Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort  

SciTech Connect

High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark) [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark)] [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: {yields} Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. {yields} We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. {yields} No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. {yields} Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

Kulich, M., E-mail: kulich@karlin.mff.cuni.cz [Department of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Sokolovska 83, CZ-186 75 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Rericha, V. [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic); Rericha, R. [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic); Shore, D.L. [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)] [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, D.P. [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part IV: Comparison of cancer incidence and mortality  

SciTech Connect

This report compares cancer incidence and mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study (LSS) cohort. Because the incidence data are derived from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, case ascertainment is limited to the time (1958-1987) and geographic restrictions (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) of the registries, whereas mortality data are available from 1950-1987 anywhere in Japan. With these conditions, there were 9,014 first primary incident cancer cases identified among LSS cohort members compared with 7,308 deaths for which cancer was listed as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. When deaths were limited to those occurring between 1958-1987 in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, there were 3,155 more incident cancer cases overall, and 1,262 more cancers of the digestive system. For cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, skin, breast, female and male genital organs, urinary system and thyroid, the incidence series was at least twice as large as the comparable mortality series. Although the incidence and mortality data are dissimilar in many ways, the overall conclusions regarding which solid cancers provide evidence of a significant dose response generally confirm the mortality findings. When either incidence or mortality data are evaluated, significant excess risks are observed for all solid cancers, stomach, colon, liver (when it is defined as primary liver cancer or liver cancer not otherwise specified on the death certificate), lung, breast, ovary and urinary bladder. No significant radiation effect is seen for cancers of the pharynx, rectum, gallbladder, pancreas, nose, larynx, uterus, prostate or kidney in either series. There is evidence of a significant excess of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the incidence data, but not in the mortality series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Air pollution and lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiological evidence proves conclusively that lung cancer correlates with air pollution. However, data on lung cancer death rates and smoking show that mankind accepts the risk of long-term and low-level exposure to carcinogens. As a rule, immediate benefits are sought and remote hazards ignored. Fear of atmospheric contamination by radioactive fallout seems to be the main factor for awareness of air pollution. Experimental works help us to understand physics of particle deposition in the lungs (inertial impactation, sedimentation, Brownian movement), shed light on carcinogenesis (eg, bay region theory in case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and surface charge changes regarding asbestos), show that atmospheric particulates accepted as harmless may act as co-carcinogens (eg, iron and benzo(a)pyrene) and stress the importance of in vitro research (bacterial mutation tests, organ cultures, sister chromatid exchange system) to screen pollutants for their malignant potential and study their pathogenesis.

Boehm, G.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Arsenic in drinking water and lung cancer: A systematic review  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to inorganic arsenic via drinking water is a growing public health concern. We conducted a systematic review of the literature examining the association between arsenic in drinking water and the risk of lung cancer in humans. Towards this aim, we searched electronic databases for articles published through April 2006. Nine ecological studies, two case-control studies, and six cohort studies were identified. The majority of the studies were conducted in areas of high arsenic exposure (100 {mu}g/L) such as southwestern Taiwan, the Niigata Prefecture, Japan, and Northern Chile. Most of the studies reported markedly higher risks of lung cancer mortality or incidence in high arsenic areas compared to the general population or a low arsenic exposed reference group. The quality assessment showed that, among the studies identified, only four assessed arsenic exposure at the individual level. Further, only one of the ecological studies presented results adjusted for potential confounders other than age; of the cohort and case-control studies, only one-half adjusted for cigarette smoking status in the analysis. Despite these methodologic limitations, the consistent observation of strong, statistically significant associations from different study designs carried out in different regions provide support for a causal association between ingesting drinking water with high concentrations of arsenic and lung cancer. The lung cancer risk at lower exposure concentrations remains uncertain.

Celik, Ismail [Department of Medical Oncology, Hacettepe University Institute of Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Gallicchio, Lisa [Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Boyd, Kristina; Lam, Tram K.; Matanoski, Genevieve [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Tao Xuguang [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Shiels, Meredith; Hammond, Edward [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Chen Liwei [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Robinson, Karen A. [Department of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Caulfield, Laura E. [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Herman, James G. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Guallar, Eliseo [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Alberg, Anthony J. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Hollings Cancer Center, and Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina (United States)], E-mail: alberg@musc.edu

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Toward Early Diagnosis of Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our long term research goal is to develop a fully automated, image-based diagnostic system for early diagnosis of pulmonary nodules that may lead to lung cancer. In this paper, we focus on generating new probabilistic models for the estimated growth ...

Ayman El-Baz; Georgy Gimel'Farb; Robert Falk; Mohamed Abou El-Ghar; Sabrina Rainey; David Heredia; Teresa Shaffer

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Former Worker Program - Early Lung Cancer Detection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former Worker Program (FWP) Former Worker Program (FWP) Home Covered Sites/Populations › Construction Worker Screening Projects › Production Worker Screening Projects › Supplemental Screening Program › Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Upcoming Events Program Implementation Outreach Medical Screening - Conventional Medical Screening - Early Lung Cancer Detection Communicating Results Protecting Participant Information Sharing De-identified Data Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) Worker Testimonials Contact Us FWP Scientific Publications FWP Documents Related Links Office of Health and Safety Home Page HSS Logo Early Lung Cancer Detection Program Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer. Through the FWP, DOE initiated the Early Lung Cancer Detection (ELCD) program using low-dose helical CT scans to detect lung cancers at an earlier, more treatable stage. Lung cancer results in about 160,000 deaths in the U.S. every year. The most common causes of lung cancer are long-term exposures to tobacco smoke and residential radon emissions, but occupational hazards, such as asbestos and ionizing radiation, also cause or contribute to the disease.

8

Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Review Genomic approaches to research in lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The medical research community is experiencing a marked increase in the amount of information available on genomic sequences and genes expressed by humans and other organisms. This information offers great opportunities for improving our understanding of complex diseases such as lung cancer. In particular, we should expect to witness a rapid increase in the rate of discovery of genes involved in lung cancer pathogenesis and we should be able to develop reliable molecular criteria for classifying lung cancers and predicting biological properties of individual tumors. Achieving these goals will require collaboration by scientists with specialized expertise in medicine, molecular biology, and decision-based statistical analysis.

Edward Gabrielson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners  

SciTech Connect

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Panel report: radiotherapy for lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Research programs designed to establish the most effective treatment schedule for lung neoplasms are reviewed, with emphasis on radiotherapy. It was concluded that the design of protocols should be to provide total therapy to all compartments of disease: local tumor, regional nodes, and distant metastases. Rather than a competitive approach as utilized in the past, each modality should be utilized as a reductive procedure of the tumor burden. As each treatment is combined effectively and efficiently in a logical sequence before the overt appearance of metastases occurs, increased tumor control and survival may eventuate. (auth)

Rubin, P.

1973-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Differential Molecular Changes in the Lung after Low and High Carcinogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Differential Molecular Changes in the Lung after Low and High Carcinogen Differential Molecular Changes in the Lung after Low and High Carcinogen Doses and Implications for Designing Molecular Epidemiology and other Studies of Radiation-Induced Lung Cancer Bobby R. Scott Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Abstract Lung Cancer Mortality Worldwide by Gender: Lung cancer was the most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide as well as the leading cause of cancer death in males in 2008 (Jemal et al. 2011). For females, it was the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death. Lung cancer accounted for 13% of the total cases and 18% of the cancer deaths. For males, the highest lung cancer incidence rates are in Central and Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, and Northern America. For females, the highest lung cancer incidence rates are in Northern America,

14

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999). A low-dose spiral chest CT differs from a full-dose conventional chest CT scan primarily in the amount of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense as the tissues of other organs (i.e., less x-ray radiation is needed to penetrate the lung). Radiation dose can be further reduced with lung cancer screening due to the

15

An optimal tumor marker group-coupled artificial neural network for diagnosis of lung cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Epidemiological statistics has shown that there are approximately 1.2 million new cases of lung cancer diagnosed every year and the death rate of these patients is 17.8%. Earlier diagnosis is key to promote the five-year survival rate of ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Diagnosis, Lung cancer, Tumor marker

Yongjun Wu; Yiming Wu; Jing Wang; Zhen Yan; Lingbo Qu; Bingren Xiang; Yiguo Zhang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part I: Use of the tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for incidence studies  

SciTech Connect

More than 30 years ago, population-based tumor registries were established in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This report, the first of a series of papers on cancer incidence, describes methodological aspects of the tumor registries and discusses issues of data quality in the context of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, the major atomic bomb survivor population. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are characterized by active case ascertainment based on abstraction of medical records at area hospitals, augmented by tissue registries operational in the area and a number of clinical and pathological programs undertaken over the years among the atomic bomb survivors. Using conventional measures of quality, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries have a death certificate-only (DCO) rate of less than 9%, a mortality/incidence (M/I) ratio of about 50%, and a histological verification (HV) rate in excess of 70%, which place these registries among the best in Japan and comparable to many established registries worldwide. All tumor registry data pertaining to the LSS population were assembled, reviewed and handled with special attention given to the quality and uniformity of data based on standardized procedures. Special studies and monitoring programs were also introduced to evaluate the quality of the tumor incidence data in the LSS. Analyses were performed to examine the quality of incidence data overall and across various substrata used for risk assessment such as age, time and radiation dose groups. No significant associations were found between radiation dose and data quality as measured by various indices. These findings warrant the use of the present tumor registry-based data for studies of cancer incidence in the atomic bomb survivors. 41 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Preston, D.L. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sumio (Hiroshima Perfectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

Zeng Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Yuan Zhu [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Zhu Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Li Lei; Shi Huashan [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Xiao Jianghong [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Li Zhiping, E-mail: lizhiping620312@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners. Progress report, March 1, 1991--November 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective trials with high-dose radiation therapy for unresectable lung cancer.

Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The Association of Inbreeding With Lung Fibrosis Incidence in Beagle Dogs That Inhaled 238PuO2 or 239PuO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of health effects in animals after exposure to internally deposited radionuclides were intended to supplement observational studies in humans. Both nuclear workers and Beagle dogs have exhibited plutonium associated lung fibrosis; however, the dogs smaller gene pool may limit the applicability of findings to humans. Data on Beagles that inhaled either plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2) or plutonium-239 dioxide (239PuO2) were analyzed. Wright's Coefficient of Inbreeding was used to measure genetic or familial susceptibility and was assessed as an explanatory variable when modeling the association between lung fibrosis incidence and plutonium exposure. Lung fibrosis was diagnosed in approximately 80% of the exposed dogs compared with 23.7% of the control dogs. The maximum degree of inbreeding was 9.4%. Regardless of isotope, the addition of inbreeding significantly improved the model in female dogs but not in males. In female dogs an increased inbreeding coefficient predicted decreased hazard of a lung fibrosis diagnosis. Lung fibrosis was common in these dogs with inbreeding affecting models of lung fibrosis incidence in females but not in males. The apparent protective effect in females predicted by these models of lung fibrosis incidence is likely to be minimal given the small degree of inbreeding in these groups.

Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brigantic, Andrea M.; Morgan, William F.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Dose-Volume Comparison of Proton Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study designed photon and proton treatment plans for patients treated with hypofractionated proton radiotherapy (PT) at the Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center (STPTC). We then calculated dosimetric parameters and compared results with simulated treatment plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), using dose--volume histograms to clearly explain differences in dose distributions between PT and SBRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (stage IA, n = 15 patients; stage IB, n = 6 patients) were studied. All tumors were located in the peripheral lung, and total dose was 66 Gray equivalents (GyE) (6.6 GyE/fraction). For treatment planning, beam incidence for proton beam technique was restricted to two to three directions for PT, and seven or eight noncoplanar beams were manually selected for SBRT to achieve optimal planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal dose to organs at risk. Results: Regarding lung tissues, mean dose, V5, V10, V13, V15, and V20 values were 4.6 Gy, 13.2%, 11.4%, 10.6%, 10.1%, and 9.1%, respectively, for PT, whereas those values were 7.8 Gy, 32.0%, 21.8%, 17.4%, 15.3%, and 11.4%, respectively, for SBRT with a prescribed dose of 66 Gy. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients between PTV and dose--volume parameters of V5, V10, V15, and V20 were 0.45, 0.52, 0.58, and 0.63, respectively, for PT, compared to 0.52, 0.45, 0.71, and 0.74, respectively, for SBRT. Conclusions: Correlations between dose--volume parameters of the lung and PTV were observed and may indicate that PT is more advantageous than SBRT when treating a tumor with a relatively large PTV or several tumors.

Kadoya, Noriyuki, E-mail: noriyuki_kadoya@yahoo.co.j [Department of Medical Physics, Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center, Southern Tohoku Institute of Neuroscience, Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan); Department of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi (Japan); Obata, Yasunori [School of Health Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Kato, Takahiro [Department of Medical Physics, Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center, Southern Tohoku Institute of Neuroscience, Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan); Kagiya, Masaru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomoda, Takuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Fuwa, Nobukazu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center, Southern Tohoku Research Institute for Neuroscience, Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated. 116 refs., 8 figs., 78 tabs.

Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Izumi, Shizue; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Ron, E.; Tokunaga, Masayoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sachio (Hiroshima City Medical Association (Japan)); Sugimoto, Sumio (Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1985  

SciTech Connect

An incidence survey among atomic bomb survivors identified 807 breast cancer cases, and 20 second breast cancers. As in earlier surveys of the Life Span Study population, a strongly linear radiation dose response was found, with the highest dose-specific excess relative risk (ERR) among survivors under 20 years old at the time of the bombings. Sixty-eight of the cases were under 10 years old at exposure, strengthening earlier reports of a marked excess risk associated with exposure during infancy and childhood. A much lower, but marginally significant, dose response was seen among women exposed at 40 years and older. It was not possible, however to discriminate statistically between age at exposure and age at observation for risk as the more important determinant of ERR per unit dose. A 13-fold ERR at 1 Sv was found for breast cancer occurring before age 35, compared to a 2-fold excess after age 35, among survivors exposed before age 20. This a posteriori finding, based on 27 exposed, known-dose, early-onset cases, suggests the possible existence of a susceptible genetics subgroup. Further studies, involving family histories of cancer and investigations at the molecular level, are suggested to determine whether such a subgroup exists. 41 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Tokunaga, Masayoshi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Kagoshima Municipal Hospital (Japan); Land, C.E. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokuoka, Shoji; Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimori, Issei; Soda, Midori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Computed axial tomography (CAT) contribution for dosimetry and treatment evaluation in lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

The use of computed axial tomography (CAT) scans in postoperative patients with lung cancer was studied to evaluate its contribution in dosimetry and to study the late effects of irradiation. Comparisons were made between the treatment planning generated from CAT scan data and that obtained from two orthogonal radiographs. Both methods offered a good approximation but with orthogonal radiographs possible mediastinal and lung shift could not be seen and the dose delivered to the spinal cord was overestimated. A control CAT scan performed 6 to 18 months after treatment showed a lung fibrosis that was strictly correlated with the treatment planning and related with doses and volume treated. CAT scans allowed more accurate treatment planning.

Van Houtte, P.; Piron, A.; Lustman-Marechal, J.; Osteaux, M.; Henry, J.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Quantitative effect of combined chemotherapy and fractionated radiotherapy on the incidence of radiation-induced lung damage: A prospective clinical study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to assess the incidence of radiological changes compatible with radiation-induced lung damage as determined by computed tomography (CT), and subsequently calculate the dose effect factors (DEF) for specified chemotherapeutic regimens. Radiation treatments were administered once daily, 5 days-per-week. Six clinical protocols were evaluated: ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and DTIC) followed by 35 Gy in 20 fractions; MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) followed by 35 Gy in 20; MOPP/ABVD followed by 35 Gy in 20; CAV (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and vincristine) followed by 25 Gy in 10; and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) concurrent with either 50-52 Gy in 20-21 or 30-36 Gy in 10-15 fractions. CT examinations were taken before and at predetermined intervals following radiotherapy. CT evidence for the development of radiation-induced damage was defined as an increase in lung density within the irradiated volume. The radiation dose to lung was calculated using a CT-based algorithm to account for tissue inhomogeneities. Different fractionation schedules were converted using two isoeffect models, the estimated single dose (ED) and the normalized total dose (NTD). The actuarial incidence of radiological pneumonitis was 71% for the ABVD, 49% for MOPP, 52% for MOPP/ABVD, 67% for CAV, 73% for 5-FU radical, and 58% for 5-FU palliative protocols. Depending on the isoeffect model selected and the method of analysis, the DEF was 1.11-1.14 for the ABVD, 0.96-0.97 for the MOPP, 0.96-1.02 for the MOPP/ABVD, 1.03-1.10 for the CAV, 0.74-0.79 for the 5-FU radical, and 0.94 for the 5-FU palliative protocols. DEF were measured by comparing the incidence of CT-observed lung damage in patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy to those receiving radiotherapy alone. The addition of ABVD or CAV appeared to reduce the tolerance of lung to radiation. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Mah, K.; Van Dyk, J.; Braban, L.E.; Hao, Y.; Keane, T.J. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Poon, P.Y. (Univ. of British Columbia (Canada))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 after exposure to fractionated moderate-dose-rate ionizing radiation in the Canadian fluoroscopy cohort study and a comparison with lung cancer mortality in the atomic bomb survivors study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current lung cancer risk estimates after exposure to low-linear energy transfer radiation such as X rays are based on studies of people exposed to such radiation at high dose rates, for example the atomic bomb survivors. Radiobiology and animal experiments suggest that risks from exposure at low to moderate dose rates, for example medical diagnostic procedures, may be overestimated by such risk models, but data for humans to examine this issue are limited. In this paper we report on lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 in a cohort of 64,172 Canadian tuberculosis patients, of whom 39% were exposed to highly fractionated multiple chest fluoroscopies leading to a mean lung radiation dose of 1.02 Sv received at moderate dose rates. These data have been used to estimate the excess relative risk per sievert of lung cancer mortality, and this is compared directly to estimates derived from 75,991 atomic bomb survivors. Based on 1,178 lung cancer deaths in the fluoroscopy study, there was no evidence of any positive association between risk and dose, with the relative risk at 1 Sv being 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.94, 1.07), which contrasts with that based on the atomic bomb survivors, 1.60 (1.27, 1.99). The difference in effect between the two studies almost certainly did not arise by chance (P = 0.0001). This study provides strong support from data for humans for a substantial fractionation/dose-rate effect for low-linear energy transfer radiation and lung cancer risk. This implies that lung cancer risk from exposures to such radiation at present-day dose rates is likely to be lower than would be predicted by current radiation risk models based on studies of high-dose-rate exposures. 25 refs., 8 tabs.

Howe, G.R. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Association of the California tobacco control program with declines in lung cancer incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SFO t b 0 b Connecticut I Connecticut t b DetroitI Detroit t b Hawaii I Hawaii t b Iowa I Iowa t the metropolitan areas of Detroit, Michigan, and SFO,

Barnoya, J; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Analyzing Geographic Patterns of Disease Incidence: Rates of Late-Stage Colorectal Cancer in Iowa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study, using geocodes of the locations of residence of newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients from the Iowa Cancer Registry, computed continuous spatial patterns of late-stage rates of colorectal cancer in Iowa. Variations in rates in intrahospital ... Keywords: GIS, SEER, colorectal cancer, geocodes, late-stage cancer

Gerard Rushton; Ika Peleg; Aniruddha Banerjee; Geoffrey Smith; Michele West

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study cohort. Breast Cancer Research 2010 12:R4. Submit yourMarshall et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R4 http://Marshall et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R4 http://

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

CT appearance of radiation injury of the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancers: Are patients with pulmonary emphysema also candidates for SBRT for lung cancers?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of radiation injury to the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and evaluate the difference by the presence of pulmonary emphysema (PE) for small lung cancers. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 45 patients with 52 primary or metastatic lung cancers were enrolled. We evaluated the CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis (within 6 months) and radiation fibrosis (after 6 months) after SBRT. Clinical symptoms were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. We also evaluated the relationship between CT appearance, clinical symptoms, and PE. Results: CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis was classified as follows: (1) diffuse consolidation, 38.5%; (2) patchy consolidation and ground-glass opacities (GGO), 15.4%; (3) diffuse GGO, 11.5%; (4) patchy GGO, 2.0%; (5) no evidence of increasing density, 32.6%. CT appearance of radiation fibrosis was classified as follows: (1) modified conventional pattern, 61.5%; (2) mass-like pattern, 17.3%; (3) scar-like pattern, 21.2%. Patients who were diagnosed with more than Grade 2 pneumonitis showed significantly less no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern than any other pattern (p = 0.0314, 0.0297, respectively). Significantly, most of these patients with no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern had PE (p = 0.00038, 0.00044, respectively). Conclusion: Computed tomographic appearance after SBRT was classified into five patterns of acute radiation pneumonitis and three patterns of radiation fibrosis. Our results suggest that SBRT can be also safely performed even in patients with PE.

Kimura, Tomoki [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan) and Department of Radiology, Kagawa University, School of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)]. E-mail: tkkimura@med.kawawa-u.ac.jp; Matsuura, Kanji [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Hashimoto, Yasutoshi [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Kaneyasu, Yuko [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Wadasaki, Koichi [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Hirokawa, Yutaka [Hiroshima Heiwa Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan); Ito, Katsuhide [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Okawa, Motoomi [Department of Radiology, Kagawa University, School of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Biologically Based Analysis of Lung  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Canadian Occupational Cohort with Low-LET Low-dose Radiation Exposure, and Comparison with Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors. Authors: W.D. Hazelton, D. Krewski, S.H. Moolgavkar Lung cancer incidence is analyzed in a large Canadian National Dose Registry (CNDR) cohort with individual annual dosimetry for low-dose occupational exposure to gamma and tritium radiation using several types of multistage models. The primary analysis utilizes the two-stage clonal expansion model (TSCE), with sensitivity analyses using extensions of this model incorporating additional stages. Characteristic and distinct temporal patterns of risk are found for dose-response affecting early, middle, or late stages of carcinogenesis, e.g., initiation with one or more stages,

33

Patterns of Care for Lung Cancer in Radiation Oncology Departments of Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the patterns of care for lung cancer in Turkish radiation oncology centers. Methods and Materials: Questionnaire forms from 21 of 24 (87.5%) centers that responded were evaluated. Results: The most frequent histology was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (81%). The most common postoperative radiotherapy (RT) indications were close/(+) surgical margins (95%) and presence of pN2 disease (91%). The most common indications for postoperative chemotherapy (CHT) were '{>=} IB' disease (19%) and the presence of pN2 disease (19%). In Stage IIIA potentially resectable NSCLC, the most frequent treatment approach was neoadjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) (57%). In Stage IIIA unresectable and Stage IIIB disease, the most frequent approach was definitive concomitant CHRT (91%). In limited SCLC, the most common treatment approach was concomitant CHRT with cisplatin+etoposide for cycles 1-3, completion of CHT to cycles 4-6, and finally prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with complete response (71%). Six cycles of cisplatin + etoposide CHT and palliative thoracic RT, when required, was the most commonly used treatment (81%) in extensive SCLC. Sixty-two percent of centers did not have endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB) facilities. Conclusion: There is great variation in diagnostic testing, treatment strategies, indications for postoperative RT and CHT, RT features, and EBB availability for LC cases. To establish standards, national guidelines should be prepared using a multidisciplinary approach.

Demiral, Ayse Nur [Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: ayse.demiral@deu.edu.tr; Alicikus, Zuemre Arican [Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey); Isil Ugur, Vahide [Ankara Oncology Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Karadogan, Ilker [Izmir Private Oncology Center, Izmir (Turkey); Yoeney, Adnan [Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Andrieu, Meltem Nalca [Ankara University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Yalman, Deniz [Ege University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey); Pak, Yuecel [Gazi University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Aksu, Gamze [Akdeniz University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey); Ozyigit, Goekhan [Hacettepe University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Ozkan, Luetfi [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bursa (Turkey); Kilciksiz, Sevil [Gaziantep University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gaziantep (Turkey); Koca, Sedat [Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Caloglu, Murat [Trakya University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Edirne (Turkey); Yavuz, Ali Aydin [Baskent University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Basak Caglar, Hale [Marmara University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Beyzadeoglu, Murat [Guelhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Igdem, Sefik [Metropolitan Florence Nightingale Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey)] (and others)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Dosimetric impact of Acuros XB deterministic radiation transport algorithm for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The novel deterministic radiation transport algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), has shown great potential for accurate heterogeneous dose calculation. However, the clinical impact between AXB and other currently used algorithms still needs to be elucidated for translation between these algorithms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AXB for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The thorax phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) was used for this study. IMRT and VMAT plans were created for the phantom in the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system. Each plan was delivered to the phantom three times using a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator to ensure reproducibility. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 film were placed inside the phantom to measure delivered doses. The measurements were compared with dose calculations from AXB 11.0.21 and the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) 11.0.21. Two dose reporting modes of AXB, dose-to-medium in medium (D{sub m,m}) and dose-to-water in medium (D{sub w,m}), were studied. Point doses, dose profiles, and gamma analysis were used to quantify the agreement between measurements and calculations from both AXB and AAA. The computation times for AAA and AXB were also evaluated. Results: For the RPC lung phantom, AAA and AXB dose predictions were found in good agreement to TLD and film measurements for both IMRT and VMAT plans. TLD dose predictions were within 0.4%-4.4% to AXB doses (both D{sub m,m} and D{sub w,m}); and within 2.5%-6.4% to AAA doses, respectively. For the film comparisons, the gamma indexes ({+-}3%/3 mm criteria) were 94%, 97%, and 98% for AAA, AXB{sub Dm,m}, and AXB{sub Dw,m}, respectively. The differences between AXB and AAA in dose-volume histogram mean doses were within 2% in the planning target volume, lung, heart, and within 5% in the spinal cord. However, differences up to 8% between AXB and AAA were found at lung/soft tissue interface regions for individual IMRT fields. AAA was found to be 5-6 times faster than AXB for IMRT, while AXB was 4-5 times faster than AAA for VMAT plan. Conclusions: AXB is satisfactorily accurate for the dose calculation in lung cancer for both IMRT and VMAT plans. The differences between AXB and AAA are generally small except in heterogeneous interface regions. AXB D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m} calculations are similar inside the soft tissue and lung regions. AXB can benefit lung VMAT plans by both improving accuracy and reducing computation time.

Han Tao; Followill, David; Repchak, Roman; Molineu, Andrea; Howell, Rebecca; Salehpour, Mohammad [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Mikell, Justin [Department of Radiation Physics, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Physics, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Use of the Active Breathing Coordinator Throughout Radical Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess feasibility and reproducibility of an Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) used throughout radical radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer, and compare lung dosimetric parameters between free-breathing and ABC plans. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients, recruited into an approved study, had free-breathing and ABC breath-hold treatment plans generated. Lung volume, the percentage volume of lung treated to a dose of {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}), and mean lung dose (MLD) were compared. Treatment (64 Gy in 32 fractions, 5 days/week) was delivered in breath-hold. Repeat breath-hold computed tomography scans were used to assess change in gross tumor volume (GTV) size and position. Setup error was also measured and potential GTV-planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated. Results: Seventeen of 18 patients completed radiotherapy using ABC daily. Intrafraction tumor position was consistent, but interfraction variation had mean (range) values of 5.1 (0-25), 3.6 (0-9.7), and 3.5 (0-16.6) mm in the superoinferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Tumor moved partially outside the PTV in 5 patients. Mean reduction in GTV from planning to end of treatment was 25% (p = 0.003). Potentially required PTV margins were 18.1, 11.9, and 11.9 mm in SI, RL, and AP directions. ABC reduced V{sub 20} by 13% (p = 0.0001), V{sub 13} by 12% (p = 0.001), and MLD by 13% (p < 0.001) compared with free-breathing; lung volume increased by 41% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Clinically significant movements of GTV were seen during radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer using ABC. Image guidance is recommended with ABC. The use of ABC can reduce dose volume parameters determining lung toxicity, and might allow for equitoxic radiotherapy dose escalation.

Brock, Juliet, E-mail: juliet.brock@icr.ac.uk [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen A.; Panakis, Niki; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; Evans, Phil M.; Brada, Michael [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Chest Reirradiation With External Beam Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lung cancer remains one of the most prevalent and deadliest malignancies worldwide. For 2008, the International Agency for the Research of Cancer (IARC) estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases of lung cancer (1.095 million in men and 0.514 million in women), with an associated 1.38 million deaths (0.95 million in men and 0.43 million in women). In the United States, lung cancer remained the number one cancer killer for both sexes in 2009, with 219,440 new cases diagnosed overall and an estimated 159,390 deaths. Recent biological and technological advances in lung cancer management notwithstanding, disease recurrence is still the dominant cause of death after initial treatment of lung cancer. This is irrespective of histology (NSCLC vs. small cell cancer), stage (early vs. locally advanced vs. metastatic), or initial treatment (surgery, RT, chemotherapy [CHT] or combinations thereof). Time to recurrence of lung cancer is not predictable, with some failures appearing early and others manifesting years later. Patterns of failure are also not easily anticipated as local (e.g., lung parenchyma, bronchial stump, or chest wall), regional (e.g., mediastinal lymph nodes), or distant (e.g., brain, liver, or bone) recurrences can appear alone or in combination. Whatever the presentation, recurrent lung cancer has historically been judged almost universally fatal as only rarely did efforts at treatment lead to control, let alone cure. More importantly, recurrence is often associated with significant distress requiring substantial supportive treatment. Recurrence leads ultimately to a significant decrease in patient quality of life, making further interventions even more limited. Because of the bleak outcome associated with recurrence, palliative retreatment has nonetheless often been attempted precisely as a means of preventing this decline in quality of life and/or reversing symptoms. However, complicating these attempts at retreatment has been the forms of initial therapy used to manage the lung cancer, the site of recurrence, and the performance of the patient at relapse. All of these have been relevant to the issue of whether the modality used initially for primary treatment could be both safe and effective in the setting of retreatment. That said, some reports in the surgical literature have suggested, for example, that re-resection in the case of local relapses in selected patients who had previous surgery for stage I lung cancer is feasible and effective and could predict for survival compared to providing the patients with supportive care alone. A particular challenge has been the question of the role and safety of thoracic reirradiation for local recurrences in those patients where RT was used as part of their initial management strategy. Thus, it has been generally assumed that once definitive EBRT has been administered further RT cannot be given because it would likely exceed normal tissue tolerances (6), or, if done, thoracic reirradiation could only be a palliative measure, as the expectation was that patients would not survive to experience potential late effects. A 2007 retrospective study by Estall et al. (4) is instructive in regard to rates of chest reirradiation. Of 527 lung cancer patients treated between 1993 and 1996, the authors reported that 279 (53%) patients were treated at least once with RT, with initial treatment being palliative for 79% of patients, definitive for 14% of patients, and adjuvant for 7% of patients. Of these 279 initial cases, 73 (27%) patients subsequently received a second course of RT, 19 (7%) patients had a third RT course, and 6 (2%) patients received a fourth course. Contemporary technological advances in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer as well as in the delivery of EBRT, along with the increasing primary role of RT in lung cancer care, now raise the question as to the appropriateness of a palliative-only model for dealing with locally recurrent lung cancer. However, in order to appropriately characterize the historic practice relevant to thoracic reirradiation of recurrent l

Jeremic, Branislav, E-mail: nebareje@gmail.com [Institute of Pulmonary Diseases, Sremska Kamenica (Serbia); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Comparative Effectiveness of 5 Treatment Strategies for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Elderly  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The incidence of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among older adults is expected to increase because of demographic trends and computed tomography-based screening; yet, optimal treatment in the elderly remains controversial. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort spanning 2001-2007, we compared survival outcomes associated with 5 strategies used in contemporary practice: lobectomy, sublobar resection, conventional radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), and observation. Methods and Materials: Treatment strategy and covariates were determined in 10,923 patients aged {>=}66 years with stage IA-IB NSCLC. Cox regression, adjusted for patient and tumor factors, compared overall and disease-specific survival for the 5 strategies. In a second exploratory analysis, propensity-score matching was used for comparison of SABR with other options. Results: The median age was 75 years, and 29% had moderate to severe comorbidities. Treatment distribution was lobectomy (59%), sublobar resection (11.7%), conventional radiation (14.8%), observation (12.6%), and SABR (1.1%). In Cox regression analysis with a median follow-up time of 3.2 years, SABR was associated with the lowest risk of death within 6 months of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.63; referent is lobectomy). After 6 months, lobectomy was associated with the best overall and disease-specific survival. In the propensity-score matched analysis, survival after SABR was similar to that after lobectomy (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.45-1.12; referent is SABR). Conventional radiation and observation were associated with poor outcomes in all analyses. Conclusions: In this population-based experience, lobectomy was associated with the best long-term outcomes in fit elderly patients with early-stage NSCLC. Exploratory analysis of SABR early adopters suggests efficacy comparable with that of surgery in select populations. Evaluation of these therapies in randomized trials is urgently needed.

Shirvani, Shervin M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Welsh, James W.; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Virus That Can Infect Lung Cancer Cells | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops Extreme Pressure Reveals a Volume Expansion Phenomenon A Nuclear Receptor with Implications for a Host of Diseases Unexpected Materials in Earth's Lowermost Mantle Nailing Down the Exciton in LiF Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Virus That Can Infect Lung Cancer Cells OCTOBER 21, 2008 Bookmark and Share The 3-D structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001. (Courtesy: The Scripps Research Institute) The structure of the Senecavirus is also depicted at http://viperdb.scripps.edu/, the "Virus Particle Explorer" developed at Scripps Research by Reddy and his colleagues. The online database is a

39

Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade {>=}2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

De Ruyck, Kim, E-mail: kim.deruyck@UGent.be [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Sabbe, Nick [Department of Applied Mathematics, Biometrics and Process Control, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), Research Institute of Growth and Development, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Vandecasteele, Katrien [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Thas, Olivier [Department of Applied Mathematics, Biometrics and Process Control, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), Research Institute of Growth and Development, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Van Meerbeeck, Jan [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Thierens, Hubert [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

Higgins, Kristin, E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); D'Amico, Thomas A. [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Local Failure in Resected N1 Lung Cancer: Implications for Adjuvant Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate actuarial rates of local failure in patients with pathologic N1 non-small-cell lung cancer and to identify clinical and pathologic factors associated with an increased risk of local failure after resection. Methods and Materials: All patients who underwent surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer with pathologically confirmed N1 disease at Duke University Medical Center from 1995-2008 were identified. Patients receiving any preoperative therapy or postoperative radiotherapy or with positive surgical margins were excluded. Local failure was defined as disease recurrence within the ipsilateral hilum, mediastinum, or bronchial stump/staple line. Actuarial rates of local failure were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox multivariate analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. Results: Among 1,559 patients who underwent surgery during the time interval, 198 met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 50 (25%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Actuarial (5-year) rates of local failure, distant failure, and overall survival were 40%, 55%, and 33%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of local failure included a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; p = 0.01), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04), and increasing number of positive N1 lymph nodes (HR, 1.3 per involved lymph node; p = 0.02). Chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward decreased risk of local failure that was not statistically significant (HR, 0.61; p = 0.2). Conclusions: Actuarial rates of local failure in pN1 disease are high. Further investigation of conformal postoperative radiotherapy may be warranted.

Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Berry, Mark [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Boyd, Jessamy [US Oncology, Dallas, TX (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Individualized Margins in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Physiological Movements and Their Dosimetric Impacts  

SciTech Connect

In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage.

Germain, Francois [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Laval University, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: fgermain@bccancer.bc.ca; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Laval University, Quebec (Canada)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Polymeric Nanoparticles Containing Taxanes Enhance Chemoradiotherapeutic Efficacy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To reduce the side effects and improve the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy, taxanes were incorporated into polymeric nanoparticles (PNP), and their synergic effect on radiation therapy in non-small cell lung cancer was evaluated. Methods and Materials: The properties of PNP-taxanes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The chemoradiotherapeutic efficacy of PNP-taxanes was determined by clonogenic assay, cellular morphology, and flow cytometry in A549 cells. In mice bearing A549-derived tumors, the tumor growth delay was examined after the treatment of PNP-taxanes and/or ionizing radiation (IR). Results: The PNP-taxanes were found to be approximately 45 nm in average diameter and to have high solubility in water. They showed the properties of active internalization into cells and preserved the anticancer effect of free taxanes. The survival fraction of A549 cells by clonogenic assay was significantly reduced in the group receiving combined treatment of PNP-taxanes and IR. In addition, in vivo radiotherapeutic efficacy was markedly enhanced by the intravenous injection of PNP-taxanes into the xenograft mice. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of PNP-taxanes to enhance the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy. These results suggest PNP-taxanes can hold an invaluable and promising position in treating human cancers as a novel and effective chemoradiation therapy agent.

Jung, Joohee [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women's University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung-Jin [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Bioimaging Probe Development, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (Singapore); Chung, Hye Kyung [Center for Development and Commercialization of Anti-cancer Therapeutics, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Development and Commercialization of Anti-cancer Therapeutics, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hye-Won; Lee, Sa-Won; Seo, Min Hyo [Department of Parenteral Delivery Program, Samyang Pharmaceuticals R and D, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Parenteral Delivery Program, Samyang Pharmaceuticals R and D, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heon Joo [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Inha University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Inha University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Si Yeol [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seong-Yun, E-mail: syj@amc.seoul.kr [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Kyung, E-mail: ekchoi@amc.seoul.kr [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women's University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Minichromosome Maintenance Protein 7 is a potential therapeutic target in human cancer and a novel prognostic marker of non-small cell lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sections from 331 NSCLC patients, who had undergone surgical resection. Immunohistochemistry using an MCM7-specific anti- body showed nuclear localization in cancer tissues, but nothing was detected in normal lung tissues (Figure 1B). Importantly, specific... ;#27; #20; C Normal tissues (n = 11) NSCLC (n = 6) SCLC (n = 3) ** NS* R el at iv e m R N A e xp re ss io n le ve ls o f M CM 7 A Normal lungMCM7 positive ?100 ?200 ?200 ?200 B D MCM7 positive (n = 196) MCM7 negative (n = 135) 0 20 40 60 80 100 0 500...

Toyokawa, Gouji; Masuda, Ken; Daigo, Yataro; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Yoshimatsu, Masanori; Takawa, Masashi; Hayami, Shinya; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Chino, Makoto; Field, Helen I; Neal, David E; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Ponder, Bruce A J; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

Comparison of Survival Rate in Primary Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Among Elderly Patients Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery, or Chemotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We retrospectively compared the survival rate in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), surgery, or chemotherapy according to lung cancer staging. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2004, 77 NSCLC patients, all of whom had WHO performance status 0-2 and were >60 years old, were enrolled in a cancer registry and retrospectively evaluated. RFA was performed on patients who had medical contraindications to surgery/unsuitability for surgery, such as advanced lung cancer or refusal of surgery. In the RFA group, 40 patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA under computed tomography (CT) guidance. These included 16 patients with stage I to II cancer and 24 patients with stage III to IV cancer who underwent RFA in an adjuvant setting. In the comparison group (n = 37), 13 patients with stage I to II cancer underwent surgery; 18 patients with stage III to IV cancer underwent chemotherapy; and 6 patients with stage III to IV cancer were not actively treated. The survival curves for RFA, surgery, and chemotherapy in these patients were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival times for patients treated with (1) surgery alone and (2) RFA alone for stage I to II lung cancer were 33.8 and 28.2 months, respectively (P = 0.426). Median survival times for patients treated with (1) chemotherapy alone and (2) RFA with chemotherapy for stage III to IV cancer were 29 and 42 months, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: RFA can be used as an alternative treatment to surgery for older NSCLC patients with stage I to II inoperable cancer and can play a role as adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy for patients with stage III to IV lung cancer.

Lee, Heon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gong Yong, E-mail: gyjin@chonbuk.ac.kr; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Keun Sang [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Preventive Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lynch, David [National Jewish Health, Interstitial and Autoimmune Lung Disease Program, Department of Radiology (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Primary Lung Cancer and Other Targets: Results of Consultant Meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and identify both advantages and disadvantages of its use in developing countries, a meeting composed of consultants of the International Atomic Energy Agency was held in Vienna in November 2006. Owing to continuous developments in the field, the meeting was extended by subsequent discussions and correspondence (2007-2010), which led to the summary presented here. The advantages and disadvantages of SBRT expected to be encountered in developing countries were identified. The definitions, typical treatment courses, and clinical results were presented. Thereafter, minimal methodology/technology requirements for SBRT were evaluated. Finally, characteristics of SBRT for developing countries were recommended. Patients for SBRT should be carefully selected, because single high-dose radiotherapy may cause serious complications in some serial organs at risk. Clinical experiences have been reported in some populations of lung cancer, lung oligometastases, liver cancer, pancreas cancer, and kidney cancer. Despite the disadvantages expected to be experienced in developing countries, SBRT using fewer fractions may be useful in selected patients with various extracranial cancers with favorable outcome and low toxicity.

Nagata, Yasushi, E-mail: nagat@hiroshima-u.ac.j [Hiroshima University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima (Japan); Wulf, Joern [Institut of Radiation Oncology, Lindenhospital, Bern (Switzerland); Lax, Ingmar [Division of Oncology and Hospital Physics, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital (Sweden); Timmerman, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (United States); Zimmermann, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, University Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Stojkovski, Igor; Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Dosimetric comparison of treatment plans based on free breathing, maximum, and average intensity projection CTs for lung cancer SBRT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether there is a CT dataset may be more favorable for planning and dose calculation by comparing dosimetric characteristics between treatment plans calculated using free breathing (FB), maximum and average intensity projection (MIP and AIP, respectively) CTs for lung cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Twenty lung cancer SBRT patients, treated on a linac with 2.5 mm width multileaf-collimator (MLC), were analyzed retrospectively. Both FB helical and four-dimensional CT scans were acquired for each patient. Internal target volume (ITV) was delineated based on MIP CTs and modified based on both ten-phase datasets and FB CTs. Planning target volume (PTV) was then determined by adding additional setup margin to ITV. The PTVs and beams in the optimized treatment plan based on FB CTs were copied to MIP and AIP CTs, with the same isocenters, MLC patterns and monitor units. Mean effective depth (MED) of beams, and some dosimetric parameters for both PTVs and most important organ at risk (OAR), lung minus PTV, were compared between any two datasets using two-tail paired t test. Results: The MEDs in FB and AIP plans were similar but significantly smaller (Ps < 0.001) than that in MIP plans. Minimum dose, mean dose, dose covering at least 90% and 95% of PTVs in MIP plans were slightly higher than two other plans (Ps < 0.008). The absolute volume of lung minus PTV receiving greater than 5, 10, and 20 Gy in MIP plans were significantly smaller than those in both FB and AIP plans (Ps < 0.008). Conformity index for FB plans showed a small but statistically significantly higher. Conclusions: Dosimetric characteristics of AIP plans are similar to those of FB plans. Slightly better target volume coverage and significantly lower low-dose region ({<=}30 Gy) in lung was observed in MIP plans. The decrease in low-dose region in lung was mainly caused by the change of lung volume contoured on two datasets rather than the differences of dose distribution between AIP and MIP plans. Compare with AIP datasets, FB datasets were more prone to significant image artifacts and MIP datasets may overestimate or underestimate the target volume when the target is closer to the denser tissue, so AIP seems favorable for planning and dose calculation for lung SBRT.

Tian Yuan; Wang Zhiheng; Ge Hong; Zhang Tian; Cai Jing; Kelsey, Christopher; Yoo, David; Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing 100021 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou, Henan 450008 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effect of Recombinant Human Endostatin on Radiosensitivity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To observe the effects of recombinant human endostatin (RHES) on the radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: First, 10 hypoxia-positive cases of pathology-diagnosed NSCLC selected from 15 patients were used to determine the normalization window, a period during which RHES improves NSCLC hypoxia. Second, 50 hypoxia-positive cases of pathology-diagnosed NSCLC (Stages I-III) were randomly divided into a RHES plus radiotherapy group (25 cases) and a radiotherapy-alone group (25 cases). Intensity = modulated radiotherapy with a total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions for 6 weeks was adopted in the two groups. The target area included primary foci and metastatic lymph nodes. In the RHES plus radiotherapy group, RHES (15 mg/day) was intravenously given during the normalization window. Results: After RHES administration, the tumor-to=normal tissue radioactivity ratio and capillary permeability surface were first decreased and then increased, with their lowest points on the fifth day compared with the first day (all p window is within about 1 week after administration. RHES combined with radiotherapy within the normalization window has better short-term therapeutic effects and local control rates and no severe adverse reactions in the treatment of NSCLC, but it failed to significantly improve the 1-year and 3-year overall survival rates.

Jiang Xiaodong; Dai Peng; Wu Jin; Song Daan [Department of Oncology, Lianyungang First People's Hospital, Lianyungang (China); Yu Jinming, E-mail: jxdysy@sohu.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Trends in the use of postoperative radiotherapy for resected non-small-cell lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A 1998 meta-analysis of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found that PORT did not improve outcomes. Yet practice guidelines differ in their recommendations with regard to PORT use. We examine temporal trends in PORT use before and after the 1998 meta-analysis. Methods and Materials: Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, we identified 22,953 patients with Stage I, II, or IIIA NSCLC who had resection between 1992 and 2002 in the United States and characterized each patient according to nodal status (N0, N1, or N2 disease). We measured use of PORT by calendar year. We examined the association between clinical and demographic characteristics and receipt of PORT using logistic regression. Results: For N0, N1, and N2 NSCLC, PORT use has declined. The proportion of patients with N0 disease receiving PORT declined from 8% in 1992 to 4% in 2002. For patients with N1 disease, PORT use declined from 51% in 1992 to 19% in 2002; and for patients with N2 disease, PORT use declined from 65% in 1992 to 37% in 2002. Conclusion: In the context of uncertainty about what constitutes optimal adjuvant treatment for resected NSCLC, PORT use has substantially declined.

Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)]. E-mail: bekelmaj@mskcc.org; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bach, Peter B. [Health Outcomes Research Group, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schrag, Deborah [Health Outcomes Research Group, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reproducibility of Tumor Motion Probability Distribution Function in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using cine megavoltage (MV) images. Methods and Materials: Cine MV images of 20 patients acquired during three-dimensional conformal (6-11 beams) SBRT treatments were retrospectively analyzed to extract tumor motion trajectories. For each patient, tumor motion PDFs were generated per fraction (PDF{sub n}) using three selected 'usable' beams. Patients without at least three usable beams were excluded from the study. Fractional PDF reproducibility (R{sub n}) was calculated as the Dice similarity coefficient between PDF{sub n} to a 'ground-truth' PDF (PDF{sub g}), which was generated using the selected beams of all fractions. The mean of R{sub n}, labeled as R{sub m}, was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient's mean tumor motion rang (A{sub m}). Change of R{sub m} during the course of SBRT treatments was also evaluated. Intra- and intersubject coefficient of variation (CV) of R{sub m} and A{sub m} were determined. Results: Thirteen patients had at least three usable beams and were analyzed. The mean of R{sub m} was 0.87 (range, 0.84-0.95). The mean of A{sub m} was 3.18 mm (range, 0.46-7.80 mm). R{sub m} was found to decrease as A{sub m} increases following an equation of R{sub m} = 0.17e{sup -0.9Am} + 0.84. R{sub m} also decreased slightly throughout the course of treatments. Intersubject CV of R{sub m} (0.05) was comparable to intrasubject CV of R{sub m} (range, 0.02-0.09); intersubject CV of A{sub m} (0.73) was significantly greater than intrasubject CV of A{sub m} (range, 0.09-0.24). Conclusions: Tumor motion PDF can be determined using cine MV images acquired during the treatments. The reproducibility of lung tumor motion PDF decreased exponentially as the tumor motion range increased and decreased slightly throughout the course of the treatments.

Zhang Fan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hu Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore); Kelsey, Chris R.; Yoo, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

Stenmark, Matthew H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shangdong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China); Ritter, Timothy [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Treatment of Cerebral Metastases From Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate clinical and physico-dosimetric variables affecting clinical outcome of patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2006, 373 patients (298 men and 75 women, median age 65 years) with brain metastases from NSCLC underwent GKRS. All of them had KPS {>=} 60%, eight or fewer brain metastases, confirmed histopathological diagnosis and recent work-up (<3 months). Thirty-five patients belonged to recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class I, 307 patients were in RPA Class II, 7 patients were in RPA Class III. Median tumor volume was 3.6 cm{sup 3}. Median marginal dose was 22.5 Gy at 50% isodose.; median 10 Gy and 12 Gy isodose volumes were 30.8 cm{sup 3} and 15.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Follow-up with MRI was performed every 3 months. Overall survival data were collected from internal database, telephone interviews, and identifying registries. Results: Mean follow-up after GKRS was 51 months (range, 6 to 96 months); mean overall survival was 14.2 months. Of 373 patients, 29 were alive at time of writing, 104 had died of cerebral progression, and 176 had died of systemic progression. In 64 cases it was not possible to ascertain the cause. Univariate and multivariate analysis were adjusted for the following: RPA class, surgery, WBRT, age, gender, number of lesions, median tumor volume, median peripheral dose, and 10 Gy and 12 Gy volumes. Identified RPA class and overall tumor volume >5 cc were the only two covariates independently predictive of overall survival in patients who died of cerebral progression. Conclusions: Global volume of brain disease should be the main parameter to consider for performing GKRS, which is a first-line therapy for patient in good general condition and controlled systemic disease.

Motta, Micaela, E-mail: motta.micaela@hsr.it [Radiotherapy Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Vecchio, Antonella del [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Attuati, Luca; Picozzi, Piero [Neurosurgery Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Perna, Lucia [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Franzin, Alberto [Neurosurgery Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Bolognesi, Angelo; Cozzarini, Cesare [Radiotherapy Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Mortini, Pietro [Neurosurgery Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Muzio, Nadia di [Radiotherapy Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Use of Palliative Radiotherapy Among Patients With Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is known to effectively palliate many symptoms of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anecdotally, RT is believed to be commonly used in this setting, but limited population-based data are available. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization patterns of palliative RT among elderly patients with Stage IV NSCLC and, in particular, to identify factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify 11,084 Medicare beneficiaries aged {>=}65 years who presented with Stage IV NSCLC in the 11 SEER regions between 1991 and 1996. The primary outcome was receipt of RT. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with receipt of RT. Results: A total of 58% of these patients received RT, with its use decreasing over time (p = 0.01). Increasing age was negatively associated with receipt of treatment (p <0.001), as was increasing comorbidities (p <0.001). Factors positively associated with the receipt of RT included income (p = 0.001), hospitalization (p <0.001), and treatment with chemotherapy (p <0.001). Although the use varied across the SEER regions (p = 0.001), gender, race/ethnicity, and distance to the nearest RT facility were not associated with treatment. Conclusions: Elderly patients with metastatic NSCLC frequently receive palliative RT, but its use varies, especially with age and receipt of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to determine whether this variability reflects good quality care.

Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)], E-mail: hayman@umich.edu; Abrahamse, Paul H.; Lakhani, Indu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Earle, Craig C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

Koshy, Matthew, E-mail: mkoshy@umm.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine and University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine and University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part III: Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, 1950-1987  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of data on the incidence of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors during the period from late 1950 through the end of 1987 (93,696 survivors accounting for 2,778,000 person-years). These analyses add 9 additional years of follow-up for leukemia and 12 for myeloma to that in the last comprehensive reports on these diseases. This is the first analysis of the lymphoma incidence data in the cohort. Using both the Leukemia Registry and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, a total of 290 leukemia, 229 lymphoma and 73 myeloma cases were identified. The primary analyses were restricted to first primary tumors diagnosed among residents of the cities or surrounding areas with Dosimetry Systems 1986 dose estimates between 0 and 4 Gy kerma (231 leukemias, 208 lymphomas and 62 myelomas). Analyses focused on time-dependent models for the excess absolute risk. Separate analyses were carried out for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and adult T-cell leukemia in this population. There was strong evidence of radiation-induced risks for all subtypes except ATL, and there were significant subtype differences with respect to the effects of age at exposure and sex and in the temporal pattern of risk. The AML dose-response function was nonlinear, whereas there was no evidence against linearity for the other subtypes. When averaged over the follow-up period, the excess absolute risk (EAR) estimates (in cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) for the leukemia subtypes were 0.6, 1.1 and 0.9 for ALL, AML and CML, respectively. The corresponding estimated average excess relative risks at 1 Sv are 9.1, 3.3 and 6.2, respectively. There was some evidence of an increased risk of lymphoma in males (EAR = 0.6 cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) but no evidence of any excess in females. 64 refs., 14 figs., 19 tabs.

Preston, D.L.; Izumi, Shizue; Kusumi, Shizuyo (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Tomonaga, Masao (A-bomb Institute of Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)); Ron, E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Dohy, Hiroo (Hiroshima A-bomb Hospital (Japan)); Matsui, Tatsuki (Nagasaki City Hospital (Japan)); Nonaka, Hiroaki (George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Respiration-Correlated Image Guidance Is the Most Important Radiotherapy Motion Management Strategy for Most Lung Cancer Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population. Materials and Methods: Images were acquired from 46 lung cancer patients participating in four separate protocols at three institutions in Europe and the United States. Seven patients were imaged using fluoroscopy, and 39 patients were imaged using 4DCT. The magnitude of respiratory tumor motion was measured. The required treatment field margins were calculated using a statistical recipe (van Herk M, et al. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000;474:1121-1135), with magnitudes of all uncertainties, except respiratory peak-to-peak displacement, the same for all patients, taken from literature. Required margins for respiratory motion management were calculated using the residual respiratory tumor motion for each patient for various motion management strategies. Margin reductions for respiration management were calculated using 4DCT, 4D-IG, and gated beam delivery. Results: The median tumor motion magnitude was 4.4 mm for the 46 patients (range 0-29.3 mm). This value corresponded to required treatment field margins of 13.7 to 36.3 mm (median 14.4 mm). The use of 4DCT, 4D-IG, and beam gating required margins that were reduced by 0 to 13.9 mm (median 0.5 mm), 3 to 5.2 mm (median 5.1 mm), and 0 to 7 mm (median 0.2 mm), respectively, to a total of 8.5 to 12.4 mm (median 8.6 mm). Conclusion: A respiratory management strategy for lung cancer radiotherapy including planning on 4DCT scans and daily image guidance provides a potential reduction of 37% to 47% in treatment field margins. The 4D image guidance strategy was the most effective strategy for >85% of the patients.

Korreman, Stine, E-mail: korreman@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (United States); Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brink, Carsten [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Juhler-Nottrup, Trine [Department of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters  

SciTech Connect

Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Preclinical and Pilot Clinical Studies of Docetaxel Chemoradiation for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Local and distant failure rates remain high despite aggressive chemoradiation (CRT) treatment for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. We conducted preclinical studies of docetaxel's cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects on lung cancer cell lines and designed a pilot study to target distant micrometastasis upfront with one-cycle induction chemotherapy, followed by low-dose radiosensitizing docetaxel CRT. Methods and Materials: A preclinical study was conducted in human lung cancer cell lines NCI 520 and A549. Cells were treated with two concentrations of docetaxel for 3 h and then irradiated immediately or after a 24-h delay. A clonogenic survival assay was conducted and analyzed for cytotoxic effects vs. radiosensitizing effects of docetaxel. A pilot clinical study was designed based on preclinical study findings. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a median follow-up of 4 years. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 75 mg/m{sup 2} of docetaxel and 75 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin on Day 1 and 150 mg/m{sup 2} of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on Days 2 through 10. Concurrent CRT was started 3 to 6 weeks later with twice-weekly docetaxel at 10 to 12 mg/m{sup 2} and daily delayed radiation in 1.8-Gy fractions to 64.5 Gy for gross disease. Results: The preclinical study showed potent cytotoxic effects of docetaxel and subadditive radiosensitizing effects. Delaying radiation resulted in more cancer cell death. The pilot clinical study resulted in a median survival of 32.6 months for the entire cohort, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 50% and 19%, respectively, and a distant metastasis-free survival rate of 61% for both 3 and 5 years. A pattern-of-failure analysis showed 75% chest failures and 36% all-distant failures. Therapy was well tolerated with Grade 3 esophagitis observed in 23% of patients. Conclusions: One-cycle full-dose docetaxel/cisplatin induction chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor followed by pulsed low-dose docetaxel CRT is promising with regard to its antitumor activity, low rates of distant failure, and low toxicity, suggesting that this regimen deserves further investigation.

Chen Yuhchyau, E-mail: yuhchyau_chen@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Pandya, Kishan J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Hyrien, Ollivier [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Keng, Peter C.; Smudzin, Therese; Anderson, Joy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Qazi, Raman; Smith, Brian [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Watson, Thomas J. [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Feins, Richard H. [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Johnstone, David W. [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (Lebanon)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Approaches to the Spatial Modelling of Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Metropolitan Perth, Western Australia, 1990 -2005.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cancer is one of potentially preventable and treatable diseases. Cancer analysis from different perspectives is necessary to provide the information for health research and the (more)

Shao, Changying

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The role of ?-catenin in activated EGFR-driven lung tumourigenesis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lung cancer is associated with a high mortality rate, with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) accounting for the majority of cases. Mutations in the epidermal (more)

Sng, Joo Li Natasha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

Taremi, Mojgan, E-mail: mojgan.taremi@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dahele, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stronach Regional Cancer Center, Newmarket, ON (Canada); Pearson, Shannon [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, Sharon [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Purdie, Thomas [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brade, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45-72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3-10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100-141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: honishi@yamanashi.ac.jp [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [School of Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fujino, Masaharu [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Gomi, Kotaro [Cancer Institute Suwa Red-Cross Hospital, Suwa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru [Kitasato University, Kanagawa (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [School of Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki [School of Medicine, Kagawa University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeda, Atsuya [Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Ouchi, Atsushi [Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [School of Cancer Institute Ariake Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Arimoto, Takuro [Kitami Red Cross Hospital, Kitami (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Jun [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received {>=}60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998-2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient's preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0-4 (T1), 5-8 (T2), and 9-12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy, may decrease the pulmonary impairment through greater lung sparing.

Lopez Guerra, Jose L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Department of Medicine, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Effect of a Contrast Agent on Proton Beam Range in Radiotherapy Planning Using Computed Tomography for Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We evaluated the effect of a contrast agent (CA) on proton beam range in a treatment planning system (TPS) for patients with locoregionally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two sets of computed tomography (CT) images (with and without CA) were obtained from 20 patients with lung cancer. Because the increase in Hounsfield unit ( Increment HU) value of the heart and great vessels due to the effect of CA is most prominent among thoracic structures, to evaluate the effect of CA on proton beam range in the TPS, we compared the calculated distal ranges in the plan with CA-enhanced CT with those with corrected CT, in which the HU values of the heart and great vessels in the CA-enhanced CT were replaced by average HU values obtained from the unenhanced CT. Results: The mean Increment HU value and the longest length of the heart and great vessels within the proton beam path in the field that passed through these structures were 189 {+-} 29 HU (range, 110-250 HU) and 7.1 {+-} 1.1 cm (range, 2.6-11.2 cm), respectively. The mean distal range error in the TPS because of the presence of CA was 1.0 {+-} 0.7 cm (range, 0.2-2.6 cm). Conclusion: If CA-enhanced CT images are used for radiotherapy planning using a proton beam for the treatment of lung cancer, our results suggest that the HU values of the heart and great vessels should be replaced by the average HU values of soft tissue to avoid discrepancies between planned and delivered doses.

Hwang, Ui-Jung; Shin, Dong Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun, E-mail: k2onco@naver.com [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports  

SciTech Connect

Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

Persinger, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Inhibiting the Aurora B Kinase Potently Suppresses Repopulation During Fractionated Irradiation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of molecular-targeted agents during radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising strategy to inhibit repopulation, thereby improving therapeutic outcome. We assessed the combined effectiveness of inhibiting Aurora B kinase and irradiation on human NSCLC cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: NSCLC cell lines were exposed to concentrations of AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (AZD1152-HQPA) inhibiting colony formation by 50% (IC50{sub clone}) in combination with single dose irradiation or different fractionation schedules using multiple 2-Gy fractions per day up to total doses of 4-40 Gy. The total irradiation dose required to control growth of 50% of the plaque monolayers (TCD50) was determined. Apoptosis, G2/M progression, and polyploidization were also analyzed. Results: TCD50 values after single dose irradiation were similar for the H460 and H661 cell lines with 11.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 10.7 {+-} 0.3 Gy, respectively. Fractionated irradiation using 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, and 1 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day schedules significantly increased TCD50 values for both cell lines grown as plaque monolayers with increasing radiation treatment time. This could be explained by a repopulation effect per day that counteracts 75 {+-} 8% and 27 {+-} 6% of the effect of a 2-Gy fraction in H460 and H661 cells, respectively. AZD1152-HQPA treatment concomitant to radiotherapy significantly decreased the daily repopulation effect (H460: 28 {+-} 5%, H661: 10 {+-} 4% of a 2-Gy fraction per day). Treatment with IC50{sub clone} AZD1152-HPQA did not induce apoptosis, prolong radiation-induced G2 arrest, or delay cell cycle progression before the spindle check point. However, polyploidization was detected, especially in cell lines without functional p53. Conclusions: Inhibition of Aurora B kinase with low AZD1152-HQPA concentrations during irradiation of NSCLC cell lines affects repopulation during radiotherapy. Thus, concomitant Aurora B kinase inhibition and irradiation may be a promising strategy for fast repopulating tumors, which are difficult to cure by dose escalation based on conventional fractionation.

Sak, Ali, E-mail: ali.sak@uni-due.de [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Stuschke, Martin; Groneberg, Michael; Kuebler, Dennis; Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E. [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Positron Emission Tomography for Assessing Local Failure After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We analyzed whether positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography standardized uptake values (SUVs) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could predict local recurrence (LR) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This study comprised 128 patients with Stage I (n = 68) or isolated recurrent/secondary parenchymal (n = 60) NSCLC treated with image-guided SBRT to 50 Gy over 4 consecutive days; prior radiotherapy was allowed. PET/computed tomography scans were obtained before therapy and at 1 to 6 months after therapy, as well as subsequently as clinically indicated. Continuous variables were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and categorical variables with Pearson chi-square or Fisher exact tests. Actuarial local failure rates were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 6-71 months), the actuarial 1-, 2-, and 3-year local control rates were 100%, 98.5%, and 98.5%, respectively, in the Stage I group and 95.8%, 87.6%, and 85.8%, respectively, in the recurrent group. The cumulative rates of regional nodal recurrence and distant metastasis were 8.8% (6 of 68) and 14.7% (10 of 68), respectively, for the Stage I group and 11.7% (7 of 60) and 16.7% (10 of 60), respectively, for the recurrent group. Univariate analysis showed that SUVs obtained 12.1 to 24 months after treatment for the Stage I group (p = 0.007) and 6.1 to 12 months and 12.1 to 24 months after treatment for the recurrent group were associated with LR (p < 0.001 for both). Of the 128 patients, 17 (13.3%) had ipsilateral consolidation after SBRT but no elevated metabolic activity on PET; none had LR. The cutoff maximum SUV of 5 was found to have 100% sensitivity, 91% specificity, a 50% positive predictive value, and a 100% negative predictive value for predicting LR. Conclusions: PET was helpful for distinguishing SBRT-induced consolidation from LR. SUVs obtained more than 6 months after SBRT for NSCLC were associated with local failure. A maximum SUV greater than 5, especially at more than 6 months after SBRT, should prompt biopsy to rule out LR.

Zhang Xu; Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chuang, Hubert H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Impact of computed tomography and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose coincidence detection emission tomography image fusion for optimization of conformal radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report a retrospective study concerning the impact of fused {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 patients consecutively treated for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer were studied. Each patient underwent CT and FDG-hybrid PET for simulation treatment in the same treatment position. Images were coregistered using five fiducial markers. Target volume delineation was initially performed on the CT images, and the corresponding FDG-PET data were subsequently used as an overlay to the CT data to define the target volume. Results: {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose-PET identified previously undetected distant metastatic disease in 8 patients, making them ineligible for curative conformal radiotherapy (1 patient presented with some positive uptake corresponding to concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis). Another patient was ineligible for curative treatment because the fused PET-CT images demonstrated excessively extensive intrathoracic disease. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was decreased by CT-PET image fusion in 21 patients (23%) and was increased in 24 patients (26%). The GTV reduction was {>=}25% in 7 patients because CT-PET image fusion reduced the pulmonary GTV in 6 patients (3 patients with atelectasis) and the mediastinal nodal GTV in 1 patient. The GTV increase was {>=}25% in 14 patients owing to an increase in the pulmonary GTV in 11 patients (4 patients with atelectasis) and detection of occult mediastinal lymph node involvement in 3 patients. Of 81 patients receiving a total dose of {>=}60 Gy at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point, after CT-PET image fusion, the percentage of total lung volume receiving >20 Gy increased in 15 cases and decreased in 22. The percentage of total heart volume receiving >36 Gy increased in 8 patients and decreased in 14. The spinal cord volume receiving at least 45 Gy (2 patients) decreased. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor with atelectasis was the single independent factor that resulted in a significant effect on the modification of the size of the GTV by FDG-PET: tumor with atelectasis (with vs. without atelectasis, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: The results of our study have confirmed that integrated hybrid PET/CT in the treatment position and coregistered images have an impact on treatment planning and management of non-small-cell lung cancer. However, FDG images using dedicated PET scanners and respiration-gated acquisition protocols could improve the PET-CT image coregistration. Furthermore, the impact on treatment outcome remains to be demonstrated.

Deniaud-Alexandre, Elisabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Touboul, Emmanuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France)]. E-mail: emmanuel.touboul@tnn.aphp.fr; Lerouge, Delphine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Grahek, Dany [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Foulquier, Jean-Noel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Petegnief, Yolande [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Gres, Benoit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); El Balaa, Hanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Keraudy, Katia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Kerrou, Kaldoun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Montravers, Francoise [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Milleron, Bernard [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Lebeau, Bernard [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Saint-Antoine Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France) and Cancerest, Paris VI University, Paris (France); Talbot, Jean-Noel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality similar to auto-IMRT plans if best effort was spent.

Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Association of P53 and ATM Polymorphisms With Risk of Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP) is the most common dose-limiting complication in lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that P53 and the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM)-dependent signaling response cascade play a crucial role in radiation-induced diseases. Consistent with this, our previous study showed that a functional genetic ATM polymorphism was associated with increased RP risk. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the role of genetic P53 polymorphism in RP, we analyzed the P53 Arg72Pro polymorphism in a cohort including 253 lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Results: We found that the P53 72Arg/Arg genotype was associated with increased RP risk compared with the 72Pro/Pro genotype. Furthermore, the P53 Arg72Pro and ATM -111G>A polymorphisms display an additive combination effect in intensifying the risk of developing RP. The cross-validation test showed that 63.2% of RP cases can be identified by P53 and ATM genotypes. Conclusions: These results indicate that genetic polymorphisms in the ATM-P53 pathway influence susceptibility to RP and genotyping P53 and ATM polymorphisms might help to identify patients susceptible to developing RP when receiving radiotherapy.

Yang Ming [Departments of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhang Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Bi Nan; Ji Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan Wen [Departments of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhao Lujun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yu Dianke; Wu Chen [Departments of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Wang Luhua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Proton Beam-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Dosimetric Comparison With Photon Plans Highlights Importance of Range Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Proton beam radiotherapy has been proposed for use in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. In the present study, we sought to analyze how the range uncertainties for protons might affect its therapeutic utility for SBRT. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer received SBRT with two to three proton beams. The patients underwent repeat planning for photon SBRT, and the dose distributions to the normal and tumor tissues were compared with the proton plans. The dosimetric comparisons were performed within an operational definition of high- and low-dose regions representing volumes receiving >50% and <50% of the prescription dose, respectively. Results: In high-dose regions, the average volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescription dose was larger for proton than for photon SBRT (i.e., 46.5 cm{sup 3} vs. 33.5 cm{sup 3}; p = .009, respectively). The corresponding conformity indexes were 2.46 and 1.56. For tumors in close proximity to the chest wall, the chest wall volume receiving {>=}30 Gy was 7 cm{sup 3} larger for protons than for photons (p = .06). In low-dose regions, the lung volume receiving {>=}5 Gy and maximum esophagus dose were smaller for protons than for photons (p = .019 and p < .001, respectively). Conclusions: Protons generate larger high-dose regions than photons because of range uncertainties. This can result in nearby healthy organs (e.g., chest wall) receiving close to the prescription dose, at least when two to three beams are used, such as in our study. Therefore, future research should explore the benefit of using more than three beams to reduce the dose to nearby organs. Additionally, clinical subgroups should be identified that will benefit from proton SBRT.

Seco, Joao, E-mail: jseco@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Panahandeh, Hamid Reza [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Westover, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; Willers, Henning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Isotoxic Dose Escalation in the Treatment of Lung Cancer by Means of Heterogeneous Dose Distributions in the Presence of Respiratory Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To test, in the presence of intrafractional respiration movement, a margin recipe valid for a homogeneous and conformal dose distribution and to test whether the use of smaller margins combined with heterogeneous dose distributions allows an isotoxic dose escalation when respiratory motion is considered. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography scanning. The gross tumor volume and clinical target volume (CTV) were outlined in the mid-ventilation phase. The CTV-to-planning target volume (PTV) margin was calculated by use of a standard margin recipe and the patient-specific respiration pattern. Standard three-dimensional treatment plans were generated and recalculated on the remaining respiration phases. The planning was repeated for a CTV-to-PTV margin decreased by 2.5 and 5 mm relative to the initial margin in all directions. Time-averaged dose-volume histograms (four-dimensional dose-volume histograms) were calculated to evaluate the CTV-to-PTV margin. Finally, the dose was escalated in the plans with decreased PTV such that the mean lung dose (predictor of radiation-induced pneumonitis) was equal to mean lung dose in the plan by use of the initially calculated margin. Results: A reduction of the standard margin by 2.5 mm compared with the recipe resulted in too low of a minimum dose for some patients. A combination of dose escalation and use of heterogeneous dose distribution was able to increase the minimum dose to the target by approximately 10% and 20% for a CTV-to-PTV margin reduction of 2.5 mm and 5.0 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The margin recipe is valid for intrafractional respiration-induced tumor motions. It is possible to increase the dose to the target without increased mean lung dose with an inhomogeneous dose distribution.

Baker, Mariwan; Nielsen, Morten [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Hansen, Olfred [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Jahn, Jonas Westberg [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Korreman, Stine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brink, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.brink@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Surgery for Medically Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Markov Model-Based Decision Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy and overall survival in patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with either stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or surgery. Methods and Materials: We constructed a Markov model to describe health states after either SBRT or lobectomy for Stage I NSCLC for a 5-year time frame. We report various treatment strategy survival outcomes stratified by age, sex, and pack-year history of smoking, and compared these with an external outcome prediction tool (Adjuvant{exclamation_point} Online). Results: Overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and other causes of death as predicted by our model correlated closely with those predicted by the external prediction tool. Overall survival at 5 years as predicted by baseline analysis of our model is in favor of surgery, with a benefit ranging from 2.2% to 3.0% for all cohorts. Mean quality-adjusted life expectancy ranged from 3.28 to 3.78 years after surgery and from 3.35 to 3.87 years for SBRT. The utility threshold for preferring SBRT over surgery was 0.90. Outcomes were sensitive to quality of life, the proportion of local and regional recurrences treated with standard vs. palliative treatments, and the surgery- and SBRT-related mortalities. Conclusions: The role of SBRT in the medically operable patient is yet to be defined. Our model indicates that SBRT may offer comparable overall survival and quality-adjusted life expectancy as compared with surgical resection. Well-powered prospective studies comparing surgery vs. SBRT in early-stage lung cancer are warranted to further investigate the relative survival, quality of life, and cost characteristics of both treatment paradigms.

Louie, Alexander V. [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Hannouf, Malek [Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Zaric, Gregory S. [Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Palma, David A. [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Cao, Jeffrey Q. [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Yaremko, Brian P. [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Malthaner, Richard [Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Division of Surgery, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Mocanu, Joseph D. [Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Changes in Global Function and Regional Ventilation and Perfusion on SPECT During the Course of Radiotherapy in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study aimed to (1) examine changes in dyspnea, global pulmonary function test (PFT) results, and functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scans during the course of radiation (RT), and (2) factors associated with the changes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-six stage I to III NSCLC patients treated with definitive RT with or without chemotherapy were enrolled prospectively. Dyspnea was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 prior to and weekly during RT. V/Q SPECT-computed tomography (CT) and PFTs were performed prior to and during RT at approximately 45 Gy. Functions of V and Q activities were assessed using a semiquantitative scoring of SPECT images. Results: Breathing improved significantly at the third week (mean dyspnea grade, 0.8 vs. 0.6; paired t-test p = 0.011) and worsened during the later course of RT (p > 0.05). Global PFT results did not change significantly, while regional lung function on V/Q SPECT improved significantly after {approx}45 Gy. The V defect score (DS) was 4.9 pre-RT versus 4.3 during RT (p = 0.01); Q DS was 4.3 pre-RT versus 4.0 during RT (p < 0.01). Improvements in V and Q functions were seen primarily in the ipsilateral lung (V DS, 1.9 pre-RT versus 1.4 during RT, p < 0.01; Q DS, 1.7 pre-RT versus 1.5 during RT, p < 0.01). Baseline primary tumor volume was significantly correlated with pre-RT V/Q DS (p < 0.01). Patients with central lung tumors had greater interval changes in V and Q than those with more peripheral tumors (p <0.05 for both V and Q DS). Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion improved during RT at 45 Gy. This suggests that adaptive planning based on V/Q SPECT during RT may allow sparing of functionally recoverable lung tissue.

Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Shaexamndong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Frey, Kirk A.; Gross, Milton D. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Arenberg, Doug [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ramnath, Nithya; Hassan, Khaled [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Veterans' Affairs Health Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Gefitinib in Combination With Irradiation With or Without Cisplatin in Patients With Inoperable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase I Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish the feasibility and tolerability of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) with radiation (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter Phase I study, 5 patients with unresectable NSCLC received 250 mg gefitinib daily starting 1 week before RT at a dose of 63 Gy (Step 1). After a first safety analysis, 9 patients were treated daily with 250 mg gefitinib plus CRT in the form of RT and weekly CDDP 35 mg/m{sup 2} (Step 2). Gefitinib was maintained for up to 2 years until disease progression or toxicity. Results: Fourteen patients were assessed in the two steps. In Step 1 (five patients were administered only gefitinib and RT), no lung toxicities were seen, and there was no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue reactions, limited to Grade 1-2. In Step 2, two of nine patients (22.2%) had DLT. One patient suffered from dyspnea and dehydration associated with neutropenic pneumonia, and another showed elevated liver enzymes. In both steps combined, 5 of 14 patients (35.7%) experienced one or more treatment interruptions. Conclusions: Gefitinib (250 mg daily) in combination with RT and CDDP in patients with Stage III NSCLC is feasible, but CDDP likely enhances toxicity. The impact of gefitinib on survival and disease control as a first-line treatment in combination with RT remains to be determined.

Rothschild, Sacha [Radiation Oncology, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bucher, Stephan E. [BioConsult GmbH, Statistical and Language Services, Rickenbach (Switzerland); Bernier, Jacques [Radio-Oncologie, Clinique de Genolier, Genolier (Switzerland); Aebersold, Daniel M. [Radiation Oncology, Inselspital and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Zouhair, Aberrahim [Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ries, Gerhard [Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Lombrieser, Norbert [Klinik fuer Radiotherapie, Stadtspital Triemli, Zuerich (Switzerland); Lippuner, Thomas [Radiology, Kantonsspital, 8400 Winterthur (Switzerland); Luetolf, Urs M.; Glanzmann, Christoph [Radiation Oncology, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Ciernik, I. Frank, E-mail: ilja.ciernik@usz.c [Center for Clinical Research, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Chiba, Yasutaka [Department of Environmental Medicine and Behavioural Science, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Fukuda, Haruyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Negoro, Shunichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Kudoh, Shinzoh [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuoka, Masahiro [Department of Medical Oncology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoichi [Research Institute for Disease of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Chronic cisplatin treatment promotes enhanced damage repair and tumor progression in a mouse model of lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment, yet the mechanisms of response to specific therapies have been largely unexplored in vivo. Employing genetic, genomic, and imaging approaches, we examined ...

Oliver, Trudy Gale

80

Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39-86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4-58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4-58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy. In these patients, elective nodal irradiation can be safely omitted from the planning target volume for the purposes of dose escalation and toxicity reduction.

Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wang Ya, E-mail: ywang94@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor of LRC, MFS, and OS.

Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Setter, Cornelia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Dahl, Olav [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Noack, Frank [Institute of Pathology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Prognostic Impact of Radiation Therapy to the Primary Tumor in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Oligometastasis at Diagnosis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated prognostic factors associated with survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and oligometastatic disease at diagnosis, particularly the influence of local treatment to the primary site on prognosis. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 through June 2011, 78 consecutive patients with oligometastatic NSCLC (<5 metastases) at diagnosis underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy ({>=}45 Gy) to the primary site. Forty-four of these patients also received definitive local treatment for the oligometastases. Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed better overall survival (OS) for those patients who received at least 63 Gy of radiation to the primary site (P=.002), received definitive local treatment for oligometastasis (P=.041), had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score >80 (P=.007), had a gross tumor volume {<=}124 cm{sup 3} (P=.002), had adenocarcinoma histology (P=.002), or had no history of respiratory disease (P=.016). On multivariate analysis, radiation dose, performance status, and tumor volume retained significance (P=.004, P=.006, and P<.001, respectively). The radiation dose also maintained significance when patients with and without brain metastases were analyzed separately. Conclusions: Tumor volume, KPS, and receipt of at least 63 Gy to the primary tumor are associated with improved OS in patients with oligometastatic NSCLC at diagnosis. Our results suggest that a subset of such patients may benefit from definitive local therapy.

Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Madrileno de Oncologia/Grupo IMO, Madrid (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Hong, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Heymach, John V. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

CANCER OF THE UPPER ALIMENTARY TRACT AND LARYNX IN POLAND AND IN POLISH-BORN AMERICANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Mortality for cancers of the buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus and larynx in Poland in 1959-72 was analysed and compared with cancer incidence regis-tered in the selected regions of Poland, with cancer mortality and incidence in other countries, and with mortality among Polish-born migrants to the U.S.A. The patterns of occurrence of these cancers in Poland appear to be similar to those of other European and American countries, except perhaps for the rather high and still increasing incidence of laryngeal cancer. Among male Polish migrants, however, mortality for these cancers was distinctly higher than either in Poland or among native Americans. This contrast, largest for oesophageal and laryngeal cancer, decreased between 1950 and 1959-61, but only for those aged below 65. Similarity of these shifts with those observed for lung cancer is stressed and explanations are looked for. Factors associated with the studied cancers and outlines for the further studies are discussed briefly. CANCERS of the upper alimentary tract and the larynx have been discussed

J. Staszew-ski

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dose Coverage Beyond the Gross Tumor Volume for Various Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Planning Techniques Reporting Similar Control Rates for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the dose falloff region for various stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) planning techniques used in the treatment of Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer reporting similar control rates. Methods and Materials: The SBRT plans were constructed on five patient data sets using seven different planning regimens. These regimens varied in the number of beams, number of fractions, prescription target, and prescribed dose used. For each case all regimens were planned using a common gross tumor volume (GTV). To compare dose falloff for the various regimens, resulting physical dose grids were converted into normalized total dose (NTD) grids. Furthermore, to determine the potential coverage of microscopic extension of the various regimens minimal peripheral NTD (NTD-MP{sub 100}) were calculated and plotted as a function of incremental volume expansions of the GTV. Results: Average values for NTD-MP{sub 100} varied over a range of 174 Gy at the GTV periphery, but this range fell to 10 Gy at a distance of 14 mm from the GTV. Of 35 plans, 23 resulted in potential microscopic extension coverage of 78% to 95%. Averages for five of seven regimens fell within the range of 80% to 85%. Results were negligibly affected when intrafraction motion effects were accounted for. Conclusions: Although average NTD-MP{sub 100} varied dramatically at the GTV, periphery values became similar at a distance of 14 mm from the GTV. With the exception of two, potential coverage of microscopic extension was similar for all planning techniques, with averages falling within a 5% range.

Arvidson, Noah B. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: tome@humonc.wisc.edu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Comparison of Tumor Volumes as Determined by Pathologic Examination and FDG-PET/CT Images of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the cut-off standardized uptake value (SUV) on {sup 18}F fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) images that generates the best volumetric match to pathologic gross tumor volume (GTV{sub path}) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with NSCLC who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans followed by lobectomy were enrolled. The surgical specimen was dissected into 5-7-mum sections at approximately 4-mm intervals and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The tumor-containing area was outlined slice by slice and the GTV{sub path} determined by summing over all the slices, taking into account the interslice thickness and fixation-induced volume reduction. The gross tumor volume from the PET images, GTV{sub PET}, was determined as a function of cut-off SUV. The optimal threshold or optimal absolute SUV was defined as the value at which the GTV{sub PET} was the same as the GTV{sub path}. Results: The fixation process induced a volumetric reduction to 82% +- 10% (range, 62-100%) of the original. The maximal SUV was 10.1 +- 3.6 (range, 4.2-18.7). The optimal threshold and absolute SUV were 31% +- 11% and 3.0 +- 1.6, respectively. The optimal threshold was inversely correlated with GTV{sub path} and tumor diameter (p 0.05). Conclusion: This study evaluated the use of GTV{sub path} as a criterion for determining the optimal cut-off SUV for NSCLC target volume delineation. Confirmatory studies including more cases are being performed.

Yu Jinming, E-mail: jn7984729@public.jn.sd.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Li Xinke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Xing Ligang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mu Dianbin [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Fu Zheng [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xiaorong [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xiangyu [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Yang Guoren [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Zhang Baijiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xindong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Ling, C. Clifton [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Andrographolide down-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells  

SciTech Connect

Andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess multiple pharmacological activities. In our previous study, Andro had been shown to inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cell migration and invasion via down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Here we demonstrated that Andro inhibited the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in A549 cells. HIF-1{alpha} plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of NSCLC. The Andro-induced decrease of cellular protein level of HIF-1{alpha} was correlated with a rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation of HIF-1{alpha}, and was accompanied by increased expressions of hydroxyl-HIF-1{alpha} and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD2), and a later decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon the treatment of Andro. The Andro-inhibited VEGF expression appeared to be a consequence of HIF-1{alpha} inactivation, because its DNA binding activity was suppressed by Andro. Molecular data showed that all these effects of Andro might be mediated via TGF{beta}1/PHD2/HIF-1{alpha} pathway, as demonstrated by the transfection of TGF{beta}1 overexpression vector and PHD2 siRNA, and the usage of a pharmacological MG132 inhibitor. Furthermore, we elucidated the involvement of Andro in HIF-1{alpha} transduced VEGF expression in A549 cells and other NSCLC cell lines. In conclusion, these results highlighted the potential effects of Andro, which may be developed as a chemotherapeutic or an anti-angiogenesis agent for NSCLC in the future.

Lin, Hui-Hsuan [School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chia-Wen [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chou, Fen-Pi [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chau-Jong [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsuan, Shu-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine and Life Science, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, No.89, Wen Hwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 717, Taiwan (China); Wang, Cheng-Kun [E-Chyun Dermatology Clinic, No.70, Sec. 3, Jhonghua E. Rd., East District, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jing-Hsien, E-mail: mk0828@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine and Life Science, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, No.89, Wen Hwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 717, Taiwan (China)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

HSPB1 Gene Polymorphisms Predict Risk of Mortality for US Patients After Radio(chemo)therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated potential associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) gene and overall survival in US patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using available genomic DNA samples from 224 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy, we genotyped 2 SNPs of HSPB1 (NCBI SNP nos. rs2868370 and rs2868371). We used both Kaplan-Meier cumulative probability and Cox proportional hazards analyses to evaluate the effect of HSPB1 genotypes on survival. Results: Our cohort consisted of 117 men and 107 women, mostly white (79.5%), with a median age of 70 years. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy (range, 63-87.5 Gy), and 183 patients (82%) received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The most common genotype of the rs2868371 SNP was CC (61%). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that this genotype was associated with poorer survival than CG and GG genotypes (univariate hazard ratio [HR] = 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.90; P=.037; multivariate HR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.01-1.92; P=.045). Conclusions: Our results showed that the CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with poorer overall survival in patients with NSCLC after radio(chemo)therapy, findings that contradict those of a previous study of Chinese patients. Validation of our findings with larger numbers of similar patients is needed, as are mechanical and clinical studies to determine the mechanism underlying these associations.

Xu Ting [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China) [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Madrileno de Oncologia/Grupo IMO, Madrid (Spain); Wang Lie; Liu Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel; O'Reilly, Michael; Lin, Steven Hsesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang Yan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou Honghao [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China)] [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Liao Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

IL-27 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenic factor production in a STAT1-dominant pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013, 32:97 http://Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013 32:97. SubmitExperimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013, 32:97 http://

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

Mehta, Minesh P. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: mehta@mail.humonc.wisc.edu; Shapiro, William R. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Phan, See C. [Clinical Development, Pharmacyclics, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Gervais, Radj [Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Carrie, Christian [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France); Chabot, Pierre [Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QB (Canada); Patchell, Roy A. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Glantz, Michael J. [University of Massachusetts, Hinsdale, MA (United States); Recht, Lawrence [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Langer, Corey [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sur, Ranjan K. [Juravinski Cancer Centre at Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Roa, Wilson H. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Mahe, Marc A. [Centre Rene Gauducheau, Nantes-St. Herblain (France); Fortin, Andre [Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QB (Canada); Nieder, Carsten [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Munchen, Munich (Germany); Meyers, Christina A. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F. [Clinical Development, Pharmacyclics, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Adaptive/Nonadaptive Proton Radiation Planning and Outcomes in a Phase II Trial for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze dosimetric variables and outcomes after adaptive replanning of radiation therapy during concurrent high-dose protons and chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Nine of 44 patients with stage III NSCLC in a prospective phase II trial of concurrent paclitaxel/carboplatin with proton radiation [74 Gy(RBE) in 37 fractions] had modifications to their original treatment plans after re-evaluation revealed changes that would compromise coverage of the target volume or violate dose constraints; plans for the other 35 patients were not changed. We compared patients with adaptive plans with those with nonadaptive plans in terms of dosimetry and outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up of 21.2 months (median overall survival, 29.6 months), no differences were found in local, regional, or distant failure or overall survival between groups. Adaptive planning was used more often for large tumors that shrank to a greater extent (median, 107.1 cm{sup 3} adaptive and 86.4 cm{sup 3} nonadaptive; median changes in volume, 25.3% adaptive and 1.2% nonadaptive; P<.01). The median number of fractions delivered using adaptive planning was 13 (range, 4-22). Adaptive planning generally improved sparing of the esophagus (median absolute decrease in V{sub 70}, 1.8%; range, 0%-22.9%) and spinal cord (median absolute change in maximum dose, 3.7 Gy; range, 0-13.8 Gy). Without adaptive replanning, target coverage would have been compromised in 2 cases (57% and 82% coverage without adaptation vs 100% for both with adaptation); neither patient experienced local failure. Radiation-related grade 3 toxicity rates were similar between groups. Conclusions: Adaptive planning can reduce normal tissue doses and prevent target misses, particularly for patients with large tumors that shrink substantially during therapy. Adaptive plans seem to have acceptable toxicity and achieve similar local, regional, and distant control and overall survival, even in patients with larger tumors, vs nonadaptive plans.

Koay, Eugene J.; Lege, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Incident Handling Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] Incident Handling Activities. Since 1989 the National Institute of Standards ...

93

Radiation-induced cancer and its modifying factor among A-bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, have conducted a long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 120,000 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and non-exposed controls since 1950. The most recent findings regarding cancer mortality and incidence in this cohort can be briefly summarized as follows: 1) An increase in leukemia mortality among A-bomb survivors peaked 5-6 years after the bombing and has decreased with time thereafter. In addition to leukemia, the incidence of cancer of the lung, breast, esophagus, stomach, colon, thyroid, ovary, urinary tract, and multiple myeloma increases with dose. At present, there is no indication of an increase in cancer of the rectum or uterus among A-bomb survivors. In general, radiation-induced solid cancers begin to appear after the age at which they are normally prone to develop, and have continued to increase with time in proportion to the natural increase in mortality of the control group. 2) There are factors which modify the effects of radiation, such as age at the time of bombing (ATB) and sex. Sensitivity to radiation, in terms of cancer induction, is higher for persons who were young ATB in general, than for those who were older ATB. 3) There was no increase in childhood cancer among those exposed while in utero, but there is a recent indication of an increase in cancer incidence among these persons as they age. 4) There seems to be no interaction in a multiplicative way between radiation and smoking and lung cancer induction.

Kato, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Curcumin enhances the mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity via downregulation of MKK1/2-ERK1/2-mediated Rad51 expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress the proliferation of a wide variety of tumor cells. Rad51 is a key protein in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, and HR represents a novel target for cancer therapy. A high expression of Rad51 has been reported in chemo- or radio-resistant carcinomas. Therefore, in the current study, we will examine whether curcumin could enhance the effects of mitomycin C (MMC), a DNA interstrand cross-linking agent, to induce cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression. Exposure of two human non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549 and H1975) to curcumin could suppress MMC-induced MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signal activation and Rad51 protein expression. Enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by constitutively active MKK1/2 (MKK1/2-CA) increased Rad51 protein levels in curcumin and MMC co-treated human lung cells. Moreover, the synergistic cytotoxic effect induced by curcumin combined with MMC was decreased by MKK1-CA-mediated enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by a significant degree. In contrast, MKK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 was shown to augment the cytotoxicity of curcumin and MMC through downregulation of ERK1/2 activation and Rad51 expression. Depletion of endogenous Rad51 expression by siRad51 RNA transfection significantly enhanced MMC and/or curcumin induced cell death and cell growth inhibition. In contrast, an overexpression of Rad51 protected lung cancer cells from synergistic cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and MMC. We concluded that Rad51 inhibition may be an additional action mechanism for enhancing the chemosensitization of MMC by curcumin in NSCLC. - Highlights: > Curcumin downregulates MKK-ERK-mediated Rad51 expression. > Curcumin enhances mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity. > Rad51 protects cells from cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and mitomycin C. > Rad51 inhibition enhances the chemosensitization of mitomycin C by curcumin.

Ko, Jen-Chung [Department of Internal Medicine, Hsinchu Hospital, Department of Health, The Executive Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University, HsinChu, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Technology Law, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Technology Law, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Min-Shao; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Kuo, Ya-Hsun; Chiu, Yu-Fan [Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yun-Wei, E-mail: linyw@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Prevention of a wrong-location misadministration through the use of an intradepartmental incident learning system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A series of examples are presented in which potential errors in the delivery of radiation therapy were prevented through use of incident learning. These examples underscore the value of reporting near miss incidents. Methods: Using a departmental incident learning system, eight incidents were noted over a two-year period in which fields were treated 'out-of-sequence,' that is, fields from a boost phase were treated, while the patient was still in the initial phase of treatment. As a result, an error-prevention policy was instituted in which radiation treatment fields are 'hidden' within the oncology information system (OIS) when they are not in current use. In this way, fields are only available to be treated in the intended sequence and, importantly, old fields cannot be activated at the linear accelerator control console. Results: No out-of-sequence treatments have been reported in more than two years since the policy change. Furthermore, at least three near-miss incidents were detected and corrected as a result of the policy change. In the first two, the policy operated as intended to directly prevent an error in field scheduling. In the third near-miss, the policy operated 'off target' to prevent a type of error scenario that it was not directly intended to prevent. In this incident, an incorrect digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) was scheduled in the OIS for a patient receiving lung cancer treatment. The incorrect DRR had an isocenter which was misplaced by approximately two centimeters. The error was a result of a field from an old plan being scheduled instead of the intended new plan. As a result of the policy described above, the DRR field could not be activated for treatment however and the error was discovered and corrected. Other quality control barriers in place would have been unlikely to have detected this error. Conclusions: In these examples, a policy was adopted based on incident learning, which prevented several errors, at least one of which was potentially severe. These examples underscore the need for a rigorous, systematic incident learning process within each clinic. The experiences reported in this technical note demonstrate the value of near-miss incident reporting to improve patient safety.

Ford, Eric C.; Smith, Koren; Harris, Kendra; Terezakis, Stephanie [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Molecular Epidemiology of Human Cancer Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epidemiology has identified several etiological factors in lung cancer, of which the most ... Finally, most molecular epidemiology studies include genetic research.

97

July 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyberincident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable...

98

January 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyberincident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters'network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of...

99

July 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information ...

100

Incidents of Security Concern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1210-2012 September 2012 DOE STANDARD Incidents of Security Concern U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1210-2012 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1210-2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS PARAGRAPH PAGE FOREWORD ................................................................................................................................ IV INCIDENTS OF SECURITY CONCERN......................................................................................1 1. SCOPE ....................................................................................................................................1 2. PURPOSE...............................................................................................................................1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PET-CTi contribution in staging macronodular versus nodular non small cell lung carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyzed through comparison 2 groups of patients first with nodules smaller than 3 cm (Luzern group) and the second one with nodules lerger than 3cm (Zurich) to assess the role of PET-CTi to the staging of the non small cell lung cancer and to demonstrate ... Keywords: PET-CTi, adenopathy, diagnosis accuracy, lung cancer, tumor staging

Dana Alexandrescu; Milena Man; Bogdan Ra?iu-Duma; Roxana Miclaus

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Incident Investigation and Reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a model procedure for incident investigations based on an examination of programs at fourteen utilities believed to have good and effective procedures. The model was compiled by an expert who also drew on materials from other industries. An outline presents the basic procedure while the main text discusses in more detail alternate methods that may be preferable for a specific utility.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Molecular Profiling to Optimize Treatment in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Review of Potential Molecular Targets for Radiation Therapy by the Translational Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group  

SciTech Connect

Therapeutic decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been mainly based on disease stage, performance status, and co-morbidities, and rarely on histological or molecular classification. Rather than applying broad treatments to unselected patients that may result in survival increase of only weeks to months, research efforts should be, and are being, focused on identifying predictive markers for molecularly targeted therapy and determining genomic signatures that predict survival and response to specific therapies. The availability of such targeted biologics requires their use to be matched to tumors of corresponding molecular vulnerability for maximum efficacy. Molecular markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), K-ras, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) represent potential parameters guide treatment decisions. Ultimately, identifying patients who will respond to specific therapies will allow optimal efficacy with minimal toxicity, which will result in more judicious and effective application of expensive targeted therapy as the new paradigm of personalized medicine develops.

Ausborn, Natalie L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Le, Quynh Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Saha, Debabrata [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simko, Jeff [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Story, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Torossian, Artour [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Lu, Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Proteomic Study of Oral Cancer Stem-Like Cells and Bone Marrow Cell Treatment for Sjgren's Syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carcinoma. Clinical Cancer Research, 2008. 14(13): p. 4085-Cell Lung Cancer. Cancer Research, 2008. 68(15): p. 6065-Inducible Factor-1?. Cancer Research, 2006. 66(7): p. 3688-

Misuno, Kaori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Air Conditioning and lungs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Conditioning and lungs Name: freeman Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: What affect does air conditioning have upon the lungs of the...

107

Probability of mediastinal involvement in non-small-cell lung cancer: a statistical definition of the clinical target volume for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Conformal irradiation (3D-CRT) of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is largely based on precise definition of the nodal clinical target volume (CTVn). A reduction of the number of nodal stations to be irradiated would facilitate tumor dose escalation. The aim of this study was to design a mathematical tool based on documented data to predict the risk of metastatic involvement for each nodal station. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the large surgical series published in the literature to identify the main pretreatment parameters that modify the risk of nodal invasion. The probability of involvement for the 17 nodal stations described by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) was computed from all these publications. Starting with the primary site of the tumor as the main characteristic, we built a probabilistic tree for each nodal station representing the risk distribution as a function of each tumor feature. Statistical analysis used the inversion of probability trees method described by Weinstein and Feinberg. Validation of the software based on 134 patients from two different populations was performed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Analysis of all of the various parameters of pretreatment staging relative to each level of the ATS map results in 20,000 different combinations. The first parameters included in the tree, depending on tumor site, were histologic classification, metastatic stage, nodal stage weighted as a function of the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic examination used (positron emission tomography scan, computed tomography scan), and tumor stage. Software is proposed to compute a predicted probability of involvement of each nodal station for any given clinical presentation. Double cross validation confirmed the methodology. A 10% cutoff point was calculated from ROC and logistic model giving the best prediction of mediastinal lymph node involvement. Conclusion: To more accurately define the CTVn in NSCLC three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, we propose a software that evaluates the risk of mediastinal lymph node involvement from easily accessible individual pretreatment parameters.

Giraud, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)]. E-mail: philippe.giraud@curie.net; De Rycke, Yann [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Lavole, Armelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tenon Hospital, Paris (France); Milleron, Bernard [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tenon Hospital, Paris (France); Cosset, Jean-Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease? Collagen is the main (and most abundant) protein in all mammalian connective tissues, including those of the heart, lungs,...

109

Predictors of High-grade Esophagitis After Definitive Three-dimensional Conformal Therapy, Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-small cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Introduction: We analyzed the ability of various patient- and treatment-related factors to predict radiation-induced esophagitis (RE) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for NSCLC with 3D-CRT, IMRT, or PBT at MD Anderson from 2000 to 2008 and had full dose-volume histogram (DVH) data available. The endpoint was severe (grade {>=}3) RE. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was used to analyze RE as a function of the fractional esophageal DVH, with clinical variables included as dose-modifying factors. Results: Overall, 652 patients were included: 405 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, 139 with IMRT, and 108 with PBT; corresponding rates of grade {>=}3 RE were 8%, 28%, and 6%, respectively, with a median time to onset of 42 days (range, 11-93 days). A fit of the fractional DVH LKB model demonstrated that the fractional effective dose was significantly different (P=.046) than 1 (fractional mean dose) indicating that high doses to small volumes are more predictive than mean esophageal dose. The model fit was better for 3D-CRT and PBT than for IMRT. Including receipt of concurrent chemotherapy as a dose-modifying factor significantly improved the LKB model (P=.005), and the model was further improved by including a variable representing treatment with >30 fractions. Examining individual types of chemotherapy agents revealed a trend toward receipt of concurrent taxanes and increased risk of RE (P=.105). Conclusions: Fractional dose (dose rate) and number of fractions (total dose) distinctly affect the risk of severe RE, estimated using the LKB model, and concurrent chemotherapy improves the model fit. This risk of severe RE is underestimated by this model in patients receiving IMRT.

Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe; Balter, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Liu Hongmei; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Genome-based identification of diagnostic molecular markers for human lung carcinomas by PLS-DA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) provides a sound statistical basis for the selection of a limited number of gene transcripts most effective in discriminating different lung tumoral histotypes. The potentialities of the PLS-DA approach ... Keywords: Cancer diagnostics, Gene transcripts, Lung tumours, PLS-DA, cDNA microarray

Giuseppe Musumarra; Vincenza Barresi; Daniele F. Condorelli; Cosimo G. Fortuna; Salvatore Scir

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

RFI - Comments on Computer Security Incident Coordination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 21:49 To: incidentcoordination@nist.gov Subject: Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE...

113

Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

Robert J. Turk

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Lung pair phantom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ``authentic lung tissue`` or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

Olsen, P.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Lung pair phantom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

Olsen, Peter C. (West Richland, WA); Gordon, N. Ross (Kennewick, WA); Simmons, Kevin L. (Kennewick, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 0510 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q...

118

LANL responds to radiological incident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

119

Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization  

SciTech Connect

In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a fire at an oilfield waste disposal facility (hereafter, disposal facility) near Rosharon, Texas, south of Houston. The fire occurred as two vacuum trucks were off-loading liquid wastes from oil and gas production wells. The trucks arrived at the disposal facility within a few minutes of each other and were parked approximately 16 feet apart. The two drivers got out of their trucks, left the engines running, and told the disposal facility employees that the trucks were to be drained and rinsed out. Both drivers then went to the drivers shed to complete paperwork and to wait for the washout to be completed. (1) The fire was caused by the ignition of hydrocarbon vapor released during the off-loading of basic

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institutes research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institutes population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCIs SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US. For colorectal cancer, the stage at diagnosis of cases diagnosed in northeast Pennsylvania was compared to data from prior years. A population-based interview study of healthy adults was conducted to document the status of cancer screening and to estimate the prevalence of established cancer risk factors in this community. This study is similar in design to that used by the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This program includes two distinct but related projects. The first project uses existing data to conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania, and the second is a population-based study of cancer risk factors and cancer screening behaviors in this same population. HUMAN SUBJECTS CONSIDERATIONS This program includes two projects: cancer surveillance and a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior. The cancer surveillance project involves only the use of existing aggregate data or de-identified data. As such, the surveillance project is exempt from human subjects considerations. The study of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors includes data from a random sample of adult residents of northeast Pennsylvania who are 18 or more years of age. All races, ethnicities and both sexes are included in proportion to their representation in the population. Subjects are interviewed anonymously by telephone; those who are unable to complete an interview in English are ineligible. This project has been reviewed and approved by the Scranton-Temple Residency Program IRB (IRB00001355), which is the IRB for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

Lesko, Samuel M.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cyber Security Incidents, Information Technology Division, ITD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reporting Computing Security Incidents Reporting Computing Security Incidents Incident Reporting Hotline: 631-344-8484 Security Incidents A computer security incident can range from a simple virus to the disclosure of sensitive information. Incidents can be minor, important, or significant. Incidents that must be reported include computer or network related activity, internal or external to the Laboratory, that may impact the Laboratory's mission. Examples of such activities include: the possibility of: loss of data; denial of services; compromise of computer security; unauthorized access to data that the Laboratory is required to control by law, regulation, or DOE orders; investigative activity by legal, law enforcement, bureaucratic, or political authorities; or a public relations embarrassment.

123

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

This book presents information on the following topics: sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the cancer registry in Nagasaki, with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977; cancer mortality; methods for study of delayed health effects of a-bomb radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis in rodents; leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma; cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands; malignant tumors in atomic bomb survivors with special reference to the pathology of stomach and lung cancer; colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors; breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors; and ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survirors.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Identification of low penetrance alleles for lung cancer: The GEnetic Lung CAncer Predisposition Study (GELCAPS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in European and African populations. Nat Genet 2006, 38(6):652-658. 26. Haiman CA, Patterson N, Freedman ML, Myers SR, Pike MC, Walisze- wska A, Neubauer J, Tandon A, Schirmer C, McDonald GJ, Greenway SC, Stram DO, Le Marchand L, Kolonel LN, Frasco M, Wong D...

Eisen, Tim; Matakidou, Athena; Consortium, Gelcaps; Houlston, Richard

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

Joshua DeLung | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DeLung About Us Joshua DeLung Joshua DeLung is an Account Manager at ENC Marketing & Communications and the Executive Editor at Relatively Journalizing. Most Recent EnerG2 Develops...

126

Definition: Angle of incidence | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angle of incidence Angle of incidence Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Angle of incidence In reference to solar energy systems: the angle a ray of sun makes with a line perpendicular to a surface; for example, a surface directly facing the sun has an angle of incidence of zero, and a surface parallel to the sun (such as a sunrise striking a horizontal rooftop) has an angle of incidence of 90°. Sunlight with an incident angle of 90° tends to be absorbed, while lower angles tend to be reflected.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Angle of incidence is a measure of deviation of something from "straight on", for example: in the approach of a ray to a surface, or the angle at which the wing or horizontal tail of an airplane is installed on the fuselage, measured relative to the axis of the fuselage.

127

Cyber Incident Information | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services » Guidance » Privacy » Cyber Incident Information Services » Guidance » Privacy » Cyber Incident Information Cyber Incident Information July 2013 Cyber Incident The Department of Energy has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information (PII). January 2013 Cyber Incident The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters' network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of employee and contractor Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Tips to Monitor Your Identity Here is a suggested list of tips to monitor and protect yourself. Assistive Technology Forms Guidance Capital Planning Information Collection Management

128

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management » JC3 Incident Reporting Management » JC3 Incident Reporting JC3 Incident Reporting JC3 Incident Reporting Procedures U.S. Department of Energy Facilities/Contractors Only DOE O 205.1-B Chg 2 4.(c)(13) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM requires a defined "process for incident reporting that requires all cyber security incidents involving information or information systems, including privacy breaches, under DOE or DOE contractor control must be identified, mitigated, categorized, and reported to the Joint Cybersecurity Coordination Center (JC3) in accordance with JC3 procedures and guidance." This document outlines the referenced JC3 reporting procedures and guidance to facilitate your reporting and CIRC's response activity. CIRC should be informed of all reportable cyber security incidents as specified below.

129

How much is a health insurer willing to pay for colorectal cancer screening tests?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colorectal Cancer (CRC) screening tests have proven to be cost-effective in preventing cancer incidence. Yet, as recent studies have shown, CRC screening tests are noticeably underutilized. Among the factors influencing CRC screening test utilization, ...

Reza Yaesoubi; Stephen D. Roberts

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Dynamic detection of nuclear reactor core incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveillance, safety and security of evolving systems are a challenge to prevent accident. The dynamic detection of a hypothetical and theoretical blockage incident in the Phenix nuclear reactor is investigated. Such an incident is characterized by abnormal ... Keywords: Contrast, Dynamic detection of perturbations, Evolving system, Fast-neutron reactor, Neighbourhood, Noise

Laurent Hartert; Danielle Nuzillard; Jean-Philippe Jeannot

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chapter_11_Incidents_of_Security_Concern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Incidents of Security Concern This chapter covers the DOE HQ implementation of DOE Order 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, Attachment 5, Incidents of Security Concern. HS-91 manages the HQ Security Incidents Program. Incidents of Security Concern (henceforth referred to as Incidents) are actions, inactions, or events that are believed to: * Pose threats to national security interests and/or DOE assets * Create potentially serious or dangerous security situations * Significantly affect the safeguards and security program's capability to protect DOE safeguards and security interests * Indicate failure to adhere to security procedures * Reveal that the system is not functioning properly, by identifying and/or mitigating potential threats (e.g., detecting suspicious activity, hostile acts, etc.).

132

ORISE: Incident Command System (ICS) Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Command System (ICS) Training Incident Command System (ICS) Training The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supports the emergency response community by promoting interagency cooperation and developing training that enhances response efforts. An example of such support involves the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Emergency Response and its compliance efforts toward the Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5 (HSPD-5), which includes the implementation of National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Response Framework (NRF). The ICS, which has been recognized for its training curricula that has exceeded national standards, is an on-scene, all-hazard incident management concept that was originally designed for emergency management agencies, but

133

Carbon Ion Radiotherapy At Gunma University: Currently Indicated Cancer And Estimation Of Need  

SciTech Connect

Carbon ion radiotherapy for the first patient at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was initiated in March of 2010. The major specifications of the facility were determined based on the experience of clinical treatments at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The currently indicated sites of cancer treatment at GHMC are lung, prostate, head and neck, liver, rectum, bone and soft tissue. In order to evaluate the potential need for treatment in the region including Gunma prefecture and the adjacent 4 prefectures, an estimation model was constructed based on the Japanese cancer registration system, regular structure surveys by the Cancer Societies, and published articles on each cancer type. Carbon ion RT was potentially indicated for 8,085 patients and realistically for 1,527 patients, corresponding to 10% and 2% of the newly diagnosed cancer patients in the region. Prostate cancer (541 patients) followed by lung cancer (436 patients), and liver cancer (313 patients) were the most commonly diagnosed cancers.

Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, 3-39-22 Showa, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Overview of Incidents Related to Live Working  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress in the research on injury and fatality information among workers who perform energized (live) and/or de-energized work. While every effort is made in the industry to avoid incidents during work on energized and de-energized lines, they do occur, and there are lessons embedded within every incident from which the utility industry can benefit, if the incidents are thoroughly analyzed, root causes are identified, and corrective actions are taken. The primary objective of...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

Definition: Cyber Security Incident | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Security Incident Security Incident Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cyber Security Incident Any malicious act or suspicious event that: Compromises, or was an attempt to compromise, the Electronic Security Perimeter or Physical Security Perimeter of a Critical Cyber Asset, or, Disrupts, or was an attempt to disrupt, the operation of a Critical Cyber Asset.[1] Related Terms Electronic Security Perimeter References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Cyber_Security_Incident&oldid=480296" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

136

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy FacilitiesContractors Only DOE O 205.1-B Chg 2 4.(c)(13) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM requires a defined "process for incident reporting that requires all...

137

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

138

AMI Cyber Security Incident Response Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is intended to be used by system and asset owners to assist in the preparation and response to AMI cyber security incidents. This document was developed by conducting interviews with EPRI members, AMI asset owners, and vendors, regarding practices involved in responding to AMI cyber security incidents and mapping the responses to requirements put forth by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Open Smart Grid (Open-SG) Working ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident/Incident Recordkeeping and Reporting CAIRS logo Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System CAIRS Database The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. Injury and Illness Dashboard The Dashboard provides an alternate interface to CAIRS information. The initial release of the Dashboard allows analysis of composite DOE-wide information and summary information by Program Office, and site. Additional data feature are under development. CAIRS Registration Form CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the

140

Incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Southeast Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background and Aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a well-known consequence of chronic liver disease (CLD). The aim of this study was to extract the HCC incidence rate in the province of Kerman, located in southern part of Iran, and compare the data with other parts of the country. Materials and Methods: All medical records related to HCC were collected through hospitals or outpatient services in public or private centers. The records of all oncology, radiotherapy, and pathology centers in Kerman province were actively searched between 1999 and 2006. The annual incidence of HCC around the country was calculated, using the

A Rticle; Sodaif Darvish Moghaddam; Ali-akbar Haghdoost; Seyed Hamed Hoseini; Rashid Ramazani; Mohammad Rezazadehkermani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lung Density Changes After Stereotactic Radiotherapy: A Quantitative Analysis in 50 Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiologic lung density changes are observed in more than 50% of patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. We studied the relationship between SBRT dose and posttreatment computed tomography (CT) density changes, a surrogate for lung injury. Methods and Materials: The SBRT fractionation schemes used to treat Stage I lung cancer with RapidArc were three fractions of 18 Gy, five fractions of 11 Gy, or eight fractions of 7.5 Gy, prescribed at the 80% isodose. Follow-up CT scans performed at less than 6 months (n = 50) and between 6 and 9 months (n = 30) after SBRT were reviewed. Posttreatment scans were coregistered with baseline scans using a B-spline deformable registration algorithm. Voxel-Hounsfield unit histograms were created for doses between 0.5 and 50 Gy. Linear mixed effects models were used to assess the effects of SBRT dose on CT density, and the influence of possible confounders was tested. Results: Increased CT density was associated with higher dose, increasing planning target volume size, and increasing time after SBRT (all p 6 Gy, were most prominent in areas receiving >20 Gy, and seemed to plateau above 40 Gy. In regions receiving >36 Gy, the reduction in air-filled fraction of lung after treatment was up to 18%. No increase in CT density was observed in the contralateral lung receiving {>=}3 Gy. Conclusions: A dose-response relationship exists for quantitative CT density changes after SBRT. A threshold of effect is seen at low doses, and a plateau at highest doses.

Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soernsen de Koste, John van; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vincent, Andrew [Department of Biometrics, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Incident and Disaster Tolerance/Response Policy COEIDTR01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incident and Disaster Tolerance/Response Policy COE­IDTR­01 1.0 Purpose To provide College faculty or disaster within a College-operated network closet. 2.0 Scope 2.1 Incident Response: Incident response for developing and implementing Disaster Tolerance/Recovery plans. 3.0 Policy 3.1 Incident Response: Any desktop

Demirel, Melik C.

143

To Improve Lung Cancer Diagnosis, Good Medicine Is a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The team encased the mimics in foam rubber and put them into layered racks of a box akin to one that holds fishing tackle. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

Reproducibility of Interfraction Lung Motion Probability Distribution Function Using Dynamic MRI: Statistical Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the statistical reproducibility of craniocaudal probability distribution function (PDF) of interfraction lung motion using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 subjects, 9 healthy volunteers and 8 lung tumor patients, underwent two to three continuous 300-s magnetic resonance imaging scans in the sagittal plane, repeated 2 weeks apart. Three pulmonary vessels from different lung regions (upper, middle, and lower) in the healthy subjects and lung tumor patients were selected for tracking, and the displacement PDF reproducibility was evaluated as a function of scan time and frame rate. Results: For both healthy subjects and patients, the PDF reproducibility improved with increased scan time and converged to an equilibrium state during the 300-s scan. The PDF reproducibility at 300 s (mean, 0.86; range, 0.70-0.96) were significantly (p < 0.001) increased compared with those at 5 s (mean, 0.65; range, 0.25-0.79). PDF reproducibility showed less sensitivity to imaging frame rates that were >2 frames/s. Conclusion: A statistically significant improvement in PDF reproducibility was observed with a prolonged scan time among the 17 participants. The confirmation of PDF reproducibility over times much shorter than stereotactic body radiotherapy delivery duration is a vital part of the initial validation process of probability-based treatment planning for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer.

Cai Jing; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jones, David R. [Department of Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Sheng Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)], E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

146

Estimation of radiation-induced cancer from three-dimensional dose distributions: Concept of organ equivalent dose  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Estimates of secondary cancer risk after radiotherapy are becoming more important for comparative treatment planning. Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate three-dimensional dose distributions for each individual patient. These data open up new possibilities for more precise estimates of secondary cancer incidence rates in the irradiated organs. We report a new method to estimate organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates. The concept of an organ equivalent dose (OED) for radiation-induced cancer assumes that any two dose distributions in an organ are equivalent if they cause the same radiation-induced cancer incidence. Methods and Materials: The two operational parameters of the OED concept are the organ-specific cancer incidence rate at low doses, which is taken from the data of the atomic bomb survivors, and cell sterilization at higher doses. The effect of cell sterilization in various organs was estimated by analyzing the secondary cancer incidence data of patients with Hodgkin's disease who were treated with radiotherapy in between 1962 and 1993. The radiotherapy plans used at the time the patients had been treated were reconstructed on a fully segmented whole body CT scan. The dose distributions were calculated in individual organs for which cancer incidence data were available. The model parameter that described cell sterilization was obtained by analyzing the dose and cancer incidence rates for the individual organs. Results: We found organ-specific cell radiosensitivities that varied from 0.017 for the mouth and pharynx up to 1.592 for the bladder. Using the two model parameters (organ-specific cancer incidence rate and the parameter characterizing cell sterilization), the OED concept can be applied to any three-dimensional dose distribution to analyze cancer incidence. Conclusion: We believe that the concept of OED presented in this investigation represents a first step in assessing the potential risk of secondary cancer induction after the clinical application of radiotherapy.

Schneider, Uwe [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: uwe.schneider@psi.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland); Ross, Dieter [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaser-Hotz, Barbara [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radio-Oncology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Risk Insights Gained from Fire Incidents  

SciTech Connect

There now exist close to 20 years of history in the application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the analysis of fire risk at nuclear power plants. The current methods are based on various assumptions regarding fire phenomena, the impact of fire on equipment and operator response, and the overall progression of a fire event from initiation through final resolution. Over this same time period, a number of significant fire incidents have occurred at nuclear power plants around the world. Insights gained from US experience have been used in US studies as the statistical basis for establishing fire initiation frequencies both as a function of the plant area and the initiating fire source.To a lesser extent, the fire experience has also been used to assess the general severity and duration of fires. However, aside from these statistical analyses, the incidents have rarely been scrutinized in detail to verify the underlying assumptions of fire PRAs. This paper discusses an effort, under which a set of fire incidents are being reviewed in order to gain insights directly relevant to the methods, data, and assumptions that form the basis for current fire PRAs. The paper focuses on the objectives of the effort, the specific fire events being reviews methodology, and anticipated follow-on activities.

Kazarians, Mardy; Nowlen, Steven P.

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Three-Dimensional Volumetric Analysis of Irradiated Lung With Adjuvant Breast Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the dose-volume histogram data of irradiated lung in adjuvant breast radiotherapy (ABR) using a three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT)-guided planning technique; and to investigate the relationship between lung dose-volume data and traditionally used two-dimensional (2D) parameters, as well as their correlation with the incidence of steroid-requiring radiation pneumonitis (SRRP). Methods and Materials: Patients beginning ABR between January 2005 and February 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included were women aged >=18 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma, who received radiotherapy using a 3D-CT technique to the breast or chest wall (two-field radiotherapy [2FRT]) with or without supraclavicular irradiation (three-field radiotherapy [3FRT]), to 50 Gy in 25 fractions. A 10-Gy tumor-bed boost was allowed. Lung dose-volume histogram parameters (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 40}), 2D parameters (central lung depth [CLD], maximum lung depth [MLD], and lung length [LL]), and incidence of SRRP were reported. Results: A total of 89 patients met the inclusion criteria: 51 had 2FRT, and 38 had 3FRT. With 2FRT, mean ipsilateral V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 40} and CLD, MLD, LL were 20%, 14%, 11%, and 8% and 2.0 cm, 2.1 cm, and 14.6 cm, respectively, with strong correlation between CLD and ipsilateral V{sub 10-V40} (R{sup 2} = 0.73-0.83, p < 0.0005). With 3FRT, mean ipsilateral V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40} were 30%, 22%, 17%, and 11%, but its correlation with 2D parameters was poor. With a median follow-up of 14.5 months, 1 case of SRRP was identified. Conclusions: With only 1 case of SRRP observed, our study is limited in its ability to provide definitive guidance, but it does provide a starting point for acceptable lung irradiation during ABR. Further prospective studies are warranted.

Teh, Amy Yuen Meei, E-mail: amy.teh@petermac.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Park, Eileen J.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Shen Liang [Biostatistics Unit, Yang Loo Ling School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Chung, Hans T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Differential action on cancer and normal tissue by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate and cytochrome C combined with radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility that radioprotective effects on potent natural killer (NK) cells by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate (AMM) + cytochrome C during radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer might result in the radiosensitization of human lung cancer cells in vivo is examined. Human lung cancer xenografts in the right hind legs of KSN mice (10 weeks old) were locally irradiated with 20 Gy of X ray. AMM (10 mg/kg/day) and/or cytochrome C (CCC) (5 mg/kg/day) were given intraperitoneally immediately before or after RT, followed by daily administration for 4 days. Natural killer activities of host splenocytes were also tested with the standard [sup 51]Cr releasing assay with YAC-1 cells as target cells. In a clinical study, 65 patients with lung cancer were treated with more than 50 Gy of RT with or without combination with AMM + CCC, OK-432 or AMM + CCC + OK-432. Before and after RT, lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were examined with dichromatic analysis using an Ortho Spectrum IIIFCM system and fluorescent MABs. In this study, the change in the absolute number of each subset was investigated. AMM + cytochrome C augumented NK activity in KSN nude mice, protected potent NK cells in patients with lung cancer against RT and sensitized the human lung cancer xenografts to RT. AMM + cytochrome C may have potential as a differential modulator of radiosensitivity of normal tissues and of tumors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Nakatsugawa, S. (Fukui Medical School (Japan)); Sugahara, T. (Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan))

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by [alpha] particles must be determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations and in parallel on electron micrographs of the dog bronchial lining. The second part of this proposal describes studies to quantitate the cycling bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on frozen and paraffin sections and similar labeling of isolated bronchial epithelial cells sorted flow cytometry.

Robbins, E.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Predicting the Risk of Secondary Lung Malignancies Associated With Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The risk of secondary lung malignancy (SLM) is a significant concern for women treated with whole-breast radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. In this study, a biologically based secondary malignancy model was used to quantify the risk of secondary lung malignancies (SLMs) associated with several common methods of delivering whole-breast radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Both supine and prone computed tomography simulations of 15 women with early breast cancer were used to generate standard fractionated and hypofractionated whole-breast RT treatment plans for each patient. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the ipsilateral breast and lung were calculated for each patient on each plan. A model of spontaneous and radiation-induced carcinogenesis was used to determine the relative risks of SLMs for the different treatment techniques. Results: A higher risk of SLMs was predicted for supine breast irradiation when compared with prone breast irradiation for both the standard fractionation and hypofractionation schedules (relative risk [RR] = 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.30-2.88, and RR = 2.68, 95% CI = 2.39-2.98, respectively). No difference in risk of SLMs was noted between standard fractionation and hypofractionation schedules in either the supine position (RR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.97-1.14) or the prone position (RR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.88-1.15). Conclusions: Compared with supine whole-breast irradiation, prone breast irradiation is associated with a significantly lower predicted risk of secondary lung malignancy. In this modeling study, fractionation schedule did not have an impact on the risk of SLMs in women treated with whole-breast RT for early breast cancer.

Ng, John, E-mail: jon9024@nyp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Shuryak, Igor [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Xu Yanguang; Clifford Chao, K.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Brenner, David J. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Burri, Ryan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NIST Calls for Suggestions to Speed Computer Incident ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Calls for Suggestions to Speed Computer Incident Teams Responses. From NIST Tech Beat: June 28, 2013. ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

156

Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

PROCEEDINGS Open Access The possible prevention of cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prevention of the infectious diseases was accomplished long before there was any understanding of the molecular biology of bacteria and viruses. As for cancer, the sharp drop in frequency of the once-commonest lethal cancer, stomach cancer, was achieved without any contribution from biological research, and the current drop in lung cancer is the end-result of the observation by epidemiologists that most lung cancer is caused by smoking. So the basis for both these triumphs was essentially empirical and owed nothing to biological research. This paper discusses how molecular biology can now offer the possibility of large-scale protection against cancer. Article Research into cancer has in the past been largely managedbydoctorsandtheemphasishastendedtobeon finding new treatments rather than on prevention. But it is quite clear that life expectancy in the industrialised world had almost doubled by the time the first antibiotics were discovered [1], and this must therefore have been achieved by prevention of the major infectious diseases rather than by devising better forms of treatment.

John Cairns

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

159

Recent Racial Incidents in Higher Education: A Contemporary Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Racial Incidents in Higher Education 1987b. "King Wants1988. "Hispanics Higher Education's Missing People." Change12-65. Chronicle of Higher Education. 1987. "Racial Brawl

Farrell, Walter C. Jr.; Jones, Cloyzelle K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In his after-action analysis, Haley has been surprised by the number of similarities in response planning, even when disaster scenarios differ dramatically. "Like this incident,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Investigation of a bladder cancer cluster in northwestern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Cancer maps from 1950 through 1979 revealed areas of high mortality from bladder cancer for both males and females in several northwestern Illinois counties. In order to further explore this excess, a bladder cancer incidence study was conducted in the eight counties comprising this region. Eligible cases were those first diagnosed with bladder cancer between 1978 and 1985. Age adjusted standardized incidence ratios were calculated for each county and for 97 zip codes within these counties. County results revealed no excesses. Zip code results indicated elevated risks in a few areas, but only two zip codes had significantly elevated results. One of these zip codes had a significant excess in males (standardized incidence ratio = 1.5) and females (standardized incidence ratio = 1.9). This excess was primarily confined to one town in this zip code, in which standardized incidence ratios were significantly elevated in males (1.7) and females (2.6). Further investigation revealed that one of four public drinking water wells in this town had been closed due to contamination; two wells were within a half mile (0.8 km) of a landfill site that had ceased operating in 1972. Tests of these two wells revealed traces of trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and other solvents. Further investigation of this cluster is discussed.

Mallin, K. (Illinois Cancer Council, Chicago (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

PLUTONIUM RELEASE INCIDENT OF NOVEMBER 20, 1959  

SciTech Connect

A nonnuclear explosion involving an evaporator occurred in a shielded cell in the Radiochemical Processing Pilot Plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on Nov. 20, 1959. Plutonium was released from the processing cell, probably as an aerosol of fine particles of plutonium oxide. It is probable that this evaporator system had accumulated -1100 g of nitric acid-insoluble plutonium in the steam stripper packing; the explosion released an estimated 150 g inside Cell 6, with about 135 g in the evaporator subcell, and about 15 g in the larger main cell. No radioactive material was released from the ventilation stacks; no contamination of grounds and facilities occurred outside of a relatively small area of OaK Ridge National Laboratory immediately adjacent to the explosion. No one was injured by the explosion, and no one received more than 2% of a lifetime body burden of plutonium or an overexposure to sources of ionizing radiation either at the time of the incident or daring subsequent cleanup operations. The explosion is considerdd to be the result of rapid reaction of nitrated organic compounds formed by the inadvertent nitration of about 14 liters of a proprietary decontaminating reagent. In cleanup the contamination was bonded to the nearby street and building surfaces with tar, paint, roofing compound, or masonry sealer, as appropriate to the surface. Decontamination of the interior of the pilot-plant building, except the processing cells, was 95% complete on Sept. 1, 1960. Decontamination of the processing cells was delayed 8 months until building modifications could be made to improve containment. Modifications to the pilot plant have been proposed which will preclude dischanges into the laboratory area and its environment of concentrations or amounts of radioactive materials that would be injurious to health or interfere with other laboratory programs. (auth)

King, L.J.; McCarley, W.T.

1961-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

Radiation carcinogenesis was first noted in studies of individuals with occupational or therapeutic exposure to radiation. Data from long-term follow-up studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have greatly enhanced our knowledge of radiation carcinogenesis. This book presents current results obtained from epidemiological studies and pathological studies on cancer among atomic bomb survivors. It includes a description of the dosimetry system which is currently being revised. Although many of the details about radiation carcinogenesis remain unknown or uncertain, it is clear that the incidence of radiation-induced cancer among atomic bomb survivors continues unabated 40 years after exposure. Recent increases in occupational and environmental exposure to radiation together with the need for a thorough review of radiation protection standards have led to increased recognition of the importance of research on radiation carcinogenesis and risk assessment.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, EPRI published a Technical Update report, "Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Power Switching" (EPRI report 1016830), which introduced a report format and form designed to allow utilities to submit reports of power switching-related incidents to a shared database. This new report summarizes work performed on the database in 2009.

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

A survey SCADA of and critical infrastructure incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze several cyber-security incidents involving critical infrastructure and SCADA systems. We classify these incidents based on Source Sector, Method of Operations, Impact, and Target Sector. Using this standardized taxonomy we can ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, cyber attack, cyber security, information assurance and security, scada, security

Bill Miller; Dale Rowe

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Clinical and prognostic significance of lung thallium uptake on rest imaging in acute myocardial infarction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exercise-induced pulmonary uptake of thallium-201 in patients with ischemic heart disease is probably due to transient pulmonary edema and left ventricular failure induced by exercise. The significance of increased lung uptake of thallium-201 at rest after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been described. Ninety-six patients admitted with chest pain for suspected AMI or unstable angina underwent thallium-201 imaging at rest. Using conventional diagnostic criteria, 62 had AMI, 12 had unstable angina and 22 had neither. Increased lung uptake of thallium-201 was present in 24 of the total 96 (25%) patients, 20 of the 62 (32%) patients with AMI and 4 of 34 (13%) patients with no evidence of infarction. In the AMI group, those with increased lung thallium-201 uptake had a higher mean +/- standard deviation segmental thallium-201 defect score (22 +/- 7 vs 12 +/- 8, p less than 0.0001), lower ejection fraction (35 +/- 14 vs 49 +/- 14%, p less than 0.002), higher peak creatine kinase levels (2,410 +/- 1,247 vs 1,496 +/- 1,228 IU/liter, p less than 0.01), higher wall motion abnormality score (25 +/- 13 vs 13 +/- 12, p less than 0.0001), increased incidence of clinical in-hospital heart failure (15 of 20 vs 7 of 42, p less than 0.0001) and higher short-term mortality (4 of 20 vs 1 of 42, p less than 0.02) compared to those without increased lung thallium-201 uptake.

Jain, D.; Lahiri, A.; Raftery, E.B. (Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (England))

1990-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

ORIGINAL PAPER A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- induced second malignancies, on Japanese atomic bomb survivors, and on background US cancer incidence and carcin- ogenic agent. As such, it is effective as a treatment for cancer, but can also induce secondary (&) Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th St., New York, NY

Brenner, David Jonathan

168

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : What You Need To Know About High- tors for heart disease. In fact, the higher your blood cholesterol, the greater your risk of developing heart disease or having a heart attack. Heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women in the United

Bandettini, Peter A.

169

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Coronary Heart Disease C oronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease, is the leading cause of death in the United. These arteries supply your heart muscle with oxygen-rich blood. Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium

Bandettini, Peter A.

170

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Physical Activity and Your Heart, is that even modest amounts of physi- cal activity are good for your health, especially your heart health activity is the type of physical activity that benefits your heart the most. This type of activity moves

Bandettini, Peter A.

171

Breast cancer risk and environmental exposures. Environ Health Perspect 105:891896  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although environmental contaminants have potential to affect breast cancer risk, explicit environmental links to this disease are limited. The most well-defined environmental risk factors are radiation exposure and alcohol ingestion. Diet is clearly related to the increased incidence of breast cancer in developed countries, but its precise role is not yet established. Recent studies have implicated exposure to organochlorines including DDT as a risk factor for breast cancer in

Mary S. Wolff; Ainsley Weston

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sustainability and continued development of the chemical industry is to a large extent dependent on learning from past incidents. The failure to learn from past mistakes is rather not deliberate but due to unawareness of the situation. Incident databases are excellent resources to learn from past mistakes; however, in order to be effective, incident databases need to be functional in disseminating the lessons learned to users. Therefore, this research is dedicated to improving user accessibility of incident databases. The objective of this research is twofold. The first objective is improving accessibility of the database system by allowing the option of word search as well as folder search for the users. This will satisfy research needs of users who are aware of the hazards at hand and need to access the relevant information. The second objective is to activate the database via integration of the database with an operational software. This will benefit research needs of users who are unaware of the existing hazards. Literature review and text mining of Major Accident Reporting System (MARS) database short reports are employed to develop an initial taxonomy, which is then refined and modified by expert review. The incident reports in MARS database is classified to the right folders in the taxonomy and implemented in a database system based on Microsoft Excel, where the users can retrieve information using folder search as well as word search option via a user friendly interface. A program coded in JAVA is prepared for integrating the incident database with a Management of Change (MOC) software prototype. A collection of keywords on hazardous substances and equipment is prepared. If the keywords exist in the MOC interface, they will be highlighted, and with the click of a button, will return up to ten relevant incident reports. Using an active and knowledge-based system, people can learn from incidents and near-misses and will be more active to reduce the frequency of recurring incidents.

Khan, Sara Shammni

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cyber Security Incident Management Program, Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 The Department of Energy operates numerous interconnected computer networks and systems to help accon~plishit s strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science, and the environment. These systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could potentially affect the Department's ability to carry out its mission. During Fiscal Year 2006, the Department experienced 132 incidents of sufficient severity to require reporting to law enforcement, an increase of 22 percent over the prior year. These statistics, troubling as they may be, are not unique to the Department; they are, in fact, reflective of a trend in cyber attacks throughout the government.

174

Climate Influences on Meningitis Incidence in Northwest Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest Nigeria is a region with high risk of meningitis. In this study, the influence of climate on monthly meningitis incidence was examined. Monthly counts of clinically diagnosed hospital-reported cases of meningitis were collected from ...

Auwal F. Abdussalam; Andrew J. Monaghan; Vanja M. Dukic; Mary H. Hayden; Thomas M. Hopson; Gregor C. Leckebusch; John E. Thornes

175

Public health: emergency management: capability analysis of critical incident response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 9/11 terrorist incident, homeland security efforts and the readiness of local emergency management agencies have become focal points in the war on terrorism. A significant issue faced by front line responders has been the significant increase ...

Thomas F. Brady

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

177

Estimation of Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation from GOES Visible Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is an important parameter for terrestrial ecosystem models. Because of its high temporal resolution, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations are very suited to ...

Tao Zheng; Shunlin Liang; Kaicun Wang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

Belinsky, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmisano, William A. (Edgewood, NM)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

179

Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer Print Thursday, 12 December 2013 11:55 ras protein The new class of inhibitors interacts with a specific mutation (Glycine to Cysteine) associated with a number of types of lung cancer. Mutations in the protein K-RAS are a very common cause for certain types of human cancers and are generally associated with a poor response to standard therapies. RAS, an abbreviation of Rat Sarcoma, is a nucleotide binding protein that responds to chemical signals (nucleotides). When in the "on" state, RAS activates other proteins, resulting in a cascade of biochemical processes; in the "off" state, RAS remains inactive. Mutations in the RAS

180

Efficiency of critical incident management systems: Instrument development and validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is much literature in the area of emergency response management systems. Even so, there is in general a lacuna of literature that deals with the issue of measuring the effectiveness of such systems. The aim of this study is to develop and validate ... Keywords: Critical incident management system (CIMS), Decision support, Emergency response systems, Instrument, Measurement, Media richness theory, National incident management systems (NIMS), Validation

Jin Ki Kim; Raj Sharman; H. Raghav Rao; Shambhu Upadhyaya

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents  

SciTech Connect

The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

Charles Solbrig

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has designated May as National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month. In 1996, an estimated 1 million cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed, of which approximately 95 % will be squamous cell or basal cell carcinomas (1). Although the incidence of melanoma is lower than those of squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas, the case-fatality rate is highest for persons with melanoma. During 19731992, mortality from melanoma increased 34%the third highest increase of all cancers (2). CDC, in collaboration with the AAD, has initiated the National Skin Cancer Prevention Education Program (NSCPEP) to increase public awareness about skin cancer and to help reduce the occurrence of and deaths associated with skin cancer. Goals of this program are to develop and disseminate educational messages for children, their parents, and other caregivers; develop guidelines for school curricula; evaluate the utility and value of the ultraviolet (UV) index; and develop educational messages for health-care providers. Additional information about this month and the NSCPEP is available from

Among Children; Young Adults

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

David J. Brenner, PhD, DSc Index terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there is direct evidence of increased cancer risk in atomic bomb survivors. Estimated dose-, sex-, and smoking), radiation exposure Lung, effects of irradiation on, 60.47 Special Reports Published online 10.1148/radiol status­dependent excess relative risks of lung cancer were derived from cancer incidence data for atomic

Brenner, David Jonathan

184

Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also reveal the molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

185

Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Surgical Management of Early-Stage Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma and the Present and Future Roles of Adjuvant Therapy: A Review for the Radiation Oncologist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the evidence for optimal surgical management and adjuvant therapy for patients with stages I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) along with factors associated with increased risks of recurrence. Based on the current evidence, we recommend optimal use of mediastinal lymph node dissection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and post-operative radiation therapy, and make suggestions for areas to explore in future prospective randomized clinical trials.

Medford-Davis, Laura [Department of Emergency Medicine, Ben Taub General Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Emergency Medicine, Ben Taub General Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); DeCamp, Malcom [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Flickinger, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Belani, Chandra P. [Department of Medical Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Varlotto, John, E-mail: jvarlotto@hmc.psu.edu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Division of Radiation Oncology, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

US DOE/NNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation NNSADataRepositoryGuide.pdf...

188

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive capability to respond effectively to medical emergencies involving radiological or nuclear materials. Through the management of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REAC/TS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation emergencies by preparing and educating first responders, medical personnel and occupational health professionals who will provide care to patients with a radiation injury or illness. REAC/TS staff provide medical advice,

189

Managing Incidents in Smart Grids la Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the Cloud Computing paradigm has emerged as a panacea for many problems in traditional IT infrastructures. Much has been said about the potential of Cloud Computing in the context of the Smart Grid, but unfortunately it is still ... Keywords: Smart Grid, SCADA systems, Incident Management, Cloud Computing, Cryptography, Searchable Encryption

Cristina Alcaraz; Isaac Agudo; David Nunez; Javier Lopez

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SSM/I Brightness Temperature Corrections for Incidence Angle Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incidence angles of the SSM/I radiometers on the DMSP satellites vary from satellite to satellite and exhibit variations of up to 1.5 during one orbit. The effects of these variations on the measured brightness temperatures are investigated ...

Rolf Fuhrhop; Clemens Simmer

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Power Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary results of a research task sponsored by EPRI's Power Switching Safety and Reliability (PSS&R) project to develop a report format and form that will allow multiple utilities to submit reports of power switching-related incidents to a shared database.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

Biobased Surfactants and DetergentsChapter 8 Lung Surfactants Formulation Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Chapter 8 Lung Surfactants Formulation Evaluation Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Lung Surfactan

193

Atrial natriuretic polypeptide-like material in rat lung  

SciTech Connect

Atrial natriuretic polypeptide-like immunoreactive material (ANP-IR) was found in rat lung by radioimmunoassay, with the concentration ranging from 0.6-1.2 pmol/g of tissue in each lobe. PAP-immunohistochemical study demonstrated that specific staining of granules for ..cap alpha..-human ANP are mainly located in the muscular layer of the pulmonary vein. Fractionation of lung extract by gel filtration and reserve phase HPLC revealed the presence of multiple forms of ANP-IR, which possibly possessed molecular structure partially different from rat ANP, atriopeptin I and III. Intravenous injection of lung extract induced potent diuresis and natriuresis in rats. These responses could be abolished when the lung extract was preincubated with antiserum for ..cap alpha..-human ANP. Specific binding sites for /sup 125/I-labeled rat ANP were also found in lung membrane preparation by radioreceptor assay. Incubation of synthetic atriopeptin III (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M) with lung tissue induced 1-28 fold increase in lung cGMP content. The results suggest that ANP-IR and its receptors existing in rat lung may be involved in the regulation of pulmonary function and have a synergic effect with ANP of cardiac origin in the control of water-electrolytes balance.

Chang, J.K.; Chang, D.; Xie, C.W.; Song, D.L.; Li, X.R.; Zhang, S.X.; Wang, T.L.; Tang, J.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

194

Cancer mortality among a group of fluorspar miners exposed to radon progeny  

SciTech Connect

A cohort study of the mortality experience (1950-1984) of 1,772 Newfoundland underground fluorspar miners occupationally exposed to high levels of radon daughters (mean dose = 382.8 working levels months) has been conducted. Observed numbers of cancers of the lung, salivary gland, and buccal cavity and pharynx were significantly elevated among these miners. A highly significant relation was noted between radon daughter exposure and risk of dying of lung cancer; the small numbers of salivary gland (n = 2) and buccal cavity and pharynx (n = 6) cancers precluded meaningful analysis of dose response. Attributable and relative risk coefficients for lung cancer were estimated as 6.3 deaths per working level month per million person-years and 0.9% per working level month, respectively. Relative risk coefficients were highest for those first exposed before age 20 years. Cigarette smokers had relative and attributable risk coefficients comparable to those of nonsmokers. Relative risks fell sharply with age, whereas attributable risks were lowest in the youngest and oldest age groups. The results suggest that efforts to raise existing occupational exposure standards may be inappropriate.

Morrison, H.I.; Semenciw, R.M.; Mao, Y.; Wigle, D.T.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Boundary conditions for NLTE polarized radiative transfer with incident radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarized NLTE radiative transfer in the presence of scattering in spectral lines and/or in continua may be cast in a so-called reduced form for six reduced components of the radiation field. In this formalism the six components of the reduced source function are angle-independent quantities. It thus reduces drastically the storage requirement of numerical codes. This approach encounters a fundamental problem when the medium is illuminated by a polarized incident radiation, because there is a priori no way of relating the known (and measurable) Stokes parameters of the incident radiation to boundary conditions for the reduced equations. The origin of this problem is that there is no unique way of deriving the radiation reduced components from its Stokes parameters (only the inverse operation is clearly defined). The method proposed here aims at enabling to work with arbitrary incident radiation field (polarized or unpolarized). In previous works an ad-hoc treatment of the boundary conditions, applying to case...

Faurobert, Marianne; Atanackovic, Olga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Physiological Interaction of Heart and Lung in Thoracic Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Introduction: The risk of early radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) limits the dose and efficacy of radiation therapy of thoracic tumors. In addition to lung dose, coirradiation of the heart is a known risk factor in the development RILT. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying physiology of the interaction between lung and heart in thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Rat hearts, lungs, or both were irradiated to 20 Gy using high-precision proton beams. Cardiopulmonary performance was assessed using breathing rate measurements and F{sup 18}-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) scans biweekly and left- and right-sided cardiac hemodynamic measurements and histopathology analysis at 8 weeks postirradiation. Results: Two to 12 weeks after heart irradiation, a pronounced defect in the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the left ventricle (LV) was observed. At 8 weeks postirradiation, this coincided with LV perivascular fibrosis, an increase in LV end-diastolic pressure, and pulmonary edema in the shielded lungs. Lung irradiation alone not only increased pulmonary artery pressure and perivascular edema but also induced an increased LV relaxation time. Combined irradiation of lung and heart induced pronounced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure and relaxation time, in addition to an increase in right ventricle end-diastolic pressure, indicative of biventricular diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, enhanced pulmonary edema, inflammation and fibrosis were also observed. Conclusions: Both lung and heart irradiation cause cardiac and pulmonary toxicity via different mechanisms. Thus, when combined, the loss of cardiopulmonary performance is intensified further, explaining the deleterious effects of heart and lung coirradiation. Our findings show for the first time the physiological mechanism underlying the development of a multiorgan complication, RILT. Reduction of dose to either of these organs offers new opportunities to improve radiation therapy treatment of thoracic tumors, potentially facilitating increased treatment doses and tumor control.

Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Veen, Sonja van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bartelds, Beatrijs [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Boer, Rudolf A. de [Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Dickinson, Michael G. [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Johan R. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Faber, Hette; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Berger, Rolf M.F. [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many incidents have occurred because industries have ignored past incidents or failed to learn lessons from the past. Incident databases provide an effective option for managing large amounts of information about the past incidents. Analysis of data stored in existing databases can lead to useful conclusions and reduction of chemical incidents and consequences of incidents. An incident database is a knowledge based system that can give an insight to the situation which led to an incident. Effective analysis of data from a database can help in development of information that can help reduce future incidents: cause of an incident, critical equipment, the type of chemical released, and the type of injury and victim. In this research, Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) database has been analyzed focusing on manufacturing events in Texas from 1993-2004. Between thirteen to sixteen states have participated in the HSEES incident reporting system and it does not include all the near miss incidents. Petroleum related incidents are also excluded from the HSEES system. Studies show that HSEES covers only 37% of all incidents in the US. This scaling ratio was used to estimate the total universe size.

Obidullah, A.S.M.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Combining Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm for Prediction of Lung Sounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognition of lung sounds is an important goal in pulmonary medicine. In this work, we present a study for neural networks--genetic algorithm approach intended to aid in lung sound classification. Lung sound was captured from the chest wall of The subjects ... Keywords: MLP, auscultation, genetic algorithm, lung sounds, neural network, respiratory diseases

?nan Gler; Hseyin Polat; Uman Ergn

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cancer in Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

statistics and information agency. The Institutes mission is better health and wellbeing for Australians through better health and welfare statistics and information. The Australasian Association of Cancer Registries (AACR) is a collaborative body representing state and territory cancer registries in Australia and New Zealand. Most are members of the International Association of Cancer Registries. The AACR was formed in November 1982 to provide a formal mechanism for promoting uniformity of collection, classification and collation of cancer data. The objectives of the AACR are to: Achieve national agreement on cancer-specific data definitions and coding and to encourage compliance with such agreements. As far as possible, data definitions and coding should be consistent with existing International Association of Cancer Registries (IACR) protocols and conventions. Facilitate the production of Australian, state and territory and national statistical publications on cancer that are comparable with each other and with international statistical publications. Improve the operational efficiency, and data completeness and quality, of the state and territory and New Zealand cancer registries through collaborative sharing of information. Contribute to national cancer control development in Australia and New Zealand through the regular and timely publication of local and national cancer statistics and the provision of data for cancer control research and health promotion. Contribute national data to international publications of the IACR. Contribute to international cancer coding and statistical analysis developments via members involvement with IACR. Facilitate national epidemiological research projects on cancer (given appropriate local and AIHW ethics committee approvals).CANCER SERIES Number 28

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USAEC SHIPMENTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, 1957-1961  

SciTech Connect

Data are summarized on incidents that have been sustained by the AEC in the transport of radioactive materials from 1957 through 1981. In the period covered by this report there were 47 incidents reported. Twenty-nine did not result in the release of radioactive materials. Of the remaining 18 cases there was none that involved any serious radiological consequences or involved costly cleanup. Six of the incidents involved onsite movements of materials. The incidents are classified in accordance with the type of radiation release that occurred, mode of transport, and type of incident. Photographs are included for a number of the incidents. (C.H.)

Patterson, D.E.; DeFatta, V.P.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from all four radiologists. These 2669 lesions include nodule outlines and subjective nodule characteristic ratings. Conclusions: The LIDC/IDRI Database is expected to provide an essential medical imaging research resource to spur CAD development, validation, and dissemination in clinical practice.

NONE

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cancer Due to Prolonged Inflammation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development. Molecular Cancer Research 4.221 (2006): 5-261.direction of future cancer research is to better understand

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Thionyl-chloride-induced lung injury and bronchiolitis obliterans  

SciTech Connect

Thionyl-chloride (TCl) is used in the manufacture of lithium batteries, producing SO2 and HCl fumes on contact with water. We report two cases of accidental TCl exposure resulting in lung injury that may vary from a relatively mild and reversible interstitial lung disease to a severe form of bronchiolitis obliterans causing, after a latent period, an acute/chronic respiratory failure as well as other complications (spontaneous pneumothorax and bronchopleural fistula), previously unreported in TCl fume inhalation.

Konichezky, S.; Schattner, A.; Ezri, T.; Bokenboim, P.; Geva, D. (Kaplan Hospital, Rehovot (Israel))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose {>=}25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving {>=}25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity.

Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy)], E-mail: krengli@med.unipmn.it; Sacco, Mariano [Department of Radiology, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Loi, Gianfranco [Department of Medical Physics, Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Masini, Laura [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Ferrante, Daniela [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Gambaro, Giuseppina [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Ronco, Marco [Department of Pneumology, Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Magnani, Corrado [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Carriero, Alessandro [Department of Radiology, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Feature: Washing Your Laundry in Public - An Analysis of Recent High-Publicity Security Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is, reportedly, a significant rise in the frequency of information security incidents. Quite obviously, there is a very significant rise in the public reporting of such incidents. Whereas all of us are more or less experienced in protecting our ...

Matthew Pemble

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Shark cartilage and cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

speculation in the past that there may be some factor in shark's cartilage that prevents cancer, recent research by the National Cancer Institute could not confirm this, and there...

207

Soy and breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Are soy foods safe for breast cancer patients? Soy is a rich source of isoflavones (primarily genistein, daidzein, and glycitein). The standard oral therapy undertaken after initial treatment (known as adjuvant therapy) for estrogen-sensitive cancers is

208

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL IN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES, JANUARY-DECEMBER 1956  

SciTech Connect

Pertinert details of the incidents are given. Some are illustrated with photographs or diagrams. (M.H.R.)

Hayes, D.F.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Low-coherence enhanced backscattering of light: characteristics and applications for colon cancer screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cooled atoms,5 liquid crystals,6 photonic crystals,7 amplifying materials,8, 9 and solar system bodies.10 system, we varied the spatial coherence length Lsc of the incident light from 200 µm to 35 µmLow-coherence enhanced backscattering of light: characteristics and applications for colon cancer

Pradhan, Prabhakar

210

ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wi l l i a m H a l e y Wi l l i a m H a l e y B r a d P o t t e r C o mm o n C h a l l e n g e s a n d S o l u t i o n s J u n e 2 0 1 1 D e e p w a t e r H o r i z o n a n dN u c l e a r & R a d i o l o g i c a l I n c i d e n t s The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill shares many of the same challenges associated with a radiological incident like the one considered in the Empire 09 1 exercise or even a much larger nuclear incident. By analyzing experiences during Deepwater Horizon, these challenges can be identified by the interagency in advance of a radiological or nuclear emergency and solutions made available. Establishing and staffing a UnifiEd Command strUCtUrE The demands of Deepwater Horizon challenged the traditional response construct envisioned by national planning systems.

211

Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

Wells, M.A. [Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stearns, L.J. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Monroeville, PA (United States); Davie, A.D. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Day, E. [PELL Resources Company, Manassas, VA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

ENVIRONMENTAL CANCER RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is submitted to the President of the United States in fulfillment of the obligations of the Presidents Cancer Panel to appraise the National Cancer Program as established in accordance with the National Cancer Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-218), the

Margaret L. Kripke, Ph.D.; Abby B. S, Ph.D.; Suzanne H. Reuben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer  

SciTech Connect

A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

Vivekanandan, Nagarajan, E-mail: viveknaren@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India); Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analysis of cancer risk related to longitudinal information on smoking habits  

SciTech Connect

Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) has followed the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) cohort consisting of atomic bomb survivors and unexposed subjects for more than 40 years. The information on their lifestyles, including smoking habits, has been collected in the past 25 years through two mail surveys of the entire LSS cohort and three interview surveys of a subcohort for the biennial medical examination program. In the present study an attempt was made to consolidate the information on smoking habits obtained from the five serial surveys, and then a risk analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of updating the smoking information on the smoking-related risk estimates for lung cancer. The estimates of smoking-related risk became larger and estimates of dose response became sharper by updating smoking information using all of the data obtained from the five serial surveys. Analyses were also conducted for cancer sites other than lung. The differences in risk estimates between the two approaches were not as evident for the other cancer sites as for lung. 13 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Defining the Critical Hurdles in Cancer Immunotherapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australia. Ovarian Cancer Research Center, University ofal: New models for cancer research: human cancer stem cellAmerican Association for Cancer Research 2010, 16:2861-71.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator was constructed and tested in 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The monochromator was originally designed as a high heat load monochromator capable of handling 5-10 kW beams from a wiggler source. This was accomplished by spreading the x-ray beam out on the surface an asymmetric-cut crystal and by using liquid metal cooling of the first crystal. The monochromator turned out to be a highly versatile monochromator that could perform many different types of experiments. The monochromator consisted of two 18 deg. asymmetrically cut Si crystals that could be rotated about 3 independent axes. The first stage ({Phi}) rotates the crystal around an axis perpendicular to the diffraction plane. This rotation changes the angle of the incident beam with the surface of the crystal without changing the Bragg angle. The second rotation ({Psi}) is perpendicular to the first and is used to control the shape of the beam footprint on the crystal. The third rotation ({Theta}) controls the Bragg angle. Besides the high heat load application, the use of asymmetrically cut crystals allows one to increase or decrease the acceptance angle for crystal diffraction of a monochromatic x-ray beam and allows one to increase or decrease the wavelength bandwidth of the diffraction of a continuum source like a bending-magnet beam or a normal x-ray-tube source. When the monochromator is used in the doubly expanding mode, it is possible to expand the vertical size of the double-diffracted beam by a factor of 10-15. When this was combined with a bending magnet source, it was possible to generate an 8 keV area beam, 16 mm wide by 26 mm high with a uniform intensity and parallel to 1.2 arc sec that could be applied in imaging experiments.

Smither, R. K.; Fernandez, P. B.; Mills, D. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Graber, T. J. [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The ultrastructure of book lung development in the bark scorpion Centruroides gracilis (Scorpiones: Buthidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hemo- lymph channels of adult book lungs in scorpions and16 References 1. Farley RD: Book gill development in embryosrelationship of the lung-book of Scorpio to the gill-book of

Farley, Roger D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident  

SciTech Connect

If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

Sullivan,T.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cancer survivorship : understanding the issues faced by cancer survivors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??International research on cancer survivorship has started to identify a range of issues that affect cancer survivors physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. These issues can (more)

Hayward, Penelope Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs. Annual progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by {alpha} particles must be determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations and in parallel on electron micrographs of the dog bronchial lining. The second part of this proposal describes studies to quantitate the cycling bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on frozen and paraffin sections and similar labeling of isolated bronchial epithelial cells sorted flow cytometry.

Robbins, E.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Development of metrology instruments for grazing incidence mirrors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) from high-brightness sources requires the use of optical components with very smooth surfaces and extremely precise shapes. Most manufacturers are not capable of measuring the figure and finish quality of the aspheric optics required for use in grazing incidence beam lines. Over the past several years we have developed measurement techniques and metrology instrumentation that have allowed us to measure the surface profile and roughness of large cylinder optics, up to one meter in length. Based on our measurements and feedback, manufacturers have been able to advance the state-of-the-art in mirror fabrication and are now able to produce acceptable components. Our analysis techniques enable designers to write meaningful specifications and predict the performance of real surfaces in their particular beamline configurations. Commercial instruments are now available for measuring surface microroughness with spatial periods smaller than about one millimeter. No commercial instruments are available for measuring the surface figure on cylindrical aspheres over long spatial periods, from one millimeter up to one meter. For that reason we developed a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that measures surface profile over the long period range in a non-contact manner to extremely high accuracy. Examples of measured surfaces and data analysis techniques will be discussed, and limitations on the quality of optical surfaces related to intrinsic material properties will also be discussed. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (USA)); Qian, Shi-nan (China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH (China). Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liu, Wuming (Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

THE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE INCIDENCE OF GALACTIC TIDAL FEATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a sample of 54 galaxy clusters (0.04 < z < 0.15) containing 3551 early-type galaxies suitable for study, we identify those with tidal features both interactively and automatically. We find that {approx}3% have tidal features that can be detected with data that reach a 3{sigma} sensitivity limit of 26.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Regardless of the method used to classify tidal features, or the fidelity imposed on such classifications, we find a deficit of tidally disturbed galaxies with decreasing clustercentric radius that is most pronounced inside of {approx}0.5 R{sub 200}. We cannot distinguish whether the trend arises from an increasing likelihood of recent mergers with increasing clustercentric radius or a decrease in the lifetime of tidal features with decreasing clustercentric radius. We find no evidence for a relationship between local density and the incidence of tidal features, but our local density measure has large uncertainties. We find interesting behavior in the rate of tidal features among cluster early-types as a function of clustercentric radius and expect such results to provide constraints on the effect of the cluster environment on the structure of galaxy halos, the build-up of the red sequence of galaxies, and the origin of the intracluster stellar population.

Adams, Scott M.; Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sand, David J.; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Bildfell, Chris; Pritchet, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Priest Rapids Dam flow curtailment: Incident report, January 7, 1961  

SciTech Connect

This incident report deals with mechanical damage (caused by falling rocks) to the power line supplying station power, Priest Rapids Dam lost all generating flow at 4:23 p.m., cutting discharge from 71,700 cfs to about 12,000 cfs. Within five minutes, spillway gates were opened, bringing river flow back to greater than 36,000 cfs in about 10 minutes. The flow at 181-B dropped from 72,000 cfs to a minimum of 56,000 cfs at about 5:25 p.m. Priest Rapids generators returned to service at 4:45 p.m., the indicated flow at the gauge reaching 71,700 cfs again at about 8:00 p.m. River temperatures at the gauge increased 0.5 C following the interruption, but not at 181-B. Prompt HAPO notification of the flow reduction as provided for in the agreement between the PUD and the AEC was not made on this occasion; the first notice came from the 251 Substation.

Kramer, H.A.; Corley, J.P.

1961-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

Plasma particle and energy reflection at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The particle and energy reflection coefficients are calculated for a plasma incident at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field. The salient result of these calculations is that the reflection coefficients can approach unity when the magnetic field is incident at grazing angles. This reflection of particles and energy will be an important process in determining the particle and energy balance in the edge plasma.

Knize, R.J.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One application of travel time information explored in this thesis is freeway incident detection. It is vital to develop reliable methods for automatically detecting incidents to facilitate the quick response and removal of incidents before they cause breakdowns in traffic flow. The use of real-time travel time data to monitor freeway conditions has the advantages over conventional loop detectors of taking into account the dynamic, longitudinal nature of traffic flow and requiring data from only a portion of the traffic stream. This study employed the Standard Normal Deviate (SND) Model to test the feasibility of using travel time data to detect lane blocking incidents. The fundamental concept of the SND Model was based on the comparison of real-time travel time data to historical travel time data for given freeway segments during specified times. The travel time and incident reports used were collected through the Real-Time Traffic Information System (RTTIS) in the north freeway corridor of Houston, Texas using probe vehicles equipped with cellular telephones. The data were compiled on 39 freeway links from October 1991 through August 1992 on weekdays during morning and afternoon data collection periods. The results of incident detection tests, applying the SND Model to incident and travel time me data from the North Freeway, indicated high successful incident detection rates. However, high false alarm rates also resulted from the SND Model test applications. An optimum SND value of 2.0 was observed for the North Freeway test data. At this value the SND tests produced successful incident detection rates of 70 percent and higher during both the morning and afternoon periods. False alarm rates were also 70 percent. The best results were achieved on those freeway sections where the most incident and travel time data had been collected. The overall results of the incident detection tests on the North Freeway demonstrated that the SND Model was a feasible incident detection algorithm, but required an extensive historical travel time data base.

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Clinical Factors Associated With Pleural Effusion After Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical factors as predictors of pleural effusion in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-three esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT from January 2001 to March 2007 were reviewed retrospectively on the basis of the following criteria: pathologically confirmed esophageal cancer, available computed tomography scan for treatment planning, 6-month follow-up after CRT, and radiation dose {>=}50 Gy. Exclusion criteria were lung metastasis, malignant pleural effusion, and surgery. Mean heart dose, mean total lung dose, and percentages of heart or total lung volume receiving {>=}10-60 Gy (Heart-V{sub 10} to V{sub 60} and Lung-V{sub 10} to V{sub 60}, respectively) were analyzed in relation to pleural effusion. Results: The median follow-up time was 26.9 months (range, 6.7-70.2) after CRT. Of the 43 patients, 15 (35%) developed pleural effusion. By univariate analysis, mean heart dose, Heart-V{sub 10} to V{sub 60}, and Lung-V{sub 50} to V{sub 60} were significantly associated with pleural effusion. Poor performance status, primary tumor of the distal esophagus, and age {>=}65 years were significantly related with pleural effusion. Multivariate analysis identified Heart-V{sub 50} as the strongest predictive factor for pleural effusion (p = 0.01). Patients with Heart-V{sub 50} <20%, 20%{<=} Heart-V{sub 50} <40%, and Heart-V{sub 50} {>=}40% had 6%, 44%, and 64% of pleural effusion, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Heart-V{sub 50} is a useful parameter for assessing the risk of pleural effusion and should be reduced to avoid pleural effusion.

Shirai, Katsuyuki, E-mail: katu.shirai@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma Prefectural Cancer Center, Ota (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Tamaki, Yoshio; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma Prefectural Cancer Center, Ota (Japan); Murata, Kazutoshi; Satoh, Yumi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Higuchi, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma Prefectural Cancer Center, Ota (Japan); Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical incidents can be prevented or mitigated by improving safety performance and implementing the lessons learned from past incidents. Despite some limitations in the range of information they provide, chemical incident databases can be utilized as sources of lessons learned from incidents by evaluating patterns and relationships that exist between the data variables. Much of the previous research focused on studying the causal factors of incidents; hence, this research analyzes the chemical incidents from both the causal and consequence elements of the incidents. A subset of incidents data reported to the Hazardous Substance Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) chemical incident database from 2002-2006 was analyzed using data mining and text mining methodologies. Both methodologies were performed with the aid of STATISTICA software. The analysis studied 12,737 chemical process related incidents and extracted descriptions of incidents in free-text data format from 3,316 incident reports. The structured data was analyzed using data mining tools such as classification and regression trees, association rules, and cluster analysis. The unstructured data (textual data) was transformed into structured data using text mining, and subsequently analyzed further using data mining tools such as, feature selections and cluster analysis. The data mining analysis demonstrated that this technique can be used in estimating the incident severity based on input variables of release quantity and distance between victims and source of release. Using the subset data of ammonia release, the classification and regression tree produced 23 final nodes. Each of the final nodes corresponded to a range of release quantity and, of distance between victims and source of release. For each node, the severity of injury was estimated from the observed severity scores' average. The association rule identified the conditional probability for incidents involving piping, chlorine, ammonia, and benzene in the value of 0.19, 0.04, 0.12, and 0.04 respectively. The text mining was utilized successfully to generate elements of incidents that can be used in developing incident scenarios. Also, the research has identified information gaps in the HSEES database that can be improved to enhance future data analysis. The findings from data mining and text mining should then be used to modify or revise design, operation, emergency response planning or other management strategies.

Mahdiyati, -

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

NIST SP 800-83, Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Special Publication 800-83 Sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and Handling ...

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

Determination of petroleum pipe scale solubility in simulated lung fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) exists in connate waters and, under the right conditions during oil drilling, can plate out on the interior surfaces of oil and gas industry equipment. Once deposited, this material is commonly referred to as ??scale.?? This thesis is concerned with the presence of 226Ra in scale deposited on the inner surfaces of oil drilling pipes and the internal dose consequences of inhalation of that scale once released. In the process of normal operation, barium sulfate scale with a radium component adheres to the inside of downhole tubulars in oil fields. When crude flow is diminished below acceptable operational requirements, the pipe is sent to a descaling operation to be cleaned, most likely by a method known as rattling. The rattling process generates dust. This research investigated the chemical composition of that aerosol and measured the solubility of pipe scale from three oilfield formations. Using standard in-vitro dissolution experimental equipment and methods, pipe scale is introduced into simulated lung fluid over a two-week period. These samples are analyzed using quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS), known for very low detection limits. Analysis reveals virtually no 226Ra present in the lung fluid exposed to pipe scale. Sample measurements were compared against background measurements using Student??s t test, which revealed that nearly all the samples were statistically insignificant in comparison to the lung fluid blanks. This statistical test proves within a 95% confidence interval that there is no 226Ra present in the lung fluid samples. These results indicate that inhaled NORM pipe scale should be classified as Class S and serve to further confirm the extreme insolubility of petroleum pipe scale. For dose calculations, the S classification means that the lung is the main organ of concern. Radium-226 from petroleum pipe scale does not solubilize in the interstitial lung fluid, and does not, therefore, enter the bloodstream via respiratory pathways. Since there is no removal by dissolution, the 500 day biological half-life implied by the S classification is based solely on the mechanical transport of 226Ra out of the lungs by phagocytosis or the mucociliary escalator.

Cezeaux, Jason Roderick

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: mxy131@ncc.re.k [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Coccidioidomycosis Incidence in Arizona Predicted by Seasonal Precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The environmental mechanisms that determine the inter-annual and seasonal variability in incidence of coccidioidomycosis are unclear. In this study, we use Arizona coccidioidomycosis case data for 19952006 to generate a timeseries of monthly estimates of exposure rates in Maricopa County, AZ and Pima County, AZ. We reveal a seasonal autocorrelation structure for exposure rates in both Maricopa County and Pima County which indicates that exposure rates are strongly related from the fall to the spring. An abrupt end to this autocorrelation relationship occurs near the the onset of the summer precipitation season and increasing exposure rates related to the subsequent season. The identification of the autocorrelation structure enabled us to construct a primary exposure season that spans August-March and a secondary season that spans April June which are then used in subsequent analyses. We show that OctoberDecember precipitation is positively associated with rates of exposure for the primary exposure season in both Maricopa County (R = 0.72, p = 0.012) and Pima County (R = 0.69, p = 0.019). In addition, exposure rates during the primary exposure seasons are negatively associated with concurrent precipitation in Maricopa (R = 20.79, p = 0.004) and Pima (R = 20.64, p = 0.019), possibly due to reduced spore dispersion. These associations enabled the generation of models to estimate exposure rates for the primary exposure season. The models explain 69 % (p = 0.009) and 54 % (p = 0.045) of the variance in the study period for Maricopa and Pima counties, respectively. We did not find any significant predictors for exposure rates during the secondary season. This study

James D. Tamerius; Andrew C. Comrie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

On the Incidence and Kinematics of Strong Mg II Absorbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of two investigations into the nature of strong (rest equivalent width > 1.0 Ang) Mg II absorption systems at high redshift. The first line of questioning examines the complete SDSS- DR3 set of quasar spectra to determine the evolution of the incidence of strong Mg II absorption. The redshift evolution of the comoving line-of-sight number density, l(x), is characterized by a roughly constant value at z > 0.8, indicating that the product of the number density and gas cross-section of halos hosting strong Mg II is unevolving at these redshifts. At z gas cross-section to strong Mg II absorption and therefore a decline in the physical processes relevant to such absorption. This evolution roughly tracks the global evolution of the SFR density. The decrease of l(x) is more pronounced for larger equivalent width systems. We also present the results of a search for strong Mg II absorption in 91 high resolution quasar spectra, which allow us to investigate the kinematics of such systems. These systems are characterized by the presence of numerous components spread over a ~200 km/s velocity width and the presence of more highly ionized species, which display kinematic profiles similar to the corresponding Mg II absorption. We consider these results in light of two competing theories to explain strong Mg II absorption: post-starburst, SN-driven galactic winds and accreting gas in the halos of massive galaxies. The later model is disfavored by the absence of evolution in l(x) at z > 1. We argue that the strong Mg II phenomenon primarily arises from feedback processes in relatively low mass galactic halos related to star formation.

Gabriel E. Prochter; Jason X. Prochaska; Scott Burles

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

Canadian Expert Panel on Tobacco Smoke and Breast Cancer Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research Ontario CancerInternational Agency for Research on Cancer, 2000. CancerThe Canadian Cancer Registries Epidemiology Research Group,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ritter, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Quint, Douglas J. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hurkmans, Coen W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Timmerman, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Bezjak, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Marsh, Lon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Okunieff, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University Cancer Center, and Winship Cancer institute, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A SAS-macro for estimation of the cumulative incidence using Poisson regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In survival analyses, we often estimate the hazard rate of a specific cause. Sometimes the main focus is not the hazard rates but the cumulative incidences, i.e., the probability of having failed from a specific cause prior to a given time. The cumulative ... Keywords: Competing risks, Cox regression, Cumulative incidence, Hazard rate, Poisson regression, Survival analysis

Berit Lindum Waltoft

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Components of an Incident Management Simulation and Gaming Framework and Related Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation's emergency responders need to work in a coordinated, well-planned manner to best mitigate the impact of an emergency incident. They need to be trained and ready to act in view of the increased security threat. The training has been traditionally ... Keywords: architecture, component, emergency response, gaming, incident management, integration, modeling, simulation

Sanjay Jain; Charles R. Mclean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

On the Surface Temperature Sensitivity of the Reflected Shortwave, Outgoing Longwave, and Net Incident Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global-mean top-of-atmosphere incident solar radiation (ISR) minus the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and the reflected shortwave radiation (RSW) is the net incident radiation (NET). This study analyzes the global-mean NET sensitivity to a ...

Hartmut H. Aumann; Alexander Ruzmaikin; Ali Behrangi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Hyperplasia in Canine Model Gayle Woloschak Northwestern University Abstract Purpose/Objective(s): There have been few studies analyzing radiation-induced prostate cancer in humans or animals. Our research attempts to fill this void by determining the effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation on the incidence of prostate cancer and prostatic hyperplasia in a large cohort of beagle dogs. Material/Methods: The subjects for the experiment were beagle dogs, which were chosen due to physiologic and anatomic similarities to humans (Thompson, 1989). We retrospectively analyzed data from historic irradiation experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on 347 beagles. The cobalt-60 cohort consisted of 268 dogs, which received whole

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Collisionless absorption of light waves incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisionless absorption of laser light incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients is studied analytically and numerically. For the normal incidence case, it is shown that both sheath inverse bremsstrahlung and the anomalous skin effect are limiting cases of the same collisionless absorption mechanism. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, the effects of finite sheath-transit time and finite density gradient are investigated. The analyses are extended to oblique incident cases. For p-polarized obliquely incident light, the results are significantly different from those for the normal incidence case. Most noticeable is the absorption enhancement for the p-polarized light due to the interaction of the electrons with the normal (parallel to the density gradient) component of the laser electric field in the sheath region.

Yang, T.Y.B.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact that the research project did not continue beyond its first year.

David G. Hoel, PhD

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase  

SciTech Connect

Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and hydrocarbon denuded diesel exhaust Title Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and hydrocarbon denuded diesel exhaust Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Holder, Amara L., Donald Lucas, Regine Goth-Goldstein, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Chemosphere Volume 70 Pagination 13-19 Date Published 09/2007 Keywords air-liquid interface, combustion particle, human bronchial epithelial cells, interleukin-8 Abstract In vitro studies with the organic extracts of diesel particles have suggested that hydrocarbons such as PAH may play a role in an inflammatory response, but these have been limited by the possible artifacts introduced in the particle collection and processing. In this study, we avoid these artifacts and use an activated carbon denuder to remove hydrocarbons from the exhaust stream to investigate their role in the inflammatory response. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE140) were exposed at the air-cell interface to diluted and aged exhaust from a diesel generator operated at partial and no load conditions. When particles were removed with a filter before cell exposure, exhaust gases accounted for almost half of the response compared to the whole exhaust. Removal of gas phase and a portion of the particle phase hydrocarbons with the denuder decreased the interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion to unexposed levels

245

Radiobiology of normal rat lung in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer radiation therapy that utilizes biochemical tumor cell targeting and provides a mixed field of high and low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation with differing ...

Kiger, Jingli Liu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Residual Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated With Endocrine Therapy With or Without Radical Radiotherapy: A Side Study of the SPCG-7 Randomized Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 randomized trial demonstrated a survival benefit of combined endocrine therapy and external-beam radiotherapy over endocrine therapy alone in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. In a subset of the study population, the incidence and clinical implications of residual prostate cancer in posttreatment prostate biopsy specimens was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Biopsy specimens were obtained from 120 of 875 men in the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 study. Results: Biopsies were performed at median of 45 months follow-up. In 63 patients receiving endocrine treatment only and 57 patients receiving combined treatment, residual cancer was found in 66% (n = 41) and 22% (n = 12), respectively (p =}8). Endocrine therapy alone was predictive of residual prostate cancer: odds ratio 7.49 (3.18-17.7), p cancer-specific death 19% vs. 9.7% (p = 0.025). In multivariable analysis, biochemical recurrence was significantly associated with residual cancer: hazard ratio 2.69 (1.45-4.99), p = 0.002, and endocrine therapy alone hazard ratio 3.45 (1.80-6.62), p cancer was significantly associated with serum prostate-specific antigen recurrence, local tumor progression, clinical recurrence, and cancer-specific death in univariable analysis. Residual cancer was predictive of prostate-specific antigen recurrence in multivariable analysis.

Solberg, Arne, E-mail: arne.solberg@stolav.n [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Haugen, Olav A. [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Pathology and Medical Genetics, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Viset, Trond [Department of Pathology and Medical Genetics, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Bergh, Anders [Department of Medical Biosciences/Pathology, Umea University Hospital, Umea (Sweden); Tasdemir, Ilker [Department of Urology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger (Norway); Ahlgren, Goeran [Department of Urology, Malmoe University Hospital, UMAS (Sweden); Widmark, Anders [Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umea University Hospital, Umea (Sweden); Angelsen, Anders [Department of Urology, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p =}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)], E-mail: mwahab@med.miami.edu; Reis, Isildinha M. [Division of Biostatistics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Hamilton, Kara [Division of Biostatistics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Jump to: navigation, search Name Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Agency/Company /Organization Resources for the Future Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy Topics Finance, Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.rff.org/RFF/Documen Country Costa Rica UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica[1] Abstract "Although fuel taxes are a practical means of curbing vehicular air pollution, congestion, and accidents in developing countries-all of which are typically major problems-they are often opposed on distributional

249

Lagrangian Drifter Dispersion in the Surf Zone: Directionally Spread, Normally Incident Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian drifter statistics in a surf zone wave and circulation model are examined and compared to single- and two-particle dispersion statistics observed on an alongshore uniform natural beach with small, normally incident, directionally ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

US DOE/NNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOENNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological Soil Samples BusinessUSA DataTools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov ...

251

A Simple Physical Model to Estimate Incident Solar Radiation at the Surface from GOES Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a model designed to estimate the incident solar radiation at the suface from GOES satellite brightness measurements in clear and cloudy conditions. In this simple physical model, the effect of Rayleigh scattering is taken into account. ...

Catherine Gautier; Georges Diak; Serge Masse

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Some Effects of the Yellowstone Fire Smoke Cloud on Incident Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the 1988 Yellowstone National Park fire, smoke cloud on incident broadband and spectral solar irradiance was studied using measurements made at the Solar Energy Research Institute's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, Golden, ...

Roland L. Hulstrom; Thomas L. Stoffel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Use of DFDR Information in the Analysis of a Turbulence Incident over Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital flight data recorder (DFDR) tapes from commercial aircraft can provide useful information about the mesoscale environment of severe turbulence incidents. Air motion computations from these data and their errors are briefly described. An ...

Peter F. Lester; Orhan Sen; R. E. Bach Jr.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Stem Cell Marker Expression in Mouse Lung after Exposure to Acute...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stem cell specific marker expression in mouse lung after whole-body exposure to irradiation with either photons or protons and evaluate modulating effects of preirradiation...

255

Proteomics for cancer biomarker discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: If we are to successfully treat cancer, we must understand the biologic underpinnings in conjunction with early diagnosis. Genome-wide expression studies have advanced the research of many cancers. Nevertheless, ...

Volchenboum, Samuel Louis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs  

SciTech Connect

One hundred and forty-seven bronchial samples (generations 3--6) from 66 patients (62 usable; 36 female, 26 male; median age 61) have been dissected by generation from fixed surgical lung specimens obtained after the removal of pathological lesions. In addition, one hundred and fifty-six mongol dog bronchi (generations 2--6) dissected from different lobes of 26 dog lungs have also been similarly prepared. One hundred and twenty-seven human samples have been completely processed for electron microscopy and have yielded 994 electron micrographs of which 655 have been entered into the Computerized Stereological Analysis System (COSAS) and been used for the measurement of the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface. Similarly 328 micrographs of dog epithelium from 33 bronchial samples have been used to measure the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface and have been entered into COSAS. Using the COSAS planimetry program, we continue to expand our established data bases which describe the volume density and nuclear numbers per electron micrograph for 5 cell types of the human bronchial epithelial lining of men and women, as well as smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers and similar parameters for the same 5 epithelial cell types of dog bronchi. Our micrographs of human bronchial epithelium have allowed us to analyze the recent suggestion that the DNA of lymphocytes may be subject to significant damage from Rn progeny while within the lung. Since the last progress report three papers have been submitted for publication. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

Robbins, E.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Animal Models in Cancer Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer is a disorder that results in inappropriate growth of cells in the wrong place and at the wrong time. Most frequently cancer arises in older individuals and becomes problematic as it grows large enough to interrupt normal organ function, invades adjacent normal tissues disrupting their function, and spreads to other sites in the body, metastatic sites, where it causes further disabilities. Cancer arises in normal cells of our body. The environmental causes of cancer include numerous, disparate fac...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

258

doi:10.1155/2012/373879 Review Article On the RET Rearrangements in Chernobyl-Related Thyroid Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. There is a consensus that Chernobyl accident has induced thyroid cancer increase in children and adolescents. The UNSCEAR report concluded that no somatic disorders other than thyroid cancer were caused by radiation exposure due to the accident except for acute radiation sickness occurred to the people within the Power Plant at the time of the accident. A hypothesis is discussed in this paper that the increase of thyroid cancer was caused predominantly by the screening, overdiagnosis, and registration of nonirradiated persons as Chernobyl victims. A mechanism of thyroid cancer overdiagnosis is described that can be active even today, causing hypertherapy. Older neglected tumors found by the screening shortly after the Chernobyl accident or brought from noncontaminated areas were misclassified as aggressive radiation-induced cancers. Therefore, supposed markers of the radiationinduced thyroid cancer, such as the RET rearrangements, are probably associated with disease duration and tumor progression. The screening effect is obviously dependent on the basis level of medical surveillance: the higher the level, the smaller the screening effect. Absence of any significant increase of thyroid cancer after the Fukushima accident in spite of the vigorous screening would certify the high level of health care in Japan especially for children. In some publications [1, 2], cause-effect relationships between radiation, certain genetic abnormalities, and incidence increase of the post-Chernobyl thyroid cancer (TC)

Sergei V. Jargin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

2D/3D registration algorithm for lung brachytherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A 2D/3D registration algorithm is proposed for registering orthogonal x-ray images with a diagnostic CT volume for high dose rate (HDR) lung brachytherapy. Methods: The algorithm utilizes a rigid registration model based on a pixel/voxel intensity matching approach. To achieve accurate registration, a robust similarity measure combining normalized mutual information, image gradient, and intensity difference was developed. The algorithm was validated using a simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms. Transfer catheters were placed inside the phantoms to simulate the unique image features observed during treatment. The algorithm sensitivity to various degrees of initial misregistration and to the presence of foreign objects, such as ECG leads, was evaluated. Results: The mean registration error was 2.2 and 1.9 mm for the simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms, respectively. The error was comparable to the interoperator catheter digitization error of 1.6 mm. Preliminary analysis of data acquired from four patients indicated a mean registration error of 4.2 mm. Conclusions: Results obtained using the proposed algorithm are clinically acceptable especially considering the complications normally encountered when imaging during lung HDR brachytherapy.

Zvonarev, P. S. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Farrell, T. J.; Hunter, R.; Wierzbicki, M.; Hayward, J. E. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Medical Physics, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada); Sur, R. K. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Jackson, Isabel L. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Vujaskovic, Zeljko, E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Changes in Initial Treatment for Prostate Cancer Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 1999-2007  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the absence of evidence from large clinical trials, optimal therapy for localized prostate cancer remains unclear; however, treatment patterns continue to change. We examined changes in the management of patients with prostate cancer in the Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective claims-based analysis of the use of radiation therapy, surgery, and androgen deprivation therapy in the 12 months after diagnosis of prostate cancer in a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare claims. Patients were Medicare beneficiaries 67 years or older with incident prostate cancer diagnosed between 1999 and 2007. Results: There were 20,918 incident cases of prostate cancer between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy decreased from 55% to 36%, and the proportion of patients receiving no active therapy increased from 16% to 23%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the most common method of radiation therapy, accounting for 77% of external beam radiotherapy by 2007. Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy began to replace open surgical approaches, being used in 49% of radical prostatectomies by 2007. Conclusions: Between 2002 and 2007, the use of androgen deprivation therapy decreased, open surgical approaches were largely replaced by minimally invasive radical prostatectomy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the predominant method of radiation therapy in the Medicare population. The aging of the population and the increasing use of newer, higher-cost technologies in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer may have important implications for nationwide health care costs.

Dinan, Michaela A.; Robinson, Timothy J. [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Zagar, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Scales, Charles D. [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Curtis, Lesley H.; Reed, Shelby D. [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Schulman, Kevin A., E-mail: kevin.schulman@duke.edu [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Morphological changes and nuclear translocation of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein precede apoptosis in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells  

SciTech Connect

We have previously shown that reactivation of DLC1, a RhoGAP containing tumor suppressor gene, inhibits tumorigenicity of human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (NSCLC). After transfection of NSCLC cells with wild type (WT) DLC1, changes in cell morphology were observed. To determine whether such changes have functional implications, we generated several DLC1 mutants and examined their effects on cell morphology, proliferation, migration and apoptosis in a DLC1 deficient NSCLC cell line. We show that WT DLC1 caused actin cytoskeleton-based morphological alterations manifested as cytoplasmic extensions and membrane blebbings in most cells. Subsequently, a fraction of cells exhibiting DLC1 protein nuclear translocation (PNT) underwent caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. We also show that the RhoGAP domain is essential for the occurrence of morphological alterations, PNT and apoptosis, and the inhibition of cell migration. DLC1 PNT is dependent on a bipartite nuclear localizing sequence and most likely is regulated by a serine-rich domain at N-terminal part of the DLC1 protein. Also, we found that DLC1 functions in the cytoplasm as an inhibitor of tumor cell proliferation and migration, but in the nucleus as an inducer of apoptosis. Our analyses provide evidence for a possible link between morphological alterations, PNT and proapoptotic and anti-oncogenic activities of DLC1 in lung cancer.

Yuan Baozhu [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)], E-mail: bby1@cdc.gov; Jefferson, Amy M.; Millecchia, Lyndell [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Popescu, Nicholas C. [Laboratory of Experimental Carcinogenesis, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MD 28092 (United States); Reynolds, Steven H. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0878  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department's Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program DOE/IG-0878 December 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 11, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy operates numerous networks and systems to help accomplish its strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science and the environment. The systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could impact the Department's

264

EP&R Standards Project Report: Technical Review of National Incident Management Standards  

SciTech Connect

The importance and necessity for a fully developed and implemented National Incident Management System (NIMS) has been demonstrated in recent years by the impact of national events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Throughout the history of emergency response to major disasters, especially when multiple response organizations are involved, there have been systemic problems in the consistency and uniformity of response operations. Identifying national standards that support the development and implementation of NIMS is key to helping solve these systemic problems. The NIMS seeks to provide uniformity and consistency for incident management by using common terminology and protocols that will enable responders to coordinate their efforts to ensure an efficient response.

Stenner, Robert D.

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analysis of the incidence angle of the beam radiation on CPC. [Compound Parabolic Concentrator  

SciTech Connect

Analytic expressions have been derived for the projected incidence angles {var theta}{sub 1} and {var theta}{sub 2} from a two-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator solar collector. For a CPC the fraction of the incident rays on the aperture at angle {var theta}, which reaches the absorber, depends only on the {var theta}{sub 1} angle. In this paper, a mathematical expression for {var theta}{sub 1} and {var theta}{sub t} has been calculated to determine the times at which acceptance of the sun's beam radiation begins and ceases for a CPC consisting of arbitrary orientation.

Pinazo, J.M.; Canada, J.; Arago, F. (Univ. Politecnica de Valencia (Spain))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

{sup 222}Rn dosimetry in the dog lung  

SciTech Connect

The alpha dose to cells in bronchial airways in the beagle dog during historical exposures to {sup 222}Rn decay products is calculated using updated information on airway morphometry, call nucleus depth, mucus thickness, physical dosimetry and atmospheric characteristics. The alpha dose per unit exposure to basal call nuclei in the upper airways ranges from 2 to 7 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1} (excluding the trachea) depending upon the exposure protocol used. The dose to alveolar tissue is 3 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1}. In the human lung, the dose factor for the bronchial airways is 9 mGy WLM{sub {minus}1} and for the pulmonary parenchyma 0.5 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1} The human tumors appear primarily in the first few branching airway generations while the only tumors observed in the animals were in the bronchioloalveolar region suggesting a difference in cell sensitivity to alpha radiation.

Harley, N.H.; Meyers, O.A.; Robbins, E.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

[sup 222]Rn dosimetry in the dog lung  

SciTech Connect

The alpha dose to cells in bronchial airways in the beagle dog during historical exposures to [sup 222]Rn decay products is calculated using updated information on airway morphometry, call nucleus depth, mucus thickness, physical dosimetry and atmospheric characteristics. The alpha dose per unit exposure to basal call nuclei in the upper airways ranges from 2 to 7 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1] (excluding the trachea) depending upon the exposure protocol used. The dose to alveolar tissue is 3 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1]. In the human lung, the dose factor for the bronchial airways is 9 mGy WLM[sub [minus]1] and for the pulmonary parenchyma 0.5 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1] The human tumors appear primarily in the first few branching airway generations while the only tumors observed in the animals were in the bronchioloalveolar region suggesting a difference in cell sensitivity to alpha radiation.

Harley, N.H.; Meyers, O.A.; Robbins, E.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Postoperative Radiotherapy in the Management of Resected Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: 10 Years' Experience in a Single Institute  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study reports the long term outcomes of postoperative radiotherapy in patients with resection for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 98 patients with resected NSCLC who received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) between January 1994 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. The most frequently performed surgical procedure was lobectomy (59 patients), followed by pneumonectomy (25), wedge resection (8), and bilobectomy (6). Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered as an adjuvant treatment in 71 patients, after a wedge resection in 8 patients, and after an R1 resection in 19 patients. The PORT was administered using a Co-60 source in 86 patients and 6-MV photons in 12 patients. A Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free survival were calculated. Results: Stages included I (n =13), II (n = 50), IIIA (n = 29), and IIIB (n = 6). After a median follow-up of 52 months median survival was 61 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free survival rates for the whole group were 50%, 78%, and 55% respectively. The RT dose, Karnofsky performance status, age, lateralization of the tumor, and pneumonectomy were independent prognostic factors for OAS; anemia and the number of involved lymph nodes were independent prognostic factors for LC. Conclusions: Doses of PORT of greater than 54 Gy were associated with higher death rate in patients with left-sided tumor, which may indicate a risk of radiation-induced cardiac mortality.

Karakoyun-Celik, Omur, E-mail: okarakoyuncelik@yahoo.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, Celal Bayar University Medical School, Manisa (Turkey); Yalman, Deniz; Bolukbasi, Yasemin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Cakan, Alpaslan [Department of Chest Surgery, Ege University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Cok, Gursel [Department of Chest Surgery, Ege University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Department of Chest Diseases, Ege University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Ozkok, Serdar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ozone, skin cancer, and the SST  

SciTech Connect

In 1971, the U.S. Congress cut off funding for development of supersonic transport aircraft prototypes when it was argued that the pollution created by SSTs could reduce the stratospheric ozone content and increase the incidence of skin cancer. At present, the theory of ozone depletion is in a rather uncertain state. Two examples of this are cited. First, ozone depletion may depend more on the availability of surfaces of aerosols and particles than on the content of chlorine. Second, it has been discovered that NO(x) can tie up active chlorine and thus reduce depletion from that source. We are therefore left with the paradoxical result that under certain circumstances SSTs flying in the lower stratospheric can actually counteract, at least partially, any ozone-depleting effects of CFCs. A recent study by scientists at the Brookhaven National Laboratory showed that melanoma rates would not be affected by changes in the ozone layer. If these results are confirmed, then much of the fear associated with ozone depletion disappears. It is difficult to tell how all this will affect a future supersonic transport program, since it is not clear whether a fleet of SSTs will increase or offset ozone depletion.

Singer, S.F.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Critical Incident and Disaster Response Policy Commencement Date: 9 December, 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Incident and Disaster Response Policy Commencement Date: 9 December, 1992 Category STATEMENT 5.1 The University shall establish a comprehensive and integrated Disaster Response Plan and appropriate measures are in place to prevent predictable or potential disasters and possible critical

272

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Colorado at Boulder, University of

273

Revised rail-stop exposure model for incident-free transport of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a model for estimating railstop doses that occur during incident-free transport of nuclear waste by rail. The model, which has been incorporated into the RADTRAN III risk assessment code, can be applied to general freight and dedicated train shipments of waste.

Ostmeyer, R.M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Oscillating two stream instability at the resonance of obliquely incident radiation in inhomogeneous plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The growth rate and the threshold value were calculated for the oscillating two-stream instability for an electromagnetic wave obliquely incident on an inhomogeneous plasma. The localization of the instability is found to be in the overdense region near the threshold and to shift toward the local plasma resonance when the pump intensity increases. (auth)

Kuo, Y.Y.; Oberman, C.; Liu, C.S.; Troyon, F.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

nicter: a large-scale network incident analysis system: case studies for understanding threat landscape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have been developing the Network Incident analysis Center for Tactical Emergency Response (nicter), whose objective is to detect and identify propagating malwares. The nicter mainly monitors darknet, a set of unused IP addresses, to observe global ... Keywords: correlation analysis, malware analysis, network monitoring

Masashi Eto; Daisuke Inoue; Jungsuk Song; Junji Nakazato; Kazuhiro Ohtaka; Koji Nakao

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Low dose radiation and cancer in A-bomb survivors: latency and non-linear dose-response in the 195090 mortality cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background: Analyses of Japanese A-bomb survivors ' cancer mortality risks are used to establish recommended annual dose limits, currently set at 1 mSv (public) and 20 mSv (occupational). Do radiation doses below 20 mSv have significant impact on cancer mortality in Japanese A-bomb survivors, and is the dose-response linear? Methods: I analyse stomach, liver, lung, colon, uterus, and all-solid cancer mortality in the 0 20 mSv colon dose subcohort of the 195090 (grouped) mortality cohort, by Poisson regression using a time-lagged colon dose to detect latency, while controlling for gender, attained age, and age-atexposure. I compare linear and non-linear models, including one adapted from the cellular bystander effect for ? particles. Results: With a lagged linear model, Excess Relative Risk (ERR) for the liver and all-solid cancers is significantly positive and several orders of magnitude above extrapolations from the Life Span Study Report 12 analysis of the full cohort. Non-linear models are strongly superior to the linear model for the stomach (latency 11.89 years), liver (36.90), lung (13.60) and all-solid (43.86) in fitting

Greg Dropkin; Greg Dropkin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Evaluating the controlled release properties of inhaled nanoparticles using isolated, perfused, and ventilated lung models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymeric nanoparticles meet the increasing interest for inhalation therapy and hold great promise to improve controlled drug delivery to the lung. The synthesis of tailored polymeric materials and the improvement of nanoparticle preparation techniques ...

Moritz Beck-Broichsitter; Thomas Schmehl; Werner Seeger; Tobias Gessler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Former Worker Program - Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense...

279

Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra for the clinical linac agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using the unfolded electron energies) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 3.7%. The corresponding measured and EGSnrc-calculated transmission data agree within 1.5%, where the typical transmission measurement uncertainty on the clinical linac is 0.4% (not including the uncertainties on the incident electron parameters). Conclusions: The approach proposed in an earlier study for unfolding photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data is accurate and practical for clinical use.

Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council, M-35 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R5 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

U-bearing particles in miners' and millers' lungs  

SciTech Connect

The size distribution of uranium-bearing particles in air particulates in occupational areas of active uranium mines and mills is largely uninvestigated. Investigation of the size of residual uranium-bearing particles in uranium miners' and millers' lungs is warranted because significant inhalation of uranium can occur in certain occupational areas. Average uranium concentrations of about 0.3 ppM U in uranium miners' and millers' lungs have been reported. Local uranium concentrations in uranium-bearing particles inhaled and regionally deposited in the lungs of uranium miners and millers are orders of magnitude larger than the average uranium concentrations reported. The feasibility of using microPIXE (particle induced x-ray emission) techniques to search for such uranium-bearing particles embedded in lung tissues has been demonstrated. Proton microbeams 20 ..mu..m in diameter, scanning in 5 ..mu..m steps, were used to irradiate sections of lung tissues 10 to 40 ..mu..m thick. The paper will briefly describe the method, and present and discuss the results obtained in an extensive search for uranium-bearing particles embedded in lung tissues, collected at autopsy, of former uranium miners and millers. 13 references, 1 table.

Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Miller, S.C.; Jones, K.W.; Cholewa, M.; Hanson, A.L.; Saccomanno, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Supine lung clearance of Tc-99m DTPA and HMPAO aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speed of Tc-99m DTPA/HMPAO radioaerosol clearance from the lungs that is represented as a slope from lungs to blood was measured in 23 male normal controls using commercial lung radioaerosol delivery units in the supine position in order to avoid the influences of gravity. The right lung was selected and three regions of interest were created for equal subdivisions of the upper, middle, and lower third. The results show that the clearance of Tc-99m DTPA/HMPAO aerosols in the upper lung is lowest. The difference between upper and lower lungs for Tc-99m DTPA/HMPAO aerosol clearances are significant. The clearance of Tc-99m DTPA aerosols was significantly faster than those of Tc-99m HMPAO in any region. The authors conclude that, although the effect of gravity disappears in the supine position in our study, the differences of aerosol clearance in different regions are still significant. Lipophilic Tc-99m HMPAO aerosols were slower than those of hydrophilic Tc-99m DTPA, which suggests there are at least two different mechanisms. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Chia-Hung Kao; Hui-Tzu Lin; Shu-Ling Yu [Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)] [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Case Study: Preparing for the Smart Grids - Identifying Current Practice for Information Security Incident Management in the Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry faces the implementation of smart grids, which will introduce new information security threats to the power automation systems. The ability to appropriately prepare for, and respond to, information security incidents, is of utmost ... Keywords: Information security, incident respons, smart grids

Maria B. Line

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of the integrated application of intelligent transportation system technologies using stochastic incident generation and resolution modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of the microscopic vehicle traffic simulation software PARAMICS to evaluate different incident management implementation alternatives in South Carolina. This study customized the simulation model for random spatial and temporal ... Keywords: freeway service patrol, intelligent transportation systems, traffic incident management, traffic simulation

Yongchang Ma; Ryan Fries; Mashrur Chowdhury; Imran Inamdar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry  

SciTech Connect

The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Lehrstuhl fuer Funktionelle Materialien, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R. [HASYLAB, DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Comparative analysis of hydrogen fire and explosion incidents: quarterly report No. 2, December 1, 1977--February 28, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional hydrogen incident reports compiled during this quarter have increased the size of the computerized data base to a current total of 280 incidents. Listings of 165 incidents that have occurred in industrial and transportation operations since 1968 are presented here. Sample case histories in six different cause categories are provided together with a discussion of common safety problems contributing to these incidents. Some of these problems are inadequate detection measures for hydrogen leaks and fires and ineffective purging with inert gas. A preliminary comparison of losses due to natural gas fires/explosions and hydrogen incidents indicates that hydrogen explosions have been, on the average, four-to-six times as damaging as natural gas explosions. Some tentative explanations for this result are presented but await confirmation from a more sophisticated statistical analysis.

Zalosh, R.G.; Short, T.P.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Arc Flash Issues in Transmission and Substation Environments: Modeling of Incident Thermal Energy of Long Arcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flashes are a serious hazard that may put people in life-threatening situations and cause great damage to existing assets. The National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) introduced requirements for electric utilities to perform arc flash hazard assessment of their facilities operating at and above 1000 V. Most methods available at this time for analyzing the incident thermal energy of arc flash were developed for low and medium-voltage industri...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Establishing Tower-Top Equipotential Zones--Case-Study of Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires employers to provide protection and training for workers who perform work on de-energized and energized lines. This Technical Update report contains the draft script of a new training video on DVD under development on establishing tower-top equipotential zones. The script contains case studies and analysis of specific selected incidents that have occurred in the field. It also includes recommendations for minimizing risks and avoiding elec...

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Incident-energy and system-size dependence of directed flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present STAR's measurements of directed flow for charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200$ GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity, transverse momentum and centrality. We find that directed flow depends on the incident energy, but not on the system size. We extend the validity of limiting fragmentation hypothesis to different collision systems.

Gang Wang

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

Lesperance, Ann M.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependent Breast Cancers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Cancer Interface. Cancer Research 2007, Geigl JB, LangerBreast Cancer Research This Provisional PDF corresponds tobreast cancers Breast Cancer Research 2007, 9:R59 doi:

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Determination of Internal Target Volume From a Single Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Scan in Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The use of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) to determine the tumor internal target volume (ITV) is usually characterized by high patient radiation exposure. The objective of this study was to propose and evaluate an approach that relies on a single static positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan to determine the ITV, thereby eliminating the need for 4D-CT and thus reduce patient radiation dose. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on the concept that the observed PET image is the result of a joint convolution of an ideal PET image (free from motion and partial volume effect) with a motion-blurring kernel (MBK) and partial volume effect. In this regard, the MBK and tumor ITV are then estimated from the deconvolution of this joint model. To test this technique, phantom and patient studies were performed using different sphere/tumor sizes and motion trajectories. In all studies, a 4D-CT and a PET/CT image of the sphere/tumor were acquired. The ITV from the proposed technique was then compared to the maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume of the 4D-CT images. A Dice coefficient of the two volumes was calculated to represent the similarity between the two ITVs. Results: The average ITVs of the proposed technique were 97.2% {+-} 0.3% and 81.0% {+-} 16.7% similar to the MIP volume in the phantom and patient studies, respectively. The average dice coefficients were 0.87 {+-} 0.05 and 0.73 {+-} 0.16, respectively, for the two studies. Conclusion: Using the proposed approach, a single static PET/CT scan has the potential to replace a 4D-CT to determine the tumor ITV. This approach has the added advantage of reducing patient radiation exposure and determining the tumor MBK compared to 4D-CT/MIP-CT.

Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Clark, John W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama R., E-mail: OMawlawi@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Spatial Estimation of Populations at Risk from Radiological Dispersion Device Terrorism Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delineation of the location and size of the population potentially at risk of exposure to ionizing radiation is one of the key analytical challenges in estimating accurately the severity of the potential health effects associated with a radiological terrorism incident. Regardless of spatial scale, the geographical units for which population data commonly are collected rarely coincide with the geographical scale necessary for effective incident management and medical response. This paper identifies major government and commercial open sources of U.S. population data and presents a GIS-based approach for allocating publicly available population data, including age distributions, to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical response strategies. In summary: The gravity model offers a straight-forward, empirical tool for estimating population flows, especially when geographical areas are relatively well-defined in terms of accessibility and spatial separation. This is particularly important for several reasons. First, the spatial scale for the area impacted by a RDD terrorism event is unlikely to match fully the spatial scale of available population data. That is, the plume spread typically will not uniformly overlay the impacted area. Second, the number of people within the impacted area varies as a function whether an attack occurs during the day or night. For example, the population of a central business district or industrial area typically is larger during the day while predominately residential areas have larger night time populations. As a result, interpolation techniques that link population data to geographical units and allocate those data based on time-frame at a spatial scale that is relevant to enhancing preparedness and response. The gravity model's main advantage is that it efficiently allocates readily available, open source population data to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical monitoring strategies. The importance of being able to link population estimates to geographic areas during the course of an RDD incident can be understood intuitively: - The spatial distribution of actual total dose equivalents of ionizing radiation is likely to vary due to changes in meteorological parameters as an event evolves over time; - The size of the geographical area affected also is likely to vary as a function of the actual release scenario; - The ability to identify the location and size of the populations that may be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation is critical to carrying out appropriate treatment and post-event medical monitoring; - Once a spatial interaction model has been validated for a city or a region, it can then be used for simulation and prediction purposes to assess the possible human health consequences of different release scenarios. (authors)

Regens, J.L.; Gunter, J.T. [Center for Biosecurity Research, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis by binding to messenger RNAs (mRNA) and inhibiting translation. To initiate an investigation into the identification of miRNAs in the domestic dog, an emerging model for human disease, a comparison of the human and canine genetic databases was conducted. The bioinformatics work revealed significant conservation of miRNA genes between the two species. Proof of principle experiments, including serial dilutions and sequencing, were performed to verify that primers made to amplify human mature miRNAs can be used to amplify canine miRNAs, providing that the mature sequences are conserved. TaqMan Real-time RT-PCR, a sensitive and specific method, was used to isolate the first miRNA mature products from canine tissues. The expression levels of miR-17-3p, miR-17-5p, miR-18, miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20, and miR-92 were evaluated in five canine tissues (heart, lung, brain, kidney, and liver). Because miRNAs have been found to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancer were compared between malignant canine mammary tumors (n=6) and normal canine mammary tissue (n=10). Resulting data revealed miR-29b and miR-21 to have a statistically significant (p<0.05) up-regulation in cancerous samples. Overall expression patterns showed nine of the ten miRNAs follow the same pattern of expression in the domestic dog as the human, while the miR-145 expression does not show a difference between the normal and cancerous samples.

Boggs, Rene' Michelle

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Accelerators for Cancer Therapy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

Lennox, Arlene J.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Quantitative Assessment of Range Fluctuations in Charged Particle Lung Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Water equivalent path length (WEL) variations due to respiration can change the range of a charged particle beam and result in beam overshoot to critical organs or beam undershoot to tumor. We have studied range fluctuations by analyzing four-dimensional computed tomography data and quantitatively assessing potential beam overshoot. Methods and Materials: The maximal intensity volume is calculated by combining the gross tumor volume contours at each respiratory phase in the four-dimensional computed tomography study. The first target volume calculates the maximal intensity volume for the entire respiratory cycle (internal target volume [ITV]-radiotherapy [RT]), and the second target volume is the maximal intensity volume corresponding to gated RT (gated-RT, {approx}30% phase window around exhalation). A compensator at each respiratory phase is calculated. Two 'composite' compensators for ITV-RT and gated-RT are then designed by selecting the minimal compensator depth at the respective respiratory phase. These compensators are then applied to the four-dimensional computed tomography data to estimate beam penetration. Analysis metrics include range fluctuation and overshoot volume, both as a function of gantry angle. We compared WEL fluctuations observed in treating the ITV-RT versus gated-RT in 11 lung patients. Results: The WEL fluctuations were <21.8 mm-WEL and 9.5 mm-WEL for ITV-RT and gated-RT, respectively for all patients. Gated-RT reduced the beam overshoot volume by approximately a factor of four compared with ITV-RT. Such range fluctuations can affect the efficacy of treatment and result in an excessive dose to a distal critical organ. Conclusion: Time varying range fluctuation analysis provides information useful for determining appropriate patient-specific treatment parameters in charged particle RT. This analysis can also be useful for optimizing planning and delivery.

Mori, Shinichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: shinshin@nirs.go.jp; Wolfgang, John; Lu, H.-M.; Schneider, Robert; Choi, Noah C.; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding among younger breast cancer survivors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the California Breast Cancer Research Program, who awardedthe California Breast Cancer Research Program, dissertationquality of life. Breast cancer Research and Treatment. 1996;

Gorman, Jessica Lynn Rickard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Chapter 16: Log-linear regression for Poisson counts Exposure to ionizing radiation is recognized as a cancer risk. In the United States, EPA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the past few decades. These estimates have been based largely on data for survivors of the atomic bombings of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombs. -3-2-10 0-7 12-1 20-2 28-3 0-7 12-1 20-2 28-3 0-7 12-1 20-2 28-3 -3 to the incidence of cancer. The data dis- cussed below report the number of cancer deaths among the survivors

Bardsley, John

298

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to U.S. Nuclear Weapon Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(a)), this Instruction: a. Establishes policy and assigns responsibilities for the DoD response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents in accordance with DoDD 3150.08 (Reference (b)). b. Authorizes DoD support for the Nuclear Weapons Accident Incident Response Subcommittee (NWAIRS) to the Nuclear Command and Control System (NCCS) Committee of Principals (CoP) to address the Federal Government response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establish policy and assign responsibilities for the DoD consequence management response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents and other nuclear or radiological incidents involving materials in DoD custody in accordance with the guidance in National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD) 28, the National Response Framework, and the National Incident Management System (References (b) through (d)). 2. APPLICABILITY. This Directive applies to: a. OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Physics and Cancer Student Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tests. He had an MRI that showed a growth in the area of swelling around his salivary gland and, after a biopsy, was diagnosed with salivary gland cancer and has been recommended...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EPS Global International Cancer Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sept.10-12th, 2010 Suzhou, China Welcome Message Dear Colleagues and Friends, It is my pleasure to announce that EPS Global International Cancer Conference will be held on...

302

Steps to Preventing Colon Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

watch out for belly fat. One of the key findings from the CUP report is that excess body fat is linked to increased risk of colorectal cancer. The report also concludes that...

303

Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83-1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83-1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14-1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Liao Kaijun [Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Armstrong, Katrina [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Incorporating Heterogeneity Correction and 4DCT in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): The Effect on Target Coverage, Organ-At-Risk Doses, and Dose Conformity  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the dosimetric impact of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) target volumes and heterogeneity correction (HC) on target coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) doses, and dose conformity in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Twelve patients with lung cancer, scanned using both helical CT and 4DCT, were treated with SBRT (60 Gy in 3 fractions). The clinical plans were calculated without HC and based on targets from the free-breathing helical CT scan (PTV{sub HEL}). Retrospectively, the clinical plans were recalculated with HC and were evaluated based on targets from 4DCT datasets (PTV{sub 4D}) accounting for patient-specific target motion. The PTV{sub 4D} was greater than PTV{sub HEL} when tumor motion exceeded 7.5 mm (vector). There were significant decreases in target coverage (V100) for the recalculated vs. clinical plans (0.84 vs. 0.94, p < 0.02) for the same monitor units. When the recalculated plans were optimized for equivalent V100 of the clinical plans, there were significant increases in the 60-Gy dose spillage (1.27 vs. 1.13, p < 0.001) and 30-Gy dose spillage (5.20 vs. 3.73, p < 0.001) vs. the clinical plans. There was a significant increase (p < 0.04) in the mean OAR doses between the optimized re-calculated and the clinical plan. Tumor motion is an important consideration for target volumes defined using helical CT. Lower prescription doses may be required when prospectively planning with HC to achieve a similar level of toxicity and dose spillage as expected when planning based on homogeneous dose calculations.

Franks, Kevin N. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Tom.Purdie@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Dawson, Laura A.; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effects of Bioactive Compounds from Different Potato Genotypes on Prostate Cancer Development in Athymic Nude Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phytochemicals are widely noted for their role in chemoprevention. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is the third most important food crop worldwide and is considered a significant source of antioxidants, providing an ideal delivery system for beneficial compounds. The anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties of potato bioactive compounds have been reported in vitro on human prostate cancer cell lines. However, in vivo studies are limited, and more information is needed to determine the chemopreventive properties of potato in the diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of potato bioactives on prostate cancer in vivo using a mouse model. Athymic nude mice received xenografts of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) and were administered extracts of potato bioactives from either the white flesh Solanum bulbocastanum (PI243510) or CO112F2-2P/P (purple-flesh Colorado selection), while control mice received water. Neither potato extract provided a significant reduction in tumor growth nor reduced levels of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF, but the S. bulbocastanum extract reduced expression of metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1) in tumors, and both potato extracts reduced MTA1 expression in lungs, suggesting the need for further research on the potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic properties of potato bioactives.

Turner, Sarah

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Identifying and Understanding the Functional Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Chemoresistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prostate tumorigenesis. Cancer Research, 71: 3459-3470. Kongprogenitor cells. Cancer Research, 72: 1878-89. Murtaughin human brain tumors. Cancer Research, 63: 5821-5828. Steer

Hindoyan, Antreas Agop

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Study of familial breast cancer: identifying additional breast cancer susceptibility loci;.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Breast cancer is a serious public health concern and despite intensive research, the etiology of breast cancer is poorly understood. Known risk factors explain only (more)

Allen-Brady, Kristina Lisa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11. KatohM. CancergenomicsandgeneticsofFGFR2[Chapter27 BreastCancerGenomics PaulT. Spellman,

Spellman, Paul T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ASHMET: a computer code for estimating insolation incident on tilted surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer code, ASHMET, has been developed by MSFC to estimate the amount of solar insolation incident on the surfaces of solar collectors. Both tracking and fixed-position collectors have been included. Climatological data for 248 US locations are built into the code. This report describes the methodology of the code, and its input and output. The basic methodology used by ASHMET is the ASHRAE clear-day insolation relationships modified by a clearness index derived from SOLMET-measured solar radiation data to a horizontal surface.

Elkin, R.F.; Toelle, R.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electrochemically adsorbed Pb on Ag (111) studied with grazing- incidence x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect

Grazing-incidence x-ray scattering studies of the evolution of electrochemically deposited layers of lead on silver (111) as a function of applied electrochemical potential are presented. Measurements were made with the adsorbed layers in contact with solution in a specially designed sample cell. The observed lead structures are a function of the applied potential and range from an incommensurate monolayer, resulting from underpotential deposition, to randomly oriented polycrystalline bulk lead, resulting from lower deposition potentials. These early experiments demonstrate the ability of in situ x-ray diffraction measurements to determine structures associated with electrochemical deposition. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Kortright, J.B.; Ross, P.N.; Melroy, O.R.; Toney, M.F.; Borges, G.L.; Samant, M.G.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fabrication and characterization of fibers with built-in liquid crystal channels and electrodes for transverse incident-light modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-in-fiber liquid crystal (LC) structure designed for the modulation of light incident transverse to the fiber axis. A hollow cavity flanked by viscous conductors is introduced into a polymer matrix, and ...

Wei, Lei

312

Assessment of Incident-Free Transport for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the incident-free radiological impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository using the RADTRAN 5.5 computer code developed by Sandia National Laboratories.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Relationship Between Light and the Development and Growth of Internal Solid Cancers: A Review of Current Research and the Potential Implications for Lighting Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light has profound effects on human and animal biology that do not involve vision. The natural cycle of light and dark affects the daily rhythms of physiology, metabolism, and behavior; and disruptions of these rhythms caused by artificial light may have serious health consequences. This report discusses the evidence for one such possible effect: the influence of light exposure during the nighttime on the incidence and development of solid cancers.

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Microchip Technology for High-Throughput Cancer Pathology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sequencing in Cancer Research . . . . 80 Appendix A: High-the Warburg Effect. Cancer Research, 2006. 66(18): p. 8927-Breast Cancer Risk. Cancer Research, 2007. 67(10): p. 4687-

Duberow, Jr, David Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

K{alpha} satellite transitions in elements with 12{<=}Z{<=}30 produced by electron incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of x-ray satellite lines in the K{alpha} region of Mg, Si, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn induced by electron incidence was studied by means of wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The satellite lines studied were K{alpha}{sup '}, K{alpha}{sub 3}, K{alpha}{sub 4}, K{alpha}{sub 5}, K{alpha}{sub 6}, and two transitions denoted here as K{alpha}{sub 22} and K{alpha}{sub 12}. Energy shifts with respect to the main K{alpha}{sub 1} diagram line and transition probabilities relative to the whole K{alpha} group were determined for a number of lines through a careful spectral processing. The dependence of these parameters, as well as of the K{beta}:K{alpha} intensity ratio, on the atomic number was compared with previous experimental and theoretical determinations when available. A discussion about the different mechanisms responsible for vacancy creation involved in the production of double-ionization satellites was performed in the light of the results obtained. Finally, the behavior of the satellite intensities as a function of the incidence energy was discussed for silicon.

Limandri, Silvina P.; Carreras, Alejo C.; Trincavelli, Jorge C. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Bonetto, Rita D. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas Dr. Jorge Ronco (CINDECA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Gamma-Rays from Grazing Incidence Cosmic Rays in the Earths Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions of grazing incidence, ultra high energy cosmic rays with the earths atmosphere may provide a new method of studying energetic cosmic rays with gamma-ray satellites. It is found that these cosmic ray interactions may produce gamma-rays on millisecond time scales which may be detectable by satellites. An extremely low gamma-ray background for transient gamma-ray events and a large area of interaction, the earths surface, make the scheme plausible. The effective cross section of detection of interactions for cosmic rays above 1020 eV is found to be more than two orders of magnitude higher than earth based detection techniques. This method may eventually offer an efficient way of probing this region of the cosmic ray energy spectrum where events are scarce. In this paper, a conceptual model is presented for the production of short bursts of gamma-rays based on these grazing incidence encounters with the earths atmosphere. Subject headings: atmospheric effects- cosmic rays- Earth- gamma-rays: bursts

Andrew Ulmer

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. =}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Technical Review of Law Enforcement Standards and Guides Relative to Incident Management  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to locate potential law enforcement-related standards that support incident management, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contacted representatives from the National Institute of Standards-Office of Law Enforcement Standards (NIST-OLES), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Secret Service, ASTM International committees that have a law enforcement focus, and a variety of individuals from local and regional law enforcement organizations. Discussions were held with various state and local law enforcement organizations. The NIJ has published several specific equipment-related law enforcement standards that were included in the review, but it appears that law enforcement program and process-type standards are developed principally by organizations that operate at the state and local level. Input is provided from state regulations and codes and from external non-government organizations (NGOs) that provide national standards. The standards that are adopted from external organizations or developed independently by state authorities are available for use by local law enforcement agencies on a voluntary basis. The extent to which they are used depends on the respective jurisdictions involved. In some instances, use of state and local disseminated standards is mandatory, but in most cases, use is voluntary. Usually, the extent to which these standards are used appears to depend on whether or not jurisdictions receive certification from a governing entity due to their use and compliance with the standards. In some cases, these certification-based standards are used in principal but without certification or other compliance monitoring. In general, these standards appear to be routinely used for qualification, selection for employment, and training. In these standards, the term Peace Officer is frequently used to refer to law enforcement personnel. This technical review of national law enforcement standards and guides identified the following four guides as having content that supports incident management: TE-02-02 Guide to Radio Communications Interoperability Strategies and Products OSHA 335-10N Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies NIJ 181584 Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel NIJ 181869 A Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation In conversations with various state and local law enforcement officials, it was determined that the following National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) standards are generally recognized and tend to be universally used by law enforcement organizations across the country: NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs NFPA 1561 Standard on Fire Department Incident Management Systems NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition) NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition)

Stenner, Robert D.; Salter, R.; Stanton, J. R.; Fisher, D.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Analysis of Senate Bill 1245: Cervical Cancer Screening Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cervical cancer mortality by race/ethnicity Other researchCancer: Recommendations and Rationale. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Targeting cancer metabolism: a therapeutic window opens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic events in cancer activate signalling pathways that alter cell metabolism. Clinical evidence has linked cell metabolism with cancer outcomes. Together, these observations have raised interest in targeting metabolic ...

Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

322

Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation compared with those treated with surgery alone.

Bishop, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mwmcdona@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Chang, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Measuring Solar Spectral and Angle-ofIncidence Effects on Photovoltaic Modules and Solar Irradiance Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, two time-of-day dependent factors have complicated the characterization of photovoltaic module and array performance; namely, changes in the solar spectrum over the day and optical effects in the module that vary with the solar angle-of-incidence. This paper describes straightforward methods for directly measuring the effects of these two factors. Measured results for commercial modules, as well as for typical solar irradiance sensors (pyranometers) are provided. The empirical relationships obtained from the measurements can be used to improve the methods used for system design, verification of performance after installation, and diagnostic monitoring of performance during operation. INTRODUCTION It is common knowledge to people familiar with photovoltaic technology that the electrical current generated by photovoltaic devices is influenced by the spectral distribution (spectrum) of sunlight. It is also commonly understood that the spectral distribution of sunlight vari...

David L. King; Jay A. Kratochvil; William E. Boyson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Twisted-light-induced intersubband transitions in quantum wells at normal incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine theoretically the intersubband transitions induced by laser beams of light with orbital angular momentum (twisted light) in semiconductor quantum wells at normal incidence. These transitions become possible in the absence of gratings thanks to the fact that collimated laser beams present a component of the light's electric field in the propagation direction. We derive the matrix elements of the light-matter interaction for a Bessel-type twisted-light beam represented by its vector potential in the paraxial approximation. Then, we consider the dynamics of photo-excited electrons making intersubband transitions between the first and second subbands of a standard semiconductor quantum well. Finally, we analyze the light-matter matrix elements in order to evaluate which transitions are more favorable for given orbital angular momentum of the light beam in the case of small semiconductor structures.

Sbierski, B; Tamborenea, P I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Electromagnetic energy within a magnetic infinite cylinder and scattering properties for oblique incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we analytically calculate the time-averaged electromagnetic energy stored inside a nondispersive magnetic isotropic cylinder which is obliquely irradiated by an electromagnetic plane wave. An expression for the optical-absorption efficiency in terms of the magnetic internal coefficients is also obtained. In the low absorption limit, we derive a relation between the normalized internal energy and the optical-absorption efficiency which is not affected by the magnetism and the incidence angle. This mentioned relation, indeed, seems to be independent on the shape of the scatterer. This universal aspect of the internal energy is connected to the transport velocity and consequently to the diffusion coefficient in the multiple scattering regime. Magnetism favors high internal energy for low size parameter cylinders, which leads to a low diffusion coefficient for electromagnetic propagation in 2D random media.

Tiago Jose Arruda; Alexandre Souto Martinez

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Self-Organized Criticality in Daily Incidence of Acute Myocardial Infarction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous periodogram power spectral analysis of daily incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) reported at a leading hospital for cardiology in Pune, India for the two-year period June 1992 to May 1994 show that the power spectra follow the universal and unique inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution. Inverse power law form for power spectra of space-time fluctuations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and have been identified as signatures of self-organized criticality. The unique quantification for self-organized criticality presented in this paper is shown to be intrinsic to quantumlike mechanics governing fractal space-time fluctuation patterns in dynamical systems. The results are consistent with El Naschie's concept of cantorian fractal spacetime characteristics for quantum systems.

A. M. Selvam; D. Sen; S. M. S. Mody

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Radiation-induced lung injury using a pig model: Evaluation by high-resolution computed tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the early phase of radiation-induced lung injury using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) under experimental conditions and to perform precise CT-pathologic correlation. Five Yorkshire pigs received a single dose of 12.5 Gy to the right lower lung. Computed tomographic images were obtained at 2-week intervals. The animals were killed after follow-up periods of 4-16 weeks. The lungs were removed, inflated, fixed, dried, and sliced corresponding to the CT sections. Computed tomography, specimen radiography, and histologic findings were correlated. Various CT findings were observed during the first 16 weeks, including ground-glass opacity, discrete consolidation, patchy consolidation, thickened interlobular septum, and bronchovascular bundle. Ground-glass opacity was associated with thickened alveolar wall and scattered tiny fibrotic foci. Thickened interlobular septum and bronchovascular bundle were the results of fibrosis adjacent to these structures. Discrete consolidation correlated with intraalveolar edema with hemorrhage and infiltration of inflammatory cells. High-resolution CT correlated well with pathology of the lung due to radiation injury as verified by precise radiologic-pathologic correlation. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Takahashi, Masashi; Balazs, G.; Moskowitz, G.W.; Palestro, C.J.; Eacobacci, T.; Khan, A.; Herman, P.G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic Rupture and Lung Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into Bronchi and Pleural Space  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of ruptured lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had ruptured transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had ruptured both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic rupture. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with ruptured liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.

Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri, E-mail: bilginaribas@hotmail.com; Dingil, Guerbuez [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Koeroglu, Mert [Sueleyman Demirel University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Two-dimensional and 3-dimensional optical coherence tomographic imaging of the airway, lung, and pleura  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) was coupled to the system to elucidate the location of the sampling site. Flexible fiberoptic OCT probes be determined. A flexible fiberoptic probe was inserted into the endotracheal tube. The visible laser light coherence tomographic system constructed in our laboratory. Lungs and pleural tissue were subsequently

Chen, Zhongping

330

Differential expression of anterior gradient gene AGR2 in prostate cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circulating tumor cells. Cancer research 2005, 48. Kovalev2 in prostate cancer. Cancer research 2010, 19. Zhang Y,cellular transformation. Cancer research 2008, 68(2):492-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Electric-Field Enhancement by Nodular Defects in Multilayer Coatings Irradiated at Normal and 45 (degree) Incidence  

SciTech Connect

The standing-wave electric-field profile within multilayer coatings is significantly perturbated by a nodular defect. The intensity, which is proportional to the electric field squared, is increased in the high index material by {>=}3x at normal incidence and {>=}12x at 45 degrees incidence angle. Therefore it is not surprising that nodular defects are initiation sites of laser-induced damage. In this study, the impact of reflectance-band centering and incident angle are explored for a 1 {micro}m diameter nodular defect seed overcoated with a 24 layer high-reflector constructed of quarter-wave thick alternating layers of hafnia and silica. The modeling was performed using a three-dimensional finite-element analysis code.

Stolz, C J; Genin, F Y; Pistor,T V

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

A Low-Dose Ipsilateral Lung Restriction Improves 3-D Conformal Planning for Partial Breast Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In trials of 3D conformal external beam partial breast radiotherapy (PBRT), the dosimetrist must balance the priorities of achieving high conformity to the target versus minimizing low-dose exposure to the normal structures. This study highlights the caveat that in the absence of a low-dose lung restriction, the use of relatively en-face fields may meet trial-defined requirements but expose the ipsilateral lung to unnecessary low-dose radiation. Adding a low-dose restriction that {dose resulted in successful plans in 88% of cases. This low-dose lung limit should be used in PBRT planning.

Mitchell, Tracy [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.c [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Salter, Lee; Graham, Cathy; Gaffney, Helene; Beckham, Wayne; Olivotto, Ivo A. [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Numerical simulation to determine the effects of incident wind shear and turbulence level on the flow around a building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of incident shear and turbulence on flow around a cubical building are being investigated by a turbulent kinetic energy/dissipation model (TEMPEST). The numerical simulations demonstrate significant effects due to the differences in the incident flow. The addition of upstream turbulence and shear results in a reduced size of the cavity directly behind the building. The accuracy of numerical simulations is verified by comparing the predicted mean flow fields with the available wind-tunnel measurements of Castro and Robins (1977). Comparing the authors' results with experimental data, the authors show that the TEMPEST model can reasonably simulate the mean flow.

Zhang, Y.Q.; Huber, A.H.; Arya, S.P.S.; Snyder, W.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

TRASH TO TREASURE: CONVERTING COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE INTO WEAPONS AGAINST CANCER  

SciTech Connect

As part of its commitment to clean up Cold War legacy sites, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated an exciting and unique project to dispose of its inventory of uranium-233 (233U) stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and extract isotopes that show great promise in the treatment of deadly cancers. In addition to increasing the supply of potentially useful medical isotopes, the project will rid DOE of a nuclear concern and cut surveillance and security costs. For more than 30 years, DOE's ORNL has stored over 1,200 containers of fissile 233U, originally produced for several defense-related projects, including a pilot study that looked at using 233U as a commercial reactor fuel. This uranium, designated as special nuclear material, requires expensive security, safety, and environmental controls. It has been stored at an ORNL facility, Building 3019A, that dates back to the Manhattan Project. Down-blending the material to a safer form, rather than continuing to store it, will eliminate a $15 million a year financial liability for the DOE and increase the supply of medical isotopes by 5,700 percent. During the down-blending process, thorium-229 (229Th) will be extracted. The thorium will then be used to extract actinium-225 (225Ac), which will ultimately supply its progeny, bismuth-213 (213Bi), for on-going cancer research. The research includes Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia at Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center in New York, as well as other serious cancers of the lungs, pancreas, and kidneys using a technique known as alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy. Alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy is based on the emission of alpha particles by radionuclides. 213Bi is attached to a monoclonal antibody that targets specific cells. The bismuth then delivers a high-powered but short-range radiation dose, effectively killing the cancerous cells but sparing the surrounding tissue. Production of the actinium and bismuth would be a private venture at no cost to the government. Isotek Systems, LLC, was commissioned by the DOE to execute the project, known as the 233U Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown Project. Isotek is a partnership between Duratek Federal Services, Burns and Roe Enterprises, and Nuclear Fuel Services. By pooling their pioneering experiences in nuclear engineering and design, nuclear recycling, and waste management, the partnership has developed a novel process to meet this clean-up milestone. The project is not only important for its cancer treatment potential, but also for setting the stage for reducing global threats through the down-blending of materials.

Nicholas, R.G.; Lacy, N.H.; Butz, T.R.; Brandon, N.E.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

National Incident Management System (NIMS) Standards Review Panel Workshop Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The importance and need for full compliant implementation of NIMS nationwide was clearly demonstrated during the Hurricane Katrina event, which was clearly expressed in Secretary Chertoff's October 4, 2005 letter addressed to the State's governors. It states, ''Hurricane Katrina was a stark reminder of how critical it is for our nation to approach incident management in a coordinated, consistent, and efficient manner. We must be able to come together, at all levels of government, to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from any emergency or disaster. Our operations must be seamless and based on common incident management doctrine, because the challenges we face as a nation are far greater than capabilities of any one jurisdiction.'' The NIMS is a system/architecture for organizing response on a ''national'' level. It incorporations ICS as a main component of that structure (i.e., it institutionalizes ICS in NIMS). In a paper published on the NIMS Website, the following statements were made: ''NIMS represents a core set of doctrine, principles, terminology, and organizational processes to enable effective, efficient and collaborative incident management at all levels. To provide the framework for interoperability and compatibility, the NIMS is based on a balance between flexibility and standardization.'' Thus the NIC is challenged with the need to adopt quality SDO generated standards to support NIMS compliance, but in doing so maintain the flexibility necessary so that response operations can be tailored for the specific jurisdictional and geographical needs across the nation. In support of this large and complex challenge facing the NIC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked to provide technical support to the NIC, through their DHS Science and Technology ? Standards Portfolio Contract, to help identify, review, and develop key standards for NIMS compliance. Upon examining the challenge, the following general process appears to be a reasonable approach for identifying and establishing existing standards that would be applicable to NIMS compliance. The suggested generalized steps to establishing existing SDO generated standards for NIMS compliance are: (1) establish search criteria from the NIMS and its support documents, (2) search SDO databases to identify key existing nationally and/or internationally recognized standards that have potential application to NIMS compliance needs, (3) review the identified standards against the specific component needs of the NIMS, (4) identify the pertinent aspects/components of those identified standards that clearly address specific NIMS compliance needs, (5) establish a process to adopt the pertinent standards, which includes the generation of formalized FEMA Guidance that identifies the specific NIMS component compliance needs addressed in the respective standard, (6) develop performance criteria for which to measure compliance with the identified NIMS components addressed by the respective adopted standard, and (7) adopt the standard, publish the guidance and performance criteria, and incorporate it into routine FEMA/NIC NIMS management operations. This review process will also help identify real gaps in standards for which new NIMS specific standards should be developed. To jump start this process and hopefully identify some key ''low hanging fruit'' standards the NIC could use to begin such a process, a panel of first-responder experts (familiar with the current standards of common use in the first-responder community) from various response disciplines was formed and a workshop held. The workshop included a pre-workshop information gathering process. This report discusses the workshop and its findings in detail.

Stenner, Robert D.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Stanton, James R.; Shebell, Peter; Schwartz, Deborah S.; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gelston, Gariann M.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia  

SciTech Connect

Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr. [National Cancer Inst., Rockville, MD (United States); Tekkel, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of implant (learning curve). Over the course of the program, we have deliberately reduced the number of needles and OR time per patient, which have potentially minimized intraoperative trauma and may have contributed to less toxicity. A learning curve in prostate brachytherapy programs affect not only the outcome but also the toxicity from the treatment.

Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moravan, Veronika M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Agranovich, Alexander [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. George Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976  

SciTech Connect

A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large, fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P . 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

Pinkston, J.A.; Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976  

SciTech Connect

A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P = 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

Pinkston, J.A. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima-Nagasaki, Japan); Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An alternative hypothesis for association between distribution wiring configurations and cancer: Planning phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several epidemiologic studies have reported positive associations between electric distribution wiring configurations and cancer incidence, particularly among children. According to the investigators of these studies, the results suggest a possible link between exposure to 60-Hertz magnetic fields because residential magnetic fields are correlated with wiring configurations. This report analyzes the plausibility of an alternate hypothesis to explain the epidemiologic observations, and recommends research to explore its validity. According to the hypothesis, ground return currents in plumbing service lines are associated with electric wiring configuration, and cause the release of corrosion products in tap water, whose ingestion constitutes a risk factor for cancer. To corroborate this hypothesis three conditions must be satisfied: the magnitude of the ground return currents in water pipes is related to wiring configuration, with higher currents generally found associated with homes classified in the high exposure categories; corrosion on the internal surface of water pipe is related to ac currents flowing on the pipe, with higher currents associated with higher rates of corrosion, and ingestion of water from pipes undergoing AC-induced corrosive processes increases the probability of developing cancer. The study's analysis did not uncover any critical data that would undermine the plausibility of this confounder hypothesis. 102 refs., 11 figs., 22 tabs.

Kavet, R. (Environmental Research Information, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (USA)); Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Dosimetric research on intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy planning for left breast cancer after breast-preservation surgery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has played an important role in breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-preservation surgery. Our aim was to study the dosimetric and implementation features/feasibility between IMRT and intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (Varian RapidArc, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). The forward IMRT plan (f-IMRT), the inverse IMRT, and the RapidArc plan (RA) were generated for 10 patients. Afterward, we compared the target dose distribution of the 3 plans, radiation dose on organs at risk, monitor units, and treatment time. All 3 plans met clinical requirements, with RA performing best in target conformity. In target homogeneity, there was no statistical significance between RA and IMRT, but both of homogeneity were less than f-IMRT's. With regard to the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the left lung, those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT; for V{sub 20} and V{sub 30}, the lowest was observed in RA; and in the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the right lung, as well as the mean dose in normal-side breast and right lung, there was no statistically significance difference between RA and IMRT, and the lowest value was observed in f-IMRT. As for the maximum dose in the normal-side breast, the lowest value was observed in RA. Regarding monitor units (MUs), those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT. Treatment time of RA was 84.6% and 88.23% shorter than f-IMRT and IMRT, respectively, on average. Compared with f-IMRT and IMRT, RA performed better in target conformity and can reduce high-dose volume in the heart and left lung-which are related to complications-significantly shortening treatment time as well. Compared with IMRT, RA can also significantly reduce low-dose volume and MUs of the afflicted lung.

Yin Yong, E-mail: yinyongsd@yahoo.com.cn [School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji'nan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Scienses, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology (China); Chen Jinhu; Sun Tao; Ma Changsheng; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Scienses, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology (China); Wang Ruozheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xinjiang Medical University, Affiliated Hospital, Urumchi (China)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluation of internal contamination levels after a radiological dispersal device incident using portal monitors  

SciTech Connect

Following a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) incident, it may be necessary to evaluate the internal contamination levels of a large number of potentially affected individuals to determine if immediate medical follow-up is necessary. Since the current laboratory capacity to screen for internal contamination is limited, rapid field screening methods can be useful in prioritizing individuals. This study evaluated the suitability of a radiation portal monitor for such screening. A model of the portal monitor was created for use with models of six anthropomorphic phantoms in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP) X-5 Monte Carlo Team (MCNP A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5. LA-CP-03-0245. Vol. 2. Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2004.). The count rates of the portal monitor were simulated for inhalation and ingestion of likely radionuclides from an RDD for each of the phantoms. The time-dependant organ concentrations of the radionuclides were determined using Dose and Risk Calculation Software Eckerman, Leggett, Cristy, Nelson, Ryman, Sjoreen and Ward (Dose and Risk Calculation Software Ver. 8.4. ORNL/TM-2001/190. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2006.). Portal monitor count rates corresponding to a committed effective dose E(50) of 10 mSv are reported.

Palmer, R.C. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ansari, A. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Freibert, E.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

Nakos, James Thomas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident  

SciTech Connect

Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Vittitoe, C.N.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 10 Biological Activity of Lycopene Against Smoke-Induced Lung Lesions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 10 Biological Activity of Lycopene Against Smoke-Induced Lung Lesions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

347

Can reduced processing decision support interfaces improve the decision-making of less-experienced incident commanders?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer-based decision support systems have been proposed as a tool to improve the decision-making of less-experienced personnel by reducing the information processing demands necessary for decision-making. This study investigated the utility of three ... Keywords: Cognitive load, Decision-making, Experience, Expertise, Fire-fighting, Incident command

Nathan C. Perry; Mark W. Wiggins; Merilyn Childs; Gerard Fogarty

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hydrogen Film Cooling With Incident and Swept-Shock Interactions in a Mach 6.4 Nitrogen Free Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium ...

Olsen G. C.; Nowak R. J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American the macroeconomic costs of greenhouse gas emission reductions under Title VII of the American Clean Energy limits on domestic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This paper analyzes the macroeconomic costs

Wing, Ian Sue

350

Early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung:  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an inhalation exposure experiment that concerns early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung of rats. Both morbidity at 18 months and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined for rats exposed to the beta-emitter /sup 147/Pm, the alpha-emitter /sup 238/Pu, or both combined. The results were used to validate hazard-function models that were developed (1)for pulmonary functional morbidity at 18 months and (2) for lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis within 18 months. Both models were found to adequately predict the experimental observations after combined chronic alpha and beta irradiation of the lung. A relative biological effectiveness of approximately 7 was obtained for /sup 238/Pu alpha radiation compared to /sup 147/Pm beta radiation for both pulmonary functional morbidity and lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. 12 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Snipes, M.B.; Newton, G.J.; Eidson, A.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Morphometry for alpha particle hits of critical targets in the lungs. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to provide detailed data on the number, location and type of critical target cells in the airspaces and to use these data in order to make risk assessments of the health effects of radon and radon progeny in the lungs. This will be done by quantitative morphometric study of the distribution of the various cell types and mucous lining layers in the lungs. The results provide anatomically correct models for dosimetry in the rate and human airways which significantly improve the ability to do risk assessment for radon exposures by providing quantitative data for specific cell types and provide a basis for mechanism based comparison between data available in animal exposures and human epidemiology.

Mercer, R.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Centriacinar alterations in lungs of cats chronically exposed to diesel exhaust  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the morphologic changes in the centriacinar regions of lungs following long-term exposure of cats to diesel exhaust. Nine male cats (13 months of age) from a minimal disease colony were exposed to diesel exhaust for 8 hours/day, 7 days/week for 27 months. Eight cats were exposed to filtered air. Following exposure, the animals were killed by exsanguination and the lungs and trachea removed from the chest by thoracotomy, weighed, and fixed via tracheal cannula with glutaraldehyde/paraformaldehyde (550 mOsmoles, pH 7.4) at 30 cm of pressure. Centriacinar regions were selected from fixed tissue, the airways bisected, and complementary tissue halves processed by a large block method for high resolution light microscopy and for scanning electron microscopy. Compared with controls, diesel-exposed cats had lower fresh lung and kidney weights and lower fixed volumes of the right cranial lobe. The volume fractions of pulmonary parenchyma and nonparenchyma were unchanged. Epithelium of terminal and respiratory bronchioles in exposed cats consisted of three types of cells (ciliated, basal, and Clara cells), compared with only one type (Clara cells) in controls. Carbon-laden macrophages were found filling alveolar and interstitial spaces in exposed animals. Type 2 pneumocyte hyperplasia was present in proximal interalveolar septa. More distal alveolar ducts and the majority of the rest of the parenchyma were unchanged from controls. We concluded that exposure to diesel exhaust produces changes in both epithelial and interstitial tissue compartments and that the focus of these lesions in peripheral lung is the centriacinar region where alveolar ducts join terminal conducting airways.

Plopper, C.G.; Hyde, D.M.; Weir, A.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Neonatal chronic lung disease in extremely immature baboons. Am J Respir Crit Care Med  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A borderline viability model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)/chronic lung disease of infancy (CLD) with pathophysiologic parameters consistent with those in extremely immature humans with BPD/CLD is described. After prenatal steroid treatment of pregnant dams, 12 premature baboons were delivered by cesarean-section at 125 d (term gestation, 185 d), treated with exogenous surfactant, and maintained on appropriate oxygen and positive pressure ventilation for at least 1 to 2 mo. In spite of appropriate oxygenation (median FI O2 at 28 d ? 0.32; range, 0.21 to 0.50) and ventilatory strategies to prevent volutrauma, the baboons exhibited pulmonary pathologic lesions known to occur in extremely immature humans of less than 1,000 g: alveolar hypoplasia, variable saccular wall fibrosis, and minimal, if any, airway disease. The CLD baboon lungs showed significantly decreased alveolization and internal surface area measurements when compared with term and term ? 2-mo air-breathing controls. A decrease in capillary vasculature was evident by PECAM staining, accompanied by dysmorphic changes. Significant elevations of TNF-?, IL-6, IL-8 levels, but not of IL-1 ? and IL-10, in tracheal aspirate fluids were present at various times during the period of ventilatory support, supporting a role for mediator-induced autoinflammation. IL-8 levels were elevated in necropsy lavages of animals with significant lung infection. This model demonstrates that impaired alveolization

Jacqueline J. Coalson; Vicki T. Winter; Theresa Siler-khodr; Bradley A. Yoder

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Incidence angle modifiers in cylindrical solar collector design. Final report, June 1996--May 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis presents an analysis of the thermal performance of cylindrical solar collectors. A major contributor to performance is optics, the principle focus of this work. A tool used to compute the incidence angle modifiers (IAM`s) for cylindrical solar collectors is presented. The Monte Carlo Method is employed in a Fortran 90 computer code to compute the hemispheric IAM`s of cylindrical solar collectors. Using concentric cylinders, the tubes are modeled with and without back plane reflectors of varying size. The computed IAM`s are verified both analytically and experimentally. Outdoor experiments on an array of cylindrical tubes with various back planes and two different tube spacings are described. Agreement with TRNSYS runs in daily energy gain is excellent. Over the 38 data sets, taken on different days, a maximum error of 11.2% is observed, with an average error of 3%. Heat loss tests, used to calculate an overall heat loss coefficient for the collector, are also described. A parametric variation study is used to illustrate the effect of varying many of the collector parameters. This study provides insight into the significant design parameters for cylindrical solar collectors. This insight is used to analyze the effect of these design parameters on the annual energy delivered by the collector. In addition, a simple cost analysis illustrates the benefits of varying the design parameters. The use of this new program and a detailed Life Cycle Cost analysis are the tools needed for optimizing the design of a cylindrical solar collector. 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Ryan, J.P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ruthenium-Platinum Thin Film Analysis Using Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ruthenium (Ru, Z = 44) is a Platinum Group Metal that has a standard hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystalline structure. Platinum (Pt, Z = 78) has a face-centered cubic (FCC) crystalline structure. When these metals are co-sputtered onto a silicon substrate, creating a few nm-thin film, they form an alloy with a combination of HCP and FCC structure. Direct methanol fuel cells rely on an anode catalyst to draw hydrogen from liquid methanol. Highly efficient fuel cells based on polymer electrolyte catalysts, known as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, have been developed, but require large amounts of a costly platinum catalyst. Thin-film nanostructure bimetallic alloys have been produced to reduce the amount of expensive Platinum needed for catalysis, and also to improve the electrochemical properties of the catalyst. Supported RuPt particles have been shown to have superior activity as anode catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation and demonstrate an improvement in resistance to poisoning in comparison to unalloyed Pt. The percentage of Ruthenium in a RuPt thin film and the process by which the alloy is produced will dictate the crystalline structure, and thus the electrochemical properties of the film. Pure Ruthenium, Pure Platinum, and eight intermediate samples at differing percent composition of Ruthenium were characterized by their X-ray diffraction patterns. The incident beam is from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory beam and operates at approximately a 1.4 Angstrom wavelength. The results show that 0% Ru through 46.17% Ru exhibit a majority FCC structure, 56.07% Ru and 60.61% Ru are mixed phase, and from 67.03% Ru through 100% Ru, the samples exhibit a HCP structure.

Jones, L.

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

Perspectives on the mesenchymal origin of metastatic cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microenvironments. Cancer Research, 39. Pollard, J. W. (host tumor hybrids. Cancer Research, 60(9), 25122519. 98.program. Clinical Cancer Research, 14(12), 36433645. 17.

Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; Seyfried, Thomas N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nanomaterials for the detection of cancer-associated biomarkers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prostate cancer persists as a major public health issue in the United States and remains the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Early detection and disease monitoring in prostate cancer can significantly improve ...

Mu, Chunyao Jenny

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

An MRI compatible manipulator for prostate cancer detection and treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and the second most common cause of cancer related death in men. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood tests and digital rectal exams (DRE) are preliminary ...

DeVita, Lauren M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong [Department of Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

HIV/Cancer DB Match Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Angeles Massachusetts New York New Jersey San Diego San Francisco Seattle METHODS Matching The Cancer and HIVAIDS records were linked using the commercially...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lung cancer incidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

BMC Cancer BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Genistein inhibits radiation-induced activation of NF-?B in prostate cancer cells promoting apoptosis and G2 /M cell cycle arrest

Julian J Raffoul; Yu Wang; Omer Kucuk; Jeffrey D Forman; Fazlul H Sarkar; Gilda G Hillman; Jeffrey D Forman; Fazlul H Sarkar; Gilda G Hillman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Improving Screening Strategies for Prostate Cancer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Th is thesis describes research on screening for prostate cancer. To improve understanding of the thesis, some background information will be provided in this introduction. (more)

Wolters, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Aligned Nanofiber Multiwell Plates for Cancer Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aligned Nanofiber Multiwell Plates for Cancer Research. Author(s), John Lannutti, Jed Johnson. On-Site Speaker (Planned), John Lannutti

364

Boron Nanotechnology-driven Cancer Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Boron Nanotechnology-driven Cancer Therapy ... Current research focuses on both the design and synthesis of high boron containing...

365

Available Technologies: High Selectivity Peptides for Cancer ...  

Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. Diagnostics and Therapeutics; Medical Devices; ... Rac1b: A Highly Selective Marker and Target for Cancer, IB-2167 ;

366

Molecular Cancer BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A doxycycline-inducible urokinase receptor (uPAR) upregulates uPAR activities including resistance to anoikis in human prostate cancer cell lines

Mohammad Hasanuzzaman; Robert Kutner; Siamak Agha-mohammadi; Jakob Reiser; Inder Sehgal

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Biocompatible Nanoparticle Materials in Cancer Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges and future perspectives of nanomedicine in cancer research will .... Self-Adaptive, Ultra-Compliant Shape Memory Alloys for Medical Implant...

368

Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

treatment Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment Scientists have observed for the first time how a laser penetrates dense, electron-rich plasma to generate ions. August...

369

BMC Cancer BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase gene and susceptibility to breast cancer in a Chinese population: a case-control analysis

Xiangjun Zhai; Jun Gao; Zhibin Hu; Jinhai Tang; Jianwei Qin; Shui Wang; Xuechen Wang; Guangfu Jin; Jiyong Liu; Wenshen Chen; Feng Chen; Xinru Wang; Qingyi Wei; Hongbing Shen; Qingyi Wei; Hongbing Shen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County --  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Title Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Erdmann, Christine A., Georgianna Farren, Kimberly Baltzell, Terri Chew, Cynthia Clarkson, Ruth Fleshman, Colin Leary, Mary Mizroch, Fern Orenstein, Marion L. Russell, Virginia Souders-Mason, and Margaret Wrensch Abstract The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, we used a community-based research approach. In our collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process. This pilot study identified specific testable hypotheses through review of the literature and consultation with relevant experts and the affected community. Initially, the study was to focus on modifiable personal environmental exposures that are associated with breast tumor promotion and higher socioeconomic status (SES). However, little information was available in the scientific literature regarding the putative mechanism by which some of the suspected environmental factors may act (i.e., initiator vs. promoter). Likewise, little is known about the distribution of personal environmental risk factors by socioeconomic status. Therefore, tumor promotion involvement and association with SES were not very useful as selection criteria, and selection of topics was based primarily on published scientific findings of human studies and community input. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the University of California at San Francisco (Committee on Human Research) and at the University of California at Berkeley (Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects)

371

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...