time during the long-term recovery period and to be more likely to need housing or financial assistance... disaster case management program in U.S. history. Method Participants Case managers. Two groups of participants were used for data collection. The first group consisted of case managers at NDRN affiliate offices who provided direct support, such as lo...

Stough, Laura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Trajectories of Happiness Following Acquired Disability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................. 69 3 Reported Ethnicity for the Total Sample at Time 1 ............................................ 70 4 Injury Severity by Injury Type for the Total Sample........................................... 71 5 Tukey Post... disability, they are more likely to employ health-promoting and self-care activities that reduce the risk of both physical (i.e. pressure sores and urinary tract infections) and mental health complications (i.e. anxiety and depression; Elliott et. al...

McCord, Carly Elizabeth

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

Accommodations for Physical Disabilities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEF HISTORY OF THE|Physical Disabilities

152

m:\\disability\\policies\\marking-dyslexia.doc THE UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

m:\\disability\\policies\\marking-dyslexia.doc THE UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX Policy and Procedures for a reason relating to his or her disability. 1.2 Dyslexia is a registered disability under the Disability editor could put right. #12;m:\\disability\\policies\\marking-dyslexia.doc 2.3.2 The written work

Sussex, University of

153

Mapping the Hallmarks of Lung Adenocarcinoma with Massively Parallel Sequencing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, is responsible for more than 500,000 deaths per year worldwide. Here, we report exome and genome sequences of 183 lung adenocarcinoma tumor/normal ...

Lander, Eric S.

154

Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no ...

Lander, Eric S.

155

antipsychotics limit disability: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Martin, Ralph R. 49 with Learning Disabilities CiteSeer Summary: Developmental dyslexia is defined as an unexpected difficulty in reading in adults and children who...

156

agency disability examiners: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Martin, Ralph R. 46 with Learning Disabilities CiteSeer Summary: Developmental dyslexia is defined as an unexpected difficulty in reading in adults and children who...

157

Instructor Exam Procedures for Students with Disabilities in courses ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instructor Exam Procedures for Students with Disabilities in courses with at least one common exam. This document addresses all courses that have any...

Kelly Beranger

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

CAREERS & the disABLED Magazine's Career Expo for People with...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

People with Disabilities CAREERS & the disABLED Magazine's Career Expo for People with Disabilities November 22, 2013 1:00PM EST Washington DC Contact http:www.eop.comexpos.php...

159

A Model for Conducting Research with Learning Disabled Adolescents and Young Adults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issues from the field of learning disabilities and the field of education in general which impact the learning disabled individual are discussed as they relate to research with learning disabled adolescents and young adults ...

Meyen, Edward L.; Schiefelbusch, Richard L.; Deshler, Donald D.; Alley, Gordon R.; Schumaker, Jean B.; Clark, Frances L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

allergic lung inflammation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the air pollutants which damage lungs and are linked to respiratory problems such as asthma. A Low symptoms, inflammation in the lung, exposure to traffic-related air...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Facts About Healthy Weight Why. The more you weigh, the more likely you are to suffer from heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes indicator of your risk for a variety of diseases. To check your BMI, use the National Heart, Lung, and Blood

Bandettini, Peter A.

162

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Healthy Sleep S leep is not just on a regular basis increases the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, and other medical conditions information on healthy sleep and sleep disorders is available from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood

Bandettini, Peter A.

163

Services for Students with Disabilities Confidentiality Statement Services for Students with Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

within the SSD office. The SSD office utilizes a secure, password protected, electronic database(s). This Information Disclosure describes how disability information about a student who is registered with the SSD of the personal, educational, and health information entrusted to us. In order to protect this privacy, we have

Buehrer, R. Michael

164

SDSU-Student Disability Services Page 1 of 5 Student Disability Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation Guidelines for Learning Disabilities In order to determine eligibility for accommodations include names and titles of the evaluators as well as the date(s) of testing. The following guidelines Achievement Test (WRAT) is not a comprehensive measure of achievement and is therefore not suitable as a sole

Gallo, Linda C.

165

Accommodations for Vision Disabilities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEF HISTORY OF THE|Physical DisabilitiesVision

166

Disability Employment POCs | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOEDisability Employment POCs Disability Employment POCs

167

ANNUAL ACCOMPLISHMENT PLAN UPDATE FOR DISABLED VETERANS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational NuclearhasAdministration77 Sandia National005-2010 orDisabled Veterans

168

Moore's law and the impact on trusted and radiation-hardened microelectronics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1965 Gordon Moore wrote an article claiming that integrated circuit density would scale exponentially. His prediction has remained valid for more than four decades. Integrated circuits have changed all aspects of everyday life. They are also the 'heart and soul' of modern systems for defense, national infrastructure, and intelligence applications. The United States government needs an assured and trusted microelectronics supply for military systems. However, migration of microelectronics design and manufacturing from the United States to other countries in recent years has placed the supply of trusted microelectronics in jeopardy. Prevailing wisdom dictates that it is necessary to use microelectronics fabricated in a state-of-the-art technology for highest performance and military system superiority. Close examination of silicon microelectronics technology evolution and Moore's Law reveals that this prevailing wisdom is not necessarily true. This presents the US government the possibility of a totally new approach to acquire trusted microelectronics.

Ma, Kwok Kee

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) Policy on Accommodations for Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_the_employability_and_retention_of_persons_with_disabilities_policy http://intranet.wvu.edu/human_resources/procedures/wvuhr37.htm We will work with the University Department of Human Resources and the ADA Coordinator in determining if a resident has a disability and what. The resident is responsible for the costs of verification. Approved by GMEC Taskforce 12/14/06 ACGME

Mohaghegh, Shahab

170

Interactive ergonomic analysis of a physically disabled person's workplace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactive ergonomic analysis of a physically disabled person's workplace Matthieu Aubry1 , Fr approach for in- teractive ergonomics evaluation, and especially adaptation of physically disabled people's workplaces. After a general survey of existing tools, we describe the requirements to perform ergonomic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

171

What Types of Jobs Do People with Disabilities Want? Mohammad Ali Lisa Schur Peter Blanck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to employment facing many people with disabilities. Keywords Disability Á Job preference Á Employment barriersWhat Types of Jobs Do People with Disabilities Want? Mohammad Ali · Lisa Schur · Peter Blanck-employed people with disabilities want to work, and if so, what types of jobs do they want? Researchers seeking

Raina, Ramesh

172

Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher and Yongdae Kim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher and Yongdae. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many compa- nies are hesitating to outsource their storage due to security concerns. The success of storage outsourcing is highly de- pendent on how well

Kim, Dae-Shik

173

An Assessment of Image Quality in Geology Works from the HathiTrust Digital Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study assesses the quality of both images and text in a sample from the 2,180 works on geology from the HathiTrust Digital Library (multi-institutional digital repository)--an outgrowth of the Michigan Digitization Project and partnership...

McEathron, Scott R.

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

174

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Physicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry Working  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Physicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry Working Party April 2008 Page 1 of 4 Royal College of Physicians: Physicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry to respond to the Royal College of Physicians consultation on physicians and the pharmaceutical industry

Rambaut, Andrew

175

Trust in Ad hoc Networks A Novel Approach based on Clustering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trust in Ad hoc Networks A Novel Approach based on Clustering J. Boodnah and E.M. Scharf Department of Electronic Engineering, Queen Mary, University of London Abstract Ad hoc Networks by virtue of their nature constraints to the network. 1. Introduction: Mobile Ad hoc Networks ­ Uses and Characteristics Mobile ad hoc

Haddadi, Hamed

176

http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~sherwood/RCsec/ CyberTrust PI Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Blurring the line between software and hardware, reconfigurable hardware offers the raw high speed such as flight control and anti-lock braking, an adversary or rogue nation could potentially craft a soft core functions have different levels of trust (for example the anti-lock brakes and the MP3 player in your car

177

Service Oriented Architecture for Monitoring Cargo in Motion Along Trusted Corridors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Oriented Architecture for Monitoring Cargo in Motion Along Trusted Corridors M. Kuehnhausen. It is built as a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) using open web service specifications and Open Geospatial and the fundamental ideas behind a Service Oriented Architecture are explained in detail. The system was evaluated

Kansas, University of

178

Integration of Business and Industrial Knowledge on Services to Set Trusted Business Communities of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ones) to define extended business service models, paying a particular attention on "fIntegration of Business and Industrial Knowledge on Services to Set Trusted Business Communities, the European Union promotes clearly internet of services based solutions to support innovative business

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

179

Trust and Exclusion in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks: An Economic Incentive Model based Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trust and Exclusion in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks: An Economic Incentive Model based Approach Nadia, and lowers the overall data reception ratio in the network. To tackle this, we propose a new incentive model with exclusion for malicious nodes called VIME. VIME is inspired from the signaling theory from economics

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

180

Evaluation of Network Trust Using Provenance Based on Distributed Local Intelligence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@illinois.edu, prasant@cs.ucdavis.edu, jinhee.cho@us.army.mil City University of New York University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign University of California, Davis §U.S. Army Research Laboratory Abstract--Provenance can such as energy loss, en- vironmental conditions or exhausting sources. We introduce a node-level trust

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

TrustForge: Flexible Access Control for Collaborative Crowd-Sourced Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

movement, the Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) is a program run by the Defense Advanced Project Agency (DARPA) with the goal of applying crowd-sourced and component-based engineering to the design of military vehicles very labor-intensive and inefficient. Our aim with TrustForge is to improve the automation

Plotkin, Joshua B.

182

An Efficient PIR Construction Using Trusted Yanjiang Yang1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Efficient PIR Construction Using Trusted Hardware Yanjiang Yang1,2 , Xuhua Ding1 , Robert H (PIR) scheme to be de- ployed in practice, low communication complexity and low computation complexity are two fundamental requirements it must meet. Most ex- isting PIR schemes only focus on the communication

Ding, Xuhua

183

THE USE OF TRUST REGIONS IN KOHN-SHAM TOTAL ENERGY MINIMIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-consistent and the Kohn-Sham (KS) total energy function associated with the system reaches the global minimum. It has longTHE USE OF TRUST REGIONS IN KOHN-SHAM TOTAL ENERGY MINIMIZATION CHAO YANG , JUAN C. MEZA , AND LIN system, is viewed in this paper as an optimization procedure that minimizes the Kohn- Sham total energy

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

184

Trust in the Health Care System and the Use of Preventive Health Services by Older Black  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trust in the Health Care System and the Use of Preventive Health Services by Older Black and White. Thomas, PhD There is strong empirical evidence of health care disparities between Black and White preventive care.1­5 The causes of disparities in health care are complex and have been the subject

Sheikh, Yaser Ajmal

185

Use of Nested Certificates for Efficient, Dynamic and Trust Preserving Public Key Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of Nested Certificates for Efficient, Dynamic and Trust Preserving Public Key Infrastructure the certificates on this path recursively. This is the classical methodology. Nested certification is a novel nested certificates ­ for other certificates. Nested certificates can be used together with classical

Levi, Albert

186

Use of Nested Certificates for Efficient, Dynamic and Trust Preserving Public Key Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of Nested Certificates for Efficient, Dynamic and Trust Preserving Public Key Infrastructure), and verify the certificates on this path recursively. This is the classical methodology. Nested certification certificates ­ called nested certificates ­ for other certificates. Nested certificates can be used together

187

Promises, Premises and Risks: Sharing Responsibilities, Working Up Trust and Sustaining Commitment in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Promises, Premises and Risks: Sharing Responsibilities, Working Up Trust and Sustaining Commitment into processes of design and development, and eliding the boundaries between production and use. To do this involves commitment and creativity from the different participants ­ in our cases, users, designers

Mogensen, Preben Holst

188

Experience you can trust. The U.S. Smart Grid Revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experience you can trust. The U.S. Smart Grid Revolution KEMA's Perspectives for Job Creation of Contents The U.S. Smart Grid Revolution December 23, 2008 KEMA's Perspectives for Job Creation i 1.S...............................................................................................2-1 2.2 Smart Grid Activity in the U

189

Trusting Routers and Relays in Ad hoc Networks. Prashant Dewan and Partha Dasgupta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with tangential goals belonging to the members of the network. In such situations micro payments can be cashedTrusting Routers and Relays in Ad hoc Networks. Prashant Dewan and Partha Dasgupta Arizona State University dewan@asu.edu, partha@asu.edu Abstract The current generation of ad hoc networks relies on other

Dasgupta, Partha

190

Call for Demos and Exhibition The 9th IEEE International Conference on Autonomic and Trusted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

__________________________________________________________________ The 9th IEEE International Conference on Autonomic and Trusted Computing (ATC-2012) Fukuoka and Computing community. The accepted demo/exhibition will be included in the CPS conference proceedings in the main conference, workshops, other conferences and venues, as well as systems and video. We encourage

Kourai, Kenichi

191

A Formal Framework for Trust Policy Negotiation in Autonomic Systems: Abduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Formal Framework for Trust Policy Negotiation in Autonomic Systems: Abduction with Soft show that soft constraints can be used to model logical reasoning, that is deduction and abduction (and induction). In partic- ular, we focus on the abduction process and we show how it can be implemented

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

192

Restoring public trust while tearing down site in rural Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the mid-1980's, the impact of three decades of uranium processing near rural Fernald, Ohio, 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, became the centre of national public controversy. When a series of incidents at the uranium foundry brought to light the years of contamination to the environment and surrounding farmland communities, local citizens' groups united and demanded a role in determining the plans for cleaning up the site. One citizens' group, Fernald Residents for Environmental Safety and Health (FRESH), formed in 1984 following reports that nearly 300 pounds of enriched uranium oxide had been released from a dust-collector system, and three off-property wells south of the site were contaminated with uranium. For 22 years, FRESH monitored activities at Fernald and participated in the decision-making process with management and regulators. The job of FRESH ended on 19 January this year when the Fernald Site was declared clean of all nuclear contamination and open to public access. It marked the end of a remarkable turnaround in public confidence and trust that had attracted critical reports from around the world. When personnel from Fluor arrived in 1992, the management team thought it understood the issues and concerns of each stakeholder group, and was determined to implement the decommissioning scope of work aggressively, confident that stakeholders would agree with its plans. This approach resulted in strained relationships with opinion leaders during the early months of Fluor's contract. To forge better relationships, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) who owns the site, and Fluor embarked on three new strategies based on engaging citizens and interested stakeholder groups in the decision-making process. The first strategy was opening communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and regulators. This strategy combined a strong public-information program with two-way communications between management and the community, soliciting and encouraging stakeholder participation early in the decision-making process. Fluor's public-participation strategy exceeded the 'check-the-box' approach common within the nuclear-weapons complex, and set a national standard that stands alone today. The second stakeholder-engagement strategy sprang from mending fences with the regulators and the community. The approach for disposing low-level waste was a 25-year plan to ship it off the site. Working with stakeholders, DOE and Fluor were able to convince the community to accept a plan to safely store waste permanently on site, which would save 15 years of cleanup and millions of dollars in cost. The third strategy addressed the potentially long delays in finalizing remedial action plans due to formal public comment periods and State and Federal regulatory approvals. Working closely with the U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agencies (EPA) and other stakeholders, DOE and Fluor were able to secure approvals of five Records of Decision on time - a first for the DOE complex. Developing open and honest relationships with union leaders, the workforce, regulators and community groups played a major role in DOE and Fluor cleaning up and closing the site. Using lessons learned at Fernald, DOE was able to resolve challenges at other sites, including worker transition, labour disputes, and damaged relationships with regulators and the community. It took significant time early in the project to convince the workforce that their future lay in cleanup, not in holding out hope for production to resume. It took more time to repair relationships with Ohio regulators and the local community. Developing these relationships over the years required constant, open communications between site decision makers and stakeholders to identify issues and to overcome potential barriers. Fluor's open public-participation strategy resulted in stakeholder consensus of five remedial-action plans that directed Fernald cleanup. This strategy included establishing a public-participation program that emphasized a shared-decision making process and aband

Schneider, Jerry [Fluor Ltd, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Wagner, Jeffrey [Fluor Fernald, P.O. Box 538704, Cincinnati, Ohio 45253-8704 (United States); Connell, Judy [Fluor Hanford Inc. P.O. Box 1000, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - awaiting lung transplantation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

www.nejm.org november 22, 2007 2143 Summary: of patients with cystic fibrosis awaiting heart and lung transplantation. J Heart Lung Transplant 1993... original article Lung...

194

Radiation-induced lung injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. (Yale Univ. Medical Center, New Haven, CT (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

When Students Grieve: Teachers of Students With Intellectual Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this study was to explore the experiences of teachers who have had elementary students with intellectual disabilities who have lost a parent or guardian. Additionally, this study documented behavioral changes and grief symptoms noted by teachers...

McAdams-Ducy, Elizabeth

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Teaching Shape Recognition to Students with Significant Intellectual Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disabilities, need mathematics skills to lead productive and independent lives. Geometry skills help students make sense of the world around them. Mastery of shape recognition is a beginning geometry skill that is necessary for progressing to more advanced...

Lyon, Kristin Joannou

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Identification of Learning Disabled Adolescents: A Bayesian Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The identification of learning disabled adolescents for program placement is a major concern of school personnel. The identification model discussed in this article addresses an array of problems associated with identification ...

Alley, Gordon R.; Deshler, Donald D.; Warner, Michael M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Medicaid managed care: Issues for beneficiaries with disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ities during and after this transition. Objective: To document experiences of Medicaid enrollees with disabilities using long-term services and supports during transition to Medicaid managed care in Kansas. Methods: During the spring of 2013, 105 Kansans... with disabilities using Medicaid long-term services and supports (LTSS) were surveyed via telephone or in-person as they transitioned to managed care. Qualitative data analysis of survey responses was conducted to learn more about the issues encountered by people...

Hall, Jean P.; Kurth, Noelle K.; Chapman, Shawna L.C.; Shireman, Theresa I.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Commencement Accessibility for People with Disabilities The Rose Garden Arena allows for the ease of access for people with disabilities to fully enjoy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

companion sit with them in the accessible seating section, to allow as many people with disabilitiesCommencement Accessibility for People with Disabilities The Rose Garden Arena allows for the ease of access for people with disabilities to fully enjoy the commencement ceremonies

Bertini, Robert L.

200

Business bridging ethnicity : how business transactions in Trinidad build trust and friendship but don't reduce prejudice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do business transactions between individuals of different ethnicities lead to social spillovers, in terms of building trust, friendship, and reducing prejudice? In this dissertation I interrogate that research question ...

Kilroy, Austin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

WON EXPOSURE AND LUNG CANCER RISK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As information on indoor air quality accumulated * it became apparent that radon and its progeny are invariably present in indoor environments and that concentrations may reach unacceptably high levels. The lung cancer excess anong miners exposed to radon progeny raised concern that exposure to radon progeny might also cause lung cancer in the general population. This presentation first provides an ovemiew of radon daughter carcinogenesis, and then reviews the recent BEIR IV report. The report described a statistical model * based on analysis of data from four studies of miners, for estimating the lung cancer risk associated with exposure to radon progeny. Tbe analyses showed that the risk of radon exposure declines with time since exposure and with increasing age. The BEIR IV committee concluded that radon progeny and cigarette smoking interact in a multiplicative fashion and that exposure-dose relationships are similar for exposure in homes and in mines.

unknown authors

202

Earning public trust and confidence: Requisites for managing radioactive wastes. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management was created in April 1991 by former Secretary James D. Watkins, who asked the group to analyze the critical institutional question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) might strengthen public trust and confidence in the civilian radioactive waste management program. The panel met eight times over a period of 27 months and heard formal presentations from nearly 100 representatives of state and local governments, non-governmental organizations, and senior DOE Headquarters and Field Office managers. The group also commissioned a variety of studies from independent experts, contracted with the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Public Administration to hold workshops on designing and leading trust-evoking organizations, and carried out one survey of parties affected by the Department`s radioactive waste management activities and a second one of DOE employees and contractors.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Facts and Figures January 2007 INCOME AND EXPENDITURE (Excluding Press, CA & Trusts) 2005-06  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facts and Figures January 2007 INCOME AND EXPENDITURE (Excluding Press, CA & Trusts) 2005-06 2004,928 Breakdown of Research Grant Income 2005-06 £'000 % £'000 Total staff 8602 8570 8,623 Research Councils 89,095 Total 203,886 188,711 Total respondents 2,890 100.0% 3,227 100.0 Breakdown of HEFCE/TDA Income 2005-06

Travis, Adrian

204

Technical Qualifications for Treating Photovoltaic Assets as Real Property by Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been proposed that Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) have the potential to lower the cost and increase the adoption of photovoltaic systems (PV) by offering a more attractive source of capital. The purpose of this paper is to explain the fundamental physical characteristics of PV and compare them to the characteristics of 'real' property, to help determine whether REITs can own PV systems.

Feldman, D.; Mendelsohn, M.; Coughlin, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Influence of Manufacturing Processes on the Performance of Phantom Lungs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chest counting is an important tool for estimating the radiation dose to individuals who have inhaled radioactive materials. Chest counting systems are calibrated by counting the activity in the lungs of phantoms where the activity in the phantom lungs is known. In the United States a commonly used calibration phantom was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is referred to as the Livermore Torso Phantom. An important feature of this phantom is that the phantom lungs can be interchanged so that the counting system can be challenged by different combinations of radionuclides and activity. Phantom lungs are made from lung tissue substitutes whose constituents are foaming plastics and various adjuvants selected to make the lung tissue substitute similar to normal healthy lung tissue. Some of the properties of phantom lungs cannot be readily controlled by phantom lung manufacturers. Some, such as density, are a complex function of the manufacturing process, while others, such as elemental composition of the bulk plastic are controlled by the plastics manufacturer without input, or knowledge of the phantom manufacturer. Despite the fact that some of these items cannot be controlled, they can be measured and accounted for. This report describes how manufacturing processes can influence the performance of phantom lungs. It is proposed that a metric that describes the brightness of the lung be employed by the phantom lung manufacturer to determine how well the phantom lung approximates the characteristics of a human lung. For many purposes, the linear attenuation of the lung tissue substitute is an appropriate surrogate for the brightness.

Traub, Richard J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Lowering Your Blood Pressure foods that are heart healthy and low in salt and sodium. High blood pressure, which is blood pressure is dangerous because it makes your heart work too hard, hardens the walls of your arteries, and can cause

Bandettini, Peter A.

207

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems, including heart attack, stroke, or even death. Overview Atherosclerosis can affect any artery-rich blood to your heart. CHD can lead to angina (chest pain) and heart attack. CHD is the leading causeNational Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Atherosclerosis A therosclerosis

Bandettini, Peter A.

208

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Physical Activity and Your Heart, is that even modest amounts of physi- cal activity are good for your health, especially your heart health activity is the type of physical activity that benefits your heart the most. This type of activity moves

Bandettini, Peter A.

209

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : What You Need To Know About High- tors for heart disease. In fact, the higher your blood cholesterol, the greater your risk of developing heart disease or having a heart attack. Heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women in the United

Bandettini, Peter A.

210

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Coronary Heart Disease C oronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease, is the leading cause of death in the United. These arteries supply your heart muscle with oxygen-rich blood. Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium

Bandettini, Peter A.

211

An fMRI study of multimodal semantic and phonological processing in reading disabled adolescents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 /Accepted: 11 September 2009 # The International Dyslexia Association 2009 Abstract Using Dyslexia . fMRI . Performance . Phonology. Reading disability. Semantics Introduction The neurobiology of reading disability An increasing body of research suggests that the core deficit in developmental dyslexia

212

Hurdling Barriers: Labor and Employment Experiences of Asian Americans with Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

French (2001) noted that negative attitudes about people with disabilities are sometimes disguised as a broad-French (2001) noted that negative attitudes about people with disabilities are sometimes disguised as a broad-

Wong, Peter Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

1 | P a g e Policy Name: Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

personal assistive devices; service animals and support persons. Persons with disabilities and the public of goods and services offered by Carleton University (1) Assistive devices Persons with disabilities are permitted to use personal assistive devices to acces

Carleton University

214

Cross{calibration of stroke disability measures: Bayesian analysis of longitudinal ordinal categorical data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross{calibration of stroke disability measures: Bayesian analysis of longitudinal ordinal. Duncan, Sue Min Lai, David B. Matchar Running head: Stroke disability measures. Giovanni Parmigiani; Abstract It is common to assess disability of stroke patients using standardized scales, such as the Rankin

West, Mike

215

DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES 1/14 DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES REQUEST with Disabilities (SSD) staff has permission to speak with the Division of Housing and Food Services (DHFS to release disability related information to the Division of Housing and Food Services as it relates to my

Texas at Austin, University of

216

DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES 4/13 DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES REQUEST with Disabilities (SSD) staff has permission to speak with the Division of Housing and Food Services (DHFS to release disability related information to the Division of Housing and Food Services as it relates to my

Texas at Austin, University of

217

DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES 12/11 DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES REQUEST with Disabilities (SSD) staff has permission to speak with the Division of Housing and Food Services (DHFS to release disability related information to the Division of Housing and Food Services as it relates to my

Texas at Austin, University of

218

Mobility barrier for disabled people DEJOUX, Virginie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobility barrier for disabled people DEJOUX, Virginie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy 12 th WCTR, July 11-15, 2010 92 55 88 virginie.dejoux@inrets.fr ARMOOGUM Jimmy INRETS - DEST Site de Marne-la-Vallée. "Le Descartes 2" 2 rue de la Butte Verte 93166 Noisy le grand cedex Telephone: 33 1 45 92 55 79 jimmy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

219

CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY HUMAN RESOURCES Employee this form to your medical provider. Section II must be fully completed by the health care provider Department/College name: Campus Phone: I authorize my health care provider to complete this form and provide

Eirinaki, Magdalini

220

University of Southampton Erasmus Scheme -Guidelines for students with specific learning difficulties/dyslexia, disabilities and health conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

difficulties/dyslexia, disabilities and health conditions These guidelines aim to supplement those produced

Anderson, Jim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

TRUST: A Computer Program for Variably Saturated Flow in Multidimensional, Deformable Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer code, TRUST. provides a versatile tool to solve a wide spectrum of fluid flow problems arising in variably saturated deformable porous media. The governing equations express the conservation of fluid mass in an elemental volume that has a constant volume of solid. Deformation of the skeleton may be nonelastic. Permeability and compressibility coefficients may be nonlinearly related to effective stress. Relationships between permeability and saturation with pore water pressure in the unsaturated zone may include hysteresis. The code developed by T. N. Narasimhan grew out of the original TRUNP code written by A. L. Edwards. The code uses an integrated finite difference algorithm for numerically solving the governing equation. Narching in time is performed by a mixed explicit-implicit numerical procedure in which the time step is internally controlled. The time step control and related feature in the TRUST code provide an effective control of the potential numerical instabilities that can arise in the course of solving this difficult class of nonlinear boundary value problem. This document brings together the equations, theory, and users manual for the code as well as a sample case with input and output.

Reisenauer, A. E.; Key, K. T.; Narasimhan, T. N.; Nelson, R. W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

asthma lung function: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Junfeng Guo; Kalman Palagyi; Kenneth C. Beck; Geoffrey Mclennan 38 Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During Computer...

224

Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2?) (LCMS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2? levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Barrios, Roberto [Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, The Methodist Hospital Physician Organization, 6565 Fannin Street, Suite M227, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lung Cancer: A Classic Example of Tumor Escape and Progression While Providing Opportunities for Immunological Intervention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of lung cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 4, no. 7,pathogenesis of lung cancer, Annual Review of Physiology,immunoreac- tivity in lung cancer: yet another player in the

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cardiac-Sparing Whole Lung IMRT in Children With Lung Metastasis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To demonstrate the dosimetric advantages of cardiac-sparing (CS) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in children undergoing whole lung irradiation (WLI). Methods and Materials: Chest CT scans of 22 children who underwent simulation with 3-dimensional (n=10) or 4-dimensional (n=12) techniques were used for this study. Treatment planning was performed using standard anteroposterior-posteroanterior (S-RT) technique and CS-IMRT. Left and right flank fields were added to WLI fields to determine whether CS-IMRT offered any added protection to normal tissues at the junction between these fields. The radiation dose to the lung PTV, cardiac structures, liver, and thyroid were analyzed and compared. Results: CS-IMRT had 4 significant advantages over S-RT: (1) superior cardiac protection (2) superior 4-dimensional lung planning target volume coverage, (3) superior dose uniformity in the lungs with fewer hot spots, and (4) significantly lower dose to the heart when flank RT is administered after WLI. Conclusions: The use of CS-IMRT and 4-dimensional treatment planning has the potential to improve tumor control rates and reduce cardiac toxicity in children receiving WLI.

Kalapurakal, John A., E-mail: j-kalapurakal@northwestern.edu [Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Zhang, Yunkai; Kepka, Alan; Zawislak, Brian; Sathiaseelan, Vythialingam [Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia [Medical Imaging, Children's Memorial Hospital Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Medical Imaging, Children's Memorial Hospital Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Gopalakrishnan, Mahesh [Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan, E-mail: druan@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Network-based Root of Trust for Installation Joshua Schiffman, Thomas Moyer, Trent Jaeger and Patrick McDaniel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department, Pennsylvania State University Administrators of large data centers often require network be automated for the administrator. The result is that secure network installation, even over an untrustedNetwork-based Root of Trust for Installation Joshua Schiffman, Thomas Moyer, Trent Jaeger

Yener, Aylin

229

NOMINATIONS INVITED The Executive Director of the Karl W. Ber Solar Energy Medal of Merit Trust, Prof. Michael T. Klein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOMINATIONS INVITED · The Executive Director of the Karl W. Böer Solar Energy Medal of Merit Trust will be awarded to an individual who has made significant pioneering contributions in solar energy, wind energy to the fields of solar energy, wind energy, or other forms of renewable energy in other ways. PANEL OF JUDGES

Firestone, Jeremy

230

SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement Tempe AZ USA 85287 rajub@asu.edu, rao@asu.edu ABSTRACT One immediate challenge in searching the deep web-similarity-based relevance assess- ment. When applied to the deep web these methods have two deficiencies. First

Kambhampati, Subbarao

231

SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement. Existing methods have two deficiencies for applying to the open col- lections like the deep web. First query in the deep web, the agreements between theses an- swer sets are likely to be helpful in assessing

Kambhampati, Subbarao

232

Assessing Relevance and Trust of the Deep Web Sources and Results Based on Inter-Source Agreement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Assessing Relevance and Trust of the Deep Web Sources and Results Based on Inter-Source Agreement Jha, Arizona State University Deep web search engines face the formidable challenge of retrieving high quality results from the vast collection of searchable databases. Deep web search is a two step process

Kambhampati, Subbarao

233

Design considerations for vehicular modifications to accommodate the disabled driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of functions to available members. The concepts are for control of an auto- mobile with a single hand (fully intact arm) or a single foot (fully intact leg) . Other varieties of disabilities (having neither a fully intact arm nor a fully intact leg) may... Modifications Single-Footed Controller Vehicle Modifications Pedal Description Auxiliary Controls Adaptability for Special Applications 6. SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS 52 56 63 65 66 67 70 72 74 General Vehicular Safety Safety Features of the Pistol...

Swarts, Albert Edwin

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - american lung association Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or bubble- related phenomena in lung alveoli. Let us further evaluate... COMPARISON OF MOUSE AND RABBIT LUNG DAMAGE EXPOSURE TO 30 kHz ... Source: Illinois at...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - a549 lung adenocarcinoma Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 48 TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors Summary: TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos-related lung cancer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the level of risk for lung and other cancers. Methods We performed a meta... household coal use and lung cancer risk, and to explore ... Source: Collection: Environmental...

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural lung diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine 18 TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors Summary: TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer...

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated lung nodule Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Sciences 2 STATISTICAL MODELING OF THE LUNG NODULES IN LOW DOSE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY SCANS OF THE CHEST Summary: STATISTICAL MODELING OF THE LUNG NODULES IN LOW DOSE...

240

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates paraquat-induced lung Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

area of the lung using X-ray attenuation data... Lung Assessment Using Computer Tomography A software program that determines the weight, tissue... composition and various...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates age-related lung Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

area of the lung using X-ray attenuation data... Lung Assessment Using Computer Tomography A software program that determines the weight, tissue... composition and various...

242

Investigating the initiation and progression of small cell lung cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 18% of all lung cancer cases and is an aggressive disease with a five-year survival rate of less than 5%, mainly due to the advanced nature of the disease at the time of diagnosis. ...

Brauneis, Alison Dooley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile Catterina Ferreccio,1,2 Claudia in northern Chile had arsenic concentrations of 860 g/liter in drinking water in the period 1958­1970. Concen and arsenic in drinking water in northern Chile in a case-control study involving patients diagnosed with lung

California at Berkeley, University of

244

Memory and normal ageing in adults with intellectual disabilities : a research portfolio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Assessment of dementia in adults with intellectual disabilities poses specific challenges. Firstly, there is a paucity of validated, standardised and appropriate neuropsychological assessments of memory for ...

McPaul, Ann

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Mothers with Learning Disabilities' Experience of Relationships with their Parents, Partners and Friends: An IPA study .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Many mothers with learning disabilities experience social isolation (McGaw, 1998; Booth & Booth, 1996) despite current research clearly delineating the importance of supportive relationships for (more)

Scully, Tamara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - amc linear disability Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: amc linear disability Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 American Mathematics Competitions AMC 1012 A Summary: for individual awards. Students with Visual or...

247

Power/knowledge in an age of reform| General education teachers and discourses of disability.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this qualitative study, comprised of interviews and observations, I explore how discourses of disability circulating within the epistemologies and practices of four general (more)

Lightman, Timohty

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research Highlights: > Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. > The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. > The results could potentially be used for the medical surveillance of workers.

Pacurari, M. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Qian, Y., E-mail: yaq2@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Porter, D.W.; Wolfarth, M. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Wan, Y.; Luo, D. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Ding, M. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Castranova, V. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Guo, N.L., E-mail: lguo@hsc.wvu.edu [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9190 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

A study of the relationship between trust and the effective communication of information within project teams of large high tech organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigates the effects trust has on the truthfulness of communications and its effectiveness within a project team. The research focuses specifically on organizational context, the situational forces that exist ...

Scherer, Alyson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Physiological Interaction of Heart and Lung in Thoracic Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction: The risk of early radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) limits the dose and efficacy of radiation therapy of thoracic tumors. In addition to lung dose, coirradiation of the heart is a known risk factor in the development RILT. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying physiology of the interaction between lung and heart in thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Rat hearts, lungs, or both were irradiated to 20 Gy using high-precision proton beams. Cardiopulmonary performance was assessed using breathing rate measurements and F{sup 18}-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) scans biweekly and left- and right-sided cardiac hemodynamic measurements and histopathology analysis at 8 weeks postirradiation. Results: Two to 12 weeks after heart irradiation, a pronounced defect in the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the left ventricle (LV) was observed. At 8 weeks postirradiation, this coincided with LV perivascular fibrosis, an increase in LV end-diastolic pressure, and pulmonary edema in the shielded lungs. Lung irradiation alone not only increased pulmonary artery pressure and perivascular edema but also induced an increased LV relaxation time. Combined irradiation of lung and heart induced pronounced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure and relaxation time, in addition to an increase in right ventricle end-diastolic pressure, indicative of biventricular diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, enhanced pulmonary edema, inflammation and fibrosis were also observed. Conclusions: Both lung and heart irradiation cause cardiac and pulmonary toxicity via different mechanisms. Thus, when combined, the loss of cardiopulmonary performance is intensified further, explaining the deleterious effects of heart and lung coirradiation. Our findings show for the first time the physiological mechanism underlying the development of a multiorgan complication, RILT. Reduction of dose to either of these organs offers new opportunities to improve radiation therapy treatment of thoracic tumors, potentially facilitating increased treatment doses and tumor control.

Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Veen, Sonja van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bartelds, Beatrijs [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Boer, Rudolf A. de [Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Dickinson, Michael G. [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Johan R. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Faber, Hette; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Berger, Rolf M.F. [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Single-Session Radiofrequency Ablation of Bilateral Lung Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This retrospective study examined the feasibility and efficacy of bilateral lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) performed in a single session. Methods: From 2002-2009, patients with bilateral lung metastases were treated by RFA, where possible in a single session under general anesthesia with CT guidance. The second lung was punctured only if no complications occurred after treatment of the first lung. Five lung metastases maximum per patient were treated by RFA and prospectively followed. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of acute and delayed complications. Secondary endpoints were calculation of hospitalization duration, local efficacy, median survival, and median time to tumor progression. Local efficacy was evaluated on CT or positron emission tomography (PET) CT. Results: Sixty-seven patients were treated for bilateral lung metastases with RFA (mean age, 62 years). Single-session treatment was not possible in 40 due to severe pneumothoraces (n = 24), bilateral pleural contact (n = 14), and operational exclusions (n = 2). Twenty-seven (41%) received single-session RFA of lesions in both lungs for 66 metastases overall. Fourteen unilateral and four bilateral pneumothoraces occurred (18 overall, 66.7%). Unilateral (n = 13) and bilateral (n = 2) chest tube drainage was required. Median hospitalization was 3 (range, 2-8) days. Median survival was 26 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 19-33). Four recurrences on RFA sites were observed (4 patients). Median time to tumor progression was 9.5 months (95% CI, 4.2-23.5). Conclusions: Although performing single-session bilateral lung RFA is not always possible due to pneumothoraces after RFA of first lung, when it is performed, this technique is safe and effective.

Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: palussiere@bergonie.org; Gomez, Fernando; Cannella, Matthieu; Ferron, Stephane; Descat, Edouard [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology, Regional Cancer Centre (France); Fonck, Marianne [Institut Bergonie, Department of Digestive Oncology (France); Brouste, Veronique [Institut Bergonie, Clinical and Epidemiological Research Unit (France); Avril, Antoine [Institut Bergonie, Department of Surgery (France)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Effects of disabled vehicles stopped on a freeway shoulder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF !3ISABLED VEHICLES STOPPFD ON A FREEWAY SHOULDER A Thesis ROY LEON WILSHIRE S" bmitted to tl-, e Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechar. ical Col lege of Texas in partial fulfillment of the t equiremcnts for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1963 Major Subject; Cevil Engineering EFFECTS OF DISABLED VEHICLES STOPPED ON A FREEWAY SHOULDER A Thesis By ROY LEON WILSHIRE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee H ad of Department August 196 3...

Wilshire, Roy Leon

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix U.S. DepartmentBaseload OperationDirect s-CO2Disabled

254

Any health care reform must allow continuation of robust Medicaid Buy-In programs for working people with disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National health care reform must meet the unique health care needs of people with disabilities. However, obtaining health care coverage for a person with disabilities can be challenging in an employer-based health insurance environment. The final...

Otto, B.; Salley, S.; Hall, Jean P.; Himmelstein, J.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

Validation of the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale, Second Edition (RCMAS-2) Scores for Children with Specific Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specific learning disabilities are one of the most common and debilitating disorders experienced by children and adolescents, and students with specific learning disabilities may be particularly vulnerable to anxiety. The ...

Raad, Jennifer Marie

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES 5/14 DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES REQUEST to release disability related information to the Division of Housing and Food Services as it relates to my requesting the accommodation. This information and the student's signature are required so Services

Texas at Austin, University of

257

DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES 6/14 DIVISION OF HOUSING AND FOOD SERVICES SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES REQUEST and Food Services (DHFS). Requests will not be processed until both the Request for Housing and Food to release disability related information to the Division of Housing and Food Services as it relates to my

Texas at Austin, University of

258

Chin-Lung Wang Professor in Mathematics, NTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chin-Lung Wang Position Professor in Mathematics, NTU Research Fields Algebraic Geometry to the non-vanishing conjecture for a pseudo-effective adjoint divisor. I am interested in studying the an

Huang, Su-Yun

259

Tumour microenvironment interactions of small cell lung cancer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterised by rapid growth, early metastatic spread and poor long-term survival. The tumour is initially sensitive to chemotherapy and thus objective response rates are high. Unfortunately, ...

Hodkinson, Philip Simon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Functional lung imaging in humans using Positron Emission Tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis deals with a method of functional lung imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this technique, a radioactive tracer, nitrogen-13, is dissolved in saline solution, and injected into a peripheral ...

Layfield, Dominick, 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

a549 human lung: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human (more) Weems, Jessica Marie 2010-01-01 26 KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG Physics Websites Summary: to the epidemiologically derived value...

262

aerosol lung inhalation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2...

263

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Selectins Mediate Small Cell Lung Cancer Systemic Metastasis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, ...

Heidemann, Franziska

265

SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: ?5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Bailey, D; Bailey, E [Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Master Limited Partnerships and Real Estate Investment Trusts: Opportunities and Potential Complications for Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Master Limited Partnerships (MLPs) and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) are two proposed investment vehicles which have the potential to lower renewable energy assets' high cost of capital; a critical factor in the Department of Energy's goal for renewable energy to achieve grid-parity with traditional sources of electric generation. Due to current U.S. federal income tax laws, regulations, and administrative interpretations, REITs and MLPs cannot finance a significant portion of the cost of renewable energy assets. Efforts are underway to alter these rules by changing the definition of 'real property' (REIT) and 'qualified income' (MLP). However, even with rule changes, both investment vehicles have structural challenges to efficiently finance renewable energy assets. Among them are 1) effectively utilizing the U.S. federal income tax incentives; 2) administratively structuring the investments to not be overly onerous or complicated, given the potential for pooling a relatively large amount of small assets; and 3) attracting and retaining a large enough investment community to participate in the funding opportunities. This report summarizes these challenges so that if proposed federal changes are made, stakeholders have an understanding of the possible outcomes.

Feldman, D.; Settle, E.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Duke University/Health System Disability Management System, 402 Oregon Street, Box 90142, Telephone: (919) 668-6213 Fax: (919) 668-3977 TTY (919) 668-1329  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duke University/Health System Disability Management System, 402 Oregon Street, Box 90142, Telephone,000 ­ Send Accommodation Fund application to the Disability Management System at (919) 668-6213 or leigh be obtained through the Disability Management System, or downloaded from the Disability Management System

Oren, Ram

268

Instructional Practices that Promote Acquisition and Generalization of Skills by Learning Disabled Adolescents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While most efforts in programming for learning disabled adolescents have been directed to the content of instructional offering, the authors identify procedures to promote acquisition and generalization of skills . Exemplified ...

Deshler, Donald D.; Alley, Gordon R.; Warner, Michael M.; Schumaker, Jean B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Rehabilitation engineers help people with disabilities with wireless technology LATEST NEWS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Technology Management & Policy Sciences RELATED LINKS - Economic Development News - GTRI Annual two parallel goals: (1) to develop new and innovative ways of applying mobile wireless technologiesRehabilitation engineers help people with disabilities with wireless technology SEARCH LATEST NEWS

270

Therapeutic Camps as Respite Care Providers: Benefits for Families of Children with Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), as well as other chronic illnesses (Florian & Krulik, 1991). Other studies also found that a child?s disability was negatively related to the parents? psychological health (Hauenstein, 1990; Waddington & Buschrossnagel, 1992). Taken together...

Shelton, Kyle J.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Artificial Tongue-Placed Tactile Biofeedback for perceptual supplementation: application to human disability and biomedical engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper aims at introducing the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution" or "perceptual supplementation", we are developing in the fields of human disability and biomedical engineering. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); (2) ankle proprioceptive acuity improvement for driving assistance in older and/or disabled adults; and (3) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper presents results of three feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults.

Vuillerme, Nicolas; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Examining Employer Attitudes and Valued Employability Skills For Individuals With and Without Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents three separate studies designed to examine perspectives on employment for individuals with disabilities from employers and educators. First, a literature review was conducted on the studies published in the past decade...

Ju, Song

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Impact of Major Events on the Lives of Family Caregivers of Children with Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The authors examine the family caregiving experience among families with children with severe emotional disabilities from a perspective that recognizes the importance of the family's views and feelings. This viewpoint ...

McDonald, Thomas P.; Couchonnal, Graciela; Early, Theresa

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Human-Centered Public Transportation Systems for Persons with Cognitive Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human-Centered Public Transportation Systems for Persons with Cognitive Disabilities -- Challenges to use mainstream public transportation systems. This project faces two unique challenges: (1) there are no true "experts" who understand all facets of public transportation system design, operation

Fischer, Gerhard

275

The Medicaid Medically Improved Group: Losing Disability Status and Growing Earnings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objectives: Under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (PL 106-170), states may extend Medicaid Buy-In coverage to a medically improved group. Improved group coverage allows adults with disabilities ...

Hall, Jean P.; Thomas, Kathleen C.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Research Strategy for Studying Learning Disabled Adolescents and Young Adults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unique problems related to adolescents and young adults which researchers must consider in designing interventions are discussed. These unique factors associate with the condition of learning disabilities in adolescents ...

Schumaker, Jean B.; Alley, Gordon R.; Warner, Michael M.; Deshler, Donald D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Research Approaches to Studying the Link Between Learning Disabilities and Juvenile Delinquency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A relationship between learning disabilities and juvenile delinquency has been hypothesized for a period of time. Research on this relationship has been clouded with methodological difficulties. These problems include the ...

Hazel, J. Stephen; Schumaker, Jean B.; Deshler, Donald D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assumptions and Strategies for Conducting Research with Learning Disabled Adolescents and Young Adults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper details the assumptions about learning disabled adolescents and young adults as well as assumptions about conducting research with this population held by researchers at the Kansas Institute. Strategies developed ...

Meyen, Edward L.; Schiefelbusch, Richard L.; Deshler, Donald D.; Alley, Gordon R.; Moran, Mary Ross; Clark, Frances L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Studying the Learning Disabled Adolescent Through Epidemiological and Intervention Research Tactics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper examines the relationship between epidemiological and intervention research with learning disabled adolescents. Several historical trends and contemporary issues (e.g., the importance of prevention as opposed ...

Altman, Reuben

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Examining individual and ecological predictors of the self-determination of students with disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article examines the impact of multiple individual and ecological factors on the self-determination of students with learning disabilities, mild and moderate mental retardation, and other health impairments. Baseline ...

Shogren, Karrie A.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Palmer, Susan B.; Soukup, Jane Helen; Little, Todd D.; Garner, Nancy; Lawrence, Margaret

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The relationship between disability and depression in multiple sclerosis: the role of uncertainty, coping, and hope.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationship between disability and depression was studied in 188 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). Patients were administered the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, Ways of Coping, Uncertainty ...

Lynch, Sharon G.; Kroencke, Dawn C.; Denney, Douglas R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Predicting School Readiness for Low-Income Children With Disability Risks Identified Early.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examined school readiness at kindergarten entry for low-income children whose disability indicators were identified before age 3. Data were collected as part ofthe Early Head Start Research and Evaluation ...

Jeon, Hyun-Joo; Peterson, Carla A.; Wall, Shavaun; Carta, Judith J.; Gayle, Luze; Eshbaugh, Elaine M.; Swanson, Mark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Sherman Anti-Trust Law: in its Relation to the Economic Welfare of The United Stats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., American steel and Wire Co . , International Paper Co . , and the American 'rin Plat e Co., producing from 60% toS:tO% of' the putput of their respective comnodities, have that practi cal monopoly which c haracter izes the trust . "Their abili ty at any... property of most of t h e concerns engage d in the manufacture of matches' was declared in ichiganto be illegal.(c) In ew Jersey the Trenton Potteries Co. which purchased mo st of t he po t t erie s manufa~turing sanitary ware in the United s tates...

Schnake, Francis Dean

1912-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - a549 lung cancer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and lung cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of casecontrol Summary: Household coal use and lung cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies... ,...

285

A review of "A History of Intelligence and 'Intellectual Disability'" by C. F. Goodey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the concepts of intellectual ability and disability became part of psychology, medicine and biology. Focusing on the period between the Protestant Reform and 1700, this book shows that in many cases it has been accepted without scienti#15;c and psychological... will in Protestant theology. However, it is important to not forget that this diagnostic is not equivalent to the author?s claim to regard intelligence and intellectual disability as historical contingences. #14;e book is well structured. Having in mind...

Navarro, Mara G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Access to health care for individuals with developmental disabilities from minority backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MENTAL RETARDATION VOLUME 42, NUMBER 6: 459470 DECEMBER 2004 459qAmerican Association on Mental Retardation Access to Health Care for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities From Minority Backgrounds Amanda Reichard, Therese Marie Sacco, and H.... Rutherford Turnbull, III Abstract In this project we examined access to health care by individuals with developmental disabilities in Kansas from low-income populations and from minority backgrounds. Four criteria for deter- mining access were employed...

Reichard, Amanda; Sacco, T. M.; Turnbull, H. Rutherford

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

Children with disabilities in the context of disaster: A social vulnerability perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

draw on empirical studies from disaster researchers and focus on the adverse physical, psychological, and educational vulnera- bilities that children with disabilities may experi- ence in the context of disaster. We conclude with a discussion... of the theory of resilience as it per- tains to children with disabilities in disaster and outline additional research needs. Social Vulnerability and Disaster Historically, disasters have been viewed as random events that cause indiscriminate losses and suffer...

Stough, Laura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in the other, tumor was identified but the site could not be specified. The radionuclide lung scan is a technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

1982-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Comment on ``Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage is not caused by inertial cavitation''  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comment on ``Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage is not caused by inertial cavitation'' [J. Acoust­1297 2000 that ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage is not caused by inertial cavitation. An argument is provided that illustrates how cavitation inception conditions in the lungs of animals are not altered

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

290

Regional Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe regional lung tissue density changes in normal lung tissue of patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 179 post-SBRT follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 62 patients who received SBRT between 2003 and 2009 were studied. Median prescription dose was 54 Gy (range, 30-60 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions. SBRT-induced lung density changes on post-SBRT follow-up CT were evaluated at approximately 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after treatment. Dose-response curves (DRC) were generated for SBRT-induced lung damage by averaging CT number (HU) changes for regions of the lungs receiving the same dose at 5-Gy intervals. Results: For all follow-up interval periods, CT numbers linearly increased with dose until 35 Gy and were constant thereafter. For 3, 18, 24, and 30 months, the rate of relative electron density increase with dose was approximately 0.24% per Gy. At 6 months, the rate was also similar below 20 Gy but then rose to 0.6% per Gy above this threshold. After 6 months, DRCs were mostly time-independent. When split between patients treated with 3 fractions of 12 to 20 Gy (median, 20 Gy; average tumor volume, 12 {+-} 16 cm{sup 3}) and with >3 fractions of 6 to 12.5 Gy (median, 9 Gy; average tumor volume, 30 {+-} 40 cm{sup 3}), DRCs differed significantly. In both cases, CT changes at 3, 18, 24, and 30 months were identical to those of the population DRC; however, patients who received >3 fractions showed 6-month CT changes that were more than twice those for the group that received 3 fractions. Conclusions: This analysis of SBRT-induced normal lung density changes indicates that lung normal tissue has more pronounced self-limited acute effects than late effects. Differences in acute CT changes following treatments in 3 fractions were considerably less than for treatments in >3 fractions.

Diot, Quentin, E-mail: quentin.diot@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Stuhr, Kelly; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Low Floor Americans with Disabilities Compliant Alternate Fuel Vehicle Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed a low emission, cost effective, fuel efficient, medium-duty community/transit shuttle bus that meets American's with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements and meets National Energy Policy Act requirements (uses alternative fuel). The Low Profile chassis, which is the basis of this vehicle is configured to be fuel neutral to accommodate various alternative fuels. Demonstration of the vehicle in Yellowstone Park in summer (wheeled operation) and winter (track operation) demonstrated the feasibility and flexibility for this vehicle to provide year around operation throughout the Parks system as well as normal transit operation. The unique configuration of the chassis which provides ADA access with a simple ramp and a flat floor throughout the passenger compartment, provides maximum access for all passengers as well as maximum flexibility to configure the vehicle for each application. Because this product is derived from an existing medium duty truck chassis, the completed bus is 40-50% less expensive than existing low floor transit buses, with the reliability and durability of OEM a medium duty truck.

James Bartel

2004-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

lung cancer smoke-free 6 One man's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fighting lung cancer Living smoke-free 6 One man's mission85 #12;Cure is the newsletter for the University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, home to cancer care and research for the Southeast's most? For more information about care and services offered at the UF Shands Cancer Center, call 352

Roy, Subrata

293

Modifications of lung clearance mechanisms by acute influenza A infection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four volunteers with naturally acquired, culture-proved influenza A infection inhaled a radiolabeled aerosol to permit investigation of lung mucociliary clearance mechanisms during and after symptomatic illness. Mucus transport in the trachea was undetectable when monitored with an external multidetector probe within 48 hours of the onset of the illness, but was found at a normal velocity by 1 week in three of the four subjects. In two volunteers who coughed 23 to 48 times during the 4.5-hour observation period, whole lung clearance was as fast within the first 48 hours of illness as during health 3 months later in spite of the absence of measurable tracheal mucus transport. Conversely, in spite of the return 1 week later of mucus transport at velocities expected in the trachea, whole lung clearance for the 4.5-hour period was slowed in two volunteers who coughed less than once an hour. The data offer evidence that cough is important in maintaining lung clearance for at least several days after symptomatic influenza A infection when other mechanisms that depend on ciliary function are severely deficient.

Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Garrard, C.S.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

P. R. Darke, R. L. Benedicktus and M. K. Brady Kramer, R. (1999) "Trust and Distrust in Organizations: Emerging Perspectives, Enduring Questions,"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;P. R. Darke, R. L. Benedicktus and M. K. Brady Kramer, R. (1999) "Trust and Distrust Relationships," Academy ofManagement Review, 23Guly): 472-90. Main, K., Dahl, D. and Darke, P.R. (2007-56. Reichheld, F. and Schefter, P. (2000) "E-Loyalty: Your Secret Weapon on the Web," Harvard Business Review

Brody, James P.

295

Disability rights in dialogue with clinical genetics conference, May 31 to June 2, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issue of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion has been hotly debated in the medical, genetic counselling, feminist, parents, disability rights and bio-ethics literature, each of the various positions critiquing each other. People from the disability rights community in particular have began to articulate a critical view of the practice of widespread prenatal diagnosis with intent to abort because the pregnancy might result in a child with a disability. Unfortunately, people from the various disciplines and perspectives, such as bioethics, disability rights, feminism and so forth, by and large, have tended only to write for themselves and their colleagues. Few people have crossed disciplines to try to talk to people with other views. The rapid advances of genome research have continued to produce new prenatal tests, raising many complex ethical questions regarding the applications of prenatal testing. But the widely disparate positions of the various factions has made it difficult to move toward formulation of public policy change necessary to encompass these new genetic technologies. Genetic counselling is in the front lines of the controversial social and ethical issues arising from prenatal diagnosis, in its interface between medical science and the consumer of services. The primary intent of the conference was to invite and facilitate productive dialogue between individuals and groups of people who have traditionally not interacted as a result of their disparate views on these issues and to learn from this process, emphasizing the involvement of people with disabilities and people who work in clinical genetics.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Building public trust: Actions to respond to the report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Democratic government requires trust: people need to know and believe that the government is telling the truth. Without information about what the government is doing and why, citizens cannot exercise democratic control over government institutions. During his first year in office, President Clinton became concerned about reports that the government had conducted unethical secret human radiation experiments during the Cold War. To address this issue, in January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by bioethicist Dr. Ruth Faden of Johns Hopkins University. The President also directed all Federal agencies to search for records related to human subjects radiation research and provide them to the Advisory Committee. This report presents the Administration`s actions to respond to the ACHRE`s findings and recommendations.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Policy for University Accommodations of Persons with Disabilities Page 1 of 6 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 4075 Rev.: 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy for University Accommodations of Persons with Disabilities Page 1 of 6 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 4075 Rev.: 4 Policy and Procedures Date: June 30, 2010 __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Policy for University Accommodations of Persons with Disabilities

Buehrer, R. Michael

298

Frizzled-8 as a putative therapeutic target in human lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fzd-8 is over-expressed in human lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 inhibits proliferation and Wnt pathway in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down Fzd-8 sensitizes lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. It is necessary to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer in order to develop more effective therapeutics for the treatment of this disease. Recent reports have shown that Wnt signaling pathway is important in a number of cancer types including lung cancer. However, the role of Frizzled-8 (Fzd-8), one of the Frizzled family of receptors for the Wnt ligands, in lung cancer still remains to be elucidated. Here in this study we showed that Fzd-8 was over-expressed in human lung cancer tissue samples and cell lines. To investigate the functional importance of the Fzd-8 over-expression in lung cancer, we used shRNA to knock down Fzd-8 mRNA in lung cancer cells expressing the gene. We observed that Fzd-8 shRNA inhibited cell proliferation along with decreased activity of Wnt pathway in vitro, and also significantly suppressed A549 xenograft model in vivo (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that knocking down Fzd-8 by shRNA sensitized the lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. These data suggest that Fzd-8 is a putative therapeutic target for human lung cancer and over-expression of Fzd-8 may be important for aberrant Wnt activation in lung cancer.

Wang, Hua-qing [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China) [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Medical Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Xu, Mei-lin [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China); Ma, Jie [Department of Pathology, Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou (China)] [Department of Pathology, Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)] [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Xie, Cong-hua, E-mail: publication.submission@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

299

POLICY FOR DISABLED & VIETNAM-ERA VETERANS Clemson University prohibits discrimination against any employee or applicant for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY FOR DISABLED & VIETNAM-ERA VETERANS Clemson University prohibits discrimination against any be in violation of the University's policy. Clemson University will treat qualified disabled veterans and veterans a policy related question should contact the Office of Access and Equity, 110 Holtzendorff Hall. Phone

Bolding, M. Chad

300

Health, Counselling and Disability Services (HCDS) 146 Stuart Street (613) 533-2506 www.queensu.ca/hcds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health, Counselling and Disability Services (HCDS) 146 Stuart Street (613) 533-2506 www For in Students: · Listlessness, lack of energy, or apparent loss of interest · Unusual or bizarre behavior, sexual or cultural identity #12;Health, Counselling and Disability Services (HCDS) 146 Stuart Street (613

Abolmaesumi, Purang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: debaere@igr.fr [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Outcome after Radiofrequency Ablation of Sarcoma Lung Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PurposeResection is the mainstay of management in patients with sarcoma lung metastases, but there is a limit to how many resections can be performed. Some patients with inoperable disease have small-volume lung metastases that are amenable to thermal ablation. We report our results after radiofrequency ablation (RFA).MethodsThis is a retrospective study of patients treated from 2007 to 2012 in whom the intention was to treat all sites of disease and who had a minimum CT follow-up of 4months. Treatment was performed under general anesthesia/conscious sedation using cool-tip RFA. Follow-up CT scans were analyzed for local control. Primary tumor type, location, grade, disease-free interval, prior resection/chemotherapy, number and size of lung tumors, uni- or bilateral disease, complications, and overall and progression-free survival were recorded.ResultsTwenty-two patients [15 women; median age 48 (range 1078) years] with 55 lung metastases were treated in 30 sessions. Mean and median tumor size and initial number were 0.9cm and 0.7 (range 0.52) cm, and 2.5 and 1 (17) respectively. Median CT and clinical follow-up were 12 (454) and 20 (863) months, respectively. Primary local control rate was 52 of 55 (95%). There were 2 of 30 (6.6%) Common Terminology Criteria grade 3 complications with no long-term sequelae. Mean (median not reached) and 2- and 3-year overall survival were 51months, and 94 and 85%. Median and 1- and 2-year progression-free survival were 12months, and 53 and 23%. Prior disease-free interval was the only significant factor to affect overall survival.ConclusionRFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with small-volume sarcoma metastases.

Koelblinger, Claus, E-mail: claus.koelblinger@bhs.at [KH Barmherzige Schwestern Ried, Department of Radiology (Austria); Strauss, Sandra, E-mail: s.strauss@ucl.ac.uk [UCL and UCLH, Department of Medical Oncology (United Kingdom); Gillams, Alice, E-mail: alliesorting@gmail.com [The London Clinic, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

1982-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Tissue Heterogeneity in IMRT Dose Calculation for Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in accuracy of dose calculation between 3 commonly used algorithms, the Pencil Beam algorithm (PB), the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), and the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition (CCCS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The 2D dose distributions obtained with the 3 algorithms were compared on each CT slice pixel by pixel, using the MATLAB code (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) and the agreement was assessed with the {gamma} function. The effect of the differences on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), tumor control, and normal tissue complication probability (TCP and NTCP) were also evaluated, and its significance was quantified by using a nonparametric test. In general PB generates regions of over-dosage both in the lung and in the tumor area. These differences are not always in DVH of the lung, although the Wilcoxon test indicated significant differences in 2 of 4 patients. Disagreement in the lung region was also found when the {Gamma} analysis was performed. The effect on TCP is less important than for NTCP because of the slope of the curve at the level of the dose of interest. The effect of dose calculation inaccuracy is patient-dependent and strongly related to beam geometry and to the localization of the tumor. When multiple intensity-modulated beams are used, the effect of the presence of the heterogeneity on dose distribution may not always be easily predictable.

Pasciuti, Katia, E-mail: ka.pasciuti@libero.i [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Malatesta, Tiziana [Medical Physics Department, S. Giovanni Calibita, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Roma (Italy); Benassi, Marcello; Di Nallo, Anna Maria [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Mirri, Alessandra; Pinzi, Valentina [Division of Radiotherapy, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Landoni, Valeria [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Istituto Regina Elena, Roma (Italy)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC from workers and controls to identify genes targeted for inactivation by plutonium in this other common histologic form of lung cancer. We will examine methylation of the p16, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT), and death associated protein kinase genes ([DAP-K], evaluated previously in adenocarcinomas) as well as the new genes being assessed in the adenocarcinomas. The second hypothesis will be tested in a cross-sectional study of cancer-free workers exposed to plutonium and an unexposed population. A cohort of 700 cancer-free workers and 700 unexposed persons is being assembled, exposures are being defined, and induced sputum collected at initial entry into the study and approximately 1-year later. Exposed and unexposed persons will be matched by 5-year age intervals and smoking status (current and former). The frequency for methylation of four genes that show the greatest difference in prevalence in tumors from workers and controls will be determined in exfoliated cells within sputum. These studies will extend those in primary tumors to determine whether difference in prevalence for individual or multiple genes are detected in sputum samples from high-risk subjects exposed to plutonium. Follow-up of this cohort offers the opportunity to validate these endpoints and future biomarkers as true markers for lung cancer risk.

Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

Venkatramani, Rajkumar, E-mail: rvenkatramani@chla.usc.edu [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kamath, Sunil [Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Olch, Arthur J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Malvar, Jemily [Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sposto, Richard [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Goodarzian, Fariba [Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Freyer, David R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Keens, Thomas G. [Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); and others

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced stage lung Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to lungs. Their effectiveness may Source: Hamza-Lup, Felix G. - School of Computing, Armstrong Atlantic State University Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

308

HE3286, an oral synthetic steroid, treats lung inflammation in mice without immune suppression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implications for therapy. Treat Respir Med 2004, 3:147-59.as a potential agent to treat autoimmune diseases. Autoimmunan oral synthetic steroid, treats lung inflammation in mice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic lung disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease and promote... , teaches people with lung ... Source: National Center for Environmental Health- Publications and Products Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3...

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon-exposed lung Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in non-smoking and smoking lung cancer... of the fetus. These mutageniccarcinogenic pollutants include aromatic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic... of transplacental exposure...

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced lung cancer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cancer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced lung cancer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr...

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing lung cancer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Department of Genetics, Yale University Collection: Biology and Medicine 20 Household coal use and lung cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of casecontrol Summary:...

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos exposure lung Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Physicians for Social Responsibility,"Sept. 2000... -treated playsets face an increased risk of getting lung or bladder cancer later in ... Source: Callender, Craig - Department...

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis gallium-67 lung Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ILD... , interstitial lung disease, texture analysis, co-occurrence matrix, computed tomography I. INTRODUCTION Computer... %. The aim of our work is to develop a novel texture ......

315

Factory Express a New Mexico Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factory Express a New Mexico Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Company ... a New Mexico small business the company.'" Factory Express is the exclusive provider in New Mexico of service and sales for the type Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Office size? Small. Staff size? Small. Budget? Small

316

Mothers' Perceptions of Community Integration Opportunities for Children with Disabilities in Qatar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................... 61 3.1 Introduction .......................................................................................... 61 3.2 Hermeneutic Phenomenology .............................................................. 61 3.3 Participants... of the phenomena of the lived experiences of mothers of children with disabilities in Qatar and the way in which these mothers have dealt with those experiences within their own community and cultural context. 5. Hermeneutics is the science and art...

Abbs, Alyn K

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Audience Response & Disability Representation in Four Film and Television Dramas: A Qualitative Audience Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ?Realism?: Comparing Movies to Life, 151 vi Chapter 5. The Sea Inside and The Brooke Ellison Story: Truth, Lies and the ?Based on a True Story? Disability (Melo)Drama, 164 Truth and Lies in Adaptation, 168 A Movie or a Film: Distinctions of Ethics and Taste...

Arenas Velez, Fernando

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

ALTERNATE FORMATS OF THIS AGENDA WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST TO QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Treasurer, Deputy Treasurer, Collector, Deputy Collector, Assessor, Deputy Assessor, and General Counsel WITH DISABILITIES. APPROPRIATE INTERPRETIVE SERVICES FOR THIS MEETING WILL BE PROVIDED IF FEASIBLE UPON ADVANCE _____________________________ General Manager, Casey Hashimoto Executive Secretary to the Board, Tami Wallenburg 333 E. Canal Drive

319

The gap in term of mobility for disabled travellers in France DEJOUX, Virginie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gap in term of mobility for disabled travellers in France DEJOUX, Virginie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy 12 Verte 93166 Noisy le grand cedex Telephone: 33 1 45 92 55 88 virginie.dejoux@inrets.fr ARMOOGUM Jimmy cedex Telephone: 33 1 45 92 55 79 jimmy.armoogum@inrets.fr ABSTRACT The demographic and social changes

Boyer, Edmond

320

POLICY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES Clemson University prohibits discrimination against any employee or applicant for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES Clemson University prohibits discrimination against any, layoff or termination - would be in violation of the University's policy. Clemson University will treat feels discriminated against or who has a policy related question should contact the Office of Access

Bolding, M. Chad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ODS 8/12 18 ODS DOCUMENTATION OF A LEARNING DISABILITY/ADD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appropriate disability certification. The guidelines below describe the necessary components of acceptable with a copy of these guidelines. Additional questions about documentation or accommodations may be referred Test 4 (WRAT4) is not a comprehensive measure of achievement and therefore is not suitable. Information

322

Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case control study using life grid interviews.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a modestly raised risk of lung cancer with prolonged residence close to heavy industry, although the confidence intervals were wide. The effect of air pollution on the incidence of lung cancer merits continued study....

Edwards, R; Pless-Mulloli, T; Howel, D; Chadwick, TJ; Bhopal, Raj; Harrison, R N; Gribbin, H

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage is not caused by inertial cavitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage is not caused by inertial cavitation William D. O'Brien, Jr to an inertial cavitation mechanism. The purpose of this article is to report the results of two experiments that directly contradict the hypothesis that ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage is caused by inertial cavitation

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

324

Response to ``Comment on `Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage is not caused by inertial cavitation'''  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to ``Comment on `Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage is not caused by inertial cavitation cavitation nuclei in lung versus other tissues such that overpressure does not affect the inertial cavitation this question, let us first be clear as to what we believe would and would not constitute inertial cavitation

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

325

KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG B. M. F. Lau1 , D. Nikezic1,2 and K to inhaled radon progeny in the human lung. The present work uses the microdosimetric approach and determines- ratory tract (HRT) due to inhaled radon progeny, ICRP66(1) made use of the absorbed fraction (AF) which

Yu, K.N.

326

Decrements in Lung Function Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decrements in Lung Function Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India Ondine S­2000, the authors investigated relations between lung function, respiratory symptoms, and arsenic in drinking water. Worldwide, populations have been identified that con- sume drinking water with arsenic concentrations above

California at Berkeley, University of

327

Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

Gate, Laurent [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France)]. E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Micillino, Jean-Claude [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Nunge, Herve [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Bottin, Marie-Claire [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Wrobel, Richard [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Binet, Stephane [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

2D/3D registration algorithm for lung brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A 2D/3D registration algorithm is proposed for registering orthogonal x-ray images with a diagnostic CT volume for high dose rate (HDR) lung brachytherapy. Methods: The algorithm utilizes a rigid registration model based on a pixel/voxel intensity matching approach. To achieve accurate registration, a robust similarity measure combining normalized mutual information, image gradient, and intensity difference was developed. The algorithm was validated using a simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms. Transfer catheters were placed inside the phantoms to simulate the unique image features observed during treatment. The algorithm sensitivity to various degrees of initial misregistration and to the presence of foreign objects, such as ECG leads, was evaluated. Results: The mean registration error was 2.2 and 1.9 mm for the simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms, respectively. The error was comparable to the interoperator catheter digitization error of 1.6 mm. Preliminary analysis of data acquired from four patients indicated a mean registration error of 4.2 mm. Conclusions: Results obtained using the proposed algorithm are clinically acceptable especially considering the complications normally encountered when imaging during lung HDR brachytherapy.

Zvonarev, P. S. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Farrell, T. J.; Hunter, R.; Wierzbicki, M.; Hayward, J. E. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Medical Physics, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada); Sur, R. K. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Your Words, You are in a unique position to shape the public image of people with disabilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cripple Person with autism, on the autism spectrum Autistic Person with Down syndrome Mongoloid Person Gimp, lame Congenital disability Birth defect Burn survivor Burn victim Post-polio syndrome Suffers

330

Effectiveness of Employing Multimedia Principles in The Design of Computer-Based Math Tutorials for Students with Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DL). The animated tutorial prototype, which was studied as part of this project, was for young children. The study evaluated a prototype of online instructional tutorial in mathematics designed for students with disabilities. The tutorial prototype was instructional...

Kanitkar, Anjali Shridhar

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

An Analysis of the Relationship between Principal Employment Interview Scores and the Achievement Scores of Students with Specific Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leadership domains ......................................................................................................... 9 Localizing leadership behaviors ..................................................................................... 10...) .......................... 34 Table 9 Correlations for Socio-Economic Status and Measures of Leadership .......................... 34 Table 10 Regression Results for Multiple Predictors and Achievement for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities...

Ostmeyer, Susan

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Perspectives of Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities and/or Autism on Their Lives and Their Problem Behavior.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of the study was 2-fold: (a) to explore the perceptions of individuals with cognitive disabilities and/ or autism regarding barriers and solutions they have experienced related to problem behavior, and (b) to ...

Ruef, Michael B.; Turnbull, Ann P.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

An anatomically realistic lung model for Monte Carlo-based dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment planning for disease sites with large variations of electron density in neighboring tissues requires an accurate description of the geometry. This self-evident statement is especially true for the lung, a highly complex organ having structures with a wide range of sizes that range from about 10{sup -4} to 1 cm. In treatment planning, the lung is commonly modeled by a voxelized geometry obtained using computed tomography (CT) data at various resolutions. The simplest such model, which is often used for QA and validation work, is the atomic mix or mean density model, in which the entire lung is homogenized and given a mean (volume-averaged) density. The purpose of this paper is (i) to describe a new heterogeneous random lung model, which is based on morphological data of the human lung, and (ii) use this model to assess the differences in dose calculations between an actual lung (as represented by our model) and a mean density (homogenized) lung. Eventually, we plan to use the random lung model to assess the accuracy of CT-based treatment plans of the lung. For this paper, we have used Monte Carlo methods to make accurate comparisons between dose calculations for the random lung model and the mean density model. For four realizations of the random lung model, we used a single photon beam, with two different energies (6 and 18 MV) and four field sizes (1x1, 5x5, 10x10, and 20x20 cm{sup 2}). We found a maximum difference of 34% of D{sub max} with the 1x1, 18 MV beam along the central axis (CAX). A ''shadow'' region distal to the lung, with dose reduction up to 7% of D{sub max}, exists for the same realization. The dose perturbations decrease for larger field sizes, but the magnitude of the differences in the shadow region is nearly independent of the field size. We also observe that, compared to the mean density model, the random structures inside the heterogeneous lung can alter the shape of the isodose lines, leading to a broadening or shrinking of the penumbra region. For small field sizes, the mean lung doses significantly depend on the structures' relative locations to the beam. In addition to these comparisons between the random lung and mean density models, we also provide a preliminary comparison between dose calculations for the random lung model and a voxelized version of this model at 0.4x0.4x0.4 cm{sup 3} resolution. Overall, this study is relevant to treatment planning for lung tumors, especially in situations where small field sizes are used. Our results show that for such situations, the mean density model of the lung is inadequate, and a more accurate CT model of the lung is required. Future work with our model will involve patient motion, setup errors, and recommendations for the resolution of CT models.

Liang Liang; Larsen, Edward W.; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198-7521 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Menstrual Support for Females with Developmental Disabilities: Survey and Interview of Parents or Caretakers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ramifications of the eugenics movement, however, have proved much more durable. Simultaneously, the states interests in requiring sterilization started outweighing the rights of a person with retardation (Vitello, 1978). In addition, the various movements (de...; Williams & Nind, 1999); and for many years little research investigated the perspectives of females with developmental disabilities (Rodgers, Lipscombe, & Santer, 2006). Although several publications have addressed contraceptive management in females...

Park, Hye Ran

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Bayesian Screening Procedure for Identification of Learning Disabled Adolescents: Administration, Scoring, and Interpretation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disabilities). These component dis abilities (CD) include : (a) decoding words, (b) .word recognition, (c) mathematical algorithms, and (d) monitoring spelling errors. The Psychometric Batte.ry (Battery) includes subtests from five achievement measures: {a.... Insert Figure 4 about here 12 Items checked in the "No" column on the checklist are not recorded on the Answer Sheet. A slash is drawn through the item number on the answer sheet for each item on the checklist checked in the "Don't Know...

Alley, Gordon R.; Deshler, Donald D.; Warner, Michael M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Preschool English Language Learners with Disabilities: A Comparison of Recommended and Actual Language of Instruction Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) 27 th Annual Report to Congress (2005) states that since 1992, an 89% reduction exists in the percentage of students ages 6 through 11 receiving special education services under ?specific learning disabilities? (SLD). OSERS... also reports that starting in 1998 the new DD label appears to have de facto replaced the SLD label for children 3 through 9. As a result, the numbers of children identified with SLD have decreased as the numbers of children assigned under the DD...

Cole, Corinna V.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

The cough response to ultrasonically nebulized distilled water in heart-lung transplantation patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of clinical heart-lung transplantation, the lungs are denervated below the level of the tracheal anastomosis. It has been questioned whether afferent vagal reinnervation occurs after surgery. Here we report the cough frequency, during inhalation of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, of 15 heart-lung transplant patients studied 6 wk to 36 months after surgery. They were compared with 15 normal subjects of a similar age and sex. The distribution of the aerosol was studied in five normal subjects using /sup 99m/technetium diethylene triamine pentaacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) in saline. In seven patients, the sensitivity of the laryngeal mucosa to instilled distilled water (0.2 ml) was tested at the time of fiberoptic bronchoscopy by recording the cough response. Ten percent of the aerosol was deposited onto the larynx and trachea, 56% on the central airways, and 34% in the periphery of the lung. The cough response to the aerosol was strikingly diminished in the patients compared with normal subjects (p less than 0.001), but all seven patients coughed when distilled water was instilled onto the larynx. As expected, the laryngeal mucosa of heart-lung transplant patients remains sensitive to distilled water. However, the diminished coughing when the distilled water is distributed by aerosol to the central airways supports the view that vagal afferent nerves do not reinnervate the lungs after heart-lung transplantation, up to 36 months after surgery.

Higenbottam, T.; Jackson, M.; Woolman, P.; Lowry, R.; Wallwork, J.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, and TNF-?), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. Iron increased the levels of IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-? in lung tissues at high altitudes. Trolox alleviated the iron-induced histological and biochemical changes to the lungs.

Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dissolution rates of uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maximum dissolution rates of uranium into simulated lung fluid from a variety of materials were measured at 37/sup 0/in the where f/sub i/ is in order to estimate clearance rates from the deep lung. A batch procedure was utilized in which samples containing as little as 10 ..mu..g of natural uranium could be tested. The materials included: products of uranium mining, milling and refining operations, coal fly ash, an environmental sample from a site exposed to multiple uranium sources, and purified samples of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, UO/sub 2/, and UF/sub 4/. Dissolution of uranium from several materials indicated the presence of more than one type of uranium compound; but in all cases, the fraction F of uranium remaining undissolved at any time t could be represented by the sum of up to three terms in the series: F = ..sigma../sub i/f/sub i/ exp (-0.693t/UPSILON/sub i/), where f/sub i/ is the initial fraction of component i with dissolution half-time epsilon/sub i/. Values of epsilon/sub i/ varied from 0.01 day to several thousand days depending on the physical and chemical form of the uranium. Dissolution occurred predominantly by formation of the (UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 3/)/sup 4 -/ ion; and as a result, tetravalent uranium compounds dissolved slowly. Dissolution rates of size-separated yellow-cake aerosols were found to be more closely correlated with specific surface area than with aerodynamic diameter.

Kalkwarf, D.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Smarter finance for cleaner energy: open up master limited partnerships (MLPs) and real estate investment trusts (REITs) to renewable energy investment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Master Limited Partnerships (MLPs) and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)both well-established investment structuresshould be opened up to renewable energy investment. MLPs and, more recently, REITs have a proven track record for promoting oil, gas, and other traditional energy sources. When extended to renewable energy projects these tools will help promote growth, move renewables closer to subsidy independence, and vastly broaden the base of investors in Americas energy economy. The extension of MLPs and REITs to renewables enjoys significant support from the investment and clean energy communities. In addition, MLPs for renewables also enjoy bipartisan political backing in Congress.

Mormann, Feliz; Reicher, Dan

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscessus lung disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

would I know... I have it? A: Some of the early warning signs of lung cancer are: A cough that doesn't go away... These symptoms can also come from other diseases, so seeing...

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos-induced lung disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

would I know... I have it? A: Some of the early warning signs of lung cancer are: A cough that doesn't go away... These symptoms can also come from other diseases, so seeing...

344

Small cell lung cancer and cancer stem cell-like cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with extreme mortality and morbidity. Although initially chemo- and radio-sensitive, almost inevitable recurrence and resistance occurs. SCLC patients often ...

Sarvi, Sana

2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid lung injury Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Series Using Active Contour Models Summary: and recruitment in oleic-acid-induced lung injury. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1998; 158: 1636-1643 2 Schreiter D... and atelectatic...

346

Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During: Layachi S, Rogerieux F, Robidel F, Lacroix G, Bayat S (2012) Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon

Boyer, Edmond

347

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates radiation-induced lung Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ameliorates radiation-induced lung Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 doi:10.1016j.ijrobp.2003.12.010 BIOLOGY...

348

Polymorphisms in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and lung function in asthma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Identifying genetic determinants for lung function is important in providing insight into the pathophysiology of asthma. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 is a transcription factor latent in ...

Litonjua, Augusto A

349

Conditional mouse lung cancer models using adenoviral or lentiviral delivery of Cre recombinase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of animal models of lung cancer is critical to our understanding and treatment of the human disease. Conditional mouse models provide new opportunities for testing novel chemopreventatives, therapeutics and ...

DuPage, Michel

350

Branching patterns emerge in a mathematical model of the dynamics of lung development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fluid pressure and fluidmechanical interactions. Lubarsky &The absence of fluid or mechanical effects may also ex-model to the mechanical and fluid dynamical factors in lung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A filter-based feature selection approach for identifying potential biomarkers for lung cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in the world and its treatment is dependant on the type and stage of cancer detected in the patient. Molecular biomarkers that can characterize the cancer ...

Lee, In-Hee; Lushington, Gerald H.; Visvanathan, Mahesh

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

353

Proteasome Inhibitors Block DNA Repair and Radiosensitize Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite optimal radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy and/or surgery, a majority of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) fail treatment. To identify novel gene targets for improved tumor control, ...

Cron, Kyle R.

354

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners. Progress report, March 1, 1991--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Respiratory symptoms and lung function in oil mist-exposed workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was registered and ventilatory function was determined in 164 men exposed to oil mist. The average exposure time was 16.2 years. One hundred fifty-nine office workers served as controls. The exposed men reported more respiratory symptoms: 14% of the exposed nonsmokers v. 2% of the nonsmoking controls having cough at least three months a year. There were non significant differences between spirometric measurements and chest roentgenograms of the men exposed to oil mist and those of the office workers. The lung function of 25 nonsmoking exposed men was further examined with other lung function tests. The mean values for closing volume, slope of the alveolar plateau, total lung capacity, residual volume, elastic recoil at various lung volumes, and diffusion capacity did not differ significantly.

Jarvholm, B. (Dept.of Occupational Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden); Bake, B.; Lavenius, B.; Thiringer, G.; Vokmann, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Lipid-Protein Interactions Alter Line Tensions and Domain Size Distributions in Lung Surfactant Monolayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The size distribution of domains in phase-separated lung surfactant monolayers influences monolayer viscoelasticity and compressibility which, in turn, influence monolayer collapse and set the compression at which the ...

Dhar, Prajnaparamita

357

Nuclear Factor I/B is an Oncogene in Small Cell Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer often diagnosed after it has metastasized. Despite the need to better understand this disease, SCLC remains poorly characterized at the molecular and genomic levels. ...

Dooley, Alison L.

358

Increased lung cancer risks are similar whether arsenic is ingested ALLAN H. SMITHa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and workers inhaling arsenic in copper smelters (IARC, 1980). At the same time that arsenic inhalation smelter workers inhaling arsenic, and a lung cancer case­control study involving ingestion of arsenic

California at Berkeley, University of

359

Lung Irradiation Increases Mortality After Influenza A Virus Challenge Occurring Late After Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To address whether irradiation-induced changes in the lung environment alter responses to a viral challenge delivered late after exposure but before the appearance of late lung radiation injury. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice received either lung alone or combined lung and whole-body irradiation (0-15 Gy). At 10 weeks after irradiation, animals were infected with 120 HAU influenza virus strain A/HKx31. Innate and adaptive immune cell recruitment was determined using flow cytometry. Cytokine and chemokine production and protein leakage into the lung after infection were assessed. Results: Prior irradiation led to a dose-dependent failure to regain body weight after infection and exacerbated mortality, but it did not affect virus-specific immune responses or virus clearance. Surviving irradiated animals displayed a persistent increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and edema. Conclusions: Lung irradiation increased susceptibility to death after infection with influenza virus and impaired the ability to complete recovery. This altered response does not seem to be due to a radiation effect on the immune response, but it may possibly be an effect on epithelial repair.

Manning, Casey M. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Johnston, Carl J. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States) [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Reed, Christina K. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Lawrence, B. Paige [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States) [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Williams, Jacqueline P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Finkelstein, Jacob N., E-mail: Jacob_Finkelstein@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Calibration of the Accuscan II IN Vivo System for High Energy Lung Counting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for high energy lung counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable lung set manufactured at the University of Cincinnati UCLL43AMEU & UCSL43AMEU containing Am-241 and Eu-152 with energies from 26 keV to 1408 keV. The lung set was used in conjunction with a Realistic Torso phantom. The phantom was placed on the RMC II counting table (with pins removed) between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The top of the detector housing was positioned perpendicular to the junction of the phantom clavicle with the sternum. This position places the approximate center line of the detector housing with the center of the lungs. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using a Realistic Torso phantom (Appendix I) and the University of Cincinnati lung set. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for high energy lung counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

Ovard R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nicotine prevents the apoptosis induced by menadione in human lung cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of long-term cigarette smokers die prematurely from the adverse effects of smoking, including on lung cancer and other illnesses. Nicotine is a main component in tobacco and has been implicated as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. However, the mechanism of nicotine action in the development of lung cancer remains largely unknown. In the present study, we designed a nicotine-apoptosis system, by pre-treatment of nicotine making lung cancer cell A549 to be in a physiological nicotine environment, and observed that nicotine promoted cell proliferation and prevented the menadione-induced apoptosis, and exerts its role of anti-apoptosis by shift of apoptotic stage induced by menadione from late apoptotic stage to early apoptotic stage, in which NF-{kappa}B was up-regulated. Interference analysis of NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells showed that knock down of NF-{kappa}B resulted in apoptosis promotion and counteracted the protective effect of nicotine. The findings suggest that nicotine has potential effect in lung cancer genesis, especially in patients with undetectable early tumor development and development of specific NF-{kappa}B inhibitors would represent a potentially exciting new pharmacotherapy for tobacco-related lung cancer.

Zhang Tao [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Lu Heng [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shang Xuan [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Tian Yihao [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zheng Congyi [Centre for Type Culture Collection, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang Shiwen [Institute of Geriatric Cardiology, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Cheng Hanhua [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: hhcheng@whu.edu.cn; Zhou Rongjia [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: rjzhou@whu.edu.cn

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

Discrepancy among Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Social Security, and functional disability measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for research and service. Disability and Health Journal. 2011;4:15. [5] U.S. Census Bureau. 2009 American Community Survey 1 year estimates. Available at: http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ADPTable?_bm=y&-qr_name=ACS_2009_1YR_G00_DP2&-geo_id=01000US... and Prevention, 2010. 2010. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/BRFSS/technical_infodata/surveydata/2009.htm#data. Accessed November 22, 2010. [7] Armour B, Campbell V, Crews J, Malarcher A, Maurice E, Richard R. State-level prevalence of cigarette smoking...

Hall, Jean P.; Kurth, Noelle K.; Fall, Emily C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reliability and Validity of the Bayesian Identification Procedure for Learning Disabled Adolescents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the lowest correlation coeffic- ients are : CD 11 non-LD Difficulty in independent functioning CD 16 non-LD Temper tantrums CD 17 non-LD Resistant to receivi ng assistance from authority CD 18 non-LD Difficulty in producing themes of adequate length 5... are: CD 13 non-LD CD 10 LD Test taking skills Study skills The six variables in the highest correlation coefficient category CD 4 CD 5 CD 12 CD 15 CD 20 LD Low self-esteem, low self-concept LD Disability in recognizing sight words LD...

Alley, Gordon R.; Deshler, Donald D.; Mellard, Daryl F.; Warner, Michael M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 ?M cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. These findings add insight to the relationship between cadmium and lung cancer.

Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

C L I N I C A L R E S E A R C H M-Cell deficit and reading disability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;CUniversityLaboratory of Physiology, Universityof Oxford,London, United Kingdom; dMountSinai School of Medicine, Departmentof the following questions: In moderately disabled readers, will temporal vision-process- ingtherapy proceduresthat improvement in oral reading and verbal skills? Method:A sample of 16 moderately disabled readers, evaluated

Hansen, Peter

366

Sustainable Energy Trust Fund  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The District of Columbia's Retail Electric Competition and Consumer Protection Act of 1999 required the DC Public Service Commission (PSC) to establish a public benefits fund to provide energy...

367

Energy Trust of Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Oregon's 1999 electric-utility restructuring legislation (SB 1149) required Pacific Power and Portland General Electric (PGE) to collect a 3% public-purpose charge from their customers to support...

368

Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We tested the hypothesis that the two common oxidant air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm)* of ozone or 15 ppm of nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. Ozone delayed the appearance of tracheal tumors and reduced the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. A suspected neuroendocrine differentiation of those lung tumors could not be established by immunocytochemistry due to overfixation of tissues. On the other hand, ozone seemed to mitigate development of hepatotoxic lesions mediated by diethylnitrosamine. In animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and exposed to nitrogen dioxide, fewer tracheal tumors and no lung tumors were found. Only a few lung tumors were produced in animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in an atmosphere of 65% oxygen. The previously observed neuroendocrine nature of tumors induced by simultaneous exposure to diethylnitrosamine and hyperoxia could not be established because the long fixation of tissues precluded immunocytochemical stains. Animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in filtered air while being housed in wire-mesh cages developed fewer lung tumors than animals given the same treatment and kept on conventional bedding in shoebox cages. Although all inhalants tested are known to produce substantial cell proliferation in the respiratory tract, it was not possible to document whether this would enhance lung tumor development. The role of the two common air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

If you are actively employed by a CHEIBA Trust Member employer and have an accident while traveling for college-approved business, this Travel Accident Insurance Plan protects you with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 54 - CHUBB If you are actively employed by a CHEIBA Trust Member employer and have an accident while traveling for college-approved business, this Travel Accident Insurance Plan protects you in death or dismemberment within 365 days of the date of the accident, the policy will pay as follows

370

Quantitative Assessment of Range Fluctuations in Charged Particle Lung Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Water equivalent path length (WEL) variations due to respiration can change the range of a charged particle beam and result in beam overshoot to critical organs or beam undershoot to tumor. We have studied range fluctuations by analyzing four-dimensional computed tomography data and quantitatively assessing potential beam overshoot. Methods and Materials: The maximal intensity volume is calculated by combining the gross tumor volume contours at each respiratory phase in the four-dimensional computed tomography study. The first target volume calculates the maximal intensity volume for the entire respiratory cycle (internal target volume [ITV]-radiotherapy [RT]), and the second target volume is the maximal intensity volume corresponding to gated RT (gated-RT, {approx}30% phase window around exhalation). A compensator at each respiratory phase is calculated. Two 'composite' compensators for ITV-RT and gated-RT are then designed by selecting the minimal compensator depth at the respective respiratory phase. These compensators are then applied to the four-dimensional computed tomography data to estimate beam penetration. Analysis metrics include range fluctuation and overshoot volume, both as a function of gantry angle. We compared WEL fluctuations observed in treating the ITV-RT versus gated-RT in 11 lung patients. Results: The WEL fluctuations were <21.8 mm-WEL and 9.5 mm-WEL for ITV-RT and gated-RT, respectively for all patients. Gated-RT reduced the beam overshoot volume by approximately a factor of four compared with ITV-RT. Such range fluctuations can affect the efficacy of treatment and result in an excessive dose to a distal critical organ. Conclusion: Time varying range fluctuation analysis provides information useful for determining appropriate patient-specific treatment parameters in charged particle RT. This analysis can also be useful for optimizing planning and delivery.

Mori, Shinichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: shinshin@nirs.go.jp; Wolfgang, John; Lu, H.-M.; Schneider, Robert; Choi, Noah C.; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Disability Plans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates byInformation

372

Retrospective Estimation of the Quality of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), OAR-PTV distance and OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10Gy, V20Gy, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54 - 0.89 , 0.90 - 1.00 , and 0.11 - 0.41, respectively. The mean EUDs (V10Gy, V20Gy) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectivel...

Koo, Jihye; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Arsenic exposure, smoking, and lung cancer in smelter workers--a case-control study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cohort of 3,916 Swedish copper smelter workers employed for at least 3 months between 1928 and 1967 was followed up through 1981. Arsenic exposure was estimated for different time periods at each workplace within the smelter. Detailed job records were linked to the exposure matrix, thus forming individual cumulative arsenic exposure measures for each smelter worker. Smoking history was collected for 107 lung cancer cases and 214 controls from the cohort. Lung cancer risks were positively related to cumulative arsenic exposure with smoking standardized relative risks ranging from 0.7 to 8.7 in different exposure groups. A negative confounding by smoking was suggested in the higher exposure categories. The interaction between arsenic and smoking for the risk of developing lung cancer was intermediate between additive and multiplicative and appeared less pronounced among heavy smokers.

Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G. (Department of Environmental Hygiene, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden))

1991-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Project #09R: Ying Luo and Niren Murthy: Multifunctional ProflavineHyaluronic Acid Conjugate (PHC): A new siRNA delivery vehicle for treating lung cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

): A new siRNA delivery vehicle for treating lung cancer siRNA is emerging as the next generation cells and treat lung cancer. PHC is composed of hyaluronic acid conjugated to proflavine through

Weber, Rodney

375

Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation in 122 Patients with Inoperable Colorectal Lung Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To analyze the factors associated with favorable survival in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases treated with percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 398 metastases were ablated in 122 patients (87 male, median age 68 years, range 29-90 years) at 256 procedures. Percutaneous CT-guided cool-tip radiofrequency ablation was performed under sedation/general anesthesia. Maximum tumor size, number of tumors ablated, number of procedures, concurrent/prior liver ablation, previous liver or lung resection, systemic chemotherapy, disease-free interval from primary resection to lung metastasis, and survival from first ablation were recorded prospectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed, and factors were compared by log rank test. Results. The initial number of metastases ablated was 2.3 (range 1-8); the total number was 3.3 (range 1-15). The maximum tumor diameter was 1.7 (range 0.5-4) cm, and the number of procedures was 2 (range 1-10). The major complication rate was 3.9 %. Overall median and 3-year survival rate were 41 months and 57 %. Survival was better in patients with smaller tumors-a median of 51 months, with 3-year survival of 64 % for tumors 2 cm or smaller versus 31 months and 44 % for tumors 2.1-4 cm (p = 0.08). The number of metastases ablated and whether the tumors were unilateral or bilateral did not affect survival. The presence of treated liver metastases, systemic chemotherapy, or prior lung resection did not affect survival. Conclusion. Three-year survival of 57 % in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases is better than would be expected with chemotherapy alone. Patients with inoperable but small-volume colorectal lung metastases should be referred for ablation.

Gillams, Alice, E-mail: alliesorting@gmail.com [The London Clinic, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Khan, Zahid [Countess of Chester Hospital (United Kingdom); Osborn, Peter [Queen Alexandra Hospital (United Kingdom); Lees, William [University College London Medical School (United Kingdom)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates ?-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/?-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and serous DKK1 level was much higher in bone metastatic NSCLC compared to non-bone metastatic NSCLC. We also found that conditioned medium from DKK1 over-expressing lung cancer cells inhibited the differentiation of osteoblast, determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin secretion, whereas the conditioned medium from DKK1 silencing lung cancer cells exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, DKK1 reduced the level of ?-catenin and RUNX2, as well as inhibiting the nuclear translocation of ?-catenin. Taken together, these results suggested that lung cancer-produced DKK1 may be an important mechanistic link between NSCLC and bone metastases, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to treat bone metastase of NSCLC.

Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui, E-mail: baohuihan1@163.com

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

377

Lung cancer in uranium miners and the implications of the U/V ratio in uranium-bearing particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several geological formations mined for uranium ore during and after the second World War had been mined earlier for vanadium. Most miners and millers from the Utah-Colorado mining region worked with this ore or its tailings at one time or another. Preliminary investigation to determine the size and location of uranium-bearing particles retained in the lungs of a former uranium miner and miller from this region, who died of lung cancer (mesothelioma), showed a high nonuniform distribution of vanadium. This observation leads to the hypothesis that the vanadium content in that lung could be associated with inhaled particles. Further examination of spectra of characteristic x-rays obtained by scanning microPIXE (particle induced x-ray emission) of an autopsy sample of this lung indicated that vanadium was indeed present in localized sites within the 20 ..mu..m spatial resolution of the proton beam. This work points out that the vanadium found in the lungs of this former miner and miller is nonuniformly distributed, and can be used for site localization and size determination of inhaled particles retained in the lungs. The meaning of U/V ratios in dust particles and in lungs is discussed. Further studies are in progress to: (1) locate uranium-bearing particles in lung tissues of former uranium miners and millers; and (2) evaluate the local alpha doses received from these particles. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Bruenger, F.W.; Miller, S.C.; Cholewa, M.; Jones, K.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

16. DofI, R. 1978. Atmospheric pollution and lung cancer. Environ Health Perspec 22: 23-31.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

16. DofI, R. 1978. Atmospheric pollution and lung cancer. Environ Health Perspec 22: 23-31. 17, 1976. 18. McCormick, R. A., and Holzworth, G. C. 1976. Air pollution ciimatology. In, Air Pollution, A, R. 1978. Late effects of air poliu- tion with special reference to lung cancer. Environ Health

Ahmad, Sajjad

379

Programs for Increasing the Engagement of Underrepresented Ethnic Groups and People with Disabilities in HPC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given the significant impact of computing on society, it is important that all cultures, especially underrepresented cultures, are fully engaged in the field of computing to ensure that everyone benefits from the advances in computing. This proposal is focused on the field of high performance computing. The lack of cultural diversity in computing, in particular high performance computing, is especially evident with respect to the following ethnic groups African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans as well as People with Disabilities. The goal of this proposal is to organize and coordinate a National Laboratory Career Development Workshop focused on underrepresented cultures (ethnic cultures and disability cultures) in high performance computing. It is expected that the proposed workshop will increase the engagement of underrepresented cultures in HPC through increased exposure to the excellent work at the national laboratories. The National Laboratory Workshops are focused on the recruitment of senior graduate students and the retention of junior lab staff through the various panels and discussions at the workshop. Further, the workshop will include a community building component that extends beyond the workshop. The workshop was held was held at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory campus in Livermore, CA. from June 14 - 15, 2012. The grant provided funding for 25 participants from underrepresented groups. The workshop also included another 25 local participants in the summer programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Below are some key results from the assessment of the workshops: 86% of the participants indicated strongly agree or agree to the statement "I am more likely to consider/continue a career at a national laboratory as a result of participating in this workshop." 77% indicated strongly agree or agree to the statement "I plan to pursue a summer internship at a national laboratory." 100% of the participants indicated strongly agree or agree to the statement "The CMD-IT NLPDEV workshop was a valuable experience."

Taylor, Valerie

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

380

Conformal piezoelectric energy harvesting and storage from motions of the heart, lung, and diaphragm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advances in battery technology have led to substantial reductions in overall sizes and increases in storageConformal piezoelectric energy harvesting and storage from motions of the heart, lung materials and devices that enable high- efficiency mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion from the nat

Rogers, John A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Lung cancer mortality among men living near an arsenic-emitting smelter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Etiologic factors for lung cancer were studied by the case-control technique among 636 men, including 212 with pulmonary carcinoma, who had died between 1961 and 1979 in a county in northern Sweden. Data on smoking habits, occupation, and residence were obtained from a next of kin to each study subject. Validation against data from other sources indicated that the exposure information was of high quality. A relative risk of 2.0 for lung cancer was seen among men who had lived within approximately 20 km from a large copper smelter. The increased risk, which is statistically significant (p less than 0.05), could not be explained by smoking habits or occupational background. Smelter workers and miners had relative risks for lung cancer of 3.0 and 4.1, respectively. No firm conclusions can be drawn on the cause of excess lung cancer risk in the smelter area, but it seems plausible that the very substantial emissions to air from the smelter, especially of arsenic, may have played a role.

Pershagen, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Research results on biomagnetic imaging of the lung tumors Laurel O. Silleruda,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-temperature, portable, high-sensitivity, fiber-optic sensors capable of robustly detecting magnetic nanoparticles them to lung tumors. A prototype fiber-optic biomagnetic sensor, based on giant magnetostrictive NSCLC, and with recurrent disease, chemotherapy and irradiation are employed, but long-term response

Coutsias, Evangelos

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult onset lung Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Advanced Bronchiectasis Don Hayes Jr., M.D., F.A.A.P., F.A.C.P., F.C.C.P.1... and Keith C. Meyer, M.D., M.S., F.A.C.P., F.C.C.P.2 ABSTRACT Lung transplant (LT) can be ......

384

CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 , A. Moreno1-based registration of CT (at two different instants of the breathing cycle, intermediate expirations) and PET images in order to simulate the instant in the breathing cycle most similar to the PET image and guarantee

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancer. Screening may include, but is not limited to, computed tomography scans, X-rays, other imaging. Areas of Emphasis: The FY13 LCRP encourages research projects that specifically address the critical groundbreaking concepts in lung cancer Emphasis on innovation Preliminary data discouraged Funding: Maximum

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

386

Modeling gas phase nitric oxide release in lung epithelial cells Jingjing Jiang a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling gas phase nitric oxide release in lung epithelial cells Jingjing Jiang a , Steven C- dated our model with experimental results of gas phase NO release and intracellular L enzyme on NO production. Our model predicts intracellular L-arginine and gas phase NO release over a wide

George, Steven C.

387

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 37, 364-372 (1985) Mineral Particles, Mineral Fibers, and Lung Cancer'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an association between lung cancer rates and concentrations of particulate air pollutants (Doll, 1978; Hitosugi, 1968; Vena, 1982), and it has been suggested that air pollution is the factor responsible exposure, and in a series of 14 control men matched for age, smoking history. and general occupational

Ahmad, Sajjad

388

The Effect of Staff Training on the Level of Engagement with Individuals with Developmental Disabilities within Two Day-Habilitation Settings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examined the effects of a staff-training intervention on the use of engagement procedures by direct-care staff who worked with adults with developmental disabilities. The intervention consisted of a mini-workshop, observation and feedback...

Para-Cremer, James Alan

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

389

Galley Proof 15/08/2008; 14:22 File: tad260.tex; BOKCTP/sx p. 1 Technology and Disability 20 (2008) 18 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galley Proof 15/08/2008; 14:22 File: tad260.tex; BOKCTP/sx p. 1 Technology and Disability 20 (2008;Galley Proof 15/08/2008; 14:22 File: tad260.t

Coughlan, James M.

390

Revised: 4.26.2012 Making Your Blackboard Courses Accessible to Students with Disabilities p. 1 of 2 What is accessibility?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with disabilities. These assistive devices need to be taken into consideration when designing accessible web your Blackboard site. Use a dark color font that is easy to read on a white background. While black

Qiu, Weigang

391

The Impact of Heart Irradiation on Dose-Volume Effects in the Rat Lung  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that heart irradiation increases the risk of a symptomatic radiation-induced loss of lung function (SRILF) and that this can be well-described as a modulation of the functional reserve of the lung. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 150-MeV protons. Dose-response curves were obtained for a significant increase in breathing frequency after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, or 25% of the total lung volume, either including or excluding the heart from the irradiation field. A significant increase in the mean respiratory rate after 6-12 weeks compared with 0-4 weeks was defined as SRILF, based on biweekly measurements of the respiratory rate. The critical volume (CV) model was used to describe the risk of SRILF. Fits were done using a maximum likelihood method. Consistency between model and data was tested using a previously developed goodness-of-fit test. Results: The CV model could be fitted consistently to the data for lung irradiation only. However, this fitted model failed to predict the data that also included heart irradiation. Even refitting the model to all data resulted in a significant difference between model and data. These results imply that, although the CV model describes the risk of SRILF when the heart is spared, the model needs to be modified to account for the impact of dose to the heart on the risk of SRILF. Finally, a modified CV model is described that is consistent to all data. Conclusions: The detrimental effect of dose to the heart on the incidence of SRILF can be described by a dose dependent decrease in functional reserve of the lung.

Luijk, Peter van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: p.van.luijk@rt.umcg.nl; Faber, Hette [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Meertens, Harm [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Schippers, Jacobus M. [Accelerator Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switerland (Switzerland); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Kampinga, Harm H. [Department of Cell Biology, Section Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. Ph.D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ?2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

Wang, Jingbo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Cao, Jianzhong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yuan, Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ji, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Arenberg, Douglas [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dai, Jianrong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang, Luhua, E-mail: wlhwq@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Incidence of Healthcare Use, Ill-Health, and Mortality in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Mealtime Support Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

people with ID in England was 56 years old in 2010, with variation according to aetiology, compared to 81 for the general population (Emerson et al. 2012, Glover and Ayub 2010). Respiratory infections are the most common cause of death in this group... sensitive conditions (ACSCs) (Balogh et al. 2005, Glover and Evison 2013). High rates of ACSCs (such as convulsions and epilepsy; dehydration and gastroenteritis; constipation; GORD; and Page 17 of 48 Journal of Intellectual Disability Research Journal...

Perez, C. M.; Ball, S. L.; Wagner, A. P.; Clare, I. C. H.; Holland, A. J.; Redley, M.

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Role of Family Satisfaction in Predicting Life Satisfaction Trajectories Over the First Five Years Following Acquired Disability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissertation by CAITLIN LOUISE HERNNDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Timothy Elliott... the First Five Years Following Acquired Disability. (August 2012) Caitlin Louise Hernndez, B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Timothy R. Elliott This study aimed to model the trajectories...

Herna?ndez, Caitlin Louise

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

Stenmark, Matthew H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shangdong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China); Ritter, Timothy [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Arsenic methylation and lung and bladder cancer in a case-control study in northern Chile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsenic (MMA) then to dimethylarsenic (DMA), although this process is not complete in most people. The trivalent form of MMA is highly toxic in vitro and previous studies have identified associations between the proportion of urinary arsenic as MMA (%MMA) and several arsenic-related diseases. To date, however, relatively little is known about its role in lung cancer, the most common cause of arsenic-related death, or about its impacts on people drinking water with lower arsenic concentrations (e.g., < 200 ?g/L). In this study, urinary arsenic metabolites were measured in 94 lung and 117 bladder cancer cases and 347 population-based controls from areas in northern Chile with a wide range of drinking water arsenic concentrations. Lung cancer odds ratios adjusted for age, sex, and smoking by increasing tertiles of %MMA were 1.00, 1.91 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.993.67), and 3.26 (1.766.04) (p-trend < 0.001). Corresponding odds ratios for bladder cancer were 1.00, 1.81 (1.063.11), and 2.02 (1.153.54) (p-trend < 0.001). In analyses confined to subjects only with arsenic water concentrations < 200 ?g/L (median = 60 ?g/L), lung and bladder cancer odds ratios for subjects in the upper tertile of %MMA compared to subjects in the lower two tertiles were 2.48 (1.085.68) and 2.37 (1.015.57), respectively. Overall, these findings provide evidence that inter-individual differences in arsenic metabolism may be an important risk factor for arsenic-related lung cancer, and may play a role in cancer risks among people exposed to relatively low arsenic water concentrations. - Highlights: Urine arsenic metabolites were measured in cancer cases and controls from Chile. Higher urine %MMA values were associated with increased lung and bladder cancer. %MMA-cancer associations were seen at drinking water arsenic levels < 200 ?g/L.

Melak, Dawit [Global Health Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ferreccio, Catterina [Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Kalman, David [School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Parra, Roxana [Hospital Regional de Antofagasta, Antofagasta (Chile); Acevedo, Johanna; Prez, Liliana; Corts, Sandra [Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Smith, Allan H.; Yuan, Yan; Liaw, Jane [Arsenic Health Effects Research Group, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Steinmaus, Craig, E-mail: craigs@berkeley.edu [Arsenic Health Effects Research Group, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

4? Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located or Larger Lung Tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric improvements in stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with larger or central lung tumors using a highly noncoplanar 4? planning system. Methods and Materials: This study involved 12 patients with centrally located or larger lung tumors previously treated with 7- to 9-field static beam intensity modulated radiation therapy to 50 Gy. They were replanned using volumetric modulated arc therapy and 4? plans, in which a column generation method was used to optimize the beam orientation and the fluence map. Maximum doses to the heart, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and spinal cord, as well as the 50% isodose volume, the lung volumes receiving 20, 10, and 5 Gy were minimized and compared against the clinical plans. A dose escalation study was performed to determine whether a higher prescription dose to the tumor would be achievable using 4? without violating dose limits set by the clinical plans. The deliverability of 4? plans was preliminarily tested. Results: Using 4? plans, the maximum heart, esophagus, trachea, bronchus and spinal cord doses were reduced by 32%, 72%, 37%, 44%, and 53% (P?.001), respectively, and R{sub 50} was reduced by more than 50%. Lung V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, and V{sub 5} were reduced by 64%, 53%, and 32% (P?.001), respectively. The improved sparing of organs at risk was achieved while also improving planning target volume (PTV) coverage. The minimal PTV doses were increased by the 4? plans by 12% (P=.002). Consequently, escalated PTV doses of 68 to 70 Gy were achieved in all patients. Conclusions: We have shown that there is a large potential for plan quality improvement and dose escalation for patients with larger or centrally located lung tumors using noncoplanar beams with sufficient quality and quantity. Compared against the clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy and static intensity modulated radiation therapy plans, the 4? plans yielded significantly and consistently improved tumor coverage and critical organ sparing. Given the known challenges in central structure dose constraints in stereotactic body radiation therapy to the lung, 4? planning may increase efficacy and reduce toxicity.

Dong, Peng; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Abraham, John; Yang, Yingli [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Johns Hopkins University admits students of any race, color, gender, religion, age, national or ethnic origin, disability, marital status or veteran status to all of the rights, privileges, programs, ben-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ethnicity, national origin, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression Facilities Alumni Banking Services Bike Racks Bookstore Bulletin Boards Career Services

Scharfstein, Daniel

399

Lung cancer among women residing close to an arsenic emitting copper smelter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lung cancer deaths occurring between 1935 and 1969 among women residing near an arsenic emitting smelter were examined. For three geographically defined exposure groups, the observed and expected number of lung cancer deaths were compared. In none of the exposure groups did the observed number of deaths exceed the expected. However, an index of exposure based on distance of residence from the smelter and duration of residence in the area was 27% higher for cases than for age-matched controls (p = .10). Adjusting for a latency of 20 yr, case exposures were 23% higher than for controls (p = .07). Dividing individuals into quintiles of exposure yielded odds ratios ranging from 1 to 1.6 (test of trend, p = .07).

Frost, F.; Harter, L.; Milham, S.; Royce, R.; Smith, A.H.; Hartley, J.; Enterline, P.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Serum Amyloid A as a Predictive Marker for Radiation Pneumonitis in Lung Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate serum markers associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade ?3 in patients with lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment serum samples from patients with stage Ib-IV lung cancer who developed RP within 1 year after radiation therapy were analyzed to identify a proteome marker able to stratify patients prone to develop severe RP by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Dosimetric parameters and 3 biological factors were compared. Results: Serum samples from 16 patients (28%) with severe RP (grade 3-4) and 42 patients (72%) with no or mild RP (grade 0-2) were collected for analysis. All patients received a median of 54 Gy (range, 42-70 Gy) of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with a mean lung dose (MLD) of 1502 cGy (range, 700-2794 cGy). An m/z peak of 11,480 Da was identified by SELDI-TOF-MS, and serum amyloid A (SAA) was the primary splitter serum marker. The receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of SAA (0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-1.00) was higher than those of C-reactive protein (0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.94), interleukin-6 (0.79; 95% CI, 0.65-0.94), and MLD (0.57; 95% CI, 0.37-0.77). The best sensitivity and specificity of combined SAA and MLD for predicting RP were 88.9% and 96.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Baseline SAA could be used as an auxiliary marker for predicting severe RP. Extreme care should be taken to limit the lung irradiation dose in patients with high SAA.

Wang, Yu-Shan [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Animal Science, National Ilan University, Ilan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Heng-Jui [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Department of Mathematics, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Su-Chen; Ko, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chih-Chia [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Yu-Wung; Jiang, Jiunn-Song [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Cheng-Yen; Chi, Mau-Shin [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, Kwan-Hwa, E-mail: M006565@ms.skh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Radiation Science and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Regulation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase from human lung tissue by nucleosides and nucleotides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGULATION OF CYCLIC AMP PHOSPHODIESTERASE FROM HUMAN LUNG TISSUE BY NUCLEOSIDES AND NUCLEOTIDES A Thesis by WILLIAM FREDRICK GLASS, II Submitted to the Graduate College oi Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John B. Moore, Jr. Cyclic nucleotide levels are important modulators of the re- les. se snd effects on target tissues of mediators of allergi?. bronchial asthma. Agents that cause a rise in cyclic AMP levels inhibit...

Glass, William Fredrick

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumours with the Patient Under Thoracic Epidural Anaesthesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours is a curative technique that is newly considered being offered to nonsurgical patients. It is of major interest because it enables local destruction of the tumour without surgery and spares healthy parenchyma. However, some patients have previous serious respiratory failure, thus ruling out mechanical ventilation. To operate with the patient under thoracic epidural is an answer to this problem. Our experience shows that the procedure is able to be performed completely without converting to general anaesthesia.

Pouliquen, Cassiopee; Kabbani, Youssef, E-mail: kabbani@bergonie.org; Saignac, Pierre; Gekiere, Jean-Pierre [Institut Bergonie, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Regional Cancer Centre (France); Palussiere, Jean [Institut Bergonie, Department of Interventional Radiology, Regional Cancer Centre (France)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Breast radiotherapy in the lateral decubitus position: A technique to prevent lung and heart irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To present an original technique for breast radiotherapy, with the aim of limiting lung and heart irradiation, satisfying quality assurance criteria. Methods and Material: An original radiotherapy technique for breast irradiation has been developed at the Institute Curie in January 1996. It consists of isocentric breast irradiation in the lateral decubitus position (isocentric lateral decubitus [ILD]). This technique is indicated for voluminous or pendulous breasts needing breast irradiation only. Thin carbon fiber supports and special patient positioning devices have been developed especially for this technique. In vivo measurements were performed to check the dose distribution before the routine use of the technique. Results: ILD has been successfully implemented in routine practice, and 500 patients have been already treated. Breast radiotherapy is performed using a dose of 50 Gy at ICRU point in 25 fractions. ILD shows good homogeneity of the dose in breast treatment volume, treatment fields are perpendicular to the skin ensuring its protection, and extremely low dose is delivered to the underlying lung and heart. Conclusion: In cases of voluminous breasts or patients with a history of lung and heart disease, our technique provides several advantages over the conventional technique with opposing tangential fields. This technique improves the dose homogeneity according to the ICRU recommendations.

Campana, Francois [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Curie, Paris (France)]. E-mail: francois.campana@curie.net; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Curie, Paris (France); Rosenwald, Jean-Claude [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Curie, Paris (France); Dendale, Remi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Curie, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Curie, Paris (France); Dreyfus, Helene [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Curie, Paris (France); Fourquet, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Curie, Paris (France)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Calculation of lung-heart ratios for single-photon emission computed tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors investigate the effectiveness of simple iterative reconstruction techniques in calculating lung-heart activity ratios (LHRs). The LHR has been shown to be an effective indicator of the severity of coronary artery disease in cardiac SPECT. A study was conducted with a mathematical cardiac torso phantom that modelled uptake of {sup 201}Tl in the heart and lung regions. The projection data included only the effects of nonuniform photon attenuation. The data were first reconstructed with zeroth-order Chang and a variant of the Bellini method, both of which utilize information from the nonuniform attenuation map. This nonuniform (NU) Bellini method compensates exactly for attenuation in the heart region, but is incorrect for other regions in the medium. These reconstructions were then used as the initial estimates in the iterative Chang, variable step-size (VSS) Chang, and Morozumi methods,m for one and five iterations. The average heart count (AHC) and average lung count (ALC) were calculated using region-of-interest (ROI) templates derived from the true activity map. The population mean LHR was tabulated as the ratio of the ALC to AHC. Using the same reconstruction procedure, the authors also calculated the sample mean LHR and standard deviation from 21 noisy 3D reconstructions.

Soares, E.J.; King, M.A.; Glick, S.J.; Villegas, B.J. [Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine] [Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer in smelter workers: a dose-response study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cause-specific mortality was followed through 1981 in a cohort of 3,916 male Swedish smelter workers employed for at least 3 months from 1928 through 1967. Arsenic levels in the air of all workplaces within the smelter were estimated for three different time periods. Using this exposure matrix and detailed information of the work history, cumulative arsenic exposure could be computed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for several dose categories using age-specific mortality rates from the county where the smelter was situated. A positive dose-response relationship was found between cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer mortality with an overall SMR of 372 (304-450, 95% confidence interval). The lung cancer mortality was related to the estimated average intensity of exposure to arsenic but not to the duration. No positive dose-response relationship was found between arsenic and ischemic heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. There was also no evident dose-response relationship between estimated exposure to sulfur dioxide and lung cancer.

Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G.; Wall, S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The respiratory health and lung function of Anglo-American children in a smelter town  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooper smelters are large, usually isolated, sources of air pollution. Arizona has several such plants on the periphery of small communities. The smelters emit predominantly sulfur oxides and particulates, and the residents of these communities intermittently are exposed to high concentrations (24-h sulfur dioxide (SO2) . 250 to 500 micrograms/m3) of smelter smoke but little other pollution. This study compared the respiratory health of Anglo-American school children who lived in one smelter community with children living in another small community in Arizona that was free of smelter air pollution. The prevalence of cough, as determined by questionnaire, was 25.6% in the smelter town children and 14.3% in the nonsmelter town children (p less than 0.05). Pulmonary function at the study onset was equal in the two groups. Over the course of the 4 yr of study, lung function growth (measured as actual forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after 4 yr of study minus predicted FEV1) was also equal in the smelter town and nonsmelter town children. These results suggest that children in smelter communities have slightly more cough when compared with children living in other communities, but no differences in initial lung function or lung function at yearly testing over the period of the study.

Dodge, R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT via group-sparsity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: 4D-CT typically delivers more accurate information about anatomical structures in the lung, over 3D-CT, due to its ability to capture visual information of the lung motion across different respiratory phases. This helps to better determine the dose during radiation therapy for lung cancer. However, a critical concern with 4D-CT that substantially compromises this advantage is the low superior-inferior resolution due to less number of acquired slices, in order to control the CT radiation dose. To address this limitation, the authors propose an approach to reconstruct missing intermediate slices, so as to improve the superior-inferior resolution.Methods: In this method the authors exploit the observation that sampling information across respiratory phases in 4D-CT can be complimentary due to lung motion. The authors approach uses this locally complimentary information across phases in a patch-based sparse-representation framework. Moreover, unlike some recent approaches that treat local patches independently, the authors approach employs the group-sparsity framework that imposes neighborhood and similarity constraints between patches. This helps in mitigating the trade-off between noise robustness and structure preservation, which is an important consideration in resolution enhancement. The authors discuss the regularizing ability of group-sparsity, which helps in reducing the effect of noise and enables better structural localization and enhancement.Results: The authors perform extensive experiments on the publicly available DIR-Lab Lung 4D-CT dataset [R. Castillo, E. Castillo, R. Guerra, V. Johnson, T. McPhail, A. Garg, and T. Guerrero, A framework for evaluation of deformable image registration spatial accuracy using large landmark point sets, Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 18491870 (2009)]. First, the authors carry out empirical parametric analysis of some important parameters in their approach. The authors then demonstrate, qualitatively as well as quantitatively, the ability of their approach to achieve more accurate and better localized results over bicubic interpolation as well as a related state-of-the-art approach. The authors also show results on some datasets with tumor, to further emphasize the clinical importance of their method.Conclusions: The authors have proposed to improve the superior-inferior resolution of 4D-CT by estimating intermediate slices. The authors approach exploits neighboring constraints in the group-sparsity framework, toward the goal of achieving better localization and noise robustness. The authors results are encouraging, and positively demonstrate the role of group-sparsity for 4D-CT resolution enhancement.

Bhavsar, Arnav; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lian, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Spatial and doseresponse analysis of fibrotic lung changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is becoming the standard of care for early stage nonoperable lung cancers. Accurate doseresponse modeling is challenging for SBRT because of the decreased number of clinical toxicity events. As a surrogate for a clinical toxicity endpoint, studies have proposed to use radiographic changes in follow up computed tomography (CT) scans to evaluate lung SBRT normal tissue effects. The purpose of the current study was to use local fibrotic lung regions to spatially and dosimetrically evaluate lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT.Methods: Forty seven SBRT patients treated at our institution from 2003 to 2009 were used for the current study. Our patient cohort had a total of 148 follow up CT scans ranging from 3 to 48 months post-therapy. Post-treatment scans were binned into intervals of 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after the completion of treatment. Deformable image registration was used to align the follow up CT scans with the pretreatment CT and dose distribution. Areas of visible fibrotic changes were contoured. The centroid of each gross tumor volume (GTV) and contoured fibrosis volume was calculated and the fibrosis volume location and movement (magnitude and direction) relative to the GTV and 30 Gy isodose centroid were analyzed. To perform a doseresponse analysis, each voxel in the fibrosis volume was sorted into 10 Gy dose bins and the average CT number value for each dose bin was calculated. Doseresponse curves were generated by plotting the CT number as a function of dose bin and time posttherapy.Results: Both fibrosis and GTV centroids were concentrated in the upper third of the lung. The average radial movement of fibrosis centroids relative to the GTV centroids was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm occurring in 11% of patients. Evaluating doseresponse curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. The authors observed a CT number plateau at doses ranging from 30 to 50 Gy for the 3, 6, and 12 months posttherapy time points. There was no evident plateau for the doseresponse curves generated using data from the 18, 24, 30, and 36 months posttherapy time points.Conclusions: Regions of local fibrotic lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT were evaluated spatially and dosimetrically. The authors found that the average fibrosis movement was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm possible. Evaluating doseresponse curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. Furthermore, our doseresponse data also suggest that one of the possible explanations of the CT number plateau effect may be the time posttherapy of the acquired data. Understanding normal tissue doseresponse is important for reducing toxicity after SBRT, especially in cases where larger tumors are treated. The methods presented in the current work build on prior quantitative studies and further enhance the understanding of normal lung doseresponse after SBRT.

Vinogradskiy, Yevegeniy; Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

CDK-associated Cullin 1 promotes cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2 in human lung cancer A549 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) expression increases in human lung carcinoma. CAC1 promotes the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells. CAC1 promotes human lung cancer A549 cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) in lung cancer, the effect of CAC1 on the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells, and the activation of signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Results showed that CAC1 expression was higher levels in human lung carcinoma than normal lung tissue, and CAC1 siRNA reduced the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing cell activity and cell division in vitro. The proportion of cells treated with CAC1 siRNA increased in the G1 phase and decreased in the S and G2/M phase, indicative of G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the proportions of early/late apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells were enhanced with CAC1 siRNA treatment. It was also found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways were involved in the proliferation of A549 cells. After CAC1 siRNA treatment, p-ERK1/2 levels decreased, and meanwhile p-p38 level increased, A549 cell proliferation increased when ERK1/2 signaling is activated by PMA. Our findings demonstrated that CAC1 promoted the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential cure target for treatment of human lung cancer.

Chen, Tian Jun [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xian Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xian 710061 (China)] [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xian Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xian 710061 (China); Gao, Fei [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xian, Xian 710043 (China)] [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xian, Xian 710043 (China); Yang, Tian; Thakur, Asmitanand; Ren, Hui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xian Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xian 710061 (China)] [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xian Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xian 710061 (China); Chen, Ming Wei, E-mail: xjtucmw@163.com [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xian Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xian 710061 (China)

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

410

Suitability of salt-gradient solar ponds for electrical power generation in the US Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Guam, and American Samoa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The procedures and findings of a study to assess the suitability of salt-gradient solar ponds for base-load (firm) electricity generation in the US Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (TTPI), Guam and American Samoa are described. The general conclusion is that solar pond power plants (SPPPs) are viable both technically and economically for some applications, possibly including atolls. The most practical immediate application would be to small and intermediate power users such as villages and airports. It is recommended that (1) at least one small SPPP be built immediately on a dry land site such as for the main village on Peleliu, Palau, (considered in this report) or at other identified feasible sites, and (2) that a design study be conducted to adapt the technology to atoll sites. This study was carried out by first reviewing all available literature on solar ponds and the regions concerned. All the regions in question were visited. Several sites were selected for specific study and SPPP conceptual designs were developed for these sites. These sites are (1) North Peleliu, Palau, with (2) Peleliu airport as an auxiliary site, (3) Aimeliik, Palau, and (4) atoll environments. Cultural, political, environmental and legal considerations were given equal weight with technical and economic factors, and locally resident persons were used as interpreters and liaisons. There exists strong support in the government and the community to develop these proposed site-specific SPPPs and land is available. Power needs were defined, construction and operation costs were calculated and performance was predicted for the site-specific designs. The results of the Palau site-specific studies were generalized to other areas and environments in the TTPI, Guam and American Samoa. An economic analysis of the SPPP conceptual design developed for Palau was made using the discounted cash flow method.

McCord, T.B.; Bathen, K.H.; Boesgaard, H.; Fanale, F.P.; McCord, C.S.; Scudder, R.J.; Weeks, D.D.; Yuen, J.W.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from all four radiologists. These 2669 lesions include nodule outlines and subjective nodule characteristic ratings. Conclusions: The LIDC/IDRI Database is expected to provide an essential medical imaging research resource to spur CAD development, validation, and dissemination in clinical practice.

NONE

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Biodistribution of the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and/or decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BNCT was proposed for the treatment of diffuse, non-resectable tumors in the lung. We performed boron biodistribution studies with 5 administration protocols employing the boron carriers BPA and/or GB-10 in an experimental model of disseminated lung metastases in rats. All 5 protocols were non-toxic and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus lung. Absolute tumor boron concentration values were therapeutically useful (2576 ppm) for 3 protocols. Dosimetric calculations indicate that BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic without exceeding radiotolerance in the lung.

D.W. Nigg; Various Others

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Radiosensitization by PARG silencing was observed in multiple lung cancer cells. PAR accumulation was enhanced by PARG silencing after DNA damage. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation were impaired by PARG siRNA. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy.

Nakadate, Yusuke [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan) [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tachibana, Taro [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Koizumi, Fumiaki, E-mail: fkoizumi@ncc.go.jp [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

414

On using an adaptive neural network to predict lung tumor motion during respiration for radiotherapy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study we address the problem of predicting the position of a moving lung tumor during respiration on the basis of external breathing signals--a technique used for beam gating, tracking, and other dynamic motion management techniques in radiation therapy. We demonstrate the use of neural network filters to correlate tumor position with external surrogate markers while simultaneously predicting the motion ahead in time, for situations in which neither the breathing pattern nor the correlation between moving anatomical elements is constant in time. One pancreatic cancer patient and two lung cancer patients with mid/upper lobe tumors were fluoroscopically imaged to observe tumor motion synchronously with the movement of external chest markers during free breathing. The external marker position was provided as input to a feed-forward neural network that correlated the marker and tumor movement to predict the tumor position up to 800 ms in advance. The predicted tumor position was compared to its observed position to establish the accuracy with which the filter could dynamically track tumor motion under nonstationary conditions. These results were compared to simplified linear versions of the filter. The two lung cancer patients exhibited complex respiratory behavior in which the correlation between surrogate marker and tumor position changed with each cycle of breathing. By automatically and continuously adjusting its parameters to the observations, the neural network achieved better tracking accuracy than the fixed and adaptive linear filters. Variability and instability in human respiration complicate the task of predicting tumor position from surrogate breathing signals. Our results show that adaptive signal-processing filters can provide more accurate tumor position estimates than simpler stationary filters when presented with nonstationary breathing motion.

Isaksson, Marcus; Jalden, Joakim; Murphy, Martin J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94036 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT data using multiscale interphase iterative nonlocal means  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in lung cancer radiotherapy due to its capability in providing important tumor motion information. However, the prolonged scanning duration required by 4D-CT causes considerable increase in radiation dose. To minimize the radiation-related health risk, radiation dose is often reduced at the expense of interslice spatial resolution. However, inadequate resolution in 4D-CT causes artifacts and increases uncertainty in tumor localization, which eventually results in extra damages of healthy tissues during radiotherapy. In this paper, the authors propose a novel postprocessing algorithm to enhance the resolution of lung 4D-CT data. Methods: The authors' premise is that anatomical information missing in one phase can be recovered from the complementary information embedded in other phases. The authors employ a patch-based mechanism to propagate information across phases for the reconstruction of intermediate slices in the longitudinal direction, where resolution is normally the lowest. Specifically, the structurally matching and spatially nearby patches are combined for reconstruction of each patch. For greater sensitivity to anatomical details, the authors employ a quad-tree technique to adaptively partition the image for more fine-grained refinement. The authors further devise an iterative strategy for significant enhancement of anatomical details. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm using a publicly available lung data that consist of 10 4D-CT cases. The authors' algorithm gives very promising results with significantly enhanced image structures and much less artifacts. Quantitative analysis shows that the authors' algorithm increases peak signal-to-noise ratio by 3-4 dB and the structural similarity index by 3%-5% when compared with the standard interpolation-based algorithms. Conclusions: The authors have developed a new algorithm to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. It outperforms the conventional interpolation-based approaches by producing images with the markedly improved structural clarity and greatly reduced artifacts.

Zhang Yu [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China and Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu Guorong [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Feng Qianjin; Chen Wufan [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Lian Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shen Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Investigation of the proinflammatory potential of biodegradable nanoparticle drug delivery systems in the lung  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particulate nanocarriers have been praised for their advantageous drug delivery properties in the lung, such as avoidance of macrophage clearance mechanisms and long residence times. However, instilled non-biodegradable polystyrene nanospheres with small diameters and thus large surface areas have been shown to induce pulmonary inflammation. This study examines the potential of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and the novel PLGA derivative, diethylaminopropylamine polyvinyl alcohol-grafted-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (DEAPA-PVAL-g-PLGA), to provoke inflammatory responses in the murine lung after intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, protein concentration, MIP-2 mRNA induction, and polymorphonucleocyte (PMN) recruitment in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were used to evaluate an inflammatory response in Balb-C mice. Two sizes of polystyrene (PS) nanospheres (diameters: 75 nm and 220 nm) were included in the study for comparison. All nanoparticle suspensions were instilled at concentrations of 1 {mu}g/{mu}l and 2.5 {mu}g/{mu}l, representative of an estimated 'therapeutic dose' and a concentrated 'dose' of particles. In all experiments, the 75 nm PS particles exhibited elevated responses for the inflammatory markers investigated. In contrast, biodegradable particles of comparable hydrodynamic diameter showed a significantly lower inflammatory response. The most marked differences were observed in the extent of PMN recruitment. While the 75 nm and 220 nm PS nanospheres exhibited 41 and 74% PMN within the total BALF cell population after 24 h, respectively, PMN recruiting in lungs instilled with both types of biodegradable particles did not exceed values of the negative isotonic glucose control. In conclusion, evidence suggests that biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles designed for pulmonary drug delivery may not induce the same inflammatory response as non-biodegradable polystyrene particles of comparable size.

Dailey, L.A. [Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmacy, Philipps-University, D-35037 Marburg (Germany)]. E-mail: lea_ann.dailey@kcl.ac.uk; Jekel, N. [University of Giessen Lung Center (UGLC), D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Fink, L. [University of Giessen Lung Center (UGLC), D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Gessler, T. [University of Giessen Lung Center (UGLC), D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Schmehl, T. [University of Giessen Lung Center (UGLC), D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Wittmar, M. [Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmacy, Philipps-University, D-35037 Marburg (Germany); Kissel, T. [Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmacy, Philipps-University, D-35037 Marburg (Germany); Seeger, W. [University of Giessen Lung Center (UGLC), D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Association of ambient air quality with children`s lung function in urban and rural Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1994, a cross-sectional epidemiological study, in which the pulmonary function of children in Tehran was compared with pulmonary function in children in a rural town in Iran, was conducted. Four hundred children aged 5--11 y were studied. Daytime ambient nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter were measured with portable devices, which were placed in the children`s neighborhoods on the days of study. Levels of these ambient substances were markedly higher in urban Tehran than in rural areas. Children`s parents were questioned about home environmental exposures (including heating source and environmental tobacco smoke) and the children`s respiratory symptoms. Pulmonary function was assessed, both by spirometry and peak expiratory flow meter. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity--as a percentage of predicted for age, sex and height--were significantly lower in urban children than in rural children. Both measurements evidenced significant reverse correlations with levels of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particulate matter. Differences in spirometric lung function were not explained by nutritional status, as assessed by height and weight for age, or by home environmental exposures. Reported airway symptoms were higher among rural children, whereas reported physician diagnosis of bronchitis and asthma were higher among urban children. The association between higher pollutant concentrations and reduced pulmonary function in this urban-rural comparison suggests that there is an effect of urban air pollution on short-term lung function and/or lung growth and development during the preadolescent years.

Asgari, M.M.; Dubois, A.; Beckett, W.S. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Asgari, M. [Shaheed Beheshti Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gent, J. [John B. Pierce Lab., New Haven, CT (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite the presence of interplay effect, the delivered dose may be reliably estimated using the 4D composite dose. In general the interplay effect may not be a primary concern with IMPT for lung cancers for the authors' institution. The described interplay analysis tool may be used to provide additional confidence in treatment delivery.

Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cao, Wenhua [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Purification and characterization of an adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase from human lung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Texas ABM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. J. B. Moore, 0 r. A cyclic AMP-speci fi c phosphodiesterase was purified from human lung tissue. Ion-exchange chromatography, hydroxylapatite chroma- tography, gel-exclusion chromatography..., and preparative isoelectric focusing yielded a 300 fold purification. The enzyme was homoge- neous, as judged by non-denaturing gels. The purified phosphodiesterase had a molecular ~eight of 60, 000, a sedimentation coefficient of 3. 2-3. 45, and a pI of 4. 6...

Schroedter, Dwight Edward

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with [sup 67]Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the lungs by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the [sup 67]Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass. 1 figure.

Cole, D.A.; Moody, D.C. III; Ellinwood, L.E.; Klein, M.G.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Individual differences in arsenic metabolism and lung cancer in a case-control study in Cordoba, Argentina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsenic (MMA) then to dimethylarsenic (DMA), although in most people this process is not complete. Previous studies have identified associations between the proportion of urinary MMA (%MMA) and increased risks of several arsenic-related diseases, although none of these reported on lung cancer. In this study, urinary arsenic metabolites were assessed in 45 lung cancer cases and 75 controls from arsenic-exposed areas in Cordoba, Argentina. Folate has also been linked to arsenic-disease susceptibility, thus an exploratory assessment of associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in folate metabolizing genes, arsenic methylation, and lung cancer was also conducted. In analyses limited to subjects with metabolite concentrations above detection limits, the mean %MMA was higher in cases than in controls (17.5% versus 14.3%, p = 0.01). The lung cancer odds ratio for subjects with %MMA in the upper tertile compared to those in the lowest tertile was 3.09 (95% CI, 1.08-8.81). Although the study size was too small for a definitive conclusion, there was an indication that lung cancer risks might be highest in those with a high %MMA who also carried cystathionine {beta}-synthase (CBS) rs234709 and rs4920037 variant alleles. This study is the first to report an association between individual differences in arsenic metabolism and lung cancer, a leading cause of arsenic-related mortality. These results add to the increasing body of evidence that variation in arsenic metabolism plays an important role in arsenic-disease susceptibility.

Steinmaus, Craig, E-mail: craigs@berkeley.ed [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States); School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Yuan Yan [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kalman, Dave [School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rey, Omar A. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Catolica de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Skibola, Christine F.; Dauphine, Dave; Basu, Anamika; Porter, Kristin E.; Hubbard, Alan; Bates, Michael N.; Smith, Martyn T.; Smith, Allan H. [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Detection of aldehydes in lung cancer cell culture by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of lung cancer. 2-4 A high level of aldehydes was found both in breath and blood of lung cancer patients. Acrolein was detected in blood from patients with breast cancer. 5 The formaldehyde level from women with breast cancer was higher than...

Shan, Guangqing

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

423

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command

Colorado at Boulder, University of

424

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC Checking on Upload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5

Colorado at Boulder, University of

425

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command

Colorado at Boulder, University of

426

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC Checking on Upload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5

Colorado at Boulder, University of

427

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command

Colorado at Boulder, University of

428

To appear in the Wiley Encyclopaedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Assistive Devices For People With Motor Disabilities -Kumar, Rahman & Krovi, 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To appear in the Wiley Encyclopaedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Assistive Devices powered devices: #12;To appear in the Wiley Encyclopaedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering For People With Motor Disabilities - Kumar, Rahman & Krovi, 1997 Assistive Devices For People With Motor

Krovi, Venkat

429

DisabilityServicesforStudents Student and Enrolment Services Division University of Saskatchewan 105 Administration Place Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A2 Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DisabilityServicesforStudents Student and Enrolment Services Division University of SaskatchewanServicesforStudents(DSS) MedicalQuestionnaire The University of Saskatchewan (U of S) will take all measures short of undue University of Saskatchewan 105 Administration Place Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A2 Canada Tel: (306) 966-7273 TTY

Saskatchewan, University of

430

The University of Maryland is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Minorities, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to Lead Directory Engineer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Lead Directory Engineer The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) is currently recruiting for the position of Lead Directory Engineer in the Center of identity management, data integration, and directory service processes across the University. The Lead

Weber, David J.

431

Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Modifiers of Exposure-Response Estimates for Lung Cancer among Miners Exposed to Radon Progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort.- Environ Health Perspect 1 03(Suppl 2):49-53 (1995)

Richard W. Hornung; James Deddens; Robert Roscoe

433

Chlorobenzene induces oxidative stress in human lung epithelial cells in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorobenzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is widely used as a solvent, degreasing agent and chemical intermediate in many industrial settings. Occupational studies have shown that acute and chronic exposure to chlorobenzene can cause irritation of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract and eyes. Using in vitro assays, we have shown in a previous study that human bronchial epithelial cells release inflammatory mediators such as the cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in response to chlorobenzene. This response is mediated through the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of monochlorobenzene on human lung cells, with emphasis on potential alterations of the redox equilibrium to clarify whether the chlorobenzene-induced inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells is caused via an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. We found that expression of cellular markers for oxidative stress, such as heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), glutathione S-transferase pi1 (GSTP1), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), were elevated in the presence of monochlorobenzene. Likewise, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased in response to exposure. However, in the presence of the antioxidants N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (MPG) or bucillamine, chlorobenzene-induced upregulation of marker proteins and release of the inflammatory mediator MCP-1 are suppressed. These results complement our previous findings and point to an oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response following chlorobenzene exposure.

Feltens, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.feltens@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Proteomics, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Moegel, Iljana, E-mail: iljana.moegel@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Roeder-Stolinski, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.roeder-stolinski@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Simon, Jan-Christoph, E-mail: Jan-Christoph.Simon@medizin.uni-leipzig.d [Leipzig University Medical Center, Clinic of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Philipp-Rosenthal-Str. 23-25, D-4103 Leipzig (Germany); Herberth, Gunda, E-mail: gunda.herberth@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lehmann, Irina, E-mail: irina.lehmann@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

Deodhar, Ajita [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology and Image-Guided Therapies (United States); Monette, Sebastien [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Laboratory of Comparative Pathology (United States); Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C. [Angiodynamics, Inc (United States); Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology and Image-Guided Therapies (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale.

Mitran, Sorin, E-mail: mitran@unc.edu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Marketing Proposal UBC Properties Trust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developments in UBC meet the guidelines set forth by REAP promoting green and sustainable developments buildings, which consequently discourages developers from offering green features to the market. Finally Indicators ..................................................................... 6 3.2 Green Building

437

Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Illinois's 1997 electric-industry restructuring legislation created separate public benefits funds that support renewable energy and residential [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2...

438

IBM Software Lincoln Trust Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into account several "lessons learned" from the company's past pre-divestiture past. A process improve- ment team had existed several years prior, but was decommissioned due to lack of meaningful automation, there were also lessons from the past that needed to be integrated into the new program. Prior attempts

439

Trusting the Cloud Christian Cachin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their service contract with the storage provider. For example, what happens if your payment for the storage

Keidar, Idit

440

Advanced Credentialing for Trusted Networks  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

During and following disasters, rapid, valid systems are needed to exchange informationamong emergency responders, with others in the community, and with the outside world. ORNL researchers have developed a Web 2.0 credentialing system that offers greater assurance of the validity of information on social networks and media and the potential to thus improve and enhance the unimpeded flow of vetted information and resources during and following a disaster to assist impacted areas and...

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Carbon Trust | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacility | OpenCarboPur Technologies JumpJungle JumpLLCCarbon Name:

442

Climate Trust | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy ResourcesInformation is 045.UpdateClimate

443

Towards the modeling of mucus draining from human lung: role of airways deformation on air-mucus interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chest physiotherapy is an empirical technique used to help secretions to get out of the lung whenever stagnation occurs. Although commonly used, little is known about the inner mechanisms of chest physiotherapy and controversies about its use are coming out regularly. Thus, a scientific validation of chest physiotherapy is needed to evaluate its effects on secretions. We setup a quasi-static numerical model of chest physiotherapy based on thorax and lung physiology and on their respective biophysics. We modeled the lung with an idealized deformable symmetric bifurcating tree. Bronchi and their inner fluids mechanics are assumed axisymmetric. Static data from the literature is used to build a model for the lung's mechanics. Secretions motion is the consequence of the shear constraints apply by the air flow. The input of the model is the pressure on the chest wall at each time, and the output is the bronchi geometry and air and secretions properties. In the limit of our model, we mimicked manual and mechanical ...

Mauroy, Benjamin; Pelca, Dominique; Fausser, Christian; Merckx, Jacques; Mitchell, Barrett R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis Ronne L. Surface2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis, Indiana University School of Medicine Digital whole slide imaging is the technique of digitizing a microscope slide at the highest resolution to produce a "digital virtual microscope slide". This digital

Zhou, Yaoqi

445

Bi-plane correlation imaging for improved detection of lung nodules Ehsan Samei1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach that utilizes angular information from a bi-plane digital acquisition in conjunction with computer. The correlated suspect lesions were registered as positive. Using an optimum ­3o vertical geometry and processing. INTRODUCTION Lung cancer is a leading cause of death in the US, surpassing the mortality associated with breast

446

Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

Yanamala, Naveena, E-mail: wqu1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hatfield, Meghan K., E-mail: wla4@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Farcas, Mariana T., E-mail: woe7@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Schwegler-Berry, Diane [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hummer, Jon A., E-mail: qzh3@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shurin, Michael R., E-mail: shurinmr@upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Birch, M. Eileen, E-mail: mib2@cdc.gov [NIOSH/CDC, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226 (United States); Gutkin, Dmitriy W., E-mail: dwgutkin@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kisin, Elena, E-mail: edk8@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bugarski, Aleksandar D., E-mail: zjl1@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shvedova, Anna A., E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Department Physiology and Pharmacology, WVU, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Abstract It is an established fact that radon progeny can induce lung cancers. However, there is a well-known  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract It is an established fact that radon progeny can induce lung cancers. However, there is a well-known discrepancy between the epidemiologically derived dose conversion factor for radon progeny is a unit of exposure to radon progeny). Up to now there is no satisfactory expla- nation to this

Yu, K.N.

448

Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the ? passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were ?4.5 cGy/?0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and ?19.7 cGy/?0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was ?13.3 cGy/?0.32%, to esophagus was ?63.4 cGy/?0.89%, and to spinal cord was ?16.3 cGy/?0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median ? passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.96540.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by nonperfect image registrations.

Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm{sup 3}), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (blocks) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 47 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% 21% (range: 0%100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% 8% (range: 56%100%;p < 0.001). Left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior systematic BDE were 3.2, 2.4, and 4.4 mm, respectively, with random BDE of 2.4, 2.1, and 2.7 mm. Margins required to include both localization and delineation uncertainties ranged from 5.0 to 11.7 mm, an average of 40% less than required for bony alignment. Conclusions: BMR is a promising approach for automatic lung tumor localization. Further evaluation is warranted to assess the accuracy and robustness of BMR against other potential localization strategies.

Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D., E-mail: gdhugo@vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, 23298 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Interfractional Reproducibility of Lung Tumor Location Using Various Methods of Respiratory Motion Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine interfractional reproducibility of the location of lung tumors using respiratory motion mitigation. Methods and Materials: Free-breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data sets and CT data sets during breath hold were acquired weekly for 17 patients undergoing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer. Distances between the center of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and a reproducible bony reference point under conditions of breath hold on end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE) and during free breathing on the 0% phase (corresponding to EI) and 50% phase (corresponding to EE) were analyzed for interfractional reproducibility. Systematic uncertainties in tumor location were determined as the difference in distance between the GTV center on the first CT data set and the mean location of GTV centers on the subsequent data sets. Random uncertainties in tumor location were determined as the standard deviation of the distances between the GTV centers and the bony reference points. Margins to account for systematic and random interfractional variations were estimated based on these uncertainties. Results: Mean values of interfractional setup uncertainties were as follows: systematic uncertainties-EI, 0.3 cm; EE, 0.2 cm; 0% phase, 0.3 cm; and 50% phase, 0.3 cm; and random uncertainties-EI, 0.3 cm; EE, 0.3 cm; 0% phase, 0.3 cm; and 50% phase, 0.3 cm. There does not appear to be any correlation between uncertainties and GTV size, but there appears to be a weak positive correlation between uncertainties and the magnitude of GTV excursion. Conclusions: Voluntary breath hold and gating on either EI or EE appear to be equally reliable methods of ensuring the reproducibility of lung tumor position. We recommend setup margins of 0.3 cm if using cone-beam CT or kilovoltage X-ray with fiducials and aligning directly to the tumor and 0.8 cm when aligning to a nearby bony surrogate using cone-beam CT or kilovoltage X-ray.

Starkschall, George, E-mail: gstarksc@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Britton, Keith [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary F.; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: angela.vanbaardwijk@maastro.nl; Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Maasland Hospital, Sittard (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Simons, Jean [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Jans Gasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

GSTM1 and CYP1A1 polymorphisms, tobacco, air pollution, and lung cancer: a study in rural Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incidence rates of lung cancer is high in Lampang Province in northern Thailand, particularly in women. This study was conducted to quantify the risk of lung cancer associated with exposures prevalent in the area and to investigate possible interactions with genetic susceptibility. The presence of several large open-cast coal mines from 1955 close to electricity-generating plants was a particular focus of concern. A point source air pollution exposure index was calculated for each village/ township reported in residential histories based on the linear distance from the Mae Moh Center (the area of the electricity-generating plants), the year-specific gaseous (SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}) or total suspended particulate emissions from the Mae Moh Power Plant, and the percentage of wind from the center. Odds ratios for the disease associated with categorical variables were estimated within unconditional logistic regression. Extraction of genomic DNA and genotyping of variants in CYP1A1 and GSTM1 were conducted to assess the extent of modification of risk by these genes that are involved in the metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Smoking of local high tar unfiltered products is commonamongst women. None of the three polymorphisms examined increased the risk of lung cancer or modified the risk associated with smoking. 96% of male and 64% of female lung cancer incidence were explained by tobacco smoking. None of the potential sources of air pollution deriving from the combustion of coal and wood, or polymorphisms in the CYP1A1 gene or deletion of the GSTM1 had an effect on the risk of lung cancer, either together or separately.

Pisani, P.; Srivatanakul, P.; Randerson-Moor, J.; Vipasrinimit, S.; Lalitwongsa, S.; Unpunyo, P.; Bashir, S.; Bishop, D.T.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Complications associated with brachytherapy alone or with laser in lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relatively little has been reported about destruction through brachytherapy of mucosa-perforating and extraluminary tumors with probable large vessel involvement causing major hemorrhagic or fistular complications. We report 12 patients subjected to laser and brachytherapy for centrally occluding lung cancer, whom we have periodically followed up from June 1986 until they died. Although all laser procedures were free from complications, necrotic cavitation in five cases, two of which were accompanied by large bronchoesophageal fistulas, and massive fatal hemoptysis occurred in six. Minor complications included radiation mucositis (two), noncritical mucosal scarring (two), and cough (four). Characteristics that will identify patients at risk of developing fatal hemoptysis and fistulas should be better defined by imaging and endoscopic techniques. In such cases, modifying the protocol or using alternative procedures should be considered. Minor complications, such as cough, can be avoided by using topical steroid therapy (eg, beclomethasone dipropionate).

Khanavkar, B.; Stern, P.; Alberti, W.; Nakhosteen, J.A. (Augusta Teaching Hospital, Bochum (West Germany))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Respiratory effort correction strategies to improve the reproducibility of lung expansion measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can be used to make measurements of pulmonary function longitudinally. The sensitivity of such measurements to identify change depends on measurement uncertainty. Previously, intrasubject reproducibility of Jacobian-based measures of lung tissue expansion was studied in two repeat prior-RT 4DCT human acquisitions. Difference in respiratory effort such as breathing amplitude and frequency may affect longitudinal function assessment. In this study, the authors present normalization schemes that correct ventilation images for variations in respiratory effort and assess the reproducibility improvement after effort correction.Methods: Repeat 4DCT image data acquired within a short time interval from 24 patients prior to radiation therapy (RT) were used for this analysis. Using a tissue volume preserving deformable image registration algorithm, Jacobian ventilation maps in two scanning sessions were computed and compared on the same coordinate for reproducibility analysis. In addition to computing the ventilation maps from end expiration to end inspiration, the authors investigated the effort normalization strategies using other intermediated inspiration phases upon the principles of equivalent tidal volume (ETV) and equivalent lung volume (ELV). Scatter plots and mean square error of the repeat ventilation maps and the Jacobian ratio map were generated for four conditions: no effort correction, global normalization, ETV, and ELV. In addition, gamma pass rate was calculated from a modified gamma index evaluation between two ventilation maps, using acceptance criterions of 2 mm distance-to-agreement and 5% ventilation difference.Results: The pattern of regional pulmonary ventilation changes as lung volume changes. All effort correction strategies improved reproducibility when changes in respiratory effort were greater than 150 cc (p < 0.005 with regard to the gamma pass rate). Improvement of reproducibility was correlated with respiratory effort difference (R = 0.744 for ELV in the cohort with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc). In general for all subjects, global normalization, ETV and ELV significantly improved reproducibility compared to no effort correction (p = 0.009, 0.002, 0.005 respectively). When tidal volume difference was small (less than 100 cc), none of the three effort correction strategies improved reproducibility significantly (p = 0.52, 0.46, 0.46 respectively). For the cohort (N = 13) with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc, the average gamma pass rate improves from 57.3% before correction to 66.3% after global normalization, and 76.3% after ELV. ELV was found to be significantly better than global normalization (p = 0.04 for all subjects, and p = 0.003 for the cohort with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc).Conclusions: All effort correction strategies improve the reproducibility of the authors' pulmonary ventilation measures, and the improvement of reproducibility is highly correlated with the changes in respiratory effort. ELV gives better results as effort difference increase, followed by ETV, then global. However, based on the spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the lung expansion rate, a single scaling factor (e.g., global normalization) appears to be less accurate to correct the ventilation map when changes in respiratory effort are large.

Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Christensen, Gary E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Ding, Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Bayouth, John E. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Carbon fullerenes (C60s) can induce inflammatory responses in the lung of mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fullerenes (C60s) occur in the environment due to natural and anthropogenic sources such as volcanic eruptions, forest fires, and the combustion of carbon-based materials. Recently, production and application of engineered C60s have also rapidly increased in diverse industrial fields and biomedicine due to C60' unique physico-chemical properties, so toxicity assessment on environmental and human health is being evaluated as a valuable work. However, data related to the toxicity of C60s have not been abundant up to now. In this study, we studied the immunotoxic mechanism and change of gene expression caused by the instillation of C60s. As a result, C60s induced an increase in sub G1 and G1 arrest in BAL cells, an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-6, and an increase of Th1 cytokines such as IL-12 and IFN-r in BAL fluid. In addition, IgE reached the maximum at 1 day after treatment in both BAL fluid and the blood, and decreased in a time-dependent manner. Gene expression of the MHC class II (H2-Eb1) molecule was stronger than that of the MHC class I (H2-T23), and an increase in T cell distribution was also observed during the experiment period. Furthermore, cell infiltration and expression of tissue damage related genes in lung tissue were constantly observed during the experiment period. Based on this, C60s may induce inflammatory responses in the lung of mice.

Park, Eun-Jung [College of Pharmacy, Dongduk Women's University, 23-1, Wolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hero; Kim, Younghun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kwangwoon University, 447-1, Wolgye-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jongheop [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanangno, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyunghee [Department of Chemical Assessment, National Institute of Environmental Research, Kyungseo-dong, Seo-gu, Incheon 404-708 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwangsik, E-mail: kspark@dongduk.ac.k [College of Pharmacy, Dongduk Women's University, 23-1, Wolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-714 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Impaired SHP2-Mediated Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activation Contributes to Gefitinib Sensitivity of Lung Cancer Cells with Epidermal Factor Receptor-Activating Mutations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most nonsmall cell lung cancers (NSCLC) display elevated expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but response to EGFR kinase inhibitors is predominantly limited to NSCLC harboring EGFR-activating mutations. ...

Lazzara, Matthew J.

457

Systematic variations in strip-out factors used in the assessment of plutonium and americium lung burdens at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in partial fulfillment of the requirements fo the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Health Physics SYSTEMATIC VARIATIONS IN STRIP-OUT FACTORS USED IN THE ASSESSMENT OF PLUTONIUM AND AMERICIUM LUNG BURDENS AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL... Variations in Strip-Out Factors Used in the Assessment of Plutonium and Americium Lung Burdens at Los Alamos National Laboratory. (December 1992) Steven Charles Myers, B. A. , State University of New York College at Buffalo; M. Ed. , State University...

Myers, Steven Charles

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Influence of radiation therapy on the lung-tissue in breast cancer patients: CT-assessed density changes and associated symptoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative electron density of lung tissue was measured from computer tomography (CT) slices in 33 breast cancer patients treated by various techniques of adjuvant radiotherapy. The measurements were made before radiotherapy, 3 months and 9 months after completion of radiation therapy. The changes in lung densities at 3 months and 9 months were compared to radiation induced radiological (CT) findings. In addition, subjective symptoms such as cough and dyspnoea were assessed before and after radiotherapy. It was observed that the mean of the relative electron density of lung tissue varied from 0.25 when the whole lung was considered to 0.17 when only the anterior lateral quarter of the lung was taken into account. In patients with positive radiological (CT) findings the mean lung density of the anterior lateral quarter increased 2.1 times 3 months after radiotherapy and was still increased 1.6 times 6 months later. For those patients without findings, in the CT pictures the corresponding values were 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The standard deviation of the pixel values within the anterior lateral quarter of the lung increased 3.8 times and 3.2 times at 3 months and 9 months, respectively, in the former group, as opposed to 1.2 and 1.1 in the latter group. Thirteen patients had an increase in either cough or dyspnoea as observed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. In eleven patients these symptoms persisted 6 months later. No significant correlation was found between radiological findings and subjective symptoms. However, when three different treatment techniques were compared among 29 patients the highest rate of radiological findings was observed in patients in which the largest lung volumes received the target dose. A tendency towards an increased rate of subjective symptoms was also found in this group.

Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.; Svane, G. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Method using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine for treating cancers of the lung  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

Cole, Dean A. (Germantown, MD); Moody, III, David C. (Superior, CO); Ellinwood, L. Edward (Grand Junction, CO); Klein, M. Gerard (Grand Junction, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques cna be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

Cole, Dean A. (60 San Juan St., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Moody, III, David C. (402 Pine Tree La., Boulder, CO 80304); Ellinwood, L. Edward (694 Sperber La., Grand Junction, CO 81506); Klein, M. Gerard (715 Victor Dr., Grand Junction, CO 81506)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung disability trust" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Plasminogen activator activity in lung and alveolar macrophages of rats exposed to graded single doses of. gamma. rays to the right hemithorax  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Male rats were sacrificed 2 or 6 months after a single dose of 0-30 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays to the right hemithorax. At autopsy, macrophages were lavaged from the right lung, counted, and frozen. The right (irradiated) and the left (shielded) lungs were frozen, then assayed for plasminogen activator (PLA) activity by the fibrin plate lysis method. Freeze-thawed macrophages were assayed for both PLA activity (/sup 125/I-fibrin clot lysis method) and fibrinolytic inhibitor activity (inhibition of urokinase-induced fibrin lysis). There was a linear, dose-dependent decrease in right lung PLA activity over the dose range of 10-30 Gy at 2 and 6 months postirradiation, reductions of 3.1 and 2.6% per Gy, respectively. PLA activity at all radiation doses was 10-15% higher at 6 months than at 2 months indicative of a partial recovery of this endothelial function in the irradiated lung. PLA activity per 10/sup 6/ macrophages decreased with increasing radiation dose at both autopsy times, closely paralleling lung PLA activity. This radiation-induced decrease in macrophage PLA activity was not due to increased fibrinolytic inhibitor activity in the irradiated macrophages. These data quantitate the dose response and time course of radiation-induced fibrinolytic defects in rat lung and suggest that information obtained from a minimally invasive procedure such as bronchoalveolar lavage may serve as an index of the degree of pulmonary fibrinolytic dysfunction after irradiation.

Ts'ao, C.; Ward, W.F.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

CATIONIC SHELL CROSSLINKED NANOPARTICLES AS INTRACELLULAR DELIVERY VEHICLES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

started in my organic chemistry classroom, as I watched Dr. David Bergbreiter talk about this intriguing subject. I would like to thank him for he was always there helping his students and encouraging us to think beyond the books. Dr. Bergbreiter... CATIONIC SHELL CROSSLINKED NANOPARTICLES AS INTRACELLULAR DELIVERY VEHICLES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY Majors: Chemistry Biomedical Science April 2011 Submitted...

Florez, Stephanie

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

463

Lung Cancer Attributable to Indoor Radon Exposures in Two Radon--Prone Areas, Stei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. For medium and low concentrations which are the typical residential radon levels, recent researches have also demonstrated increased risks of lung cancer for people exposed. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon--prone areas, Stei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). One important difference between the two studied areas is related to the houses built using uranium waste as construction material in Stei area. Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Stei area was 2650 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. and 366 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3} in the Spanish region. The results are compute with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were calculated in the Stei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than observed from the national statistics. In comparison, in Torrelodones area, a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer were estimated along a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number observed by authorities. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure.

Dinu, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin; Vasiliniuc, Stefan [Faculty of Env. Science, 'Babes-Bolyai' University, Fantanele, No. 30 Cluj Napoca (Romania); Sainz, Carlos; Poncela, Luis Santiago Quindos [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Herrera Oria s/n. 39011, Santander (Spain)

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

The effects of nitrogen oxides on cytochrome P-450 mediated mixed-function oxidations in mammalian lung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF NITROGEN OXIDES ON CYTOCHROME P-450 MEDIATED MIXED-FUNCTION OXIDATIONS IN ~IAN IUNG A Thesis by LEO DEAN TUCKER, II Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Biology THE EFFECTS OF NITROGEN OXIDES ON CYTOCHROME P-450 MEDIATED MIXED-FUNCTION OXIDATIONS IN MAMMALIAN LUNG A Thesis by LEO DEAN TUCKER, II Approved as to style and content by...

Tucker, Leo Dean

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Effect of induction chemotherapy on estimated risk of radiation pneumonitis in bulky nonsmall cell lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patients with bulky nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be at a high risk for radiation pneumonitis (RP) if treated with up-front concurrent chemoradiation. There is limited information about the effect of induction chemotherapy on the volume of normal lung subsequently irradiated. This study aims to estimate the reduction in risk of RP in patients with NSCLC after receiving induction chemotherapy. Between 2004 and 2009, 25 patients with Stage IV NSCLC were treated with chemotherapy alone (no surgery or radiation therapy [RT]) and had computed tomography (CT) scans before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Simulated RT plans were created for the prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans so as to deliver 60 Gy to the thoracic disease in patients who had either a >20% volumetric increase or decrease in gross tumor volume (GTV) from chemotherapy. The prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans were analyzed to compare the percentage of lung volume receiving?20 Gy (V20), mean lung dose (MLD), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Eight patients (32%) had a GTV reduction >20%, 2 (8%) had GTV increase >20%, and 15 (60%) had stable GTV. In the 8 responders, there was an absolute median GTV decrease of 88.1 cc (7.3 to 351.6 cc) or a 48% (20% to 62%) relative reduction in tumor burden. One had >20% tumor progression during chemotherapy, yet had an improvement in dosimetric parameters postchemotherapy. Among these 9 patients, the median decrease in V20, MLD, and NTCP was 2.6% (p<0.01), 2.1 Gy (p<0.01), and 5.6% (p<0.01), respectively. Less than one-third of patients with NSCLC obtain >20% volumetric tumor reduction from chemotherapy alone. Even with that amount of volumetric reduction, the 5% reduced risk of RP was only modest and did not convert previously ineligible patients to safely receive definitive thoracic RT.

Amin, Neha P., E-mail: npamin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University and Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Miften, Moyed; Thornton, Dale; Ryan, Nicole; Kavanagh, Brian; Gaspar, Laurie E [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Clinical trials with cyclophosphamide and misonidazole combination for maintaining treatment after radiation therapy of lung carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fifteen patients with inoperable non oat cell lung carcinoma, who had already been treated with telecobalt therapy in the mediastinum-hilar region, were treated with continuing therapy with misonidazole (MISO) and cyclophosphamide (Cy). MISO was administered in single doses of 1000 mg/m/sup 2/ and 500 mg/m/sup 2/, orally. Cy was administered in single doses of 500 mg/m/sup 2/ and 250 mg/m/sup 2/, i.v. This treatment was given every 4 weeks. All patients (15/15) suffered from hyporexia, nausea and vomiting within 48 hours from administration; furthermore, 2 patients had hemoragic cystitis, 2 had peripheral neurotoxicity, 3 had fever, and 2 had serious nervous depression. Leukopenia occurred in all patients immediately after drug administration, although it was not present in any patient by the time of the next administration. This clinical trial was concluded in December 1981. The follow-up at 18 months shows 7/15 cases of relapse. Eight of 15 patients are alive with progression of disease from 8 to 18 months.

Busutti, L.; Breccia, A.; Stagni, G.; Gattavecchia

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (4286) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.470 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (2686%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted.

Goksel, E; Cone, D; Kucucuk, H; Senkesen, O; Yilmaz, M; Aslay, I [Acibadem Kozyatgi Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Tezcanli, E; Garipagaoglu, M; Sengoz, M [Acibadem University, Istanbul (Turkey)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-?B, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPAR?/?-mediated lipid homeostasis. A pro-cancer gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, and NF-?B signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ? Chronic As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure to lung epithelial cells resulted in a cancer-like phenotype. ? Mice injected with arsenic transformed (B-As) cells displayed metastatic tumors. ? Microarray profiling revealed changes in mitochondrial metabolism and ROS response. ? p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, PPAR? and NF-?B networks promoted pro-cancer signaling. ? B-As cells represent a lung cancer model to explore As-associated carcinogenesis.

Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)] [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A novel synthetic analog of militarin, MA-1 induces mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by ROS generation in human lung cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synthetic Militarin analog-1[(2R,3R,4R,5R)-1,6-bis(4-(2,4,4-trimethylpentan-2-yl)phenoxy) hexane-2,3,4,5-tetraol] is a novel derivative of constituents from Cordyceps militaris, which has been used to treat a variety of chronic diseases including inflammation, diabetes, hyperglycemia and cancers. Here, we report for the first time the synthesis of Militarin analog-1 (MA-1) and the apoptotic mechanism of MA-1 against human lung cancer cell lines. Treatment with MA-1 significantly inhibited the viability of 3 human lung cancer cell lines. The inhibition of viability and growth in MA-1-treated A549 cells with an IC{sub 50} of 5 ?M were mediated through apoptosis induction, as demonstrated by an increase in DNA fragmentation, sub-G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-DNA fraction, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. The apoptotic cell death caused mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through regulation of expression of the Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the final stage of apoptosis, activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, was induced. Furthermore, A549 lung cancer cells were more responsive to MA-1 than a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B), involving the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation and JNK/p38 MAPK exhibited attenuated DNA fragmentation in MA-1-induced apoptosis. Oral administration of MA-1 also retarded growth of A549 orthotopic xenografts. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the new synthetic derivative MA-1 triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through ROS generation and regulation of MAPKs and may be a potent therapeutic agent against human lung cancer. - Highlights: We report a novel synthesized derivative, militarin analog-1 (MA-1). MA-1-induced cancer cell death was triggered by the ROS generation through MAPKs. The MA-1-induced cell death was also modulated by the mitochondria-mediated pathway. The apoptotic cancer cell death by MA-1 was also exhibited in orthotopic xenografts. Our findings suggest MA-1 as a clinically useful agent for human lung cancer.

Yoon, Deok Hyo; Lim, Mi-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yu Ran [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi-Ho [Mushroom Research Division, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 404-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [R and D Center, Dong-A Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Yongin 446-905 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byeong Hwa [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Youl [Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Won O. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Park, Haeil [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sunga, E-mail: sachoi@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Woong, E-mail: tawkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung.

Liu, H. Helen [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: hliu@mdanderson.org; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tutt, Teresa [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Choi, Bum [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang, Joy [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Catherine [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chi, Melinda [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Luo Dershan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pan Tinsu [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hunjan, Sandeep [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosen, Isaac [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Prado, Karl [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are ?0.2 0.2, ?1.5 1.1, and ?0.2 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the variances of MP error in SI direction explained by target sizes, motion patterns, and EX variations are 9% with the 2D method, 74.4% with the 3D method, and 27% with the 4D method. The EX/SD detection errors are both < 1.0 mm for the 2D method and < 2.0 mm for the 4D method. Conclusions: The 2D method provides the most accurate MP detection regardless of the motion pattern variations, while its performance is limited by the accuracy of target identification in the projection images. The 3D method causes the largest error in MP determination, and its accuracy significantly depends on target sizes, motion patterns, and EX variations. The 4D method provides moderate MP detection results, while its accuracy relies on a regular motion pattern. In addition, the 2D and 4D methods both provide accurate measurement of the motion SD/EX, providing extra information for motion management.

Zhuang, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: jun.zhou@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Targeting SHP2 for EGFR inhibitor resistant non-small cell lung carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: SHP2 is required for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC H1975 cell proliferation. SHP2 inhibitor blocks EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and proliferation. SHP2 inhibitor exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. SHP2 inhibitor synergizes with PI3K inhibitor in suppressing cell growth. Targeting SHP2 represents a novel strategy for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs. -- Abstract: Targeted therapy with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has produced a noticeable benefit to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors carry activating mutations (e.g. L858R) in EGFR. Unfortunately, these patients develop drug resistance after treatment, due to acquired secondary gatekeeper mutations in EGFR (e.g. T790M). Given the critical role of SHP2 in growth factor receptor signaling, we sought to determine whether targeting SHP2 could have therapeutic value for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC. We show that SHP2 is required for EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation in EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC cell line H1975, which harbors the EGFR T790M/L858R double-mutant. We demonstrate that treatment of H1975 cells with II-B08, a specific SHP2 inhibitor, phenocopies the observed growth inhibition and reduced ERK1/2 activation seen in cells treated with SHP2 siRNA. Importantly, we also find that II-B08 exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. Finally, we observe that combined inhibition of SHP2 and PI3K impairs both the ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling axes and produces significantly greater effects on repressing H1975 cell growth than inhibition of either protein individually. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting SHP2 may represent an effective strategy for treatment of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs.

Xu, Jie; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shen, Weihua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Turchi, John J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Zhang, Zhong-Yin, E-mail: zyzhang@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

473

Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

Kwint, Margriet [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van den [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose, E-mail: j.belderbos@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Rapid Disease Progression With Delay in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess rate of disease progression from diagnosis to initiation of treatment for Stage I-IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with NSCLC underwent at least two sets of computed tomography (CT) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans at various time intervals before treatment. Progression was defined as development of any new lymph node involvement, site of disease, or stage change. Results: Median time interval between first and second CT scans was 13.4 weeks, and between first and second PET scans was 9.0 weeks. Median initial primary maximum tumor dimension (MTD) was 3.5 cm (0.6-8.5 cm) with a median standardized uptake value (SUV) of 13.0 (1.7-38.5). The median MTD increased by a median of 1.0 cm (mean, 1.6 cm) between scans for a median relative MTD increase of 35% (mean, 59%). Nineteen patients (48%) progressed between scans. Rate of any progression was 13%, 31%, and 46% at 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. Upstaging occurred in 3%, 13%, and 21% at these intervals. Distant metastasis became evident in 3%, 13%, and 13% after 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. T and N stage were associated with progression, whereas histology, grade, sex, age, and maximum SUV were not. At 3 years, overall survival for Stage III patients with vs. without progression was 18% vs. 67%, p = 0.05. Conclusions: With NSCLC, treatment delay can lead to disease progression. Diagnosis, staging, and treatment initiation should be expedited. After 4-8 weeks of delay, complete restaging should be strongly considered.

Mohammed, Nasiruddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry Llyn, E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Grills, Inga Siiner; Battu, Madhu; Fitch, Dwight Lamar [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Wong, Ching-yee Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Margolis, Jeffrey Harold [Department of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Chmielewski, Gary William; Welsh, Robert James [Department of Thoracic Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data obtained in this work, when taken together with the data obtained previously for head and neck cancer, suggests that the cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume variation curves measured during radiotherapy with conventional fractionation. The proposed method can be used for treatment evaluation and adaptation.

Chvetsov, Alexei V., E-mail: chvetsov2@gmail.com; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)] [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

The development of a sensitive method to study volatile organic compounds in gaseous emissions of lung cancer cell lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HCO3 producing excess H+ ions in the medium and therefore a fall in pH. This is seen as a color change. 10 When the confluence has reached 90% the cells are ready to be sub-cultured (Fig 2). 50 % cells in media Thawed... patients with no prior treatment for lung cancer. We have used an alternative method for the spectrometric analysis and quantitation of the selected chemical markers. The pre-concentration method involved a Purge and Trap unit with a thermal desorber...

Maroly, Anupam

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

477

Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System Phase I: Hypo-Elastic Model for CFD Implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An isotropic constitutive model for the parenchyma of lung has been derived from the theory of hypo-elasticity. The intent is to use it to represent the mechanical response of this soft tissue in sophisticated, computational, fluid-dynamic models of the lung. This demands that the continuum model be accurate, yet simple and effcient. An objective algorithm for its numeric integration is provided. The response of the model is determined for several boundary-value problems whose experiments are used for material characterization. The effective elastic, bulk, and shear moduli, and Poissons ratio, as tangent functions, are also derived. The model is characterized against published experimental data for lung. A bridge between this continuum model and a dodecahedral model of alveolar geometry is investigated, with preliminary findings being reported.

Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

478

Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received {>=}60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998-2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient's preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0-4 (T1), 5-8 (T2), and 9-12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy, may decrease the pulmonary impairment through greater lung sparing.

Lopez Guerra, Jose L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Department of Medicine, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Digitoxin and a synthetic monosaccharide analog inhibit cell viability in lung cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanisms of digitoxin-inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) cells remain unclear. Understanding how digitoxin or derivate analogs induce their cytotoxic effect below therapeutically relevant concentrations will help in designing and developing novel, safer and more effective anti-cancer drugs. In this study, NCI-H460 cells were treated with digitoxin and a synthetic analog D6-MA to determine their anti-cancer activity. Different concentrations of digitoxin and D6-MA were used and the subsequent changes in cell morphology, viability, cell cycle, and protein expressions were determined. Digitoxin and D6-MA induced dose-dependent apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells via caspase-9 cleavage, with D6-MA possessing 5-fold greater potency than digitoxin. In comparison, non-tumorigenic immortalized bronchial and small airway epithelial cells displayed significantly less apoptotic sensitivity compared to NCI-H460 cells suggesting that both digitoxin and D6-MA were selective for NSCLC. Furthermore, NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin and D6-MA treatment. Post-treatment evaluation of key G2/M checkpoint regulatory proteins identified down-regulation of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin. Additionally, Chk1/2 and p53 related proteins experienced down-regulation suggesting a p53-independent cell cycle arrest mechanism. In summary, digitoxin and D6-MA exert anti-cancer effects on NCI-H460 cells through apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, with D6-MA showing at least 5-fold greater potency relative to digitoxin. -- Highlights: ? Digitoxin and synthetic analog D6-MA induced apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ? Apoptotic cell death induced by analog was 5-fold more potent when compared to digitoxin. ? NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin (? 5 nM) and analog (? 1 nM) treatment. ? Digitoxin inhibited the expression of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin at sub-therapeutic concentrations. ? D6-MA was 4-fold more potent than digitoxin.

Elbaz, Hosam A. [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stueckle, Todd A. [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States) [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States); Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; O'Doherty, George A. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lowry, David T.; Sargent, Linda M.; Wang, Liying [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States)] [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States); Dinu, Cerasela Zoica, E-mail: cerasela-zoica.dinu@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Disabled Visitor Parking Only  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENCES LIBRARY M acNIDER M EDICINE BER RYH ILL BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

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481

Quantitative CT of lung nodules: Dependence of calibration on patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size for single- and dual-energy techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calcium concentration may be a useful feature for distinguishing benign from malignant lung nodules in computer-aided diagnosis. The calcium concentration can be estimated from the measured CT number of the nodule and a CT number vs calcium concentration calibration line that is derived from CT scans of two or more calcium reference standards. To account for CT number nonuniformity in the reconstruction field, such calibration lines may be obtained at multiple locations within lung regions in an anthropomorphic phantom. The authors performed a study to investigate the effects of patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size on the derived calibration lines at ten lung region positions using both single energy (SE) and dual energy (DE) CT techniques. Simulated spherical lung nodules of two concentrations (50 and 100 mg/cc CaCO{sub 3}) were employed. Nodules of three different diameters (4.8, 9.5, and 16 mm) were scanned in a simulated thorax section representing the middle of the chest with large lung regions. The 4.8 and 9.5 mm nodules were also scanned in a section representing the upper chest with smaller lung regions. Fat rings were added to the peripheries of the phantoms to simulate larger patients. Scans were acquired on a GE-VCT scanner at 80, 120, and 140 kVp and were repeated three times for each condition. The average absolute CT number separations between the calibration lines were computed. In addition, under- or overestimates were determined when the calibration lines for one condition (e.g., small patient) were used to estimate the CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules for a different condition (e.g., large patient). The authors demonstrated that, in general, DE is a more accurate method for estimating the calcium contents of lung nodules. The DE calibration lines within the lung field were less affected by patient body size, calibration nodule size, and nodule position than the SE calibration lines. Under- or overestimates in CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules were also in general smaller in quantity with DE than with SE. However, because the slopes of the calibration lines for DE were about one-half the slopes for SE, the relative improvement in the concentration estimates for DE as compared to SE was about one-half the relative improvement in the separation between the calibration lines. Results in the middle of the chest thorax section with large lungs were nearly completely consistent with the above generalization. On the other hand, results in the upper-chest thorax section with smaller lungs and greater amounts of muscle and bone were mixed. A repeat of the entire study in the upper thorax section yielded similar mixed results. Most of the inconsistencies occurred for the 4.8 mm nodules and may be attributed to errors caused by beam hardening, volume averaging, and insufficient sampling. Targeted, higher resolution reconstructions of the smaller nodules, application of high atomic number filters to the high energy x-ray beam for improved spectral separation, and other future developments in DECT may alleviate these problems and further substantiate the superior accuracy of DECT in quantifying the calcium concentrations of lung nodules.

Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Way, Ted W.; Schipper, Mathew J.; Larson, Sandra C.; Christodoulou, Emmanuel G. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

2009 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 2906-1367 Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital or family status. An equal opportunity health will be compromised leading to premature fruit breakdown. Once the fruit is mature, the pumpkins desirable to consumers and lead to premature fruit meltdowns. Pumpkins need to be cut from the vine

Liskiewicz, Maciej

483

2009 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 2901-7020 Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

helps protect your investment in your home and makes it a safer, healthier, and more pleasant place, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital or family status. An equal opportunity and to learn to control the conditions that lead to mold growth. In order to grow, molds require: · A food

Liskiewicz, Maciej

484

2013 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University ENTO-55NP Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, g  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, genetic information, marital, family, or veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued of insecticides often leads to a dramatic reduction in arthropod diversity, especially natural enemies that often

Liskiewicz, Maciej

485

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 4H-308NP Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, ge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lead rope or reins around your hand when leading. · Always lead and saddle/bridle from the left side, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, genetic information, marital, family, or veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued

Liskiewicz, Maciej

486

This lesson plan is part of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) heart attack education campaign, Act in Time to Heart Attack Signs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;#12;This lesson plan is part of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) heart attack education campaign, Act in Time to Heart Attack Signs. It was designed to be the 10th session of an existing 9-session heart health education course for Latinos entitled Your Heart, Your Life

Bandettini, Peter A.

487

Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties from MODIS and AIRS JUN LI,* HUNG-LUNG HUANG,* CHIAN-YI LIU,* PING YANG, TIMOTHY J. SCHMIT,# HELI WEI,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties from MODIS and AIRS JUN LI,* HUNG-LUNG HUANG,* CHIAN monitoring of the distribution of clouds during day and night. The MODIS is able to provide a high-spatial-resolution (1­5 km) cloud mask, cloud classification mask, cloud-phase mask, cloud-top pressure (CTP

Li, Jun

488

Role of MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 in the development of breast cancer brain and lung metastasis in a syngeneic rat model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to study the expression of MMP2, MMP 3 and MMP9 in breast cancer brain and lung metastasis, we used a syngeneic rat model of distant metastasis of ENU1564, a carcinogen-induced mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. At six weeks post inoculation...

Mendes, Odete Rodrigues

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Association Between White Blood Cell Count Following Radiation Therapy With Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an inflammatory response to radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the association between RP and white blood cell (WBC) count, an established metric of systemic inflammation, after RT for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received ?60 Gy as definitive therapy. The primary endpoint was whether WBC count after RT (defined as 2 weeks through 3 months after RT completion) was associated with grade ?3 or grade ?2 RP. Median lung volume receiving ?20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 31%, and post-RT WBC counts ranged from 1.7 to 21.2 10{sup 3} WBCs/?L. Odds ratios (ORs) associating clinical variables and post-RT WBC counts with RP were calculated via logistic regression. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to define optimal post-RT WBC count cut points. Results: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly higher in patients with grade ?3 RP than without (P<.05). Optimal cut points for post-RT WBC count were found to be 7.4 and 8.0 10{sup 3}/?L for grade ?3 and ?2 RP, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between post-RT WBC count and grade ?3 (n=46, OR=2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4?4.9, P=.003) and grade ?2 RP (n=164, OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01). This association held in a stepwise multivariate regression. Of note, V{sub 20} was found to be significantly associated with grade ?2 RP (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01) and trended toward significance for grade ?3 RP (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=.06). Conclusions: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly and independently associated with RP and have potential utility as a diagnostic or predictive marker for this toxicity.

Tang, Chad; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Critical Appraisal of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Dose Calculation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the clinical impact of the Acuros XB algorithm (implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment-planning system) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Methods and Materials: A CT dataset of 10 patients presenting with advanced NSCLC was selected and contoured for planning target volume, lungs, heart, and spinal cord. Plans were created for 6-MV and 15-MV beams using three-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity-modulated therapy, and volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc. Calculations were performed with Acuros XB and the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm. To distinguish between differences coming from the different heterogeneity management and those coming from the algorithm and its implementation, all the plans were recalculated assigning Hounsfield Unit (HU) = 0 (Water) to the CT dataset. Results: Differences in dose distributions between the two algorithms calculated in Water were <0.5%. This suggests that the differences in the real CT dataset can be ascribed mainly to the different heterogeneity management, which is proven to be more accurate in the Acuros XB calculations. The planning target dose difference was stratified between the target in soft tissue, where the mean dose was found to be lower for Acuros XB, with a range of 0.4% {+-} 0.6% (intensity-modulated therapy, 6 MV) to 1.7% {+-} 0.2% (three-dimensional conformal therapy, 6 MV), and the target in lung tissue, where the mean dose was higher for 6 MV (from 0.2% {+-} 0.2% to 1.2% {+-} 0.5%) and lower for 15 MV (from 0.5% {+-} 0.5% to 2.0% {+-} 0.9%). Mean doses to organs at risk presented differences up to 3% of the mean structure dose in the worst case. No particular or systematic differences were found related to the various modalities. Calculation time ratios between calculation time for Acuros XB and the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm were 7 for three-dimensional conformal therapy, 5 for intensity-modulated therapy, and 0.2 for volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc. Conclusion: The availability of Acuros XB could improve patient dose estimation, increasing the data consistency of clinical trials.

Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: afc@iosi.ch [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)] [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)] [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Use of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Ventilation Imaging to Correlate Lung Dose and Function With Clinical Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based ventilation is an emerging imaging modality that can be used in the thoracic treatment planning process. The clinical benefit of using ventilation images in radiation treatment plans remains to be tested. The purpose of the current work was to test the potential benefit of using ventilation in treatment planning by evaluating whether dose to highly ventilated regions of the lung resulted in increased incidence of clinical toxicity. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment 4DCT data were used to compute pretreatment ventilati