Sample records for lung cancer incidence

  1. SCENARIOS OF FUTURE LUNG CANCER INCIDENCE BY EDUCATIONAL LEVEL: MODELLING STUDY IN DENMARK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 SCENARIOS OF FUTURE LUNG CANCER INCIDENCE BY EDUCATIONAL LEVEL: MODELLING STUDY IN DENMARK Gwenn : 10.1016/j.ejca.2010.07.027 #12;2 Abstract Objective: To model future trends in lung cancer incidence in Denmark by education under different scenarios for cigarette smoking. Methods: Lung cancer incidence until

  2. Incidence and risk factors for lung cancer among women in the women’s interagency HIV study (WIHS) and men in the multicenter AIDS cohort study (MACS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incidence and risk factors for lung cancer among women inan increased incidence of lung can- cer among people withis due to HIV or to other lung cancer risk factors such as

  3. aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    --22000000 34 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c ancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer L ung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung can cer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lun g cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cance r Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer

  4. LUNG CANCER 6. LUNG CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    LUNG CANCER 47 6. LUNG CANCER 6.1. SUMMARY Lung cancer was the third most common cancer in Ireland (Table 6.1). The average number of new lung cancer cases diagnosed each year was 1,000 in women and 1 for women and 1% for men. The risk of developing lung cancer up to the age of 74 was 1 in 37 for women and 1

  5. Lung cancer...115 Chapter 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    NICR/NCRI Lung cancer...115 Chapter 11: Lung cancer (including trachea, bronchus and lung; C33-C34 of lung cancer diagnosed each year in Ireland during 2000-2004. o Male incidence rates decreased by 1 by 2.7%. o Higher levels of treatment occurred among those with small cell lung cancer (compared to non

  6. Skin metastases from lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mollet, Todd W; Garcia, Carlos A; Koester, Glenn

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cutaneous metastases from the lung frequently indicate aof skin metastases from lung cancer. Intern Med. 1996; 35:9. Coslett LM, Katlic MR. Lung cancer with skin metastasis.

  7. QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT LUNG CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT LUNG CANCER Q: What are the early signs of lung cancer? How would I know I have it? A: Some of the early warning signs of lung cancer are: · A cough that doesn't go away what may be causing these symptoms. Q: How is lung cancer diagnosed? A: Your doctor may do one or more

  8. Role of curative radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer. [Clinical factors effecting efficacy and incidence of complications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coy, P.; Kennelly, G.M.

    1980-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1963 to 1974, 141 patients with lung cancer were treated with curative intent in the A. Maxwell Evans Clinic in Vancouver. The clinical presentation, age and sex distribution, histology, and reasons for surgery not being carried out are examined. The results of this treatment are presented. An attempt has been made to isolate a group of patients who have a better prognosis so that treatment selection can be improved. Hemoptysis, cough, dyspnea, and incidental finding on routine chest x-ray were the most common manner of presentation. Thirty-four percent of the patients were over 70 years of age and 13% were women. The crude overall three- and five-year survival rates were 18 and 10% (19 and 9% in the men, 17 and 14% in the women). Patients presenting with dyspnea had a better survival than those presenting with cough and hemoptysis. Patients with lesions less than 3 cm in diameter had a 28% three-year survival, compared with 14% for lesions greater than 5 cm in diameter. The three- and five-year survival rates in patients over 70 years of age were 23 and 17% respectively. The response to treatment and the survival were better in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-two percent were alive at three years and 12% at five years as compared with 9 and 5% for other histologies. Fifty-four percent of the 35 patients with a complete response and with squamous cell carcinoma were alive at three years, compared with only 8% of the 12 patients with other histologies who showed a complete response.

  9. Early Lung Cancer Detection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer.

  10. AmericanLungAssociationStateofLungDiseaseinDiverseCommunities2010 55 Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    AmericanLungAssociationStateofLungDiseaseinDiverseCommunities2010 55 Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in one or both of the lungs . While normal cells reproduce and develop into healthy lung tissue, these abnormal cells reproduce faster and never grow into normal lung tissue . Lumps

  11. What Lung Cancer Patients Need to Know

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    What Lung Cancer Patients Need to Know About Bone Health A Publication of The Bone and Cancer Foundation #12;Contents THIS PUBLICATION PROVIDES IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LUNG CANCER AND BONE HEALTH. HOW BONE WORKS (PAGE 2). WHAT LUNG CANCER CAN DO TO BONE (PAGE 2). TREATING BONE

  12. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no ...

  13. AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY PATIENT HEALTH SERIES Lung Cancer Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY PATIENT HEALTH SERIES Lung Cancer Prevention What are the chances that I will develop lung cancer? The #1 cause of lung cancer is exposure to tobacco smoke. Your chances increase others (second-hand smoke), the greater your chances of developing lung cancer. People who have never

  14. High Prevalence of Lung Cancer in a Surgical Cohort of Lung Cancer Patients A Decade After Smoking Cessation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AJ, Samet M: Epidemiology of Lung Cancer. Chest 2003, 123:The accumulated evidence on lung cancer and environmentalMR, Fueger JJ, et al: “Lung carcinoma in former smokers”.

  15. Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer survival: Lessons from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Page /1 5 Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer ( ). With regards to cancer risk, a first comprehensive review of socioeconomic inequalities was1 published by IARC in 1997 ( ). This review covered inequalities in cancer mortality, incidence and survival and discussed

  16. Lung Cancer as a Second Primary Malignancy: Increasing Prevalence and Its Influence on Survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quadrelli, Silvia; Lyons, Gustavo; Colt, Henri; Chimondeguy, Domingo; Silva, Carlos

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    therapy for multiple primary lung cancers. Chest. REFERENCEMR. Multiple primary lung cancers. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg.606–12. 2. Johnson BE. Second lung cancers in patients after

  17. Lung Cancer: A Classic Example of Tumor Escape and Progression While Providing Opportunities for Immunological Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer,” Annual Review ofp63 immunoreac- tivity in lung cancer: yet another player inprotein-related genes in lung cancer: correlation with drug

  18. The role of uPAR signaling in lung cancer Background and significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    The role of uPAR signaling in lung cancer Background and significance Lung cancer is the leading of lung cancer ­ non-small-cell-lung cancer (about 85% of all lung cancer cases) and small- cell-lung cancer (about 15%) (Herbst et al., 2008). Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is rapidly growing and often

  19. Estimating Volumes of Simulated Lung Cancer Nodules David E. Gilsinn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilsinn, David E.

    Estimating Volumes of Simulated Lung Cancer Nodules David E. Gilsinn Bruce R. Borchardt Amelia Tebbe§ July 15, 2009 Abstract Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. Computed to- mography (CT) shows promise in detecting lung cancers at earlier, more operable

  20. Lung Cancer . Author manuscript p16INK4A inactivation mechanisms in non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Lung Cancer . Author manuscript Page /1 10 p16INK4A inactivation mechanisms in non-small-cell lung occupational risk factor and that asbestos acts synergistically with tobacco smoking to induce lung cancer. Although some somatic gene alterations in lung cancer have been linked to tobacco smoke, few data

  1. WON EXPOSURE AND LUNG CANCER RISK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    As information on indoor air quality accumulated * it became apparent that radon and its progeny are invariably present in indoor environments and that concentrations may reach unacceptably high levels. The lung cancer excess anong miners exposed to radon progeny raised concern that exposure to radon progeny might also cause lung cancer in the general population. This presentation first provides an ovemiew of radon daughter carcinogenesis, and then reviews the recent BEIR IV report. The report described a statistical model * based on analysis of data from four studies of miners, for estimating the lung cancer risk associated with exposure to radon progeny. Tbe analyses showed that the risk of radon exposure declines with time since exposure and with increasing age. The BEIR IV committee concluded that radon progeny and cigarette smoking interact in a multiplicative fashion and that exposure-dose relationships are similar for exposure in homes and in mines.

  2. Small RNA combination therapy for lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tammela, Tuomas

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs have enormous potential as cancer therapeutics, but their effective delivery to most solid tumors has been difficult. Here, we show that a new lung-targeting nanoparticle is capable of delivering ...

  3. Lung Cancer: A Classic Example of Tumor Escape and Progression While Providing Opportunities for Immunological Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of lung cancer,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 4, no. 7,pathogenesis of lung cancer,” Annual Review of Physiology,immunoreac- tivity in lung cancer: yet another player in the

  4. Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile Catterina Ferreccio,1,2 Claudia- trations have since been reduced to 40 g/liter. We investi- gated the relation between lung cancer and arsenic in drinking water in northern Chile in a case-control study involving patients diagnosed with lung

  5. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC from workers and controls to identify genes targeted for inactivation by plutonium in this other common histologic form of lung cancer. We will examine methylation of the p16, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT), and death associated protein kinase genes ([DAP-K], evaluated previously in adenocarcinomas) as well as the new genes being assessed in the adenocarcinomas. The second hypothesis will be tested in a cross-sectional study of cancer-free workers exposed to plutonium and an unexposed population. A cohort of 700 cancer-free workers and 700 unexposed persons is being assembled, exposures are being defined, and induced sputum collected at initial entry into the study and approximately 1-year later. Exposed and unexposed persons will be matched by 5-year age intervals and smoking status (current and former). The frequency for methylation of four genes that show the greatest difference in prevalence in tumors from workers and controls will be determined in exfoliated cells within sputum. These studies will extend those in primary tumors to determine whether difference in prevalence for individual or multiple genes are detected in sputum samples from high-risk subjects exposed to plutonium. Follow-up of this cohort offers the opportunity to validate these endpoints and future biomarkers as true markers for lung cancer risk.

  6. Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

  7. Mouse models of lung cancer : understanding the molecular and cellular basis of lung tumorigenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Erica L. (Erica Lynn), 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Patients are typically diagnosed with advanced disease and have a high fatality:case ratio. Despite its prevalence, the identity of the cell of origin, precursor ...

  8. Lung Cancer (2005) 47, 41--47 Improving the specificity of fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung Cancer (2005) 47, 41--47 Improving the specificity of fluorescence bronchoscopy spectroscopy; Lung cancer; Bronchoscopy Summary Detection of malignancies of the bronchial tree in an early

  9. Investigating the initiation and progression of small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brauneis, Alison Dooley

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 18% of all lung cancer cases and is an aggressive disease with a five-year survival rate of less than 5%, mainly due to the advanced nature of the disease at the time of diagnosis. ...

  10. lung cancer smoke-free 6 One man's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    Fighting lung cancer Living smoke-free 6 One man's mission85 #12;Cure is the newsletter for the University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, home to cancer care and research for the Southeast's most? For more information about care and services offered at the UF Shands Cancer Center, call 352

  11. TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk mutations are observed in about 40e70% of lung cancer tissues, and the hot spot codon mu- tations factors that influence TP53 gene mutation in lung cancer patients residing areas with high lung cancer

  12. Airway epithelial gene expression in the diagnostic evaluation of smokers with suspect lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Airway epithelial gene expression in the diagnostic evaluation of smokers with suspect lung cancer, Timothy Anderson6, Norman Gerry7, Joseph Keane4, Marc E Lenburg7 & Jerome S Brody1 Lung cancer smokers with suspicion of lung cancer could be used as a lung cancer biomarker. Using a training set (n

  13. Frizzled-8 receptor is activated by the Wnt-2 ligand in non-small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    disease in non-small cell lung cancer. Semin ThoracW, Khuri FR: The care of the lung cancer patient in the 21stJablons DM: Wnt signaling in lung cancer. Cancer Lett 2005,

  14. Tumour microenvironment interactions of small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodkinson, Philip Simon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterised by rapid growth, early metastatic spread and poor long-term survival. The tumour is initially sensitive to chemotherapy and thus objective response rates are high. Unfortunately, ...

  15. Selectins Mediate Small Cell Lung Cancer Systemic Metastasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, Franziska

    Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, ...

  16. Lung Cancer (2004) 46, 333--340 High serum YKL-40 level in patients with small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung Cancer (2004) 46, 333--340 High serum YKL-40 level in patients with small cell lung cancer May 2004; accepted 6 May 2004 KEYWORDS Small cell lung carcinoma; Tumor invasiveness; YKL-40; HC gp-39 evaluated serum YKL-40 in 131 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Twenty-two percent

  17. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that contralateral breast doses and LAR were comparable to WBRT, despite their added complexity. The smaller irradiated volume of the ABPI plan contributed to a halving of LAR for contralateral breast compared with the other plan types. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for a left breast protocol using kilovoltage CBCT contributed <10% to LAR for the majority of organs, and did not exceed 22% of total organ dose. Conclusions: Phantom measurements and calculations of LAR from the BEIR VII models predict that complex breast radiotherapy techniques do not increase the theoretical risk of second cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

  18. Expression of Phosphorylated Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein (pRKIP) is a Predictor of Lung Cancer Survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pRKIP) is a predictor of lung cancer survival Sara Huerta-RKIP and phospho-RKIP in human lung cancer tissue microarrayand in those with early stage lung cancer. Conclusions: This

  19. Evaluation of Irinotecan as a Third- or Fourth-line Treatment for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keener, James

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual PatientChemotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Elderly."Lung Cancer 38, Supplement 3.0 (2002): 67-70. Print. "

  20. Accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy compared to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amini, Arya; Lin, Steven H; Wei, Caimiao; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. Radiation Oncologystage iii non-small cell lung cancer: randomized phase IIIfactors for non-small cell lung cancer. Lung Cancer 1997,

  1. Socioeconomic status and prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates among the diverse population of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MN, Smith E, Siadaty M, Hauck FR, Pickle LW (2006) Spatial analysis of prostate cancer incidence and race in Virginia,

  2. Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and geographic We have previously shown that geographic differences in cancer mortalities in Europe are related of 45 male and 47 female cancers. Differences in cancer incidences are correlated moder- ately, first

  3. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN The Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) Defense Appropriations Act provides for $10.5 million to the Department of Defense Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP) to support innovative, high- impact lung cancer research. This program

  4. Lung Cancer Discovery Award (LCD) Program Description Page 1 of 7 5/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Lung Cancer Discovery Award (LCD) Program Description Page 1 of 7 5/25/2011 IMPORTANT NOTES REFERENCE. The Lung Cancer Discovery Award supports the development of novel medical treatments, advancing current treatment options and/or finding a cure for lung cancer through clinical, laboratory

  5. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE 49:709718 (2006) Smoking Imputation and Lung Cancer in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE 49:709­718 (2006) Smoking Imputation and Lung Cancer exhaust exposure and lung cancer mortality in a large retrospective cohort study of US railroad workers­1996. Mortality analyses incorporated the effect of smoking on lung cancer risk. Results The smoking adjusted

  6. MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells Jagadeesh Setti micelle (MFM) system that is encoded with a lung cancer-targeting peptide (LCP), and encapsulated. The LCP-encoded MFM showed significantly increased Rv 6-dependent cell targeting in H2009 lung cancer

  7. Optimal Surface Marker Locations for Tumor Motion Estimation in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Optimal Surface Marker Locations for Tumor Motion Estimation in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy Bin Dong is a widely used approach in lung cancer radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to propose an algorithm been tested on realistic clinical data of four lung cancer patients. Thoracic 4DCT scans with 10 phases

  8. Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current Epidemiological on sele- nium and lung cancer and identify sources of heterogeneity among studies. When all studies were.30). Overall, these results suggest that selenium may have some protective effect against lung cancer

  9. Small cell lung cancer and cancer stem cell-like cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarvi, Sana

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with extreme mortality and morbidity. Although initially chemo- and radio-sensitive, almost inevitable recurrence and resistance occurs. SCLC patients often ...

  10. The Role of PKR/eIF2 alpha Signaling Pathway in Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma: thePrognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Yong He 1,2 , Arlenevariable for non-small cell lung cancer patients. Clin

  11. In vitro and in vivo effects of geranylgeranyltransferase I inhibitor P61A6 on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P61A6 on non-small cell lung cancer cells. BMC Cancer 2013in mice with K-RAS-induced lung cancer. J Clin Invest 2007,advances in non-small cell lung cancer biology and clinical

  12. Frizzled-8 as a putative therapeutic target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hua-qing [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China) [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Medical Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Xu, Mei-lin [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China); Ma, Jie [Department of Pathology, Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou (China)] [Department of Pathology, Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)] [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Xie, Cong-hua, E-mail: publication.submission@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fzd-8 is over-expressed in human lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 inhibits proliferation and Wnt pathway in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down Fzd-8 sensitizes lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. It is necessary to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer in order to develop more effective therapeutics for the treatment of this disease. Recent reports have shown that Wnt signaling pathway is important in a number of cancer types including lung cancer. However, the role of Frizzled-8 (Fzd-8), one of the Frizzled family of receptors for the Wnt ligands, in lung cancer still remains to be elucidated. Here in this study we showed that Fzd-8 was over-expressed in human lung cancer tissue samples and cell lines. To investigate the functional importance of the Fzd-8 over-expression in lung cancer, we used shRNA to knock down Fzd-8 mRNA in lung cancer cells expressing the gene. We observed that Fzd-8 shRNA inhibited cell proliferation along with decreased activity of Wnt pathway in vitro, and also significantly suppressed A549 xenograft model in vivo (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that knocking down Fzd-8 by shRNA sensitized the lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. These data suggest that Fzd-8 is a putative therapeutic target for human lung cancer and over-expression of Fzd-8 may be important for aberrant Wnt activation in lung cancer.

  13. Increased lung cancer risks are similar whether arsenic is ingested ALLAN H. SMITHa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Increased lung cancer risks are similar whether arsenic is ingested or inhaled ALLAN H. SMITHa that inorganic arsenic was a human lung carcinogen based on studies involving exposure through inhalation. In 2004, IARC listed arsenic in drinking water as a cause of lung cancer, making arsenic the first

  14. Clinical Investigation: Breast Cancer Predicting the Risk of Secondary Lung Malignancies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Clinical Investigation: Breast Cancer Predicting the Risk of Secondary Lung Malignancies Associated. Accepted for publication Sep 19, 2011 Summary The risk of secondary lung cancers after whole breast lower risk of secondary lung malignancy than treatment with the supine breast tech- nique. Breast

  15. A Distributed Biomarker Atlas for Lung Research aiding the Discovery and Early Detection of Cancer Biomarkers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    A Distributed Biomarker Atlas for Lung Research aiding the Discovery and Early Detection of Cancer Atlas software system that allows a researcher to correlate lung cancer patients with similar characteristics around regions of the lung in which their sample specimens including multiple types

  16. Lung cancer mortality among U. S. uranium miners: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, A.S.; McMillan, A.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines lung cancer mortality among a cohort of white underground uranium miners in the Colorado plateau and is based on mortality follow-up through December 31, 1977. The analytic methods represent a miner's annual age-specific lung cancer mortality rate as the (unspecified) rate among nonsmoking men born at the same time and with no mining history, multiplied by the relative risk factor R. This factor depends on the miner's total exposures to radon daughters (in working level months (WLM) and to cigarettes (in packs), accumulated from start of exposure until 10 years before his current age. Among those examined, the relative risk function giving the highest likelihood of the data was R . (1 + 0.31 X 10(-/sup 2/) WLM)(1 + 0.51 X 10(-/sup 3/) packs). This multiplicative function specifies that ratios of mortality rates for miners versus nonminers with similar age and smoking characteristics do not depend on smoking status. By contrast, differences between miners' and nonminers' mortality rates are substantially higher for smokers than for nonsmokers. The data rejected (P . .01) several additive functions for R that specify relative risk as a sum of components due to radiation and to cigarette smoking. Cumulative exposures to both radiation and cigarettes gave better fits to the data than did average annual exposure rates. Age at start of underground mining had no effect on risk, after controlling for age at lung cancer death, year of birth, and cumulative radiation and smoking exposures.

  17. Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan with historically high air pollution levels. This work tests whether persistent spatial patterns of metrics of chronic exposure to air pollutants are associated with the observed patterns of cancer incidence rates

  18. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of PGG–paclitaxel, a novel macromolecular formulation of paclitaxel, in nu/nu mice bearing NCI-460 lung cancer xenografts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in nu/nu mice bearing NCI-460 lung cancer xenografts Xingheto mice bearing SC NCI-H460 lung cancer xenografts at a doseÁ Paclitaxel Á Drug delivery Á Lung cancer Abbreviations PGA

  19. Anti-Tumor Effect in Human Lung Cancer by a Combination Treatment of Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors: SL142 or SL325 and Retinoic Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a K-ras ribozyme against human lung cancer cell lineHeymach JV, Lippman SM (2008) Lung cancer. N Engl J Med 359:for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. J Thorac Oncol 2:

  20. Antitumor effects of L-BLP25 Antigen-Specific tumor immunotherapy in a novel human MUC1 transgenic lung cancer mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yannelli JR: Vaccines for lung cancer. J Thorac Oncol 2006,vaccines in non-small cell lung cancer. J Thorac Oncol 2006,6. Szabo E: MUC1 expression in lung cancer. Methods Mol Med

  1. Nuclear Factor I/B is an Oncogene in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Alison L.

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer often diagnosed after it has metastasized. Despite the need to better understand this disease, SCLC remains poorly characterized at the molecular and genomic levels. ...

  2. Characterization of Lung Cancer by Amide Proton Transfer (APT) Imaging: An In-Vivo Study in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    Characterization of Lung Cancer by Amide Proton Transfer (APT) Imaging: An In-Vivo Study in the brain tumor. In this study, we tested the feasibility of in-vivo APT imaging of lung tumor malignant lung cancer cell lines. The results revealed that APT imaging is feasible to quantify lung tumors

  3. A filter-based feature selection approach for identifying potential biomarkers for lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Hee; Lushington, Gerald H.; Visvanathan, Mahesh

    2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in the world and its treatment is dependant on the type and stage of cancer detected in the patient. Molecular biomarkers that can characterize the cancer phenotype are thus a key...

  4. Pathol Biol (Paris) . Author manuscript The increasing role of amphiregulin in non-small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -small cell lung cancer Beno t Busserî , Jean-Luc Coll , Amandine Hurbin * Institut d oncologie/d veloppement.Hurbin@ujf-grenoble.fr > Abstract Non-small cell lung cancers present a 5-year survival rate below 12 . Such a poor prognosis may be explained by non small cell lung% cancer cells evasion to apoptosis and resistance to treatments

  5. Identifying HotSpots in Lung Cancer Data Using Association Rule Mining Ankit Agrawal and Alok Choudhary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    Identifying HotSpots in Lung Cancer Data Using Association Rule Mining Ankit Agrawal and Alok, IL 60201, USA Email: {ankitag,choudhar}@eecs.northwestern.edu Abstract--We analyze the lung cancer. The resulting rules conform with existing biomedical knowledge and provide interesting insights into lung cancer

  6. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  7. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  8. A study of the relationship between emotional history and the incidence of cancer in human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian, Henry Andrew

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    report a more severe emotional history than the non-cancer group. Eighty-eight male subjects were selected from the Veterans Administration Hospital in Temple, Texas to be interviewed according to a patterned interview guide. Results... SUBJECTS' CRITICAL INCIDENTS 55 APPENDIX D - SUMMARIES OF NON-CANCER 72 SUBJECTS' CRITICAL INCIDENTS APPENDIX E - RELEASE FORM 87 VITA 89 LIST OF TABLES Table Page B iographical Data of Sub j ects in Sample 10 Statistical Analysis of Data 22...

  9. IL-27 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenic factor production in a STAT1-dominant pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IL-27 directly restrains lung tumorigenicity by suppressingof human non-small cell lung cancer in SCID mice. J Clinfactor in non-small cell lung cancer. J Clin Invest 1998,

  10. An NQO1-and PARP-1-mediated cell death pathway induced in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    %) of all cancer-related deaths in the United States (1). Current therapies for non-small-cell lung cancerAn NQO1- and PARP-1-mediated cell death pathway induced in non-small-cell lung cancer cells is the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Patients treated with current chemotherapies

  11. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Bailey, D; Bailey, E [Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: ?5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

  12. Study of lung-metastasized prostate cancer cell line chemotaxis to epidermal growth factor with a BIOMEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Study of lung-metastasized prostate cancer cell line chemotaxis to epidermal growth factorpp) doi:10.1088/2043-6262/3/3/035007 Study of lung-metastasized prostate cancer cell line chemotaxis of 10 µm. The device was placed on a culture dish and primed with growth media. Lung-metastasized cells

  13. The Intracellular Localization of ID2 Expression Has a Predictive Value in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Intracellular Localization of ID2 Expression Has a Predictive Value in Non Small Cell Lung-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and the clinicopathological features and prognosis of these patients Expression Has a Predictive Value in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer. PLoS ONE 4(1): e4158. doi:10.1371/journal

  14. Introduction Prostate cancer has the highest incidence of any malig-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -dependent to androgen-independent tumors (2). In the case of metastasis, androgen sup- pression is the leading treatment of cancer-related deaths in men in industrialized countries (1). Besides metas- tasis to bone and lymph

  15. Breast cancer incidence following preeclampsia or gestational hypertension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wormuth, Jennifer Karen

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to examine the relationship between preeclampsia or gestational hypertension and subsequent breast cancer in a population of 6,564 pregnant women. Data on the study population came from the Child Health...

  16. Predictive Factors of Late Radiation Fibrosis: A Prospective Study in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazeron, Renaud [University of Lyon, Centre Leon Berard, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France); Etienne-Mastroianni, Benedicte [Hopital Louis Pradel, Department of Pneumology, Lyon (France); Perol, David [University of Lyon, Centre Leon Berard, Departement of Public Health, Lyon (France); Arpin, Dominique [Hopital de la Croix-Rousse, Department of Pneumology, Lyon (France); Vincent, Michel [Hopital Saint Luc-Saint Joseph, Department of Pneumology, Lyon (France); Falchero, Lionel [Centre Hospitalier General, Department of Pneumology, Villefranche sur Saone (France); Martel-Lafay, Isabelle; Carrie, Christian [University of Lyon, Centre Leon Berard, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France); Claude, Line, E-mail: claude@lyon.fnclcc.f [University of Lyon, Centre Leon Berard, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine predictive factors of late radiation fibrosis (RF) after conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were included in a prospective trial. Clinical evaluation, chest X-ray, and pulmonary functional tests including diffusion parameters were performed before and 6 months after radiotherapy. An independent panel of experts prospectively analyzed RF, using Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic scales classification. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify relationships between clinical, functional, or treatment parameters and incidence of RF. Variations of circulating serum levels of pro-inflammatory (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, tumor growth factor beta1) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines during 3D-RT were examined to identify correlations with RF. Results: Of the 96 patients included, 72 were evaluable for RF at 6 months. Thirty-seven (51.4%) developed RF (Grade >=1), including six severe RF (Grades 2-3; 8.3%). In univariate analysis, only poor Karnofsky Performance Status and previous acute radiation pneumonitis were associated with RF (p < 0.05). Dosimetric factors (mean lung dose, percentage of lung volume receiving more than 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 Gy) were highly correlated with RF (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, previous acute radiation pneumonitis and dosimetric parameters were significantly correlated with RF occurrence. It was not significantly correlated either with cytokines at baseline or with their variation during 3D-RT. Conclusions: This study confirms the importance of dosimetric parameters to limit the risk of RF. Contrary to acute radiation pneumonitis, RF was not correlated to cytokine variations during 3D-RT.

  17. Conditional mouse lung cancer models using adenoviral or lentiviral delivery of Cre recombinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPage, Michel

    The development of animal models of lung cancer is critical to our understanding and treatment of the human disease. Conditional mouse models provide new opportunities for testing novel chemopreventatives, therapeutics and ...

  18. Proteasome Inhibitors Block DNA Repair and Radiosensitize Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cron, Kyle R.

    Despite optimal radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy and/or surgery, a majority of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) fail treatment. To identify novel gene targets for improved tumor control, ...

  19. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  20. A novel strategy for surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for lung cancer imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    A novel strategy for surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for lung Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as versatile-step procedure for the surface functionalization of SPIO nanoparticles with a lung cancer-targeting peptide

  1. The development of a sensitive method to study volatile organic compounds in gaseous emissions of lung cancer cell lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroly, Anupam

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a low cost, reliable system that would lead to early detection of lung cancer. Tests involved the quantitation of gaseous metabolic emissions from immortalized lung ...

  2. The Oncogenic Lung Cancer Fusion Kinase CD74-ROS Activates a Novel Invasiveness Pathway through E-Syt1 Phosphorylation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Hannah

    Patients with lung cancer often present with metastatic disease and therefore have a very poor prognosis. The recent discovery of several novel ROS receptor tyrosine kinase molecular alterations in non–small cell lung ...

  3. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chun-Chin

    We utilize multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of noncancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from humans. Our results show that the combination of second-harmonic ...

  4. The association between fatalistic beliefs and late stage at diagnosis of lung and colorectal cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Liu, Michael Pang-Hsiang; Abel, Gary A.; Wardle, Jane; Keating, Nancy L.

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    -based cohort of 4,319 U.S. patients with newly-diagnosed lung or colorectal cancer participating in the Cancer Care Outcomes and Research Surveillance (CanCORS) study. Fatalistic beliefs were assessed with an established measure. A fatalism score (range 4...

  5. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 ?M cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship between cadmium and lung cancer.

  6. Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that has rapidly increased in global incidence in recent dec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    in recent dec- ades1,2 . In the United States, the average annual increase in thyroid cancer incidence of 6.6% between 2000 and 2009 is the highest among all cancers2 . Although the death rate of thyroid cancer is relatively low, the rate of disease recurrence or persistence is high, which is asso- ciated with increased

  7. Arsenic exposure, smoking, and lung cancer in smelter workers--a case-control study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G. (Department of Environmental Hygiene, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1991-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cohort of 3,916 Swedish copper smelter workers employed for at least 3 months between 1928 and 1967 was followed up through 1981. Arsenic exposure was estimated for different time periods at each workplace within the smelter. Detailed job records were linked to the exposure matrix, thus forming individual cumulative arsenic exposure measures for each smelter worker. Smoking history was collected for 107 lung cancer cases and 214 controls from the cohort. Lung cancer risks were positively related to cumulative arsenic exposure with smoking standardized relative risks ranging from 0.7 to 8.7 in different exposure groups. A negative confounding by smoking was suggested in the higher exposure categories. The interaction between arsenic and smoking for the risk of developing lung cancer was intermediate between additive and multiplicative and appeared less pronounced among heavy smokers.

  8. Project #09R: Ying Luo and Niren Murthy: Multifunctional ProflavineHyaluronic Acid Conjugate (PHC): A new siRNA delivery vehicle for treating lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    ): A new siRNA delivery vehicle for treating lung cancer siRNA is emerging as the next generation of targeted therapies for lung cancer treatment. In advancing siRNA into clinical trials, safe and effective delivery vehicle, termed ProflavineHyaluronic Acid Conjugate (PHC), which can deliver siRNA to lung cancer

  9. Arsenic methylation and lung and bladder cancer in a case-control study in northern Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melak, Dawit [Global Health Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ferreccio, Catterina [Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Kalman, David [School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Parra, Roxana [Hospital Regional de Antofagasta, Antofagasta (Chile); Acevedo, Johanna; Pérez, Liliana; Cortés, Sandra [Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Smith, Allan H.; Yuan, Yan; Liaw, Jane [Arsenic Health Effects Research Group, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Steinmaus, Craig, E-mail: craigs@berkeley.edu [Arsenic Health Effects Research Group, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsenic (MMA) then to dimethylarsenic (DMA), although this process is not complete in most people. The trivalent form of MMA is highly toxic in vitro and previous studies have identified associations between the proportion of urinary arsenic as MMA (%MMA) and several arsenic-related diseases. To date, however, relatively little is known about its role in lung cancer, the most common cause of arsenic-related death, or about its impacts on people drinking water with lower arsenic concentrations (e.g., < 200 ?g/L). In this study, urinary arsenic metabolites were measured in 94 lung and 117 bladder cancer cases and 347 population-based controls from areas in northern Chile with a wide range of drinking water arsenic concentrations. Lung cancer odds ratios adjusted for age, sex, and smoking by increasing tertiles of %MMA were 1.00, 1.91 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99–3.67), and 3.26 (1.76–6.04) (p-trend < 0.001). Corresponding odds ratios for bladder cancer were 1.00, 1.81 (1.06–3.11), and 2.02 (1.15–3.54) (p-trend < 0.001). In analyses confined to subjects only with arsenic water concentrations < 200 ?g/L (median = 60 ?g/L), lung and bladder cancer odds ratios for subjects in the upper tertile of %MMA compared to subjects in the lower two tertiles were 2.48 (1.08–5.68) and 2.37 (1.01–5.57), respectively. Overall, these findings provide evidence that inter-individual differences in arsenic metabolism may be an important risk factor for arsenic-related lung cancer, and may play a role in cancer risks among people exposed to relatively low arsenic water concentrations. - Highlights: • Urine arsenic metabolites were measured in cancer cases and controls from Chile. • Higher urine %MMA values were associated with increased lung and bladder cancer. • %MMA-cancer associations were seen at drinking water arsenic levels < 200 ?g/L.

  10. Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui, E-mail: baohuihan1@163.com

    2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates ?-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/?-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and serous DKK1 level was much higher in bone metastatic NSCLC compared to non-bone metastatic NSCLC. We also found that conditioned medium from DKK1 over-expressing lung cancer cells inhibited the differentiation of osteoblast, determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin secretion, whereas the conditioned medium from DKK1 silencing lung cancer cells exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, DKK1 reduced the level of ?-catenin and RUNX2, as well as inhibiting the nuclear translocation of ?-catenin. Taken together, these results suggested that lung cancer-produced DKK1 may be an important mechanistic link between NSCLC and bone metastases, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to treat bone metastase of NSCLC.

  11. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Chien-Chih [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Su, Chun-Li [Department of Human Development and Family Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kwun-Min [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fang, Kang, E-mail: kangfang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  12. Lung cancer mortality among men living near an arsenic-emitting smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pershagen, G.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Etiologic factors for lung cancer were studied by the case-control technique among 636 men, including 212 with pulmonary carcinoma, who had died between 1961 and 1979 in a county in northern Sweden. Data on smoking habits, occupation, and residence were obtained from a next of kin to each study subject. Validation against data from other sources indicated that the exposure information was of high quality. A relative risk of 2.0 for lung cancer was seen among men who had lived within approximately 20 km from a large copper smelter. The increased risk, which is statistically significant (p less than 0.05), could not be explained by smoking habits or occupational background. Smelter workers and miners had relative risks for lung cancer of 3.0 and 4.1, respectively. No firm conclusions can be drawn on the cause of excess lung cancer risk in the smelter area, but it seems plausible that the very substantial emissions to air from the smelter, especially of arsenic, may have played a role.

  13. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  14. Imaging-Histologic Discordance at Percutaneous Biopsy of the Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in small pe- ripheral lung cancers. AJR Am J Roentgenolin reports indicating ‘‘primary lung cancer’’ or ‘‘benignspecified,’’ ‘‘primary lung cancer,’’ or ‘‘metastatic

  15. Therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancers harboring the fusion oncogene EML4-ALK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katayama, Ryohei

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene represents a molecular target in a small subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). This fusion leads to ...

  16. The development of a sensitive method to study volatile organic compounds in gaseous emissions of lung cancer cell lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroly, Anupam

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSITIVE METHOD TO STUDY VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN GASEOUS EMISSIONS OF LUNG CANCER CELL LINES A Thesis by ANUPAM MAROLY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2005 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSITIVE METHOD TO STUDY VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN GASEOUS EMISSIONS OF LUNG CANCER CELL...

  17. Lung cancer among women residing close to an arsenic emitting copper smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, F.; Harter, L.; Milham, S.; Royce, R.; Smith, A.H.; Hartley, J.; Enterline, P.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung cancer deaths occurring between 1935 and 1969 among women residing near an arsenic emitting smelter were examined. For three geographically defined exposure groups, the observed and expected number of lung cancer deaths were compared. In none of the exposure groups did the observed number of deaths exceed the expected. However, an index of exposure based on distance of residence from the smelter and duration of residence in the area was 27% higher for cases than for age-matched controls (p = .10). Adjusting for a latency of 20 yr, case exposures were 23% higher than for controls (p = .07). Dividing individuals into quintiles of exposure yielded odds ratios ranging from 1 to 1.6 (test of trend, p = .07).

  18. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  19. Lung cancers attributable to environmental tobacco smoke and air pollution in non-smokers in different European countries: a prospective study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vineis, Paolo; Hoek, Gerard; Krzyzanowski, Michal; Vigna-Taglianti, Federica; Veglia, Fabrizio; Airoldi, Luisa; Overvad, Kim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Lund, Eiliv; Agudo, Antonio; Martinez, Carmen; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Cirera, Lluis; Quiros, Jose R; Berglund, Goran; Manjer, Jonas; Forsberg, Bertil; Day, Nicholas E; Key, Timothy J; Kaaks, Rudolf; Saracci, Rodolfo; Riboli, Elio

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    into Cancer and Nutrition)(N = 520,000). We report estimates of the proportion of lung cancers attributable to ETS and air pollution in this population. Results The proportion of lung cancers in never- and ex-smokers attributable to ETS was estimated...

  20. Retrospective Estimation of the Quality of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Jihye; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), OAR-PTV distance and OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10Gy, V20Gy, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54 - 0.89 , 0.90 - 1.00 , and 0.11 - 0.41, respectively. The mean EUDs (V10Gy, V20Gy) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectivel...

  1. Cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer in smelter workers: a dose-response study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G.; Wall, S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cause-specific mortality was followed through 1981 in a cohort of 3,916 male Swedish smelter workers employed for at least 3 months from 1928 through 1967. Arsenic levels in the air of all workplaces within the smelter were estimated for three different time periods. Using this exposure matrix and detailed information of the work history, cumulative arsenic exposure could be computed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for several dose categories using age-specific mortality rates from the county where the smelter was situated. A positive dose-response relationship was found between cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer mortality with an overall SMR of 372 (304-450, 95% confidence interval). The lung cancer mortality was related to the estimated average intensity of exposure to arsenic but not to the duration. No positive dose-response relationship was found between arsenic and ischemic heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. There was also no evident dose-response relationship between estimated exposure to sulfur dioxide and lung cancer.

  2. SU-E-J-29: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Tumor Motion Consistency for Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Makhija, K; Keall, P [The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Arm, J; Hunter, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate whether the breathing-guidance system: audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. This will minimize respiratory-induced tumor motion variations across cancer imaging and radiotherapy procedues. This is the first study to investigate the impact of respiratory guidance on tumor motion. Methods: Tumor motion consistency was investigated with five lung cancer patients (age: 55 to 64), who underwent a training session to get familiarized with AV biofeedback, followed by two MRI sessions across different dates (pre and mid treatment). During the training session in a CT room, two patient specific breathing patterns were obtained before (Breathing-Pattern-1) and after (Breathing-Pattern-2) training with AV biofeedback. In each MRI session, four MRI scans were performed to obtain 2D coronal and sagittal image datasets in free breathing (FB), and with AV biofeedback utilizing Breathing-Pattern-2. Image pixel values of 2D images after the normalization of 2D images per dataset and Gaussian filter per image were used to extract tumor motion using image pixel values. The tumor motion consistency of the superior-inferior (SI) direction was evaluated in terms of an average tumor motion range and period. Results: Audiovisual biofeedback improved tumor motion consistency by 60% (p value = 0.019) from 1.0±0.6 mm (FB) to 0.4±0.4 mm (AV) in SI motion range, and by 86% (p value < 0.001) from 0.7±0.6 s (FB) to 0.1±0.2 s (AV) in period. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves both breathing pattern and tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential for facilitating reproducible tumor motion towards achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  3. CDK-associated Cullin 1 promotes cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2 in human lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Tian Jun [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China); Gao, Fei [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xi’an, Xi’an 710043 (China)] [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xi’an, Xi’an 710043 (China); Yang, Tian; Thakur, Asmitanand; Ren, Hui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China); Chen, Ming Wei, E-mail: xjtucmw@163.com [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)

    2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) expression increases in human lung carcinoma. •CAC1 promotes the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells. •CAC1 promotes human lung cancer A549 cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) in lung cancer, the effect of CAC1 on the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells, and the activation of signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Results showed that CAC1 expression was higher levels in human lung carcinoma than normal lung tissue, and CAC1 siRNA reduced the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing cell activity and cell division in vitro. The proportion of cells treated with CAC1 siRNA increased in the G1 phase and decreased in the S and G2/M phase, indicative of G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the proportions of early/late apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells were enhanced with CAC1 siRNA treatment. It was also found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways were involved in the proliferation of A549 cells. After CAC1 siRNA treatment, p-ERK1/2 levels decreased, and meanwhile p-p38 level increased, A549 cell proliferation increased when ERK1/2 signaling is activated by PMA. Our findings demonstrated that CAC1 promoted the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential cure target for treatment of human lung cancer.

  4. Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakadate, Yusuke [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan) [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tachibana, Taro [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Koizumi, Fumiaki, E-mail: fkoizumi@ncc.go.jp [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Radiosensitization by PARG silencing was observed in multiple lung cancer cells. •PAR accumulation was enhanced by PARG silencing after DNA damage. •Radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation were impaired by PARG siRNA. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy.

  5. Methods for testing interactions, with applications to occupational exposures, smoking, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.C.; Whittemore, A.S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various approaches to assessing the interaction between smoking and occupational exposures are described. The definition of interaction depends on the measure of association under consideration and can be expressed in terms of disease risk, time, or dose. Simple descriptive methods and maximum likelihood model fitting methods are presented for analyzing interactions in terms of joint effects on disease risk. Methods for assessing the influence of exposures on times to disease, using appropriate denominators, are also described. The various approaches are illustrated with published data on lung cancer in relation to asbestos, radon daughters, chloromethyl ethers, and arsenic. Some of the mechanisms that can be invoked to explain the observed patterns include initiation and promotion, lung clearance, transport across cell membranes, and mucous secretion.

  6. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (±2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (±12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (±1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  7. Serum Amyloid A as a Predictive Marker for Radiation Pneumonitis in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yu-Shan [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Animal Science, National Ilan University, Ilan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Heng-Jui [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Department of Mathematics, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Su-Chen; Ko, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chih-Chia [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Yu-Wung; Jiang, Jiunn-Song [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Cheng-Yen; Chi, Mau-Shin [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, Kwan-Hwa, E-mail: M006565@ms.skh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Radiation Science and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate serum markers associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade ?3 in patients with lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment serum samples from patients with stage Ib-IV lung cancer who developed RP within 1 year after radiation therapy were analyzed to identify a proteome marker able to stratify patients prone to develop severe RP by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Dosimetric parameters and 3 biological factors were compared. Results: Serum samples from 16 patients (28%) with severe RP (grade 3-4) and 42 patients (72%) with no or mild RP (grade 0-2) were collected for analysis. All patients received a median of 54 Gy (range, 42-70 Gy) of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with a mean lung dose (MLD) of 1502 cGy (range, 700-2794 cGy). An m/z peak of 11,480 Da was identified by SELDI-TOF-MS, and serum amyloid A (SAA) was the primary splitter serum marker. The receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of SAA (0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-1.00) was higher than those of C-reactive protein (0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.94), interleukin-6 (0.79; 95% CI, 0.65-0.94), and MLD (0.57; 95% CI, 0.37-0.77). The best sensitivity and specificity of combined SAA and MLD for predicting RP were 88.9% and 96.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Baseline SAA could be used as an auxiliary marker for predicting severe RP. Extreme care should be taken to limit the lung irradiation dose in patients with high SAA.

  8. Individual differences in arsenic metabolism and lung cancer in a case-control study in Cordoba, Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinmaus, Craig, E-mail: craigs@berkeley.ed [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States); School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Yuan Yan [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kalman, Dave [School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rey, Omar A. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Catolica de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Skibola, Christine F.; Dauphine, Dave; Basu, Anamika; Porter, Kristin E.; Hubbard, Alan; Bates, Michael N.; Smith, Martyn T.; Smith, Allan H. [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsenic (MMA) then to dimethylarsenic (DMA), although in most people this process is not complete. Previous studies have identified associations between the proportion of urinary MMA (%MMA) and increased risks of several arsenic-related diseases, although none of these reported on lung cancer. In this study, urinary arsenic metabolites were assessed in 45 lung cancer cases and 75 controls from arsenic-exposed areas in Cordoba, Argentina. Folate has also been linked to arsenic-disease susceptibility, thus an exploratory assessment of associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in folate metabolizing genes, arsenic methylation, and lung cancer was also conducted. In analyses limited to subjects with metabolite concentrations above detection limits, the mean %MMA was higher in cases than in controls (17.5% versus 14.3%, p = 0.01). The lung cancer odds ratio for subjects with %MMA in the upper tertile compared to those in the lowest tertile was 3.09 (95% CI, 1.08-8.81). Although the study size was too small for a definitive conclusion, there was an indication that lung cancer risks might be highest in those with a high %MMA who also carried cystathionine {beta}-synthase (CBS) rs234709 and rs4920037 variant alleles. This study is the first to report an association between individual differences in arsenic metabolism and lung cancer, a leading cause of arsenic-related mortality. These results add to the increasing body of evidence that variation in arsenic metabolism plays an important role in arsenic-disease susceptibility.

  9. Alpha/Beta Ratio for Normal Lung Tissue as Estimated From Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body and Conventionally Fractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheenstra, Alize E.H.; Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Belderbos, José S.A.; Damen, Eugène M.F.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate the ?/? ratio for which the dose-dependent lung perfusion reductions for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CFRT) are biologically equivalent. Methods and Materials: The relations between local dose and perfusion reduction 4 months after treatment in lung cancer patients treated with SBRT and CFRT were scaled according to the linear-quadratic model using ?/? ratios from 0 Gy to ? Gy. To test for which ?/? ratio both treatments have equal biological effect, a 5-parameter logistic model was optimized for both dose–effect relationships simultaneously. Beside the ?/? ratio, the other 4 parameters were d{sub 50}, the steepness parameter k, and 2 parameters (M{sub SBRT} and M{sub CFRT}) representing the maximal perfusion reduction at high doses for SBRT and CFRT, respectively. Results: The optimal fitted model resulted in an ?/? ratio of 1.3 Gy (0.5-2.1 Gy), M{sub SBRT} = 42.6% (40.4%-44.9%), M{sub CFRT} = 66.9% (61.6%-72.1%), d{sub 50} = 35.4 Gy (31.5-9.2 Gy), and k = 2.0 (1.7-2.3). Conclusions: An equal reduction of lung perfusion in lung cancer was observed in SBRT and CFRT if local doses were converted by the linear-quadratic model with an ?/? ratio equal to 1.3 Gy (0.5-2.1 Gy)

  10. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cao, Wenhua [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite the presence of interplay effect, the delivered dose may be reliably estimated using the 4D composite dose. In general the interplay effect may not be a primary concern with IMPT for lung cancers for the authors' institution. The described interplay analysis tool may be used to provide additional confidence in treatment delivery.

  11. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  12. Modifiers of Exposure-Response Estimates for Lung Cancer among Miners Exposed to Radon Progeny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard W. Hornung; James Deddens; Robert Roscoe

    The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort.- Environ Health Perspect 1 03(Suppl 2):49-53 (1995)

  13. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: Zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased, number of skin cancers in the EBRT patients compared with that of the general population.

  14. Lung Lung Lung (woman only)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    as the leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States in 1987 and now claims the lives of more IS A MAJOR HEALTH PROBLEM FOR WOMEN in the United States, not only owing to its high incidence rate but, more respond to treatment differently than men (iii) Cigarette Smoking Among Adults ­ United States, 2006

  15. Abstract It is an established fact that radon progeny can induce lung cancers. However, there is a well-known

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Abstract It is an established fact that radon progeny can induce lung cancers. However, there is a well-known discrepancy between the epidemiologically derived dose conversion factor for radon progeny is a unit of exposure to radon progeny). Up to now there is no satisfactory expla- nation to this

  16. SU-E-T-170: Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Proton Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, S; Zhao, L; Ramirez, E; Singh, H; Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) errors in proton therapy planning of lung cancer. Methods: A lung cancer case treated at our center was used in this retrospective study. The original plan was generated using two proton fields (posterior-anterior and left-lateral) with XiO treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using uniform scanning proton therapy system. First, the computed tomography (CT) set of original lung treatment plan was re-sampled for rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) angles ranged from ?5° to +5°, with an increment of 2.5°. Second, 12 new proton plans were generated in XiO using the 12 re-sampled CT datasets. The same beam conditions, isocenter, and devices were used in new treatment plans as in the original plan. All 12 new proton plans were compared with original plan for planning target volume (PTV) coverage and maximum dose to spinal cord (cord Dmax). Results: PTV coverage was reduced in all 12 new proton plans when compared to that of original plan. Specifically, PTV coverage was reduced by 0.03% to 1.22% for roll, by 0.05% to 1.14% for yaw, and by 0.10% to 3.22% for pitch errors. In comparison to original plan, the cord Dmax in new proton plans was reduced by 8.21% to 25.81% for +2.5° to +5° pitch, by 5.28% to 20.71% for +2.5° to +5° yaw, and by 5.28% to 14.47% for ?2.5° to ?5° roll. In contrast, cord Dmax was increased by 3.80% to 3.86% for ?2.5° to ?5° pitch, by 0.63% to 3.25% for ?2.5° to ?5° yaw, and by 3.75% to 4.54% for +2.5° to +5° roll. Conclusion: PTV coverage was reduced by up to 3.22% for rotational error of 5°. The cord Dmax could increase or decrease depending on the direction of rotational error, beam angles, and the location of lung tumor.

  17. The Use of the Active Breathing Coordinator Throughout Radical Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Juliet, E-mail: juliet.brock@icr.ac.uk [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen A.; Panakis, Niki; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; Evans, Phil M.; Brada, Michael [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess feasibility and reproducibility of an Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) used throughout radical radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer, and compare lung dosimetric parameters between free-breathing and ABC plans. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients, recruited into an approved study, had free-breathing and ABC breath-hold treatment plans generated. Lung volume, the percentage volume of lung treated to a dose of {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}), and mean lung dose (MLD) were compared. Treatment (64 Gy in 32 fractions, 5 days/week) was delivered in breath-hold. Repeat breath-hold computed tomography scans were used to assess change in gross tumor volume (GTV) size and position. Setup error was also measured and potential GTV-planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated. Results: Seventeen of 18 patients completed radiotherapy using ABC daily. Intrafraction tumor position was consistent, but interfraction variation had mean (range) values of 5.1 (0-25), 3.6 (0-9.7), and 3.5 (0-16.6) mm in the superoinferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Tumor moved partially outside the PTV in 5 patients. Mean reduction in GTV from planning to end of treatment was 25% (p = 0.003). Potentially required PTV margins were 18.1, 11.9, and 11.9 mm in SI, RL, and AP directions. ABC reduced V{sub 20} by 13% (p = 0.0001), V{sub 13} by 12% (p = 0.001), and MLD by 13% (p < 0.001) compared with free-breathing; lung volume increased by 41% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Clinically significant movements of GTV were seen during radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer using ABC. Image guidance is recommended with ABC. The use of ABC can reduce dose volume parameters determining lung toxicity, and might allow for equitoxic radiotherapy dose escalation.

  18. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the ? passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were ?4.5 cGy/?0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and ?19.7 cGy/?0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was ?13.3 cGy/?0.32%, to esophagus was ?63.4 cGy/?0.89%, and to spinal cord was ?16.3 cGy/?0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2–161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median ? passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.9654–0.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by nonperfect image registrations.

  19. Incidence of primary liver cancer and aetiological aspects: a study of a defined population from a low-endemicity area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J Kaczynski; G Hansson; S Wallerstedt

    Summary The prevalence of primary liver cancer (PLC) varies throughout the world. It has been attributed to variations in incidence of the predominant histological type, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The incidence of PLC types other than HCC such as cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) is far less known, especially in low-incidence areas. The aetiology of HCC and other PLC types is obscure, with the exception of the association between HCC and cirrhosis as well as chronic viral hepatitis. The present retrospective incidence and aetiology study concerns a well-defined population from a period with a high autopsy frequency. Preserved biopsy specimens were re-evaluated histopathologically and patient records were studied. Among 590 histologically verified cases of PLC, HCC constituted 90%, CCC 8 % and a mixed form of these types 1%. At the end of the study period the annual age-standardised incidence rate of HCC was 3.6 cases per 100 000 inhabitants. Other PLC types were hepatoblastoma (n = 3), fibrolamellar carcinoma (n = 2), angiosarcoma (n = 1) and infantile haemangioendothelioma (n = 1), each constituting less than I % of the PLC cases. Comparing HCC with CCC we found that cirrhosis (70%) and alcoholism (21%) was significantly more frequent in HCC, and cholelithiasis was significantly more common (60%) in patients with CCC. In the majority of the PLC cases with liver cirrhosis this disorder was unknown before diagnosis of the tumour.

  20. Complications associated with brachytherapy alone or with laser in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanavkar, B.; Stern, P.; Alberti, W.; Nakhosteen, J.A. (Augusta Teaching Hospital, Bochum (West Germany))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relatively little has been reported about destruction through brachytherapy of mucosa-perforating and extraluminary tumors with probable large vessel involvement causing major hemorrhagic or fistular complications. We report 12 patients subjected to laser and brachytherapy for centrally occluding lung cancer, whom we have periodically followed up from June 1986 until they died. Although all laser procedures were free from complications, necrotic cavitation in five cases, two of which were accompanied by large bronchoesophageal fistulas, and massive fatal hemoptysis occurred in six. Minor complications included radiation mucositis (two), noncritical mucosal scarring (two), and cough (four). Characteristics that will identify patients at risk of developing fatal hemoptysis and fistulas should be better defined by imaging and endoscopic techniques. In such cases, modifying the protocol or using alternative procedures should be considered. Minor complications, such as cough, can be avoided by using topical steroid therapy (eg, beclomethasone dipropionate).

  1. Local Failure in Resected N1 Lung Cancer: Implications for Adjuvant Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Berry, Mark [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Boyd, Jessamy [US Oncology, Dallas, TX (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate actuarial rates of local failure in patients with pathologic N1 non-small-cell lung cancer and to identify clinical and pathologic factors associated with an increased risk of local failure after resection. Methods and Materials: All patients who underwent surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer with pathologically confirmed N1 disease at Duke University Medical Center from 1995-2008 were identified. Patients receiving any preoperative therapy or postoperative radiotherapy or with positive surgical margins were excluded. Local failure was defined as disease recurrence within the ipsilateral hilum, mediastinum, or bronchial stump/staple line. Actuarial rates of local failure were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox multivariate analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. Results: Among 1,559 patients who underwent surgery during the time interval, 198 met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 50 (25%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Actuarial (5-year) rates of local failure, distant failure, and overall survival were 40%, 55%, and 33%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of local failure included a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; p = 0.01), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04), and increasing number of positive N1 lymph nodes (HR, 1.3 per involved lymph node; p = 0.02). Chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward decreased risk of local failure that was not statistically significant (HR, 0.61; p = 0.2). Conclusions: Actuarial rates of local failure in pN1 disease are high. Further investigation of conformal postoperative radiotherapy may be warranted.

  2. A novel synthetic analog of militarin, MA-1 induces mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by ROS generation in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Deok Hyo; Lim, Mi-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yu Ran [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi-Ho [Mushroom Research Division, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 404-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [R and D Center, Dong-A Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Yongin 446-905 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byeong Hwa [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Youl [Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Won O. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Park, Haeil [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sunga, E-mail: sachoi@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Woong, E-mail: tawkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic Militarin analog-1[(2R,3R,4R,5R)-1,6-bis(4-(2,4,4-trimethylpentan-2-yl)phenoxy) hexane-2,3,4,5-tetraol] is a novel derivative of constituents from Cordyceps militaris, which has been used to treat a variety of chronic diseases including inflammation, diabetes, hyperglycemia and cancers. Here, we report for the first time the synthesis of Militarin analog-1 (MA-1) and the apoptotic mechanism of MA-1 against human lung cancer cell lines. Treatment with MA-1 significantly inhibited the viability of 3 human lung cancer cell lines. The inhibition of viability and growth in MA-1-treated A549 cells with an IC{sub 50} of 5 ?M were mediated through apoptosis induction, as demonstrated by an increase in DNA fragmentation, sub-G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-DNA fraction, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. The apoptotic cell death caused mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through regulation of expression of the Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the final stage of apoptosis, activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, was induced. Furthermore, A549 lung cancer cells were more responsive to MA-1 than a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B), involving the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation and JNK/p38 MAPK exhibited attenuated DNA fragmentation in MA-1-induced apoptosis. Oral administration of MA-1 also retarded growth of A549 orthotopic xenografts. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the new synthetic derivative MA-1 triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through ROS generation and regulation of MAPKs and may be a potent therapeutic agent against human lung cancer. - Highlights: • We report a novel synthesized derivative, militarin analog-1 (MA-1). • MA-1-induced cancer cell death was triggered by the ROS generation through MAPKs. • The MA-1-induced cell death was also modulated by the mitochondria-mediated pathway. • The apoptotic cancer cell death by MA-1 was also exhibited in orthotopic xenografts. • Our findings suggest MA-1 as a clinically useful agent for human lung cancer.

  3. Impaired SHP2-Mediated Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activation Contributes to Gefitinib Sensitivity of Lung Cancer Cells with Epidermal Factor Receptor-Activating Mutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazzara, Matthew J.

    Most non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) display elevated expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but response to EGFR kinase inhibitors is predominantly limited to NSCLC harboring EGFR-activating mutations. ...

  4. Detection of aldehydes in lung cancer cell culture by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Guangqing

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Aldehydes in lung cancer cell culture have been investigated using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization. In this study, the poly(dimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fiber was used...

  5. Evaluation of a complex intervention for depression in patients with lung cancer: the design, execution and results of a randomised controlled trial. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jane

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate a complex intervention for major depression in patients with lung cancer. Major depression is a leading cause of disease burden worldwide and is particularly important ...

  6. Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, D.A.; Moody, D.C. III; Ellinwood, L.E.; Klein, M.G.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with [sup 67]Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the lungs by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the [sup 67]Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass. 1 figure.

  7. The effects of PTHrP-mediated ERK activation on non-small cell lung carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phun, Jennifer

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    knockout mouse shows delayed lung development. Pediatric ResL.J. (1991). All major lung cancer cell types produceregulates apoptosis in lung cancer cells through protein

  8. Digitoxin and a synthetic monosaccharide analog inhibit cell viability in lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbaz, Hosam A. [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stueckle, Todd A. [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States) [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States); Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; O'Doherty, George A. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lowry, David T.; Sargent, Linda M.; Wang, Liying [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States)] [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States); Dinu, Cerasela Zoica, E-mail: cerasela-zoica.dinu@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanisms of digitoxin-inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) cells remain unclear. Understanding how digitoxin or derivate analogs induce their cytotoxic effect below therapeutically relevant concentrations will help in designing and developing novel, safer and more effective anti-cancer drugs. In this study, NCI-H460 cells were treated with digitoxin and a synthetic analog D6-MA to determine their anti-cancer activity. Different concentrations of digitoxin and D6-MA were used and the subsequent changes in cell morphology, viability, cell cycle, and protein expressions were determined. Digitoxin and D6-MA induced dose-dependent apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells via caspase-9 cleavage, with D6-MA possessing 5-fold greater potency than digitoxin. In comparison, non-tumorigenic immortalized bronchial and small airway epithelial cells displayed significantly less apoptotic sensitivity compared to NCI-H460 cells suggesting that both digitoxin and D6-MA were selective for NSCLC. Furthermore, NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin and D6-MA treatment. Post-treatment evaluation of key G2/M checkpoint regulatory proteins identified down-regulation of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin. Additionally, Chk1/2 and p53 related proteins experienced down-regulation suggesting a p53-independent cell cycle arrest mechanism. In summary, digitoxin and D6-MA exert anti-cancer effects on NCI-H460 cells through apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, with D6-MA showing at least 5-fold greater potency relative to digitoxin. -- Highlights: ? Digitoxin and synthetic analog D6-MA induced apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ? Apoptotic cell death induced by analog was 5-fold more potent when compared to digitoxin. ? NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin (? 5 nM) and analog (? 1 nM) treatment. ? Digitoxin inhibited the expression of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin at sub-therapeutic concentrations. ? D6-MA was 4-fold more potent than digitoxin.

  9. Metabolic Syndrome, Vitamin D Status, and the Incidence of Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rorabaugh, Joseph Randall

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Background: Epidemiologic data on the role of metabolic syndrome on prostate cancer risk is inconsistent, and only one case-control trial has examined the combined relationship of metabolic syndrome and vitamin D deficiency. Objective...

  10. Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: angela.vanbaardwijk@maastro.nl; Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Maasland Hospital, Sittard (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Simons, Jean [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Jans Gasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

  11. Impact of tumor size and tracer uptake heterogeneity in F-FDG PET and CT NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    heterogeneity on various PET uptake delineation approaches. Methods: 25 NSCLC cancer patients with 18F-FDG PET/CT increasingly used for staging Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) (1). In addition, the use of 18 F-FDG PET/CT F-FDG), associated with Computed Tomography (CT) since the development of PET/CT devices, has been

  12. Predictive Parameters of CyberKnife Fiducial-less (XSight Lung) Applicability for Treatment of Early Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahig, Houda; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Vu, Toni; Doucet, Robert; Béliveau Nadeau, Dominic [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Radiation Oncology Department, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Roberge, David; Lambert, Louise; Carrier, Jean-François [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Filion, Edith, E-mail: edith.filion.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine which parameters allow for CyberKnife fiducial-less tumor tracking in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 133 lung SBRT patients were preselected for direct soft-tissue tracking based on manufacturer recommendations (peripherally located tumors ?1.5 cm with a dense appearance) and staff experience. Patients underwent a tumor visualization test to verify adequate detection by the tracking system (orthogonal radiographs). An analysis of potential predictors of successful tumor tracking was conducted looking at: tumor stage, size, histology, tumor projection on the vertebral column or mediastinum, distance to the diaphragm, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, and patient body mass index. Results: Tumor visualization was satisfactory for 88 patients (66%) and unsatisfactory for 45 patients (34%). Median time to treatment start was 6 days in the success group (range, 2-18 days) and 15 days (range, 3-63 days) in the failure group. A stage T2 (P=.04), larger tumor size (volume of 15.3 cm{sup 3} vs 6.5 cm{sup 3} in success and failure group, respectively) (P<.0001), and higher tumor density (0.86 g/cm{sup 3} vs 0.79 g/cm{sup 3}) were predictive of adequate detection. There was a 63% decrease in failure risk with every 1-cm increase in maximum tumor dimension (relative risk for failure = 0.37, CI=0.23-0.60, P=.001). A diameter of 3.6 cm predicted a success probability of 80%. Histology, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, distance to diaphragm, patient's body mass index, and tumor projection on vertebral column and mediastinum were not found to be predictive of success. Conclusions: Tumor size, volume, and density were the most predictive factors of a successful XSight Lung tumor tracking. Tumors >3.5 cm have ?80% chance of being adequately visualized and therefore should all be considered for direct tumor tracking.

  13. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V., E-mail: chvetsov2@gmail.com; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)] [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data obtained in this work, when taken together with the data obtained previously for head and neck cancer, suggests that the cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume variation curves measured during radiotherapy with conventional fractionation. The proposed method can be used for treatment evaluation and adaptation.

  14. Reproducibility of Tumor Motion Probability Distribution Function in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Fan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hu Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore); Kelsey, Chris R.; Yoo, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using cine megavoltage (MV) images. Methods and Materials: Cine MV images of 20 patients acquired during three-dimensional conformal (6-11 beams) SBRT treatments were retrospectively analyzed to extract tumor motion trajectories. For each patient, tumor motion PDFs were generated per fraction (PDF{sub n}) using three selected 'usable' beams. Patients without at least three usable beams were excluded from the study. Fractional PDF reproducibility (R{sub n}) was calculated as the Dice similarity coefficient between PDF{sub n} to a 'ground-truth' PDF (PDF{sub g}), which was generated using the selected beams of all fractions. The mean of R{sub n}, labeled as R{sub m}, was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient's mean tumor motion rang (A{sub m}). Change of R{sub m} during the course of SBRT treatments was also evaluated. Intra- and intersubject coefficient of variation (CV) of R{sub m} and A{sub m} were determined. Results: Thirteen patients had at least three usable beams and were analyzed. The mean of R{sub m} was 0.87 (range, 0.84-0.95). The mean of A{sub m} was 3.18 mm (range, 0.46-7.80 mm). R{sub m} was found to decrease as A{sub m} increases following an equation of R{sub m} = 0.17e{sup -0.9Am} + 0.84. R{sub m} also decreased slightly throughout the course of treatments. Intersubject CV of R{sub m} (0.05) was comparable to intrasubject CV of R{sub m} (range, 0.02-0.09); intersubject CV of A{sub m} (0.73) was significantly greater than intrasubject CV of A{sub m} (range, 0.09-0.24). Conclusions: Tumor motion PDF can be determined using cine MV images acquired during the treatments. The reproducibility of lung tumor motion PDF decreased exponentially as the tumor motion range increased and decreased slightly throughout the course of the treatments.

  15. The ethanol extract of Scutellaria baicalensis and the active compounds induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis including upregulation of p53 and Bax in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Jiayu; Morgan, Winston A.; Sanchez-Medina, Alberto; Corcoran, Olivia, E-mail: o.corcoran@uel.ac.uk

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a lack of scientific authentication, Scutellaria baicalensis is clinically used in Chinese medicine as a traditional adjuvant to chemotherapy of lung cancer. In this study, cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that crude ethanolic extracts of S. baicalensis were selectively toxic to human lung cancer cell lines A549, SK-LU-1 and SK-MES-1 compared with normal human lung fibroblasts. The active compounds baicalin, baicalein and wogonin did not exhibit such selectivity. Following exposure to the crude extracts, cellular protein expression in the cancer cell lines was assessed using 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS/Protein Fingerprinting. The altered protein expression indicated that cell growth arrest and apoptosis were potential mechanisms of cytotoxicity. These observations were supported by PI staining cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry and Annexin-V apoptotic analysis by fluorescence microscopy of cancer cells treated with the crude extract and pure active compounds. Moreover, specific immunoblotting identification showed the decreased expression of cyclin A results in the S phase arrest of A549 whereas the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest in SK-MES-1 cells results from the decreased expression of cyclin D1. Following treatment, increased expression in the cancer cells of key proteins related to the enhancement of apoptosis was observed for p53 and Bax. These results provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical use of this herb as an adjuvant to lung cancer therapy. - Research Highlights: > Scutellaria baicalensis is a clinical adjuvant to lung cancer chemotherapy in China. > Scutellaria ethanol extracts selectively toxic to A549, SK-LU-1 and SK-MES-1. > Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin were toxic to all lung cancer cell lines. > Proteomics identified increased p53 and BAX in response to Scutellaria extracts.

  16. Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenmark, Matthew H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shangdong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China); Ritter, Timothy [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

  17. Recent Progress in Ultra-Wideband Microwave Breast Cancer Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coates, Mark

    were diagnosed in the United States and Canada ­ with as many as 45,000 cases leading to death. For women, breast cancer mortality rates are higher than for any other cancer, with the exception of lung as early as possible. This will not only reduce mortality and incidence rates, but also significantly ease

  18. Method using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine for treating cancers of the lung

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Dean A. (Germantown, MD); Moody, III, David C. (Superior, CO); Ellinwood, L. Edward (Grand Junction, CO); Klein, M. Gerard (Grand Junction, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

  19. Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Dean A. (60 San Juan St., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Moody, III, David C. (402 Pine Tree La., Boulder, CO 80304); Ellinwood, L. Edward (694 Sperber La., Grand Junction, CO 81506); Klein, M. Gerard (715 Victor Dr., Grand Junction, CO 81506)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques cna be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

  20. Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: jun.zhou@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are ?0.2 ± 0.2, ?1.5 ± 1.1, and ?0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the variances of MP error in SI direction explained by target sizes, motion patterns, and EX variations are 9% with the 2D method, 74.4% with the 3D method, and 27% with the 4D method. The EX/SD detection errors are both < 1.0 mm for the 2D method and < 2.0 mm for the 4D method. Conclusions: The 2D method provides the most accurate MP detection regardless of the motion pattern variations, while its performance is limited by the accuracy of target identification in the projection images. The 3D method causes the largest error in MP determination, and its accuracy significantly depends on target sizes, motion patterns, and EX variations. The 4D method provides moderate MP detection results, while its accuracy relies on a regular motion pattern. In addition, the 2D and 4D methods both provide accurate measurement of the motion SD/EX, providing extra information for motion management.

  1. Rapid Disease Progression With Delay in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry Llyn, E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Grills, Inga Siiner; Battu, Madhu; Fitch, Dwight Lamar [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Wong, Ching-yee Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Margolis, Jeffrey Harold [Department of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Chmielewski, Gary William; Welsh, Robert James [Department of Thoracic Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess rate of disease progression from diagnosis to initiation of treatment for Stage I-IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with NSCLC underwent at least two sets of computed tomography (CT) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans at various time intervals before treatment. Progression was defined as development of any new lymph node involvement, site of disease, or stage change. Results: Median time interval between first and second CT scans was 13.4 weeks, and between first and second PET scans was 9.0 weeks. Median initial primary maximum tumor dimension (MTD) was 3.5 cm (0.6-8.5 cm) with a median standardized uptake value (SUV) of 13.0 (1.7-38.5). The median MTD increased by a median of 1.0 cm (mean, 1.6 cm) between scans for a median relative MTD increase of 35% (mean, 59%). Nineteen patients (48%) progressed between scans. Rate of any progression was 13%, 31%, and 46% at 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. Upstaging occurred in 3%, 13%, and 21% at these intervals. Distant metastasis became evident in 3%, 13%, and 13% after 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. T and N stage were associated with progression, whereas histology, grade, sex, age, and maximum SUV were not. At 3 years, overall survival for Stage III patients with vs. without progression was 18% vs. 67%, p = 0.05. Conclusions: With NSCLC, treatment delay can lead to disease progression. Diagnosis, staging, and treatment initiation should be expedited. After 4-8 weeks of delay, complete restaging should be strongly considered.

  2. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  3. Rsf-1 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancers and regulates cyclinD1 expression and ERK activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qingchang; Dong, Qianze [Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China)] [Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Wang, Enhua, E-mail: wangenhuacmu@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China)] [Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China)

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 expression is elevated in non-small cell lung cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 depletion inhibits proliferation and increased apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 depletion decreases the level of cyclinD1 and phosphor-ERK expression. -- Abstract: Rsf-1 (HBXAP) was recently reported to be overexpressed in various cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of Rsf-1 in primary lung cancer and its biological roles in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been reported. The molecular mechanism of Rsf-1 in cancer aggressiveness remains ambiguous. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of Rsf-1 in NSCLC tissues and found that Rsf-1 was overexpressed at both the mRNA and protein levels. There was a significant association between Rsf-1 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0220) and poor differentiation (p = 0.0013). Furthermore, knockdown of Rsf-1 expression in H1299 and H460 cells with high endogenous Rsf-1 expression resulted in a decrease of colony formation ability and inhibition of cell cycle progression. Rsf-1 knockdown also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. Further analysis showed that Rsf-1 knockdown decreased cyclin D1 expression and phospho-ERK levels. In conclusion, Rsf-1 is overexpressed in NSCLC and contributes to malignant cell growth by cyclin D1 and ERK modulation, which makes Rsf-1 a candidate therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  4. Methods for analyzing occupational cohort data with application to lung cancer in US uranium miners: Techniques for fitting and checking exposure-time-response models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halpern, J.; Whittemore, A.S.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods were used to examine how lung cancer death rates vary with cumulative exposures to radiation and tobacco among uranium miners. The two methods produced similar results when death rate ratios were taken to be the product of radiation and tobacco effects. The estimates were discrepant when death rate ratios were taken to be the sum of radiation and tobacco effects. Both methods indicated better fit for the multiplicative model. It may be that cumulative exposures are inappropriate measures of the effects of radiation and tobacco on lung cancer death rates, as well as for other pollutants where the assumption of cumulative dose is the basis for risk assessments.

  5. Effect of induction chemotherapy on estimated risk of radiation pneumonitis in bulky non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amin, Neha P., E-mail: npamin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University and Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Miften, Moyed; Thornton, Dale; Ryan, Nicole; Kavanagh, Brian; Gaspar, Laurie E [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patients with bulky non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be at a high risk for radiation pneumonitis (RP) if treated with up-front concurrent chemoradiation. There is limited information about the effect of induction chemotherapy on the volume of normal lung subsequently irradiated. This study aims to estimate the reduction in risk of RP in patients with NSCLC after receiving induction chemotherapy. Between 2004 and 2009, 25 patients with Stage IV NSCLC were treated with chemotherapy alone (no surgery or radiation therapy [RT]) and had computed tomography (CT) scans before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Simulated RT plans were created for the prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans so as to deliver 60 Gy to the thoracic disease in patients who had either a >20% volumetric increase or decrease in gross tumor volume (GTV) from chemotherapy. The prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans were analyzed to compare the percentage of lung volume receiving?20 Gy (V20), mean lung dose (MLD), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Eight patients (32%) had a GTV reduction >20%, 2 (8%) had GTV increase >20%, and 15 (60%) had stable GTV. In the 8 responders, there was an absolute median GTV decrease of 88.1 cc (7.3 to 351.6 cc) or a 48% (20% to 62%) relative reduction in tumor burden. One had >20% tumor progression during chemotherapy, yet had an improvement in dosimetric parameters postchemotherapy. Among these 9 patients, the median decrease in V20, MLD, and NTCP was 2.6% (p<0.01), 2.1 Gy (p<0.01), and 5.6% (p<0.01), respectively. Less than one-third of patients with NSCLC obtain >20% volumetric tumor reduction from chemotherapy alone. Even with that amount of volumetric reduction, the 5% reduced risk of RP was only modest and did not convert previously ineligible patients to safely receive definitive thoracic RT.

  6. Cutaneous metastasis of primitive neuroectodermal lung tumor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Romero, Diana; Hilara Sanchez, Yolanda; Perez Alvarez, Javier; Ramirez Garcia, Jose Ramon; de Pable Martin, Maria Pilar

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neuroectodermal tumour of the lung: report of two cases.metastasis due to small-cell lung cancer: a case report.Cell Carcinoma of the Lung. Actas Dermosifiliogr. 2008;99:

  7. Role of MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 in the development of breast cancer brain and lung metastasis in a syngeneic rat model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Odete Rodrigues

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study the expression of MMP2, MMP 3 and MMP9 in breast cancer brain and lung metastasis, we used a syngeneic rat model of distant metastasis of ENU1564, a carcinogen-induced mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. At six weeks post inoculation...

  8. www.thelancet.com Vol 372 October 25, 2008 1473 Effects of smoking and solid-fuel use on COPD, lung cancer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ted

    and cooking.2 Tobacco smoking and indoor air pollution from solid-fuel use are the most important global risk an independent risk factor for tuberculosis5­7 and suggested a positive association between indoor air pollution COPD, lung cancer, and tuberculosis will be a ected by trends in smoking and indoor air pollution

  9. Regulation of E2F-1 gene expression in human breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngwenya, Sharon Khethiwe

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    among women in the Western world, second to lung cancer. And in 2003, approximately 39,800 women died as a result of breast cancer (10). The reported incidence of breast cancer has risen during recent years due to the increase of mammography... likely to be initiated, i.e. early adulthood and reproductive years, and increased breast cancer risk (17). However, other studies have reported that estrogens are able to induce direct and indirect free radical-mediated DNA damage, genetic...

  10. Lung tumor tracking, trajectory reconstruction, and motion artifact removal using rotational cone-beam projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, John Henry

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breast and prostate cancer are more common than lung cancer,but lung cancer causes the most deaths. Courtesy of theSB Jiang, Markerless lung tumor tracking and trajectory

  11. Association Between White Blood Cell Count Following Radiation Therapy With Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chad; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an inflammatory response to radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the association between RP and white blood cell (WBC) count, an established metric of systemic inflammation, after RT for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received ?60 Gy as definitive therapy. The primary endpoint was whether WBC count after RT (defined as 2 weeks through 3 months after RT completion) was associated with grade ?3 or grade ?2 RP. Median lung volume receiving ?20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 31%, and post-RT WBC counts ranged from 1.7 to 21.2 × 10{sup 3} WBCs/?L. Odds ratios (ORs) associating clinical variables and post-RT WBC counts with RP were calculated via logistic regression. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to define optimal post-RT WBC count cut points. Results: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly higher in patients with grade ?3 RP than without (P<.05). Optimal cut points for post-RT WBC count were found to be 7.4 and 8.0 × 10{sup 3}/?L for grade ?3 and ?2 RP, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between post-RT WBC count and grade ?3 (n=46, OR=2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4?4.9, P=.003) and grade ?2 RP (n=164, OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01). This association held in a stepwise multivariate regression. Of note, V{sub 20} was found to be significantly associated with grade ?2 RP (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01) and trended toward significance for grade ?3 RP (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=.06). Conclusions: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly and independently associated with RP and have potential utility as a diagnostic or predictive marker for this toxicity.

  12. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J., E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paul, Marinus A. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each 9.7%. Toxicity was mild, with grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis and rib fractures in 2% and 3%, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with potentially operable disease who underwent primary SABR had a median OS that exceeded 5 years. This finding supports ongoing randomized clinical trials comparing surgery and SABR in cases of operable stage I NSCLC.

  13. Progressive Genomic Instability in the FVB/Kras[superscript LA2] Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacks, Tyler E.

    Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations ...

  14. Stage-specific sensitivity to p53 restoration during lung cancer progression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldser, David M.

    Tumorigenesis is a multistep process that results from the sequential accumulation of mutations in key oncogene and tumour suppressor pathways. Personalized cancer therapy that is based on targeting these underlying genetic ...

  15. Influence of radiation therapy on the lung-tissue in breast cancer patients: CT-assessed density changes and associated symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.; Svane, G. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative electron density of lung tissue was measured from computer tomography (CT) slices in 33 breast cancer patients treated by various techniques of adjuvant radiotherapy. The measurements were made before radiotherapy, 3 months and 9 months after completion of radiation therapy. The changes in lung densities at 3 months and 9 months were compared to radiation induced radiological (CT) findings. In addition, subjective symptoms such as cough and dyspnoea were assessed before and after radiotherapy. It was observed that the mean of the relative electron density of lung tissue varied from 0.25 when the whole lung was considered to 0.17 when only the anterior lateral quarter of the lung was taken into account. In patients with positive radiological (CT) findings the mean lung density of the anterior lateral quarter increased 2.1 times 3 months after radiotherapy and was still increased 1.6 times 6 months later. For those patients without findings, in the CT pictures the corresponding values were 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The standard deviation of the pixel values within the anterior lateral quarter of the lung increased 3.8 times and 3.2 times at 3 months and 9 months, respectively, in the former group, as opposed to 1.2 and 1.1 in the latter group. Thirteen patients had an increase in either cough or dyspnoea as observed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. In eleven patients these symptoms persisted 6 months later. No significant correlation was found between radiological findings and subjective symptoms. However, when three different treatment techniques were compared among 29 patients the highest rate of radiological findings was observed in patients in which the largest lung volumes received the target dose. A tendency towards an increased rate of subjective symptoms was also found in this group.

  16. Genetic association with overall survival of taxane-treated lung cancer patients - a genome-wide association study in human lymphoblastoid cell lines followed by a clinical association study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Nifang

    Background: Taxane is one of the first line treatments of lung cancer. In order to identify novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that might contribute to taxane response, we performed a genome-wide association study ...

  17. Antiproliferative MCR peptides block physical interaction of insulin with retinoblastoma protein (RB) in human lung cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razvan Tudor Radulescu; Kai Kehe

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifteen years ago, a structural analysis of the hormone insulin and the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB) revealed that they may physically interact with one another. Subsequently, an RB peptide corresponding to the proposed RB binding site for insulin was found to recognize full-length insulin in vitro. As part of efforts aimed at developing this RB peptide into an anti-cancer drug, this molecule was chemically coupled to a cellular internalization signal and termed "MCR peptide". Meanwhile, several such MCR peptide variants have been demonstrated to restrain the proliferation of different human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, one of the MCR peptides coined MCR-10 was shown to be capable of interfering with the complex formation between insulin and RB in HepG2 human hepatoma cells, as monitored by immunofluorescence. This latter result indicating an in vivo association between insulin and RB was confirmed by a follow-up study combining the methods of co-immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of the insulin-RB complex in A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells. Specifically, we demonstrate this heterodimer by means of a magnetic beads-based immunoprecipitation approach and equally show that this dimer can be disrupted by MCR-4 or MCR-10 each of which is known to possess antiproliferative properties, yet to a much lesser extent by a control peptide. Thus, this investigation has yielded another important proof for the occurrence of the insulin-RB dimer and, furthermore, its validity as a target for antineoplastic MCR peptides.

  18. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose escalation with therapeutic gain in 79% of the cases.

  19. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

  20. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar, E-mail: rvenkatramani@chla.usc.edu [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kamath, Sunil [Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Olch, Arthur J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Malvar, Jemily [Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sposto, Richard [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Goodarzian, Fariba [Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Freyer, David R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Keens, Thomas G. [Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); and others

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

  1. Total Gross Tumor Volume Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients Treated With Selective Nodal Irradiation for Stage I to III Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reymen, Bart, E-mail: bart.reymen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Van Loon, Judith; Baardwijk, Angela van; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Lunde, Ragnar [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Leuven/ KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In non-small cell lung cancer, gross tumor volume (GTV) influences survival more than other risk factors. This could also apply to small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Analysis of our prospective database with stage I to III SCLC patients referred for concurrent chemo radiation therapy. Standard treatment was 45 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions twice daily concurrently with carboplatin-etoposide, followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in case of non-progression. Only fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-positive or pathologically proven nodal sites were included in the target volume. Total GTV consisted of post chemotherapy tumor volume and pre chemotherapy nodal volume. Survival was calculated from diagnosis (Kaplan-Meier ). Results: A total of 119 patients were included between May 2004 and June 2009. Median total GTV was 93 ± 152 cc (7.5-895 cc). Isolated elective nodal failure occurred in 2 patients (1.7%). Median follow-up was 38 months, median overall survival 20 months (95% confidence interval = 17.8-22.1 months), and 2-year survival 38.4%. In multivariate analysis, only total GTV (P=.026) and performance status (P=.016) significantly influenced survival. Conclusions: In this series of stage I to III small cell lung cancer patients treated with FDG-PET-based selective nodal irradiation total GTV is an independent risk factor for survival.

  2. The site of action of PTHrP's proliferative inhibition in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vander Werff, Ryan Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hormone-related protein in lung cancer cell survival, Chesttreat human non-small cell lung carcinoma through inhibitingthe Growth of Orthotopic Human Lung Tumors in Athymic Mice

  3. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

  4. Mapping the Hallmarks of Lung Adenocarcinoma with Massively Parallel Sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, is responsible for more than 500,000 deaths per year worldwide. Here, we report exome and genome sequences of 183 lung adenocarcinoma tumor/normal ...

  5. Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halasz, Lia M., E-mail: lhalasz@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Taback, Nathan [Division of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Division of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Punglia, Rinaa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The indications for treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) remain controversial. We studied patterns, predictors, and cost of SRS use in elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we identified patients with NSCLC who were diagnosed with brain metastases between 2000 and 2007. Our cohort included patients treated with radiation therapy and not surgical resection as initial treatment for brain metastases. Results: We identified 7684 patients treated with radiation therapy within 2 months after brain metastases diagnosis, of whom 469 (6.1%) cases had billing codes for SRS. Annual SRS use increased from 3.0% in 2000 to 8.2% in 2005 and varied from 3.4% to 12.5% by specific SEER registry site. After controlling for clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, we found SRS use was significantly associated with increasing year of diagnosis, specific SEER registry, higher socioeconomic status, admission to a teaching hospital, no history of participation in low-income state buy-in programs (a proxy for Medicaid eligibility), no extracranial metastases, and longer intervals from NSCLC diagnosis. The average cost per patient associated with radiation therapy was 2.19 times greater for those who received SRS than for those who did not. Conclusions: The use of SRS in patients with metastatic NSCLC increased almost 3-fold from 2000 to 2005. In addition, we found significant variations in SRS use across SEER registries and socioeconomic quartiles. National practice patterns in this study suggested both a lack of consensus and an overall limited use of the approach among elderly patients before 2008.

  6. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, ...

  7. A new mouse model to explore the initiation, progression, and therapy of BRAF(V600E)-induced lung tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dankort, David; Filenova, Elena; Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Jones, Kirk; McMahon, Martin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and RAS mutations in human lung cancer and melanoma. Cancerreceptor signaling pathway in lung cancers. Int. J. Can- ceractivated in non-small-cell lung cancer and associated with

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few of lung cancer, and 2,053 controls recruited from 8 Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self

  9. Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persinger, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

  10. Inhibiting the Aurora B Kinase Potently Suppresses Repopulation During Fractionated Irradiation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sak, Ali, E-mail: ali.sak@uni-due.de [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Stuschke, Martin; Groneberg, Michael; Kuebler, Dennis; Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E. [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of molecular-targeted agents during radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising strategy to inhibit repopulation, thereby improving therapeutic outcome. We assessed the combined effectiveness of inhibiting Aurora B kinase and irradiation on human NSCLC cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: NSCLC cell lines were exposed to concentrations of AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (AZD1152-HQPA) inhibiting colony formation by 50% (IC50{sub clone}) in combination with single dose irradiation or different fractionation schedules using multiple 2-Gy fractions per day up to total doses of 4-40 Gy. The total irradiation dose required to control growth of 50% of the plaque monolayers (TCD50) was determined. Apoptosis, G2/M progression, and polyploidization were also analyzed. Results: TCD50 values after single dose irradiation were similar for the H460 and H661 cell lines with 11.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 10.7 {+-} 0.3 Gy, respectively. Fractionated irradiation using 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, and 1 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day schedules significantly increased TCD50 values for both cell lines grown as plaque monolayers with increasing radiation treatment time. This could be explained by a repopulation effect per day that counteracts 75 {+-} 8% and 27 {+-} 6% of the effect of a 2-Gy fraction in H460 and H661 cells, respectively. AZD1152-HQPA treatment concomitant to radiotherapy significantly decreased the daily repopulation effect (H460: 28 {+-} 5%, H661: 10 {+-} 4% of a 2-Gy fraction per day). Treatment with IC50{sub clone} AZD1152-HPQA did not induce apoptosis, prolong radiation-induced G2 arrest, or delay cell cycle progression before the spindle check point. However, polyploidization was detected, especially in cell lines without functional p53. Conclusions: Inhibition of Aurora B kinase with low AZD1152-HQPA concentrations during irradiation of NSCLC cell lines affects repopulation during radiotherapy. Thus, concomitant Aurora B kinase inhibition and irradiation may be a promising strategy for fast repopulating tumors, which are difficult to cure by dose escalation based on conventional fractionation.

  11. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dios, Núria Rodríguez de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, R. Bryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moreno-Jiménez, Marta [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Proton Therapy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Ramella, Sara [Division of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Everitt, Sarah [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University (Australia); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); and others

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ?2 and grade ?3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ?60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ?2 and grade ?3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ?17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ?2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ?3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors are statistically predictive of RE, the V60 alone provides the best predictive ability. Efforts to reduce the V60 should be prioritized, with further research needed to identify and validate new predictive factors.

  12. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  13. Functional Promoter Variant rs2868371 of HSPB1 Is Associated With Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Qingsong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wei, Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Yuan, Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)] [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain)] [Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Wang, Li-E. [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To date, no biomarkers have been found to predict, before treatment, which patients will develop radiation pneumonitis (RP), a potentially fatal toxicity, after chemoradiation for lung cancer. We investigated potential associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HSPB1 and risk of RP after chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects were patients with NSCLC treated with chemoradiation at 1 institution. The training data set comprised 146 patients treated from 1999 to July 2004; the validation data set was 125 patients treated from August 2004 to March 2010. We genotyped 2 functional SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371) from all patients. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess the risk of grade ?2 or ?3 RP in both data sets and a parametric log-logistic survival model to evaluate the association of HSPB1 genotypes with that risk. Results: Grade ?3 RP was experienced by 13% of those with CG/GG and 29% of those with CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 in the training data set (P=.028); corresponding rates in the validation data set were 2% CG/GG and 14% CC (P=.02). Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed the association of CC of HSPB1 rs2868371 with higher risk of grade ?3 RP than CG/GG after adjustment for sex, age, performance status, and lung mean dose. This association was validated both in the validation data set and with Harrell's C statistic. Conclusions: The CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with severe RP after chemoradiation for NSCLC.

  14. SU-E-J-267: Weekly Volumetric and Dosimetric Changes in Adaptive Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell-Lung Cancer Using 4D CT and Gating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shang, Q [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xiong, F; Zhang, X; Zhang, Q; Fu, S [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was to evaluate the significance of weekly imageguided patient setup and to assess the volumetric and dosimetric changes in no-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with adaptive conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 9 NSCLC patients treated with 3D CRT underwent 4D CT-on-rail every five fractions. ITV was generated from three phases of the 4DCT (the end of exhalation, 25% before and after the end of exhalation). The margin of ITV to PTV is 5mm. 6 weekly CTs were acquired for each patient. The weekly CTs were fused with the planning CT by vertebrae. The couch shift was recorded for each weekly CT to evaluate the setup error. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on weekly CT images by a physician. Beams from the original plans were applied to weekly CTs to calculate the delivered doses. All patients underwent replanning after 20 fractions. Results: Among the total 54 CTs, the average setup error was 2.0± 1.7, 2.6± 2.1, 2.7± 2.2 mm in X, Y, and Z direction, respectively. The average volume of the primary GTV was reduced from 42.45 cc to 22.78 cc (47.04%) after 6 weeks. The maximal volume regression occurred between 15 and 20 fractions. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) reduced the V20 and V5 of the lung by 33.5% and 16.89%, respectively. ART also reduced Dmean and D1/3 of the heart by 31.7% and 32.32%, respectively. Dmax of the spinal cord did not vary much during the treatment course. Conclusion: 5 mm margin is sufficient for 4D weekly CTguided radiotherapy in lung cancer. Tumor regression was observed in the majority of patients. ART significantly reduced the OARs dose. Our preliminary results indicated that an off-line ART approach is appropriate in clinical practice.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Surgery for Medically Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Markov Model-Based Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, Alexander V. [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Hannouf, Malek [Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Zaric, Gregory S. [Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Palma, David A. [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Cao, Jeffrey Q. [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Yaremko, Brian P. [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Malthaner, Richard [Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Division of Surgery, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Mocanu, Joseph D. [Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy and overall survival in patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with either stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or surgery. Methods and Materials: We constructed a Markov model to describe health states after either SBRT or lobectomy for Stage I NSCLC for a 5-year time frame. We report various treatment strategy survival outcomes stratified by age, sex, and pack-year history of smoking, and compared these with an external outcome prediction tool (Adjuvant{exclamation_point} Online). Results: Overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and other causes of death as predicted by our model correlated closely with those predicted by the external prediction tool. Overall survival at 5 years as predicted by baseline analysis of our model is in favor of surgery, with a benefit ranging from 2.2% to 3.0% for all cohorts. Mean quality-adjusted life expectancy ranged from 3.28 to 3.78 years after surgery and from 3.35 to 3.87 years for SBRT. The utility threshold for preferring SBRT over surgery was 0.90. Outcomes were sensitive to quality of life, the proportion of local and regional recurrences treated with standard vs. palliative treatments, and the surgery- and SBRT-related mortalities. Conclusions: The role of SBRT in the medically operable patient is yet to be defined. Our model indicates that SBRT may offer comparable overall survival and quality-adjusted life expectancy as compared with surgical resection. Well-powered prospective studies comparing surgery vs. SBRT in early-stage lung cancer are warranted to further investigate the relative survival, quality of life, and cost characteristics of both treatment paradigms.

  16. Lung cancer and indoor pollution from heating and cooking with solid fuels - The IARIC International Multicentre Case-Control study in Eastern/Central Europe and the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lissowska, J.; Bardin-Mikolajczak, A.; Fletcher, T.; Zaridze, D.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Rudnai, P.; Fabianova, E.; Cassidy, A.; Mates, D.; Holcatova, I.; Vitova, V.; Janout, V.; Mannetje, A.; Brennan, P.; Boffetta, P. [Center for Cancer, Warsaw (Poland). Dept. of Epidemiology & Cancer Prevention

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to fuel from cooking and heating has not been studied in Europe, where lung cancer rates are high and many residents have had a long tradition of burning coal and unprocessed biomass. Study subjects included 2,861 cases and 3,118 controls recruited during 1998-2002 in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, and the United Kingdom. The odds ratio of lung cancer associated with solid fuel use was 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.44) for cooking or heating, 1.37 (95% CI: 0.90, 2.09) for solid fuel only for cooking, and 1.24 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.47) for solid fuels used for both cooking and heating. Risk increased relative to the percentage of time that solid fuel was used for cooking (P-trend {lt} 0.0001), while no risk increase was detected for solid fuel used for heating. The odds ratio of lung cancer in whole-life users of solid cooking fuel was 1.80 (95% CI: 1.35, 2.40). Switching to nonsolid fuels resulted in a decrease in risk. The odds ratio for the longest duration of time since switching was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.92). The data suggest a modest increased risk of lung cancer related to solid-fuel use for cooking rather than heating.

  17. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  18. SU-E-J-265: Practical Issues and Solutions in Reconstructing and Using 4DCT for Radiotherapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, W; Feigenberg, S; Yi, B; Lasio, G; Prado, K; D'Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report practical issues and solutions in reconstructing and using 4DCT to account for respiratory motion in radiotherapy planning. Methods: Quiet breathing 4DCT was used to account for respiratory motion for patients with lung or upper abdomen tumor. A planning CT and a 4DCT were acquired consecutively with a Philips Brilliance CT scanner and Varian RPM System. The projections were reconstructed into 10 phases. In Pinnacle RTP system, we contour a GTV in each phase and unite all 10 GTVs as ITV. The ITV is then mapped to the planning CT. We describe practical issues, their causes, our solutions and reasoning during this process. Results: In 6 months, 9 issues were reported for 8 patients with lung cancer. For two patients, part of the GTV (?50% and 10%) in planning CT fell outside the ITV in 4DCT. There was a 7 mm variation in first patient back position because less restricted immobilization had to be used. The second discrepancy was due to moderate variation in breathing amplitude. We extended the ITV to include the GTV since both variations may likely happen during treatment. A LUL tumor showed no motion due to a 10-s long no-breathing period. An RLL tumor appeared double due to an abnormally deeper breath at the tumor region. We repeated 4DCT reiterating the importance of quiet, regular breathing. One patient breathed too light to generate RPM signal. Two issues (no motion in lung, incomplete images in 90% phase) were due to incorrect tag positions. Two unexplainable errors disappeared when repeating reconstruction. In summary, 5 issues were patient-related and 4 were technique issues. Conclusion: Improving breathing regularity avoided large artifacts in 4DCT. One needs to closely monitor patient breathing. For uncontrollable variations, larger PTVs are necessary which requires appropriate communication between physics and the treating physician.

  19. Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Huidong "Warren"

    , abbreviated as CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States for both men to lung cancer in cause of cancer deaths. Despite the fact that it is highly preventable, approximately, colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of death from cancer in women (after breast and lung cancer

  20. Visualization of Density Variation in Lung Aristofanes C. Silva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endler, Markus

    Visualization of Density Variation in Lung Nodules Arist´ofanes C. Silva e-mail: ari-Rio Inf.MCC09/02 June, 2002 Abstract We propose a method for visualize lung nodule, in order to emphasize, limiar. #12;1 Introduction Lung cancer is known to be the form of cancer with the smallest survival rate

  1. Network Biology of Tumor Stem-like Cells Identified a Regulatory Role of CBX5 in Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yau-Hua

    Mounting evidence links cancers possessing stem-like properties with worse prognosis. Network biology with signal processing mechanics was explored here using expression profiles of a panel of tumor stem-like cells (TSLCs). ...

  2. Chronic cisplatin treatment promotes enhanced damage repair and tumor progression in a mouse model of lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Trudy Gale

    Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment, yet the mechanisms of response to specific therapies have been largely unexplored in vivo. Employing genetic, genomic, and imaging approaches, we examined ...

  3. Early lung cancer detection project: Evaluation of 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine (H{sub 2}TCPP). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tockman, M.S.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author evaluated a synthetic porphyrin, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP) as a marker of carcinogenesis. H{sub 2}TCPP was compared with two other carcinogenesis markers evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to detect exfoliated sputum cells undergoing transformation to lung cancer. In the present project the authors first established optimal conditions for cultured neoplastic and non-neoplastic (sputum) cells to take up H{sub 2}TCPP. This was accomplished using spectrofluorimetry and video-enhanced fluorescent microscopy to maximize H{sub 2}TCPP auto-fluorescence across a matrix of substrate conditions, including; reagent concentration, incubation time, temperature, and pH. The second aim was to validate H{sub 2}TCPP on clinical material obtained from subjects monitored in advance of clinical cancer and link those marker results with subsequent histologic confirmation of disease. This was accomplished by applying H{sub 2}TCPP to sputum specimens archived by the Frost Center at Johns Hopkins which maintains a record of the clinical course and long-term follow-up for the patients from whom the specimens were obtained. The authors have used fluorescent immunostaining and flow cytometry to compare uptake of these cytoplasmic Mabs to that of a potential new marker of carcinogenesis, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4 carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP). The nuclear uptake of H{sub 2}TCPP was compared to a standard quantitative fluorescent DNA marker (7-AAD).

  4. Response and Resistance to NF-?B Inhibitors in Mouse Models of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Wen

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently showed that genetic inhibition of the NF-?B pathway affects both the initiation and the maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as ...

  5. NF-?B Fans the Flames of Lung Carcinogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacks, Tyler E.

    This perspective on Deng et al. (beginning on p. 424 in this issue of the journal) examines the link between NF-?B and lung tumorigenesis. Experiments in genetically engineered mouse models of lung cancers are elucidating ...

  6. Predictive Treatment Management: Incorporating a Predictive Tumor Response Model Into Robust Prospective Treatment Planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengpeng, E-mail: zhangp@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We hypothesized that a treatment planning technique that incorporates predicted lung tumor regression into optimization, predictive treatment planning (PTP), could allow dose escalation to the residual tumor while maintaining coverage of the initial target without increasing dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: We created a model to estimate the geometric presence of residual tumors after radiation therapy using planning computed tomography (CT) and weekly cone beam CT scans of 5 lung cancer patients. For planning purposes, we modeled the dynamic process of tumor shrinkage by morphing the original planning target volume (PTV{sub orig}) in 3 equispaced steps to the predicted residue (PTV{sub pred}). Patients were treated with a uniform prescription dose to PTV{sub orig}. By contrast, PTP optimization started with the same prescription dose to PTV{sub orig} but linearly increased the dose at each step, until reaching the highest dose achievable to PTV{sub pred} consistent with OAR limits. This method is compared with midcourse adaptive replanning. Results: Initial parenchymal gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.6 to 186.5 cm{sup 3}. On average, the primary GTV and PTV decreased by 39% and 27%, respectively, at the end of treatment. The PTP approach gave PTV{sub orig} at least the prescription dose, and it increased the mean dose of the true residual tumor by an average of 6.0 Gy above the adaptive approach. Conclusions: PTP, incorporating a tumor regression model from the start, represents a new approach to increase tumor dose without increasing toxicities, and reduce clinical workload compared with the adaptive approach, although model verification using per-patient midcourse imaging would be prudent.

  7. Regarding Autocontouring and Manual Contouring: Which Is the Better Method for Target Delineation Using 18F-FDG PET/CT in NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer? By K. Wu et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Using 18F-FDG PET/CT in Non­Small Cell Lung Cancer? By K. Wu et al M Hatt, D Visvikis, C Cheze Le Rest delineation in PET/CT for NSCLC. 17 NSCLC tumors were delineated with both automated and manual approaches, using either combined PET/CT or CT and PET independently. As expected, the manual contouring of the PET

  8. ForPeerReview High Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 6 in Non-Small Cell Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ForPeerReview High Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 6 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells: an indicator-4934.2009.00763.x #12;ForPeerReview 1 Research Paper High Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 6 in Non-Small Cell Lung in the development and dissemination of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. We have

  9. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39-86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4-58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4-58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy. In these patients, elective nodal irradiation can be safely omitted from the planning target volume for the purposes of dose escalation and toxicity reduction.

  10. Minichromosome Maintenance Protein 7 is a potential therapeutic target in human cancer and a novel prognostic marker of non-small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toyokawa, Gouji; Masuda, Ken; Daigo, Yataro; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Yoshimatsu, Masanori; Takawa, Masashi; Hayami, Shinya; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Chino, Makoto; Field, Helen I; Neal, David E; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Ponder, Bruce A J; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Background The research emphasis in anti-cancer drug discovery has always been to search for a drug with the greatest antitumor potential but fewest side effects. This can only be achieved if the drug used is against a specific target...

  11. Anti-Tumor Effect in Human Lung Cancer by a Combination Treatment of Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors: SL142 or SL325 and Retinoic Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    novel drugs for the treatment of cancer. Nat Rev Drug Discovepigenetic (and more) treatments for cancer. Nat Rev Cancera promising treatment for cancer. In this study, we

  12. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Sunit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mchan@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Lovato, James F. [Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to improve this.

  13. Autophagy Is Required for Glucose Homeostasis and Lung Tumor Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsli-Uzunbas, Gizem

    Macroautophagy (autophagy hereafter) recycles intracellular components to sustain mitochondrial metabolism that promotes the growth, stress tolerance, and malignancy of lung cancers, suggesting that autophagy inhibition ...

  14. Reconstruction of a time-averaged midposition CT scan for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients using deformable registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Sonke, J.-J.; Herk, M. van; Damen, E. M. F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: lower lobe lung tumors move with amplitudes of up to 2 cm due to respiration. To reduce respiration imaging artifacts in planning CT scans, 4D imaging techniques are used. Currently, we use a single (midventilation) frame of the 4D data set for clinical delineation of structures and radiotherapy planning. A single frame, however, often contains artifacts due to breathing irregularities, and is noisier than a conventional CT scan since the exposure per frame is lower. Moreover, the tumor may be displaced from the mean tumor position due to hysteresis. The aim of this work is to develop a framework for the acquisition of a good quality scan representing all scanned anatomy in the mean position by averaging transformed (deformed) CT frames, i.e., canceling out motion. A nonrigid registration method is necessary since motion varies over the lung. Methods and Materials: 4D and inspiration breath-hold (BH) CT scans were acquired for 13 patients. An iterative multiscale motion estimation technique was applied to the 4D CT scan, similar to optical flow but using image phase (gray-value transitions from bright to dark and vice versa) instead. From the (4D) deformation vector field (DVF) derived, the local mean position in the respiratory cycle was computed and the 4D DVF was modified to deform all structures of the original 4D CT scan to this mean position. A 3D midposition (MidP) CT scan was then obtained by (arithmetic or median) averaging of the deformed 4D CT scan. Image registration accuracy, tumor shape deviation with respect to the BH CT scan, and noise were determined to evaluate the image fidelity of the MidP CT scan and the performance of the technique. Results: Accuracy of the used deformable image registration method was comparable to established automated locally rigid registration and to manual landmark registration (average difference to both methods <0.5 mm for all directions) for the tumor region. From visual assessment, the registration was good for the clearly visible features (e.g., tumor and diaphragm). The shape of the tumor, with respect to that of the BH CT scan, was better represented by the MidP reconstructions than any of the 4D CT frames (including MidV; reduction of 'shape differences' was 66%). The MidP scans contained about one-third the noise of individual 4D CT scan frames. Conclusions: We implemented an accurate method to estimate the motion of structures in a 4D CT scan. Subsequently, a novel method to create a midposition CT scan (time-weighted average of the anatomy) for treatment planning with reduced noise and artifacts was introduced. Tumor shape and position in the MidP CT scan represents that of the BH CT scan better than MidV CT scan and, therefore, was found to be appropriate for treatment planning.

  15. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Does Not Underdose the Microscopic Disease and has the Potential to Increase Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guckenberger, Matthias, E-mail: guckenberger_m@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Academic Unit of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Lung Unit, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Partridge, Mike [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate doses to the microscopic disease (MD) in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to model tumor control probability (TCP). Methods and Materials: In a retrospective planning study, three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were adapted to shape and volume changes of the gross tumor volume (GTV) once or twice during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses of 66 Gy; doses in the ART plans were escalated using an iso-mean lung dose (MLD) approach compared to non-adapted treatment. Dose distributions to the volumes of suspect MD were simulated for a scenario with synchronous shrinkage of the MD and GTV and for a scenario of a stationary MD despite GTV shrinkage; simulations were performed using deformable image registration. TCP calculations considering doses to the GTV and MD were performed using three different models. Results: Coverage of the MD at 50 Gy was not compromised by ART. Coverage at 60 Gy in the scenario of a stationary MD was significantly reduced from 92% {+-} 10% to 73% {+-} 19% using ART; however, the coverage was restored by iso-MLD dose escalation. Dose distributions in the MD were sufficient to achieve a TCP >80% on average in all simulation experiments, with the clonogenic cell density the major factor influencing TCP. The combined TCP for the GTV and MD was 19.9% averaged over all patients and TCP models in non-adaptive treatment with 66 Gy. Iso-MLD dose escalation achieved by ART increased the overall TCP by absolute 6% (adapting plan once) and by 8.7% (adapting plan twice) on average. Absolute TCP values were significantly different between the TCP models; however, all TCP models suggested very similar TCP increase by using ART. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to the shrinking GTV did not compromise dose coverage of volumes of suspect microscopic disease and has the potential to increase TCP by >40% compared with radiotherapy planning without ART.

  16. HIF-2? deletion promotes Kras-driven lung tumor development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacks, Tyler E.

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The oxygen-sensitive hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional regulators HIF-1? and HIF-2? are overexpressed in many human NSCLCs, ...

  17. VARIATIONAL APPROACH FOR SEGMENTATION OF LUNG NODULES Amal A. Faraga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisville, University of

    VARIATIONAL APPROACH FOR SEGMENTATION OF LUNG NODULES Amal A. Faraga , Hossam Abdelmunimab , James, Louisville, Kentucky g University of Louisville, Department of Radiology ABSTRACT Lung nodules from low dose CT (LDCT) scans may be used for early detection of lung cancer. However, these nodules vary in size

  18. Diversity of gene expression in adenocarcinoma of the lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botstein, David

    Diversity of gene expression in adenocarcinoma of the lung Mitchell E. Garber*, Olga G. Troyanskaya Contributed by David Botstein, September 21, 2001 The global gene expression profiles for 67 human lung tumors pathologic analysis. Four main histologic subtypes of lung cancer are regularly distinguished by tumor

  19. Weight Gain in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients During Treatment With Split-Course Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Is Associated With Superior Survival

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gielda, Benjamin T., E-mail: Benjamin_gielda@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Mehta, Par [Department of Radiation Oncology at Rush Copley Medical Center, Aurora, IL (United States); Khan, Atif [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Marsh, James C.; Zusag, Thomas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Warren, William H. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Bonomi, Philip [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Liptay, Michael; Faber, L. Penfield [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is an accepted treatment for potentially resectable, locally advanced, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We reviewed a decade of single institution experience with preoperative split-course CRT followed by surgical resection to evaluate survival and identify factors that may be helpful in predicting outcome. Methods and Materials: All patients treated with preoperative split-course CRT and resection at Rush University Medical Center (RUMC) between January 1999 and December 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Patient and treatment related variables were assessed for correlation with outcomes. Results: A total of 54 patients were analyzed, 76% Stage IIIA, 18% Stage IIIB, and 6% oligometastatic. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate was 31.5%, and the absence of nodal metastases (pN0) was 64.8%. Median OS and 3-year actuarial survival were 44.6 months and 50%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed initial stage (p < 0.01) and percent weight change during CRT (p < 0.01) significantly correlated with PFS/OS. On multivariate analysis initial stage (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.18-4.90; p = 0.02) and percent weight change (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67-0.93; p < 0.01) maintained significance with respect to OS. There were no cases of Grade 3+ esophagitis, and there was a single case of Grade 3 febrile neutropenia. Conclusions: The strong correlation between weight change during CRT and OS/PFS suggests that this clinical parameter may be useful as a complementary source of predictive information in addition to accepted factors such as pathological response.

  20. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wee, Jon O. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Punglia, Rinaa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  1. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Videtic, Gregory M.M., E-mail: videtig@ccf.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chao, Samuel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Brain Tumor and NeuroOncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rice, Thomas W. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Adelstein, David J. [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Barnett, Gene H. [Brain Tumor and NeuroOncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Mekhail, Tarek M. [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A. [Brain Tumor and NeuroOncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Brain Tumor and NeuroOncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  2. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Parlak, Cem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Oncology Center, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  3. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 000:000000 (2011) Quantitative Analysis of Tumor Burden in Mouse Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung via MRI Vanessa K. Tidwell,1 Joel R. Garbow,2 Alexander S. Krupnick,3 John A. Engelbach,2 and Arye Nehorai1 Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Despite recent advances. Preclinical rodent models provide a unique opportu- nity to test novel therapeutic drugs for targeting lung

  4. Neural Network Classifiers and Gene Selection Methods for Microarray Data on Human Lung Adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Giri

    Neural Network Classifiers and Gene Selection Methods for Microarray Data on Human Lung with lung cancer gene expression data sets available from the CAMDA website. Many different classification several new methods for classifying gene expression data from lung cancer patients. Our approach uses

  5. Learning Methods for Lung Tumor Markerless Gating in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dy, Jennifer G.

    Learning Methods for Lung Tumor Markerless Gating in Image-Guided Radiotherapy Ying Cui Dept. For gated lung cancer radiotherapy, it is difficult to generate ac- curate gating signals due to the large techniques, we apply them on five sequences of fluoroscopic images from five lung cancer patients against

  6. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mak, Kimberley S. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Leslie K. [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Mak, Raymond H. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Shuang [Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Pile-Spellman, John [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Abrahm, Janet L. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Prigerson, Holly G. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Psycho-oncology and Palliative Care Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A., E-mail: tbalboni@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Psycho-oncology and Palliative Care Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC outcomes and strategies for reducing MSCC-related costs.

  7. Differential regulation of RANTES and IL-8 expression in lung adenocarcinoma cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Differential regulation of RANTES and IL-8 expression in lung adenocarcinoma cells Corinne expression in lung adenocarcinoma cells HALauthormanuscriptinserm-00143972,version1 HAL author manuscript Lung Cancer 56, 2 (2007) 167-74 #12;2 Summary In lung adenocarcinoma, expression of Regulated upon

  8. Bullous Lung Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Corey; Carey, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thorascopic surgery. Bullous Lung Disease REFERENCES 1.S, Kaiser LR. Giant bullous lung disease: evaluation,for bullous disease of the lung. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg.

  9. Colorectal cancer and diet in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodoratou, Evropi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is a cancer that forms in the tissues of the colon and/ or rectum and more than 95% of colorectal cancers are adenocarcinomas. It is the third most common cancer in incidence and mortality ...

  10. Lung tumor tracking, trajectory reconstruction, and motion artifact removal using rotational cone-beam projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, John Henry

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    incidence and death rates for cancer in the United States.and death (below) rates for cancer in the United States.

  11. Dosimetric characterization of the GammaClip™{sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer postwedge resection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currier, Blake [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)] [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Munro, John J. III [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States)] [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States); Medich, David C. [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A novel {sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source, the GammaClip™, was developed by Source Production and Equipment Co. (New Orleans, LA) which is designed similar to a surgical staple while delivering therapeutic radiation. In this report, the brachytherapy source was characterized in terms of “Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO” by Perez-Calatayud et al. [Med. Phys. 39, 2904–2929 (2012)] using the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 formalism.Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle 5, version 1.6 in water and air, the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove photon energies below 10 keV in accordance with TG-43U1 recommendations and previously reviewed {sup 169}Yb energy cutoff levels [D. C. Medich, M. A. Tries, and J. M. Munro, “Monte Carlo characterization of an Ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty,” Med. Phys. 33, 163–172 (2006)]. TG-43U1 dosimetric data, including S{sub K}, D-dot (r,?), ?, g{sub L}(r), F(r, ?), ?{sub an}(r), and ?{sub an} were calculated along with their statistical uncertainties. Since the source is not axially symmetric, an additional set of calculations were performed to assess the resulting axial anisotropy.Results: The brachytherapy source's dose rate constant was calculated to be (1.22 ± 0.03) cGy h{sup ?1} U{sup ?1}. The uncertainty in the dose to water calculations, D-dot (r,?), was determined to be 2.5%, dominated by the uncertainties in the cross sections. The anisotropy constant, ?{sub an}, was calculated to be 0.960 ± 0.011 and was obtained by integrating the anisotropy factor between 1 and 10 cm using a weighting factor proportional to r{sup ?2}. The radial dose function was calculated at distances between 0.5 and 12 cm, with a maximum value of 1.20 at 5.15 ± 0.03 cm. Radial dose values were fit to a fifth order polynomial and dual exponential regression. Since the source is not axially symmetric, angular Monte Carlo calculations were performed at 1 cm which determined that the maximum azimuthal anisotropy was less than 8%.Conclusions: With a higher photon energy, shorter half-life and higher initial dose rate {sup 169}Yb is an interesting alternative to {sup 125}I for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer.

  12. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuhchyau [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States)], E-mail: yuhchyau_chen@urmc.rochester.edu; Pandya, Kishan J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Feins, Richard [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Johnstone, David W. [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (Lebanon); Watson, Thomas [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m{sup 2}, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, and 25 mg/m{sup 2} were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m{sup 2}), II (20 mg/m{sup 2}), and III (25 mg/m{sup 2}), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 {+-} 0.06 {mu}mol/l, 0.32 {+-} 0.05 {mu}mol/l, and 0.52 {+-} 0.14 {mu}mol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 {+-} 0.09 {mu}mol/l, 0.61 {+-} 0.1 {mu}mol/l, and 0.96 {+-} 0.23 {mu}mol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l (t > 0.05 {mu}mol/l) was 1.6 {+-} 0.3 h, 1.9 {+-} 0.2 h, and 3.0 {+-} 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization.

  13. Activation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and risk of lung cancer among rural women in India who cook with biomass fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Mondal, Nandan Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayali; Dutta, Anindita; Siddique, Shabana; Ray, Manas Ranjan, E-mail: manasrray@rediffmail.com

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass fuel burning on the risk of carcinogenesis in the airways has been investigated in 187 pre-menopausal women (median age 34 years) from eastern India who cooked exclusively with biomass and 155 age-matched control women from same locality who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas. Compared with control, Papanicolau-stained sputum samples showed 3-times higher prevalence of metaplasia and 7-times higher prevalence of dysplasia in airway epithelial cell (AEC) of biomass users. Immunocytochemistry showed up-regulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt{sup ser473} and p-Akt{sup thr308}) proteins in AEC of biomass users, especially in metaplastic and dysplastic cells. Compared with LPG users, biomass-using women showed marked rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) indicating oxidative stress. There were 2–5 times more particulate pollutants (PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}), 72% more nitrogen dioxide and 4-times more particulate-laden benzo(a)pyrene, but no change in sulfur dioxide in indoor air of biomass-using households, and high performance liquid chromatography estimated 6-fold rise in the concentration of benzene metabolite trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine of biomass users. Metaplasia and dysplasia, p-Akt expression and ROS generation were positively associated with PM and t,t-MA levels. It appears that cumulative exposure to biomass smoke increases the risk of lung carcinogenesis via oxidative stress-mediated activation of Akt signal transduction pathway. -- Highlights: ? Carcinogenesis in airway cells was examined in biomass and LPG using women. ? Metaplasia and dysplasia of epithelial cells were more prevalent in biomass users. ? Change in airway cytology was associated with oxidative stress and Akt activation. ? Biomass users had greater exposure to respirable PM, B(a)P and benzene. ? Cooking with biomass increases cancer risk in the airways via Akt activation.

  14. Harvard University recognizes that smoking is dangerous to the health of the smoker and that involuntary smoking is a cause of disease, including lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and that involuntary smoking is a cause of disease, including lung cancer, in healthy nonsmokers. The simple separation

  15. May 4, 2007 10:5 WSPC/Trim Size: 9in x 6in for Review Volume chapter10 SURVIVAL MODEL AND ESTIMATION FOR LUNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    AND ESTIMATION FOR LUNG CANCER PATIENTS Xingchen Yuana , Don Hongb , and Yu Shyrc,d a Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510, Nashville, TN 37232, USA d Department of Statistics, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, ROC Lung cancer for a group of lung cancer patients for survival study, the covariates in the hazard function are estimated

  16. Curcumin enhances the mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity via downregulation of MKK1/2-ERK1/2-mediated Rad51 expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Jen-Chung [Department of Internal Medicine, Hsinchu Hospital, Department of Health, The Executive Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University, HsinChu, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Technology Law, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Technology Law, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Min-Shao; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Kuo, Ya-Hsun; Chiu, Yu-Fan [Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yun-Wei, E-mail: linyw@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress the proliferation of a wide variety of tumor cells. Rad51 is a key protein in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, and HR represents a novel target for cancer therapy. A high expression of Rad51 has been reported in chemo- or radio-resistant carcinomas. Therefore, in the current study, we will examine whether curcumin could enhance the effects of mitomycin C (MMC), a DNA interstrand cross-linking agent, to induce cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression. Exposure of two human non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549 and H1975) to curcumin could suppress MMC-induced MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signal activation and Rad51 protein expression. Enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by constitutively active MKK1/2 (MKK1/2-CA) increased Rad51 protein levels in curcumin and MMC co-treated human lung cells. Moreover, the synergistic cytotoxic effect induced by curcumin combined with MMC was decreased by MKK1-CA-mediated enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by a significant degree. In contrast, MKK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 was shown to augment the cytotoxicity of curcumin and MMC through downregulation of ERK1/2 activation and Rad51 expression. Depletion of endogenous Rad51 expression by siRad51 RNA transfection significantly enhanced MMC and/or curcumin induced cell death and cell growth inhibition. In contrast, an overexpression of Rad51 protected lung cancer cells from synergistic cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and MMC. We concluded that Rad51 inhibition may be an additional action mechanism for enhancing the chemosensitization of MMC by curcumin in NSCLC. - Highlights: > Curcumin downregulates MKK-ERK-mediated Rad51 expression. > Curcumin enhances mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity. > Rad51 protects cells from cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and mitomycin C. > Rad51 inhibition enhances the chemosensitization of mitomycin C by curcumin.

  17. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  18. Prevention of in vivo lung tumor growth by prolonged local delivery of hydroxycamptothecin using poly(ester-carbonate)-collagen composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevention of in vivo lung tumor growth by prolonged local delivery of hydroxycamptothecin using February 2010 Available online 22 February 2010 Keywords: Prevention Lung tumors Recurrence Films Local treatment of most cancers, and this is especially true with lung cancer. Consequently, methods to deliver

  19. Integrated training in Lung Biology and Diseases Sponsored by the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Integrated training in Lung Biology and Diseases Sponsored by the Division of Pulmonary Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, Emphysema) 3 Pulmonary Infections 4 Lung Cancer 5 Cystic Fibrosis 6 Lung Transplantation 7 Pulmonary Hypertension 8 Pulmonary Embolism 9 Occupational Lung Diseases 10 Airway Allergic

  20. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheek, Gregory [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with intensified treatment.

  1. Development and Validation of a Prognostic Model Using Blood Biomarker Information for Prediction of Survival of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Combined Chemotherapy and Radiation or Radiotherapy Alone (NCT00181519, NCT00573040, and NCT00572325)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehing-Oberije, Cary, E-mail: cary.dehing@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Aerts, Hugo [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Yu Shipeng [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA (United States); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Menheere, Paul [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hilvo, Mika [Institute of Medical Technology, University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Weide, Hiska van der [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rao, Bharat [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA (United States); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Currently, prediction of survival for non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiotherapy is mainly based on clinical factors. The hypothesis of this prospective study was that blood biomarkers related to hypoxia, inflammation, and tumor load would have an added prognostic value for predicting survival. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and blood samples were collected prospectively (NCT00181519, NCT00573040, and NCT00572325) from 106 inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer patients (Stages I-IIIB), treated with curative intent with radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. Blood biomarkers, including lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-8, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and cytokeratin fragment 21-1, were measured. A multivariate model, built on a large patient population (N = 322) and externally validated, was used as a baseline model. An extended model was created by selecting additional biomarkers. The model's performance was expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic and assessed by use of leave-one-out cross validation as well as a validation cohort (n = 52). Results: The baseline model consisted of gender, World Health Organization performance status, forced expiratory volume, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume and yielded an AUC of 0.72. The extended model included two additional blood biomarkers (CEA and IL-6) and resulted in a leave-one-out AUC of 0.81. The performance of the extended model was significantly better than the clinical model (p = 0.004). The AUC on the validation cohort was 0.66 and 0.76, respectively. Conclusions: The performance of the prognostic model for survival improved markedly by adding two blood biomarkers: CEA and IL-6.

  2. Page 2 Innovative Clinical Trials and Research Expand Targeted Medical Therapies and Personalized Approaches to Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    and changing the standard of care for many patients with thoracic cancers; · Offers a wide range of cutting-edge factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer, medical oncologists and researchers

  3. Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative in Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative in Massachusetts: Developing a New Electronic Tool Presented (CEH) Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) #12;Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative "Develop methods for linking environmental databases with childhood cancer incidence data to identify

  4. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  5. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang [Toxicogenomics Team, Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  6. Original Contribution Acute Myocardial Infarction Mortality in Comparison with Lung and Bladder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Original Contribution Acute Myocardial Infarction Mortality in Comparison with Lung and Bladder, 2007; accepted for publication July 27, 2007. Arsenic in drinking water is known to be a cause of lung lung and bladder cancer, AMI mortality was the predominant cause of excess

  7. Location registration and recognition (LRR) for serial analysis of nodules in lung CT scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Location registration and recognition (LRR) for serial analysis of nodules in lung CT scans Michal t In the clinical workflow for lung cancer management, the comparison of nodules between CT scans from subsequent in investigating the condition of the lung. The algorithm uses a combination of feature extraction, indexing

  8. A Framework for Automatic Segmentation of Lung Nodules from Low Dose Chest CT Scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    A Framework for Automatic Segmentation of Lung Nodules from Low Dose Chest CT Scans Ayman El-Baz1 the high accuracy of the proposed approach. 1 Introduction Because lung cancer is the most common cause 1, an initial LDCT slice is segmented with our algorithms introduced in [3] to isolate lung tissues

  9. Automatic 3D Registration of Lung Surfaces in Computed Tomography Scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic 3D Registration of Lung Surfaces in Computed Tomography Scans Margrit Betke, PhD1 scheme until the registration performance is sufficient. We applied our method to register the 3D lung computed tomography (CT) has become a well-established means of diag- nosing primary lung cancer

  10. Visualization of Density Variation in Lung Aristofanes C. Silva a,, Paulo Cezar P. Carvalho b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visualization of Density Variation in Lung Nodules Arist´ofanes C. Silva a,, Paulo Cezar P de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Abstract We propose a method for visualize lung nodule, in order to emphasize submitted to Medical Image Analysis 27 May 2002 #12;1 Introduction Lung cancer is known to be the form

  11. Clinical Cancer Care Full screening services and diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Clinical Cancer Care · Full screening services and diagnostics · Advanced treatments for all forms of cancer · Most frequent cancers at the Cancer Center: Breast 15% Gastrointestinal 13% Skin 17% Lung 13 treatment protocols that link the latest Cancer Center research to clinical care · Familial Cancer Program

  12. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacurari, M. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Qian, Y., E-mail: yaq2@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Porter, D.W.; Wolfarth, M. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Wan, Y.; Luo, D. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Ding, M. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Castranova, V. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Guo, N.L., E-mail: lguo@hsc.wvu.edu [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9190 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research Highlights: > Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. > The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. > The results could potentially be used for the medical surveillance of workers.

  13. Advances in Lung Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    Advances in Lung Volume Reduction Surgery The Ohio University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction LungVolumeReductionSurgery Spring 2010 © 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center ­ 04 Consult Ohio State's #12;The Ohio State University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Patient

  14. Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Sets forth requirements for the DOE Incidents of Security Concern Program, including timely identification and notification of, response to, inquiry into, reporting of, and closure actions for incidents of security concern. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 470.1; DOE N 471.3; and Chapter IV of DOE M 471.2-1B (Note: Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Chapter III remain in effect.) Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  15. Also in This Issue 2 International Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    Also in This Issue 2 International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership 3 Improving Staging Information 4 Studying the Care of Older Prostate Cancer Patients (CARDI) 4 The Northern Ireland PSA Database 5 Lung Cancer Resection Rates 5 All Ireland Cancer Atlas 5 CaPPS Update 6 Living With and Beyond Prostate

  16. Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Bluett, Jaques [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Yi Pei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe, E-mail: rmohan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dose–volume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dose–volume histogram indices (mean ± SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% ± 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% ± 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 ± 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 ± 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential dosimetric error caused by breathing motion.

  17. Enterprise Incidents Issue 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isn't possibl ... " Two .. nxious hours later thelo' moved into sensor range of the derellct, and discovered that he was wrong. "Can lo'ou r .. ise them yet, Lieutenant?" Kirk asked. Art .. r "Nor sir. There's just the automatic s.o.s. still beine...ScoTpress q ENTERPR.,ISE C I D E N T Stories by 8 Sheila Clark A STAR TREK FANZINE ENTERPRISE INCIDENTS 8 stories by Sheila Clark Abduction The Falcon Incident Tor'uaa Strancer. at the Gate Philanthrop), It l Foraet You Journe...

  18. T4DT: Processing 4D CT scans of the Lungs Robert Fowler Joe Warren Yin Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Joe

    T4DT: Processing 4D CT scans of the Lungs Robert Fowler Joe Warren Yin Zhang Rice University technology for processing time-varying CT scans (4D CT) of the lungs. In particular, we propose to develop these tools to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of current treatments for lung cancer. #12;T4DT

  19. Identification of novel lung genes in bronchial epithelium by serial analysis of gene Kim M. Lonergan*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Raymond T.

    1 Identification of novel lung genes in bronchial epithelium by serial analysis of gene expression of human bronchial epithelium should provide a basis for studying lung diseases including cancer. We have deduced global gene expression profiles of bronchial epithelium and lung parenchyma, based upon a vast

  20. SU-E-J-249: Correlation of Mean Lung Ventilation Value with Ratio of Total Lung Volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, N; Qu, H; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Lung ventilation function measured from 4D-CT and from breathing correlated CT images is a novel concept to incorporate the lung physiologic function into treatment planning of radiotherapy. The calculated ventilation functions may vary from different breathing patterns, affecting evaluation of the treatment plans. The purpose of this study is to correlate the mean lung ventilation value with the ratio of the total lung volumes obtained from the relevant CTs. Methods: A ventilation map was calculated from the variations of voxel-to-voxel CT densities from two breathing phases from either 4D-CT or breathing correlated CTs. An open source image registration tool of Plastimatch was used to deform the inhale phase images to the exhale phase images. To calculate the ventilation map inside lung, the whole lung was delineated and the tissue outside the lung was masked out. With a software tool developed in house, the 3D ventilation map was then converted in the DICOM format associated with the planning CT images. The ventilation map was analyzed on a clinical workstation. To correlate ventilation map thus calculated with lung volume change, the total lung volume change was compared the mean ventilation from our method. Results: Twenty two patients who underwent stereotactic body irradiation for lung cancer was selected for this retrospective study. For this group of patients, the ratio of lung volumes for the inhale (Vin ) and exhale phase (Vex ) was shown to be linearly related to the mean of the local ventilation (Vent), Vin/Vex=1.+0.49*Vent (R2=0.93, p<0.01). Conclusion: The total lung volume change is highly correlated with the mean of local ventilation. The mean of local ventilation may be useful to assess the patient's lung capacity.

  1. Radiotherapy With 8-MHz Radiofrequency-Capacitive Regional Hyperthermia for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Radiofrequency-Output Power Correlates With the Intraesophageal Temperature and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohguri, Takayuki [Department of Radiology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan)], E-mail: ogurieye@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Imada, Hajime; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita [Department of Radiology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Terashima, Hiromi [Department of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Korogi, Yukunori [Department of Radiology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with regional hyperthermia (HT) guided by radiofrequency (RF)-output power and intraesophageal temperature and evaluate the potential contribution of HT to clinical outcomes in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with RT plus regional HT were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-two of the 35 patients underwent intraesophageal temperature measurements. Patients with subcutaneous fat of 2.5 cm or greater, older age, or other serious complications did not undergo this therapy. The 8-MHz RF-capacitive heating device was applied, and in all patients, both the upper and lower electrodes were 30 cm in diameter, placed on opposite sides of the whole thoracic region, and treatment posture was the prone position. The HT was applied within 15 minutes after RT once or twice a week. Results: All thermal parameters, minimum, maximum, and mean of the four intraesophageal temperature measurements at the end of each session and the proportion of the time during which at least one of the four intraesophageal measurements was 41{sup o}C or higher in the total period of each session of HT, of the intraesophageal temperature significantly correlated with median RF-output power. Median RF-output power ({>=}1,200 W) was a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall, local recurrence-free, and distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusions: The RT combined with regional HT using a higher RF-output power could contribute to better clinical outcomes in patients with Stage III NSCLC. The RF-output power thus may be used as a promising parameter to assess the treatment of deep regional HT if deep heating using this device is performed with the same size electrodes and in the same body posture.

  2. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperduto, Paul W., E-mail: psperduto@mropa.com [Metro MN CCOP, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Wang, Meihua [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Medical School Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)] [University of Wisconsin Medical School Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Schell, Michael C. [Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)] [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Demas, William [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States)] [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Shah, Sunjay A. [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States)] [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States); Nedzi, Lucien A. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States); Perry, Gad [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Suh, John H. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

  3. Does aluminum smelting cause lung disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramson, M.J.; Wlodarczyk, J.H.; Saunders, N.A.; Hensley, M.J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evidence concerning a relationship between work in the aluminum industry and lung disease has been reviewed using epidemiologic criteria. Adequate data on environmental exposure are rarely presented. Case series on aluminum potroom workers over the past 50 years have identified an asthmalike syndrome that appears to be due to an irritant rather than an allergic mechanism. These studies have been supported by evidence of within shift variability of measures of lung function. However, to date, there is inadequate evidence to resolve the question of whether potroom exposure initiates asthma or merely precipitates asthmalike symptoms in a predisposed individual. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated evidence of reduced lung function, consistent with chronic airflow limitation. In exposed aluminum smelter workers compared to unexposed control subjects. Cigarette smoking, the major potential confounding variable, has been measured and accounted for in multivariate analyses. To date, evidence is lacking from longitudinal studies about the development of disabling chronic obstructive lung disease. Exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles in the production and consumption of anodes has biologic plausibility for an association of lung cancer with work in an aluminum smelter. Although retrospective mortality studies have failed to account for the probable high prevalence of smoking in blue collar workers, the relative risk of lung cancer is very low if present at all. Pulmonary fibrosis has not been shown to be a significant problem in aluminum smelter workers. Future research in the aluminum industry needs to concentrate on longitudinal studies, preferably with an inception cohort for the investigation of potroom asthma. 92 references.

  4. STATISTICAL MODELING OF THE LUNG NODULES IN LOW DOSE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY SCANS OF THE CHEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisville, University of

    the Center for Disease Control (CDC) of the United States reported 90139 men and 69078 women death cases due cancer is the second most common cancer in the United States among white, African American and American]. Research studies to reach an optimal detection rate for early detection of lung cancer, is the hope

  5. Lung Link: Improved Artificial Lung Conduits Clinical Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Lung Link: Improved Artificial Lung Conduits Clinical Problem · Lung Disease takes nearly 335,000 lives each year in the Unites States alone and is a growing problem [1]. · The waiting list for lung]. · A new artificial and portable assistance device for the lung would aid extend patients lives until

  6. Incident at the Rock Pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgfeld, Doug

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the off limit rock pile At a Portland school Where theDoug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/Doug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/

  7. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  8. The cationic amino acid transporter 2 is induced in inflammatory lung models and regulates lung fibrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niese, Kathryn A; Chiaramonte, Monica G; Ellies, Lesley G; Rothenberg, Marc E; Zimmermann, Nives

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acid transporter 2 is induced in inflammatory lung modelsand regulates lung fibrosis Respiratory Research 2010, 11:872 is induced in inflammatory lung models and regulates lung

  9. Cancer in Ireland 1994-2004: A comprehensive report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    Cancer in Ireland 1994-2004: A comprehensive report A report of cancer incidence, mortality AT and Comber H. Cancer in Ireland 1994-2004: A comprehensive report. Northern Ireland Cancer Registry/National Cancer Registry, Ireland; 2009 #12;#12;NICR/NCRI Contents...i Contents Contents

  10. High Throughput Analysis of Breast Cancer Specimens on the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cancer accounts for about 30% of all cancers and 15% of all cancer deaths in women in the United States in the United States. Women living in North America have the highest rate of breast cancer in the world [1]. In spite of the increase in the incidence of the disease, the death rates of breast cancer continue

  11. 17/03/2006 Accepted in European Journal of Cancer Prevention Time Trends and Geographic Variations for Thyroid Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    17/03/2006 Accepted in European Journal of Cancer Prevention 1 Time Trends and Geographic Variations for Thyroid Cancer in New Caledonia, a Very High Incidence Area (1985-1999) Thérèse Truong1 mail: guenel@vjf.inserm.fr Running head: Incidence of thyroid cancer in New Caledonia #12

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - aids cancer clinical Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer Society The American Lung... Center 1400 Jackson St. Denver, CO 80206-2761 Your Health Care Provider The National ... Source: National Center for Environmental Health-...

  13. aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    --22000000 58 Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer

  14. Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm Related to Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakurai, Jun, E-mail: sakurai@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Mimura, Hidefumi; Gobara, Hideo; Hiraki, Takao; Kanazawa, Susumu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a case of pulmonary artery (PA) pseudoaneurysm related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of lung tumor. We performed RFA for a pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma directly adjacent to a branch of the PA. Seventeen days later, the patient complained of hemoptysis. A chest CT image revealed PA pseudoaneurysm. Transcatheter coil embolization was performed 59 days after RFA. Although PA pseudoaneurysm is rare, with an incidence of 0.2% (1/538 sessions) at our institution, it should be recognized as a risk when treating lung tumors adjacent to a branch of the PA.

  15. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations.

  16. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09.

  17. Reporting Incidents Of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To enhance the Department of Energy (DOE) Incidents of Security Concern Reporting Program through more consistent reporting, better information tracking, and interactive coordination. DOE N 251.54, dated 07/08/03, extends this directive until 07/08/04. Cancels Deputy Secretary Glauthier memorandum, subject: Reporting Security Incidents, dated 9-7-99.

  18. Imaging Lung Disease in Systemic Sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strollo, Diane; Goldin, Jonathan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    undergoing surgical biopsy of the lung. Radiology 1997, 205:disease. In Pathology of the Lung. Edited by Thurlbeck WM,organs, most frequently the lungs and gastrointes- tinal

  19. Imaging Lung Disease in Systemic Sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strollo, Diane; Goldin, Jonathan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W, et al. : Interstitial lung disease in progressiveGL, Myers JL: Diffuse lung disease: diagnostic accuracy ofsurgical biopsy of the lung. Radiology 1997, 205:229–234.

  20. Pneumothorax in a Single Lung Patient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sauneuf, Bertrand; Champigneulle, Benoit; Pène, Frédéric

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pneumothorax in a Single Lung Patient Bertrand Sauneuf, MD*encapsulation of the diseased lung and containment of therevealed a single right lung expanded through the entire

  1. Research results on biomagnetic imaging of the lung tumors Laurel O. Silleruda,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutsias, Evangelos

    of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. One of the difficulties associated that the death rate for lung cancer is so high is a reflection of the suboptimal state of current therapeutic of initial diagnosis 5-year cure rates are ~50% 1 . For patients with more-advanced, nonresectable initial

  2. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09; Admin Chg 2 dated 12-22-09. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B.

  3. Suppression of Rev3, the catalytic subunit of Pol zeta, sensitizes drug-resistant lung tumors to chemotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doles, Jason D.

    Platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs are front-line therapies for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. However, intrinsic drug resistance limits the clinical efficacy of these agents. Recent evidence suggests that ...

  4. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

  5. Lung pair phantom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsen, Peter C. (West Richland, WA); Gordon, N. Ross (Kennewick, WA); Simmons, Kevin L. (Kennewick, WA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  6. Lung pair phantom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsen, P.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ``authentic lung tissue`` or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  7. MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

  8. Facts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision TARGETING CANCER CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    cancer through studies called clinical trials. Today's lung cancer radiation therapy treatments provide treatments or medications to help. Everyone responds differently to the stress of cancerFacts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision TARGETING CANCER CARE © ASTRO 2012 Printed

  9. Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name _________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name's Title _________________________________________________________________ Date and Time of Accident accident occurred

  10. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan, E-mail: druan@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

  11. Lung Transplantation for Advanced Bronchiectasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    Lung Transplantation for Advanced Bronchiectasis Don Hayes Jr., M.D., F.A.A.P., F.A.C.P., F.C.C.P.1 and Keith C. Meyer, M.D., M.S., F.A.C.P., F.C.C.P.2 ABSTRACT Lung transplant (LT) can be successfully performed on patients with advanced bronchiectatic lung disease with subsequent good posttransplant quality

  12. Incidence algebra of a presentation Eric Reynaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Incidence algebra of a presentation Eric Reynaud D´epartement de Math´ematiques, Universit´e de an incidence algebra of a poset associated to a presentation by a quiver and relations of a finite dimensional algebra. We provide an exact sequence relying the fundamental groups of the incidence algebra

  13. Statistical analysis of end-points in cancer clinical trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Ian

    the treatment. 'Quality of life' cannot be defined precisely, and the term is used to cover three types of approach. Firstly, the control of symptoms due to a cancer can be assessed, for example control of cough and chest pain from a lung cancer can be measured...

  14. Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT Jiahui Wang Department: Accurate segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease ILD in thoracic computed tomography CT developed in this study a texture analysis-based method for accurate segmentation of lungs with severe ILD

  15. Superthreshold Behavior of Ultrasound-Induced Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Superthreshold Behavior of Ultrasound-Induced Lung Hemorrhage in Adult Rats Role of Pulse of an earlier ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage study (Ultrasound Med Biol 2003; 29:1625­1634) that estimated, at least for the lung. Key Words: duty factor; lung hemorrhage; pulsed ultrasound; pulse duration; pulse

  16. RESEARCH Open Access Analysis of primary risk factors for oral cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    RESEARCH Open Access Analysis of primary risk factors for oral cancer from select US states , Michelle Chino3 , Karl Kingsley1* Abstract Objectives: To examine the primary risk factor for oral cancer in oral cancer incidence and mortality. Methods: Population-based data on oral cancer morbidity

  17. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy At Gunma University: Currently Indicated Cancer And Estimation Of Need

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, 3-39-22 Showa, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon ion radiotherapy for the first patient at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was initiated in March of 2010. The major specifications of the facility were determined based on the experience of clinical treatments at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The currently indicated sites of cancer treatment at GHMC are lung, prostate, head and neck, liver, rectum, bone and soft tissue. In order to evaluate the potential need for treatment in the region including Gunma prefecture and the adjacent 4 prefectures, an estimation model was constructed based on the Japanese cancer registration system, regular structure surveys by the Cancer Societies, and published articles on each cancer type. Carbon ion RT was potentially indicated for 8,085 patients and realistically for 1,527 patients, corresponding to 10% and 2% of the newly diagnosed cancer patients in the region. Prostate cancer (541 patients) followed by lung cancer (436 patients), and liver cancer (313 patients) were the most commonly diagnosed cancers.

  18. Risk of Salivary Gland Cancer After Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boukheris, Houda [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gilbert, Ethel S. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stratton, Kayla L. [Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)] [Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hammond, Sue [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mertens, Ann C. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L. [Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Inskip, Peter D., E-mail: inskippe@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption on the risk of second primary salivary gland cancer (SGC) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Methods and Materials: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of SGC in the CCSS were calculated using incidence rates from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based cancer registries. Radiation dose to the salivary glands was estimated based on medical records. Poisson regression was used to assess risks with respect to radiation dose, chemotherapy, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results: During the time period of the study, 23 cases of SGC were diagnosed among 14,135 childhood cancer survivors. The mean age at diagnosis of the first primary cancer was 8.3 years, and the mean age at SGC diagnosis was 24.8 years. The incidence of SGC was 39-fold higher in the cohort than in the general population (SIR = 39.4; 95% CI = 25.4-57.8). The EAR was 9.8 per 100,000 person-years. Risk increased linearly with radiation dose (excess relative risk = 0.36/Gy; 95% CI = 0.06-2.5) and remained elevated after 20 years. There was no significant trend of increasing risk with increasing dose of chemotherapeutic agents, pack-years of cigarette smoking, or alcohol intake. Conclusion: Although the cumulative incidence of SGC was low, childhood cancer survivors treated with radiation experienced significantly increased risk for at least 2 decades after exposure, and risk was positively associated with radiation dose. Results underscore the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors for the development of new malignancies.

  19. SYN T H E S I S THE magazinE OF UC DAVIS COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER VOL 16 nO 1 SPRing/SUmmER 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    , targeted lung cancer treatments have given her hope and inspiration. We hope you enjoy this issue to improve cancer detection First steps>> Targeted treatments, like Herceptin against breast cancer, have, the best treatments in the world may not be good enough if the disease is not detected early. Cancer

  20. INTRODUCTION Acute lung injury is characterized by lesions of both lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INTRODUCTION Acute lung injury is characterized by lesions of both lung endothelial and alveolar collagenase (Pardo et al., 1997). The latter was increased following acute lung injury induced by hyperoxia

  1. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease: Changes in Lung Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung (2010) 188:143–149 DOI 10.1007/s00408-009-Tissue Disease-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease:Changes in Lung Function Brent W. Kinder • Cyrus Shariat •

  2. Use of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Ventilation Imaging to Correlate Lung Dose and Function With Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yevgeniy.vinogradskiy@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Castillo, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Departments of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Departments of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Martel, Mary K. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based ventilation is an emerging imaging modality that can be used in the thoracic treatment planning process. The clinical benefit of using ventilation images in radiation treatment plans remains to be tested. The purpose of the current work was to test the potential benefit of using ventilation in treatment planning by evaluating whether dose to highly ventilated regions of the lung resulted in increased incidence of clinical toxicity. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment 4DCT data were used to compute pretreatment ventilation images for 96 lung cancer patients. Ventilation images were calculated using 4DCT data, deformable image registration, and a density-change based algorithm. Dose–volume and ventilation-based dose function metrics were computed for each patient. The ability of the dose–volume and ventilation-based dose–function metrics to predict for severe (grade 3+) radiation pneumonitis was assessed using logistic regression analysis, area under the curve (AUC) metrics, and bootstrap methods. Results: A specific patient example is presented that demonstrates how incorporating ventilation-based functional information can help separate patients with and without toxicity. The logistic regression significance values were all lower for the dose–function metrics (range P=.093-.250) than for their dose–volume equivalents (range, P=.331-.580). The AUC values were all greater for the dose–function metrics (range, 0.569-0.620) than for their dose–volume equivalents (range, 0.500-0.544). Bootstrap results revealed an improvement in model fit using dose–function metrics compared to dose–volume metrics that approached significance (range, P=.118-.155). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study that attempts to correlate lung dose and 4DCT ventilation-based function to thoracic toxicity after radiation therapy. Although the results were not significant at the .05 level, our data suggests that incorporating ventilation-based functional imaging can improve prediction for radiation pneumonitis. We present an important first step toward validating the use of 4DCT-based ventilation imaging in thoracic treatment planning.

  3. Novel applications of data mining methodologies to incident databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Sumit

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    10. Management of Change 11. Incident Investigation 12. Emergency Planning and Response 13. Audits 14. Trade Secrets 5 1.4. Incident Investigation Incident investigation is one of the elements in PSM. Incident investigation follows...

  4. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  5. PATHOBIOLOGY IN FOCUS Patient-derived xenografts, the cancer stem cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    in the United States as a result of this and other smoking-related malignancies (though the death rate for women contributed to the reduced prevalence of lung cancer, and consequently decreased the number of deaths

  6. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Coronary Heart Disease C oronary is available from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Web site at www.nhlbi.nih.gov (under

  7. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Atherosclerosis A therosclerosis, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Web site at www.nhlbi.nih.gov (under Health Information

  8. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : What You Need To Know About High on lowering cholesterol is available from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Web site

  9. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Healthy Sleep S leep is not just information on healthy sleep and sleep disorders is available from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood

  10. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Physical Activity and Your Heart benefits. It can strengthen your heart and improve lung func- tion, and it may help prevent certain types

  11. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Facts About Healthy Weight Why indicator of your risk for a variety of diseases. To check your BMI, use the National Heart, Lung, and Blood

  12. Survival after bilateral lung transplantation versus single lung transplantation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Survival after bilateral lung transplantation versus single lung transplantation for patients, Pennsylvania, USA. 8 International Heart and Lung Transplant Registry, Addison, Texas. Word count: 3204 Background: Both single and bilateral lung transplantation (LT) are recognized options for patients with end

  13. Incident Prevention, Warning, and Response (IPWAR) Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual defines a structured, cohesive, and consistent process for performing incident prevention, warning, and response for DOE's Federal information systems and is consistent with the requirements of Federal laws, Executive orders, national security directives, and other regulations. The Manual also provides requirements and implementation instructions for the Department's Incident Prevention, Warning and Response process, and supplements DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03. DOE N 205.17 cancels this manual. This manual cancels DOE N 205.4, Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents, dated 3/18/2002.

  14. The branching programme of mouse lung development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    ARTICLES The branching programme of mouse lung development Ross J. Metzger1 {, Ophir D. Klein2 {, Gail R. Martin2 & Mark A. Krasnow1 Mammalian lungs are branched networks containing thousands by three geometrically simple local modes of branching used in three different orders throughout the lung

  15. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute A T - A - G L A N C E : Asthma A sthma is a chronic (longterm) lung dis ease that inflames and narrows the air ways. This makes the airways swollen and very, the muscles around them tighten. This causes the airways to nar row, and less air flows to your lungs

  16. Superthreshold Behavior of Ultrasound-Induced Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Superthreshold Behavior of Ultrasound-Induced Lung Hemorrhage in Adult Rats Role of Pulse and reevaluate the ultra- sound-induced lung hemorrhage findings of a previous 5 × 3 factorial design study, 250, and 500 Hz) and exposure duration (ED; 5, 10, and 20 s) on ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage

  17. Implementation and evaluation of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique for lung SBRT patients following RTOG protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Chengyu, E-mail: shicy1974@gmail.com [St. Vincent's Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Tazi, Adam; Fang, Deborah Xiangdong; Iannuzzi, Christopher [St. Vincent's Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To implement modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols in our clinic for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with Stage I/II non–small cell lung cancer. Five patients with non–small cell lung cancer have been treated with SBRT. All the patients were immobilized using CIVCO Body Pro-Lok system and scanned using GE 4-slice computed tomography. The MDCA technique that was previously published was adopted as our planning technique, and RTOG protocols for the lung SBRT were followed. The patients were treated on Novalis Tx system with cone-beam computed tomography imaging guidance. All the patient plans passed the RTOG criteria. The conformal index ranges from 0.99 to 1.12 for the planning target volume, and the biological equivalent dose for the planning target volume is overall 100 Gy. Critical structures (lung, spinal cord, brachial plexus, skin, and chest wall) also meet RTOG protocols or published data. A 6-month follow-up of one of the patients shows good local disease control. We have successfully implemented the MDCA technique into our clinic for the lung SBRT program. It shows that the MDCA is useful and efficient for the lung SBRT planning, with the plan quality meeting the RTOG protocols.

  18. Laminin ?2 fragments are increased in the circulation of patients with early phase acute lung injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with early phase acute lung injury ing ?uids of patientsepithelial repair in acute lung injury—a translationalmatrix biology in the lung. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol

  19. Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Techniques (Presentation) Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray...

  20. Thursday, April 10, 2008 A Fuller Picture of Your Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Thursday, April 10, 2008 A Fuller Picture of Your Lungs A cheap MRI machine images lung function poor pictures of the lungs, which are full of air, and gives an incomplete picture of lung functions a cheap MRI machine that uses a weak magnetic field to image critical aspects of lung physiology

  1. Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer on Pulmonary Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tada, Akihiro, E-mail: tdakihiro@gmail.com; Hiraki, Takao [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Iguchi, Toshihiro [Fukuyama City Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Toyooka, Shinichi [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Cancer and Thoracic Surgery (Japan); Kiura, Katsuyuki [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan); Tsuda, Toshihide [Okayama University Graduate School, Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Graduate School of Environmental Science (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Epidemiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate altered pulmonary function retrospectively after RFA. Methods: This retrospective study comprised 41 ablation sessions for 39 patients (22 men and 17 women; mean age, 64.8 years). Vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) at 1 and 3 months after RFA were compared with the baseline (i.e., values before RFA). To evaluate the factors that influenced impaired pulmonary function, univariate analysis was performed by using multiple variables. If two or more variables were indicated as statistically significant by univariate analysis, these variables were subjected to multivariate analysis to identify independent factors. Results: The mean VC and FEV{sub 1} before RFA and 1 and 3 months after RFA were 3.04 and 2.24 l, 2.79 and 2.11 l, and 2.85 and 2.13 l, respectively. The values at 1 and 3 months were significantly lower than the baseline. Severe pleuritis after RFA was identified as the independent factor influencing impaired VC at 1 month (P = 0.003). For impaired FEV{sub 1} at 1 month, only severe pleuritis (P = 0.01) was statistically significant by univariate analysis. At 3 months, severe pleuritis (VC, P = 0.019; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.003) and an ablated parenchymal volume {>=}20 cm{sup 3} (VC, P = 0.047; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.038) were independent factors for impaired VC and FEV{sub 1}. Conclusions: Pulmonary function decreased after RFA. RFA-induced severe pleuritis and ablation of a large volume of marginal parenchyma were associated with impaired pulmonary function.

  2. Acute Appendicitis from Metastatic Small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundararajan, Radhika; Landman, Adam B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of appendicitis: F-18 FDG PET/CT. Clin Nucl Med. 2006;31:also had a staging PET CT that detected the metastasis priorhave described screening PET CT incidentally diagnosing

  3. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  4. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  5. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  6. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  7. Injury / Incident Report INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    OF INJURY NONE EMPLOYER PHYSICIAN EMERGENCY FAMILY PHYSICIAN OTHER PHYSICIAN / SPECIALIST TO YOUR. _________________________________________ Room #___________________ STATE EXACTLY - THE SEQUENCE OF EVENTS LEADING UP TO THE INCIDENT, WHERE TO USE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE DEVICES 8 NOT GUARDED OR IMPROPERLY GUARDED 9 INADEQUATE ILLUMINATION 10

  8. Prevalence and contribution of BRCA1 mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer: Results from three US population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, A.S.; Gong, G.; Itnyre, J. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the familial risks of cancers of the breast and ovary, using data pooled from three population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer that were conducted in the United States. We base estimates of the frequency of mutations of BRCA1 (and possibly other genes) on the reported occurrence of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the mothers and sisters of 922 women with incident ovarian cancer (cases) and in 922 women with no history of ovarian cancer (controls). Segregation analysis and goodness-of-fit testing of genetic models suggest that rare mutations (frequency .0014; 95% confidence interval .0002-.011) account for all the observed aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in these families. The estimated risk of breast cancer by age 80 years is 73.5% in mutation carriers and 6.8% in noncarriers. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 27.8% in carriers and 1.8% in noncarriers. For cancer risk in carriers, these estimates are lower than those obtained from families selected for high cancer prevalence. The estimated proportion of all U.S. cancer diagnoses, by age 80 years, that are due to germ-line BRCA1 mutations is 3.0% for breast cancer and 4.4% for ovarian cancer. Aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer was less evident in the families of 169 cases with borderline ovarian cancers than in the families of cases with invasive cancers. Familial aggregation did not differ by the ethnicity of the probands, although the number of non-White and Hispanic cases (N = 99) was sparse. 14 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Multigenerational epigenetic effects of nicotine on lung function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie, Frances M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects of nicotine on lung function. BMC Medicine 2013 11:homeostasis, and repair of the lung. PPAR Res 2012, 8.effects of nicotine on lung function Frances M Leslie

  10. Bleb Point: Mimicker of Pneumothorax in Bullous Lung Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelabert, Christopher; Nelson, Mathew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G, Biderman P, et al. “The lung point”: an REFERENCESof cystic and bullous lung disease. Chest Surg Clin N Am.S, Kaiser LR. Giant bullous lung disease: chest radiography

  11. Characterization of Lung's Emphysema Distribution: Numerical Assessment of Disease Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterization of Lung's Emphysema Distribution: Numerical Assessment of Disease Development M, Egypt. Abstract--Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) refers to a group of lung diseases bronchitis. Pulmonary emphysema is defined as a lung disease characterized by "abnormal enlargement

  12. STOMACH CANCER 9. STOMACH CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    of association and strength of evidence Increases risk Decreases risk Convincing or probable Helicobacter pylori/obesity 9 1 Helicobacter and Cancer Collaborative Group, 2001; 2 International Agency for Research on Cancer

  13. Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation? – Revisiting the “go or grow” hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garay, Tamás; Juhász, Éva; Molnár, Eszter [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Eisenbauer, Maria [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czirók, András [Department of Biological Physics, Eötvös University, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Dekan, Barbara; László, Viktória; Hoda, Mir Alireza [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Döme, Balázs [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); National Korányi Institute of TB and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tímár, József [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Klepetko, Walter [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Walter [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Heged?s, Balázs, E-mail: balazs.hegedus@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The “go or grow” hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. - Highlights: • We investigated the “go or grow” hypothesis in human cancer cells in vitro. • Proliferation and migration positively correlate in melanoma and lung cancer cells. • Duration of cytokinesis and migration shows inverse correlation. • Increased FAK activation is present in highly motile melanoma cells.

  14. allergic lung inflammation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the air pollutants which damage lungs and are linked to respiratory problems such as asthma. A Low symptoms, inflammation in the lung, exposure to traffic-related air...

  15. Software Architecture Decomposition Using Attributes Chung-Horng Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung, Chung-Horng

    1 Software Architecture Decomposition Using Attributes Chung-Horng Lung Xia Xu Department and Eppinger [29] in other engineering disciplines. Inspired by Alexander, Andreu [2] and Lung,

  16. Automatic Lung Vessel Segmentation via Stacked Multiscale Feature Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Automatic Lung Vessel Segmentation via Stacked Multiscale Feature Learning Ryan Kiros, Karteek We introduce a representation learning approach to segmenting vessels in the lungs. Our algorithm

  17. Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jingbo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Cao, Jianzhong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yuan, Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ji, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Arenberg, Douglas [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dai, Jianrong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang, Luhua, E-mail: wlhwq@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ?2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

  18. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  19. Incident Data Analysis Using Data Mining Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veltman, Lisa M.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and findings that are currently available will greatly aid in this effort. 7 3. HSEES DATA The Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) data includes information on events where: ? There was an uncontrolled/illegal release... = Equipment failure, 3 = Operator Error, 8 = Other, G = Intentional, H = Bad weather condition, S = Illegal act SEC_FACT Secondary factor contributing to incident 1=Improper mixing, 2=Equipment failure, 3=Human error, 4=Improper filling, loading, or packing...

  20. Projection of tuberculosis incidence with increasing immigration trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    May 29, 2008 ... lung (Smith and Moss, 1994). Characteristics of the host immune response dictate whether an exposed individual will develop latent infection ...

  1. A common language for computer security incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Howard; Thomas A Longstaff

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the computer security information regularly gathered and disseminated by individuals and organizations cannot currently be combined or compared because a common language has yet to emerge in the field of computer security. A common language consists of terms and taxonomies (principles of classification) which enable the gathering, exchange and comparison of information. This paper presents the results of a project to develop such a common language for computer security incidents. This project results from cooperation between the Security and Networking Research Group at the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, and the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. This Common Language Project was not an effort to develop a comprehensive dictionary of terms used in the field of computer security. Instead, the authors developed a minimum set of high-level terms, along with a structure indicating their relationship (a taxonomy), which can be used to classify and understand computer security incident information. They hope these high-level terms and their structure will gain wide acceptance, be useful, and most importantly, enable the exchange and comparison of computer security incident information. They anticipate, however, that individuals and organizations will continue to use their own terms, which may be more specific both in meaning and use. They designed the common language to enable these lower-level terms to be classified within the common language structure.

  2. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lingos, T.I.; Recht, A.; Vicini, F.; Abner, A.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R. (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The likelihood of radiation pneumonitis and factors associated with its development in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy have not been well established. To assess these, the authors retrospectively reviewed 1624 patients treated between 1968 and 1985. Median follow-up for patients without local or distant failure was 77 months. Patients were treated with either tangential fields alone (n = 508) or tangents with a third field to the supraclavicular (SC) or SC-axillary (AX) region (n = 1116). Lung volume treated in the tangential fields was generally limited by keeping the perpendicular distance (demagnified) at the isocenter from the deep field edges to the posterior chest wall (CLD) to 3 cm or less. Seventeen patients with radiation pneumonitis were identified (1.0%). Radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed when patients presented with cough (15/17, 88%), fever (9/17, 53%), and/or dyspnea (6/17, 35%) and radiographic changes (17/17) following completion of RT. Radiographic infiltrates corresponded to treatment portals in all patients, and in 12 of the 17 patients, returned to baseline within 1-12 months. Five patients had permanent scarring on chest X ray. No patient had late or persistent pulmonary symptoms. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was correlated with the combined use of chemotherapy (CT) and a third field. Three percent (11/328) of patients treated with a 3-field technique who received chemotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis compared to 0.5% (6 of 1296) for all other patients (p = 0.0001). When patients treated with a 3-field technique received chemotherapy concurrently with radiation therapy, the incidence of radiation pneumonitis was 8.8% (8/92) compared with 1.3% (3/236) for those who received sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy (p = 0.002).

  3. Sports activities and risk of testicular cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Coldman; J. M. Elwooda; R. P. Gallagher; Nottingham Nottingham

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary.-The relationship of testicular seminoma with several factors was explored using a case-control study. Previously recognized associations with cryptorchidism and infantile inguinal hernia were confirmed and relationships were also found with cycling and horse-riding. These findings represent the first relationships of testicular cancer with well-defined postnatal risk factors. TESTICULAR CANCER is now the most common neoplasm in men aged 25-34 in England and Wales (Davies, 1981) and follows only non-melanoma skin cancer in Canada (Statistics Canada, 1980). Mortality in young men has been rising during this century in a number of countries (Davies, 1981; Grumet & MacMahon, 1958). Similar increases in incidence have been reported by several cancer registries for the age range 15-30 (Muir & Nectoux, 1978; Schottenfeld et al., 1980; Clemmesen, 1969; Petersen & Lee, 1972). Current estimates of incidence in British Columbia indicate that approximately 1 in 400 males will develop testicular cancer (Cancer Registry, 1975). The majority of studies of the epidemiology of testicular tumours have used routinely collected data to analyse the effects of factors such as social class, marital status, geography, racial group and religious preference. Case-control studies have analysed factors such as cryptorchidism and other prenatal conditions. Where it was examined, these studies have shown that, while differences exist in the age-specific incidence, treatment and prognosis of seminoma compared to other types of testicular cancer, the relationship to known risk factors is similar (Morrison, 1976b; Graham et al., 1977). The present report examines a number of characteristics of childhood and adolescence in a case-control study of all patients treated for seminoma of the testis at a regional treatment centre in the period 1970-77.

  4. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 94, pp. 37653770, April 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that exposure of the lung to -emit- ting radon progeny is the largest component of background radiation received to high levels of radon progeny have the largest incidence of radiation-induced lung cancers of any

  5. Defect in lung growth* Comparative study of three diagnostic criteria.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Defect in lung growth* Comparative study of three diagnostic criteria. P. DECHELOTTE, A. LABBE, O and fetuses (49 pathological cases and 25 controls) to detect defects in lung growth. In each case lung disease. RA count is low in lung hypoplasia but is not an entirely reliable diagnostic criterion since

  6. Lung, Artificial: Basic Principles and Current Applications William J. Federspiel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Lung, Artificial: Basic Principles and Current Applications William J. Federspiel Kristie A. Henchir University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION Artificial lungs currently of the lung, which is to oxygenate the blood and remove carbon dioxide. Current artificial lungs are also

  7. GREIT: towards a consensus EIT algorithm for lung images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    GREIT: towards a consensus EIT algorithm for lung images Andy Adler1 , John Arnold2 , Richard in the patient's lungs. However, most clinical and physiological research in lung EIT is done using older reconstruction algorithm for lung EIT, called GREIT (Graz consensus Reconstruc- tion algorithm for EIT

  8. Immune Reactions of the Lung in Infection and Allergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Immune Reactions of the Lung in Infection and Allergy ¡ Interactions of microorganisms with cells of the lung ¡ Cells and mediators in immune reactions of the lung Sabine Ehrt, New York, USA Rees Kassen, Hannover Characterization of pulmonary host defense mechanisms in chronic lung disease 10.00 ­ 10.40 Albert

  9. Collapsibility of Lung Volume by Paired Inspiratory and Expiratory CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collapsibility of Lung Volume by Paired Inspiratory and Expiratory CT Scans: Correlations with Lung Function and Mean Lung Density Tsuneo Yamashiro, MD, Shin Matsuoka, MD, PhD, Brian J. Bartholmai, MD, Rau: To evaluate the relationship between measurements of lung volume (LV) on inspiratory/expiratory computed

  10. NHLBI Workshop Summaries Resident Cellular Components of the Human Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelhardt, John F.

    NHLBI Workshop Summaries Resident Cellular Components of the Human Lung Current Knowledge and Goals, Maryland; 5 Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health and Cell Biology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; 11 Developmental Lung Biology Research

  11. CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM 2010 ANNUAL REPORT WITH STATISTICAL DATA FROM 2009 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS MEDICAL CENTER #12;2 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2 #12;3 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 3 UIMC CANCER PROGRAM CHANGING MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE. FOR GOOD. #12;4 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT

  12. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)] [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-?B, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPAR?/?-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, and NF-?B signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ? Chronic As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure to lung epithelial cells resulted in a cancer-like phenotype. ? Mice injected with arsenic transformed (B-As) cells displayed metastatic tumors. ? Microarray profiling revealed changes in mitochondrial metabolism and ROS response. ? p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, PPAR? and NF-?B networks promoted pro-cancer signaling. ? B-As cells represent a lung cancer model to explore As-associated carcinogenesis.

  13. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  14. Determination of lung segments in computed tomography images using the Euclidean distance to the pulmonary artery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoecker, Christina; Moltz, Jan H.; Lassen, Bianca; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Institute for Medical Image Computing, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Institute for Medical Image Computing, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Welter, Stefan [Ruhrlandklinik, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tueschener Weg 40, 45239 Essen (Germany)] [Ruhrlandklinik, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tueschener Weg 40, 45239 Essen (Germany); Peitgen, Heinz-Otto [Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen (Germany)] [Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen (Germany)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) imaging is the modality of choice for lung cancer diagnostics. With the increasing number of lung interventions on sublobar level in recent years, determining and visualizing pulmonary segments in CT images and, in oncological cases, reliable segment-related information about the location of tumors has become increasingly desirable. Computer-assisted identification of lung segments in CT images is subject of this work.Methods: The authors present a new interactive approach for the segmentation of lung segments that uses the Euclidean distance of each point in the lung to the segmental branches of the pulmonary artery. The aim is to analyze the potential of the method. Detailed manual pulmonary artery segmentations are used to achieve the best possible segment approximation results. A detailed description of the method and its evaluation on 11 CT scans from clinical routine are given.Results: An accuracy of 2–3 mm is measured for the segment boundaries computed by the pulmonary artery-based method. On average, maximum deviations of 8 mm are observed. 135 intersegmental pulmonary veins detected in the 11 test CT scans serve as reference data. Furthermore, a comparison of the presented pulmonary artery-based approach to a similar approach that uses the Euclidean distance to the segmental branches of the bronchial tree is presented. It shows a significantly higher accuracy for the pulmonary artery-based approach in lung regions at least 30 mm distal to the lung hilum.Conclusions: A pulmonary artery-based determination of lung segments in CT images is promising. In the tests, the pulmonary artery-based determination has been shown to be superior to the bronchial tree-based determination. The suitability of the segment approximation method for application in the planning of segment resections in clinical practice has already been verified in experimental cases. However, automation of the method accompanied by an evaluation on a larger number of test cases is required before application in the daily clinical routine.

  15. Cancer Imaging Clinical Cancer Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near Ir; Heptamethine Cyanine Dye–mediated; Xiaojian Yang; Chunmeng Shi; Rong Tong; Weiping Qian; Haiyen E. Zhau; Ruoxiang Wang; Guodong Zhu; Jianjun Cheng; Vincent W. Yang; Tianmin Cheng; Maged Henary; Lucjan Strekowski; W. K. Chung

    Purpose: Near-IR fluorescence imaging has great potential for noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumors. In this study, we show the preferential uptake and retention of two hepatamethine cyanine dyes, IR-783 and MHI-148, in tumor cells and tissues. Experimental Design: IR-783 and MHI-148 were investigated for their ability to accumulate in human cancer cells, tumor xenografts, and spontaneous mouse tumors in transgenic animals. Time- and concentration-dependent dye uptake and retention in normal and cancer cells and tissues were compared, and subcellular localization of the dyes and mechanisms of the dye uptake and retention in tumor cells were evaluated using organelle-specific tracking dyes and bromosulfophthalein, a competitive inhibitor of organic anion transporting peptides. These dyes were used to detect human cancer metastases in a mouse model and differentiate cancer cells from normal cells in blood. Results: These near-IR hepatamethine cyanine dyes were retained in cancer cells but not normal cells, in tumor xenografts, and in spontaneous tumors in transgenic mice. They can be used to detect cancer metastasis and cancer cells in blood with a high degree of sensitivity. The dyes were found to concentrate in the mitochondria and lysosomes of cancer cells, probably through organic anion transporting peptides,

  16. Lung Nodule Detection in Screening Computed Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gori, I; Cerello, P; Cheran, S C; De Nunzio, G; Fantacci, M E; Kasae, P; Masala, G L; Pérez-Martínez, A; Retico, A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images with 1.25 mm slice thickness is presented. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The results obtained on the collected database of lung CT scans are discussed.

  17. The NOD/RIP2 Pathway Is Essential for Host Defenses Against Chlamydophila pneumoniae Lung Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bacterial infection of the lung in predisposition/protectionof Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lung following bone marrowneutrophil recruitment to the lungs. Levels of IL-6 and IFN-

  18. THE KINETICS OF REVERSIBLE-SEQUESTRATION OF LEUKOCYTES BY THE ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT LUNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goliaei, Bahrain.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Granulocytes. , c. II. The Lung . . Material and Method .Isolated Perfusion rfused Lung Preparation. , B. C. Single-1954). "Role of Am. J. the Lungs in Regulation of the White

  19. Unbalanced Data Classification Using Support Vector Machines with Active Learning on Scleroderma Lung Disease Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jongyoon

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scleroderma Lung Study (SLS) . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi List of Figures CT scans of Normal Lung (NL), Lung Fibrosis (LF), and Honeycomb (HC) . Denoised

  20. Effects of combined hyperoxia and cyclooxygenase inhibition in neonatal rat lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. Effect of indomethacin on lung development in postnatalinhibition & neonatal rat lungs the fetal ductus arteriosus.expression in human lungs of newborns with congenital

  1. Aerosol Deposition in Healthy and Emphysematous Rat Lungs : : Insights From MRI Measurements and Computational Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Jessica M.

    1.1 Lung Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Particle Concentration Calibration . . . 4.2.6 Lung Particle1.2 Particle Deposition in the Lung . . . . . . . . 1.3

  2. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  3. Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. (Yale Univ. Medical Center, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  5. Security incidents on the Internet, 1989--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an analysis of trends in Internet security based on an investigation of 4,299 Internet security-related incidents reported to the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center (CERT{reg_sign}/CC) from 1989 through 1995. Prior to this research, knowledge of actual Internet security incidents was limited and primarily anecdotal. This research: (1) developed a taxonomy to classify Internet attacks and incidents, (2) organized, classified, and analyzed CERT{reg_sign}/CC incident records, (3) summarized the relative frequency of the use of tools and vulnerabilities, success in achieving access, and results of attacks, (4) estimated total Internet incident activity, (5) developed recommendations for Internet users and suppliers, and (6) developed recommendations for future research. With the exception of denial-of-service attacks, security incidents were found to be increasing at a rate less than Internet growth. Estimates showed that most, if not all, severe incidents were reported to the CERT{reg_sign}/CC, and that more than one out of three above average incidents (in terms of duration and number of sites) were reported. Estimates also indicated that a typical Internet site was involved in, at most, around one incident (of any kind) per year, and a typical Internet host in, at most, around one incident in 45 years. The probability of unauthorized privileged access was around an order of magnitude less likely. As a result, simple and reasonable security precautions should be sufficient for most Internet users.

  6. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Christine S., E-mail: chungc1@sutterhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, California (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nelson, Kerrie [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Xu, Yang [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keating, Nancy L. [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Office of the Executive Dean, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study, these results should be viewed as hypothesis generating.

  7. Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdiyati, -

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    incidents from both the causal and consequence elements of the incidents. A subset of incidents data reported to the Hazardous Substance Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) chemical incident database from 2002-2006 was analyzed using data mining...

  8. RESEARCH Open Access Cellular transcriptional profiling in human lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH Open Access Cellular transcriptional profiling in human lung epithelial cells infected expression profiles of human lung A549 cells infected by five different subtypes of human and avian influenza

  9. CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, ASTHMA AND LUNG BIOLOGY PUBLICATIONS (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, ASTHMA AND LUNG BIOLOGY PUBLICATIONS (2008) Alexis NE, Muhlebach MS, Peden DB, Noah TL. Attenuation of host defense function of lung phagocytes in early cystic

  10. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Chung-Horng Lung Joseph E. Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung, Chung-Horng

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH Chung-Horng Lung Æ Joseph E. Urban Gerald T. Mackulak Analogy-based domain problem that shares significant aspects with the past problem and C.-H. Lung (&) Department of Systems

  11. Classification of skin abnormalties using oblique incident diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Uribe, Alejandro

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (malignant), and (ii) group 2 consisting of common nevi (benign), compound nevi (benign), junctional nevi (benign), against dysplastic nevi (pre-cancerous) and melanoma (cancerous). For each group a bootstrap based Bayes classifier was designed to separate...

  12. Polarized Helium to Image the Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leduc, M; Leduc, Mich\\`{e}le; Nacher, Pierre-Jean

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main findings of the european PHIL project (Polarised Helium to Image the Lung) are reported. State of the art optical pumping techniques for polarising ^3He gas are described. MRI methodological improvements allow dynamical ventilation images with a good resolution, ultimately limited by gas diffusion. Diffusion imaging appears as a robust method of lung diagnosis. A discussion of the potential advantage of low field MRI is presented. Selected PHIL results for emphysema are given, with the perspectives that this joint work opens up for the future of respiratory medicine.

  13. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belinsky, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmisano, William A. (Edgewood, NM)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

  14. Countries with Estimated or Reported Tuberculosis Incidence, 2009 "High Incidence" areas are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000 population Afghanistan Cook China India Namibia Sri Lanka Colombia Indonesia Nepal Sudan Comoros Iraq Nicaragua Suriname Congo Japan

  15. Contribution of Gular Pumping to Lung Ventilation in Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brainerd, Elizabeth

    Contribution of Gular Pumping to Lung Ventilation in Monitor Lizards Tomasz Owerkowicz,1 * Colleen that lizards are subject to a speed- dependent axial constraint that prevents effective lung ventilation during locomotion, varanids use a positive pressure gular pump to assist lung ventilation. Disabling the gular pump

  16. THE MECHANICS OF LUNG TISSUE UNDER HIGH-FREQUENCY VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Mark

    THE MECHANICS OF LUNG TISSUE UNDER HIGH-FREQUENCY VENTILATION MARKUS R. OWEN AND MARK A. LEWIS SIAM­1761 Abstract. High-frequency ventilation is a radical departure from conventional lung ventilation question concerns ventilator-induced damage to the lung tissue, and a clear protocol for the most effective

  17. THE MECHANICS OF LUNG TISSUE UNDER HIGH-FREQUENCY VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE MECHANICS OF LUNG TISSUE UNDER HIGH-FREQUENCY VENTILATION MARKUS R. OWEN AND MARK A. LEWIS Abstract. High frequency ventilation is a radical departure from conventional lung ventilation question concerns ventilator induced damage to the lung tissue, and a clear protocol for the most effective

  18. Changes in Model Lung Surfactant Monolayers Induced by Palmitic Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    Changes in Model Lung Surfactant Monolayers Induced by Palmitic Acid Frank Bringezu, Junqi Ding of model lung surfactant lipid monolayers. Adding increasing fractions of palmitic acid (PA) to a 77/23 (wt to the rational design of replacement lung surfactants for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome

  19. ccsd00004040, Polarized Helium to Image the Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00004040, version 1 ­ 24 Jan 2005 Polarized Helium to Image the Lung Mich#18;ele Leduc the Lung) are reported. State of the art optical pumping techniques for polarising 3 He gas are described limited by gas di#11;usion. Di#11;usion imaging appears as a robust method of lung diagnosis. A discussion

  20. Tomographic Digital Subtraction Angiography for Lung Perfusion Estimation in Rodents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomographic Digital Subtraction Angiography for Lung Perfusion Estimation in Rodents Cristian T. The capabilities of TDSA are established in studies on lung perfusion in rats. Using an imaging system developed in to therapeutics. Keywords X-ray; digital subtraction angiography; tomosynthesis; small animal; lung; perfusion

  1. Biomaterials 28 (2007) 31313139 Towards improved artificial lungs through biocatalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomaterials 28 (2007) 3131­3139 Towards improved artificial lungs through biocatalysis Joel L in the development of artificial lungs and respiratory assist devices, which use hollow fiber membranes (HFMs intervention involves the use of mechan- ical ventilators to provide breathing support while the lungs recover

  2. The Comprehensive Imaging-Based Analysis of the Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    The Comprehensive Imaging-Based Analysis of the Lung: A Forum for Team Science1 Eric A. Hoffman, Ph description and understanding of the human lung and its response to disease, injury, and treatment, which for the need to volumetrically im- age the lung and to provide objective, quantitative measures characterizing

  3. Lung, Artificial: Current Research and Future Directions William J. Federspiel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Lung, Artificial: Current Research and Future Directions William J. Federspiel Robert G. Svitek University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION Artificial lungs are medical devices designed to take over or supplement the respiratory function of the lung: oxygenating the blood

  4. Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3 Helium Dynamic MRI Ben T. Chen,* Anja C.S. Brau, and G. Allan Johnson Dynamic regional lung function was investigated in rats using by a constant flow ventila- tor. Based on regional differences in the behavior of inspired air, the lung

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Effect of Different Sitting Postures on Lung Capacity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makhsous, Mohsen

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Effect of Different Sitting Postures on Lung Capacity, Expiratory Flow, and Lumbar, Makhsous M. Effect of different sitting postures on lung capacity, expiratory flow, and lumbar lordosis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2006;87:504-9. Objective: To investigate the effect of sitting posture on lung

  6. Asymmetries in Electrical Impedance Tomography Lung Images Bartlomiej Grychtol1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Asymmetries in Electrical Impedance Tomography Lung Images Bartlomiej Grychtol1 and Andy Adler2 1, it has been used to image the thorax, to monitor the movement of blood and gas in the heart and lungs. One key application of EIT is to determine the distribution of ventilation within the lungs

  7. Cell Stem Cell Generation of Multipotent Lung and Airway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    Cell Stem Cell Article Generation of Multipotent Lung and Airway Progenitors from Mouse ESCs.01.018 SUMMARY Deriving lung progenitors from patient-specific pluripotent cells is a key step in producing differenti- ated lung epithelium for disease modeling and trans- plantation. By mimicking the signaling

  8. Predicting Panel Ratings for Semantic Characteristics of Lung Nodules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    Predicting Panel Ratings for Semantic Characteristics of Lung Nodules Dmitriy Zinovev De@cdm.depaul.edu ABSTRACT In reading CT scans with potentially malignant lung nodules, radiologists make use of high level a second opinion - predicting these semantic characteristics for lung nodules. In our previous work, we

  9. NHLBI Workshop Future Directions in Early Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelhardt, John F.

    NHLBI Workshop Future Directions in Early Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease Research An NHLBI Workshop of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington; 3 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National substantial progress toward under- standing the molecular basis for CF lung disease, leading to the discovery

  10. Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs ADAM G. POLAK 1 losses along the airway branches. Calculations done for succeeding lung volumes result in the semidynamic to the choke points, characteristic differences of lung regional pressures and volumes, and a shape

  11. Special Article Elucidating Nature's Solutions to Heart, Lung, and Blood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storz, Jay F.

    Special Article Elucidating Nature's Solutions to Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases and Sleep defenses, and oxygen transport. In 2006, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute released a funding understanding of nature's solutions to heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders through future research

  12. Identification of Early Interstitial Lung Disease in Smokers from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Early Interstitial Lung Disease in Smokers from the COPDGene Study George R interstitial lung disease (ILD) on chest computed tomographic (CT) scans. Materials and Methods: The CT scans: Early interstitial lung disease; CT scan; smoker. ªAUR, 2010 I diopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF

  13. Computerised lung sound analysis to improve the specificity of paediatric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elhilali, Mounya

    Computerised lung sound analysis to improve the specificity of paediatric pneumonia diagnosis that pulmonary pathology can be differentiated from normal using computerised lung sound analysis (CLSA). The authors will record lung sounds from 600 children aged #5 years, 100 each with consolidative pneumonia

  14. Evaluation of Plasma Resistant Hollow Fiber Membranes For Artificial Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Evaluation of Plasma Resistant Hollow Fiber Membranes For Artificial Lungs HEIDE J. EASH,* HEATHER in artificial lungs (ox- ygenators) undergo plasma leakage (or wetting) in which blood plasma slowly fills2 gas permeance of a plasma resistant fiber imposes the greatest constraint upon artificial lung

  15. Lung Disease in Pediatrics: is it all in the Genes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung Disease in Pediatrics: is it all in the Genes? Jay K. Kolls, M.D.Jay K. Kolls, M.D. Chair with CF do worse than other? #12;· Outcomes are better at CF centers · There is huge variation in lung with the same mutation do worse than others? · Modifier genes ­ lung disease ­ Tgfb1 ­ Irfd1 ­ neutrophil

  16. Dynamic Lung Morphology of Methacholine-Induced Heterogeneous Bronchoconstriction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Lung Morphology of Methacholine-Induced Heterogeneous Bronchoconstriction Ben T. Chen and G). The method provides direct visualization of the venti- lated regions within the lung. Heterogeneous bronchoconstric- tion following the i.v. MCh injection was evident using this technique. These 3 He dynamic lung

  17. EIT measurement of heart and lung perfusion Helga Ross1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    EIT measurement of heart and lung perfusion Helga Ross1 , Benjamin J.W. Chow2 , and Andy Adler1 1. Introduction Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) shows promise for monitoring a patient's heart and lungs matching in the lungs. The goal of this research is to determine the accuracy of EIT measurements of blood

  18. Cardiopulmonary Function in RatsWith Lung Hemorrhage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Cardiopulmonary Function in RatsWith Lung Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed Ultrasound Exposure Jeffery using superthreshold exposure conditions known to produce sig- nificant lung hemorrhage. Methods. In 1 in the left lung of each rat. In a second group of 6 rats, 5 foci of ultrasound-induced hemorrhage were

  19. a bStomach Lung cell zone Clara cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    a bStomach Lung Chief-cell zone Stem-cell zone Mucus- cell zone Clara cell Tracheal airway Basal independent studies show that, if push comes to shove, differentiated cells of the stomach and lung can act and the other by Stange et al.2 published in Cell, find that followingdepletionofstemcellsinthestomach or lung

  20. -Glutamyl transferase deficiency results in lung oxidant stress in normoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc, Robert E.

    -Glutamyl transferase deficiency results in lung oxidant stress in normoxia JYH CHANG JEAN,1 YUE E. Marc, Elizabeth Klings, and Martin Joyce-Brady. -Glutamyl transferase deficiency results in lung oxidant stress in normoxia. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 283: L766­L776, 2002. First published May 3

  1. Early Recognition of Lung's Air Sacs Wall Collapsing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Early Recognition of Lung's Air Sacs Wall Collapsing M. EMAM, J-F RENAUD de la Faverie, N. GHARBI discusses the possibility of applying a non- liner analysis approach on air density distribution within lung airways tree at any level of branching1. Computed Tomography (CT) 2 source images of the lung

  2. INVESTIGATION The Lsktm1 Locus Modulates Lung and Skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broman, Karl W.

    INVESTIGATION The Lsktm1 Locus Modulates Lung and Skin Tumorigenesis in the Mouse Antonella Galvan to both skin and lung tumorigenesis over the susceptibility of the SWR/J strain. In an effort to map tumor.93) and lung (LOD score = 8.74) tumorigenesis. Two genes, Igfbp5 and Igfbp2, residing in this locus

  3. Original article Lentivirus-induced interstitial lung disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Lentivirus-induced interstitial lung disease: pulmonary pathology in sheep a chronic disease in sheep affecting, among other organs, the lungs. Interstitial pneumonitis is similar the pathological features of lungs of sheep naturally infected with visna-maedi virus with the results obtained

  4. A Case Report of 20 Lung Radiofrequency Ablation Sessions for 50 Lung Metastases from Parathyroid Carcinoma Causing Hyperparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tochio, Maki, E-mail: m-tochio@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Takao, Motoshi; Shimamoto, Akira; Tarukawa, Tomohito; Shimpo, Hideto [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan); Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 47-year-old man presented with multiple lung metastases from parathyroid carcinoma that caused hyperparathyroidism and refractory hypercalcemia. Lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation was repeated to decrease the serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels and improve general fatigue. Pulmonary resection was combined for lung hilum metastases. The patient is still alive 4 years after the initial RF session. He has received 20 RF sessions for 50 lung metastases during this period.

  5. Version0109 THIS INJURY AND ILLNESS INCIDENT REPORT IS ONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Version0109 THIS INJURY AND ILLNESS INCIDENT REPORT IS ONE OF THE FIRST FORMS THAT MUST BE FILLED's Form 301 ­ Injury and Illness Incident Report, should be completed as soon as possible after? ______________________ 10. Date of Accident __________________________ DESCRIPTIONOFTHEINJURY: 1. State name of machine

  6. TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting Why?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting ­ Why? Obligation to report Health Care of the accident ­ if not, the organization (i.e. the department) can be fined Obligation under Section 51, 52 happened? When did it happen? (Date, Time and Place) When was the accident/incident reported? Any

  7. Final Report DOE Grant# DE-FG02-98ER62592: Second Cancers, Tumor p53, and Archaea Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel M. Lesko, MD, MPH

    2006-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute conducted cancer surveillance in Northeast Pennsylvania using data from the instituteâ??s population-based regional cancer registry and the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. The results of this surveillance have been used to set priorities for research and outreach activities at the Cancer Institute and selected results have been reported to medical professionals at member hospitals and in the community. One consistent observation of this surveillance was that colorectal cancer was unusually common in Northeast Pennsylvania; incidence was approximately 25% higher than the rate published for NCIâ??s Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program. In addition, death rates form colorectal cancer in several counties in this region were above the 90Th percentile for colorectal cancer mortality in the United States. As a result of these observations, several activities have been developed to increase awareness of colorectal cancer and the value of screening for this cancer in both the lay and medical communities. Funding from this grant also provided support for a population-based study of cancer risk factors, screening practices, and related behaviors. This project continues beyond the termination of the present grant with funding from other sources. This project gathers data from a representative sample of adults residing in a six county area of Northeast Pennsylvania. Analyses conducted to date of the established risk factors for colorectal cancer have not revealed an explanation for the high incidence of this cancer in this population.

  8. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol . Author manuscript Defective angiogenesis in hypoplastic human fetal lungs correlates with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol . Author manuscript Page /1 12 Defective angiogenesis in hypoplastic human fetal lungs correlates with nitric oxide synthase deficiency that occurs despite enhanced.bourbon@inserm.fr > Abstract Lung hypoplasia (LH) is a life-threatening congenital abnormality with various causes. It involves

  9. Differential Expression of Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases 4 in Developing Rat Lung Running Title: PDE4 in developing rat lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Differential Expression of Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases 4 in Developing Rat Lung Running Title: PDE4 in developing rat lung Emmanuel Lopez 1,2,3,4 , Pierre-Henri Jarreau 1,2,3,4 , Elodie Zana 1 Dynamics 239, 9 (2010) 2470-8" DOI : 10.1002/dvdy.22374 #12;2 Abstract During the perinatal period, lungs

  10. Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs presented to WSU SOM PAD January 10, 2012 presented by Sandra A. Rempel, Ph.D. Associate Director of Research, JFCC #12;JFCC Cancer Research Programs Cancer Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Program Members: Gwen Alexander, Andrea Cassidy

  11. Influence of Manufacturing Processes on the Performance of Phantom Lungs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chest counting is an important tool for estimating the radiation dose to individuals who have inhaled radioactive materials. Chest counting systems are calibrated by counting the activity in the lungs of phantoms where the activity in the phantom lungs is known. In the United States a commonly used calibration phantom was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is referred to as the Livermore Torso Phantom. An important feature of this phantom is that the phantom lungs can be interchanged so that the counting system can be challenged by different combinations of radionuclides and activity. Phantom lungs are made from lung tissue substitutes whose constituents are foaming plastics and various adjuvants selected to make the lung tissue substitute similar to normal healthy lung tissue. Some of the properties of phantom lungs cannot be readily controlled by phantom lung manufacturers. Some, such as density, are a complex function of the manufacturing process, while others, such as elemental composition of the bulk plastic are controlled by the plastics manufacturer without input, or knowledge of the phantom manufacturer. Despite the fact that some of these items cannot be controlled, they can be measured and accounted for. This report describes how manufacturing processes can influence the performance of phantom lungs. It is proposed that a metric that describes the brightness of the lung be employed by the phantom lung manufacturer to determine how well the phantom lung approximates the characteristics of a human lung. For many purposes, the linear attenuation of the lung tissue substitute is an appropriate surrogate for the brightness.

  12. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006 chest pain headaches elevated bp rapid heart rate muscle tremors shock symptoms grinding of teeth visual Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress

  13. Breast cancer risk in relation to urinary and serum biomarkers of phytoestrogen exposure in the EPIC-Norfolk study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Heather A; Chapelais, Gaelle; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Bingham, Sheila

    2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of breast cancer, but only a limited range of phytoestrogens has been examined in prospective cohort studies. Methods Serum and urine samples from 237 incident breast cancer cases and 952 control individuals (aged 45 to 75 years) in the European Prospective...

  14. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also reveal the molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

  15. Decreased respiratory system compliance on the sixth day of mechanical ventilation is a predictor of death in patients with established acute lung injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with established acute lung injury. Respiratory Researchof patients with acute lung injury. Predictors of mortality.of mortality in acute lung injury during the era of lung

  16. 1 888 939 3333 | cancer.ca Cancer Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 888 939 3333 | cancer.ca Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013 Special topic: Liver cancer Produced by Canadian Cancer Society, Statistics Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Provincial/Territorial Cancer Registries cancer.ca/statistics #12;2Canadian Cancer Society n Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013 Citation

  17. Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis Ronne L. Surface2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis quantitate metastatic mouse lung tumors in a lung section using a H&E stain. Lung sections from a mouse lung of view from each slide representing a whole lung lobe with multiple lung metastases was selected

  18. The Role of single minded 2 short in mammary gland development and breast cancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Hyeong-il

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    are more susceptible to childhood leukemias and germ-line cancers, but are more than 50% less likely to develop solid tumors including cancers of the lung, colon, skin, head and neck (Boker et al., 2001; Hasle et al., 2000a; Hasle et al., 2000b; Hasle et... al., 2000c; Yang et al., 2002a) (Table 2). Even more striking is the observation that women with DS are 10-25 times less likely to develop breast cancer in comparison to age- matched normal populations (Benard et al., 2005; Hasle et al., 2000a...

  19. Bloggers as Citizen Journalists: The 2012 Pink Slime Incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pannone, Anthony

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and added to ground beef to make lean affordable beef blends. News reports questioning the safety and quality of LFTB began in March 2012. A qualitative content analysis was performed on 44 blogs that mentioned the pink slime incident between...

  20. Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Sara Shammni

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The sustainability and continued development of the chemical industry is to a large extent dependent on learning from past incidents. The failure to learn from past mistakes is rather not deliberate but due to unawareness ...

  1. ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

  2. Effects of a superoxide dismutase mimetic on biomarkers of lung angiogenesis and alveolarization during hyperoxia with intermittent hypoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Michael; Bany-Mohammed, Fayez; Kenney, M Cristina; Beharry, Kay D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dif- ferential responses in the lungs of newborn mouse pupsdismutase protein in the lungs of patients with respiratoryventilation exposes the lungs of ELGANs to oxidative stress

  3. Phenotypic Plasticity in the Lungs of Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at High Altitude and the Relationship With Aerobic Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirkey, Nicholas Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induced Mitogenic Factor in Lung With Vasoconstrictive andin growing dogs enhances lung diffusing capacity for oxygenJ. and Banchero, N. (1980). Lung morphometry in guinea pigs

  4. Conditional deletion of epithelial IKKbeta impairs alveolar formation through apoptosis and decreased VEGF expression during early mouse lung morphogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HL076538, V.L. ); American Lung Association of CA ResearchBL performed the lung morphometric and quantitativedouble transgenic animals and lung dissections. JX performed

  5. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Solbrig

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  6. Data-Driven Lung Nodule Models for Robust Nodule Detection in Chest CT Amal A. Farag, James Graham, Salwa Elshazly and Aly Farag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    States for men is 84.6 and 55.2 for women, while death rate for men is 69.4 and 40.6 for women [1 to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) of the United States, in 2005 alone 90139 men and 69078 women in the United States died of Lung cancer. During that same year 89271 women and 107416 men were diagnosed

  7. Characterization of Lung Tissues using Liquid-Crystal Tunable Filter and Hyperspectral Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won, Chang-Hee

    Characterization of Lung Tissues using Liquid-Crystal Tunable Filter and Hyperspectral Imaging to characterize lung tissue for detecting emphysematous tissues in lung volume reduction surgery. The system, the spectral signature of healthy lung tissue and simulated smokers lung tissue is obtained and compared

  8. Lung EIT: Should we reconstruct resistivity or conductivity? Bartlomiej Grychtol1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Lung EIT: Should we reconstruct resistivity or conductivity? Bartlomiej Grychtol1 , Andy Adler2 1.grychtol@dkfz.de MOTIVATION: In lung EIT, the quantity of interest is the change in regional air volume in the lungs. However. The model contains two non-conductive objects that represent the lungs. Assuming that lung resistivity

  9. Does socioeconomic disparity in cancer incidence vary across racial/ethnic groups?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Daixin; Morris, Cyllene; Allen, Mark; Cress, Rosemary; Bates, Janet; Liu, Lihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bauer KR, Brown M, Cress RD, Parise CA, Caggiano V (2007)M, Tsodikov A, Bauer KR, Parise CA, Caggiano V (2008) The

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA); Goulding, Frederick S. (Lafayette, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons Compton backscattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to monimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A System for Open-Access 3 He Human Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    A System for Open-Access 3 He Human Lung Imaging at Very Low Field I.C. RUSET,1 L.L. TSAI,2,3 R describe a prototype system built to allow open-access very-low-field MRI of human lungs using laser images of human lungs. We include discussion on challenges unique to imaging at 50­200 kHz, including

  13. Toward A Quantitative Understanding of Gas Exchange in the Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Yulin V

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a mathematical framework that quantifies the gas-exchange processes in the lung. The theory is based on the solution of the one-dimensional diffusion equation on a simplified model of lung septum. Gases dissolved into different compartments of the lung are all treated separately with physiologically important parameters. The model can be applied in magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized xenon for quantification of lung parameters such as surface-to-volume ratio and the air-blood barrier thickness. In general this model provides a description of a broad range of biological exchange processes that are driven by diffusion.

  14. Metabolomics in Lung Inflammation: A High Resolution H NMR Study...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exposed to Silica Dust . Abstract: First ¹H NMR metabolomics studies on excised lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) from mice exposed to crystalline silica are...

  15. abscessus lung disease: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in patient health by reducing ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) 1 . To protect against VILI, many novel modes Adler, Andy 31 Fibroblast growth factor 10 and...

  16. asthma lung function: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Junfeng Guo; Kalman Palagyi; Kenneth C. Beck; Geoffrey Mclennan 38 Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During Computer...

  17. Mechanism-based inhibition of cancer metastasis with (?)-epigallocatechin gallate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Atsushi [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan) [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Green Tea Laboratory, Saitama Prefectural Agriculture and Forestry Research Center, Saitama 358-0042 (Japan); Watanabe, Tatsuro; Mondal, Anupom; Suzuki, Kaori; Kurusu-Kanno, Miki [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan)] [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Li, Zhenghao; Yamazaki, Takashi [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan) [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Fujiki, Hirota [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan)] [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Suganuma, Masami, E-mail: masami@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan)] [Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan)

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •EGCG reduced cell motility of highly metastatic human lung cancer cells. •EGCG increased cell stiffness of the cells, indicating the inhibition of phenotypes of EMT. •EGCG inhibited expression of vimentin and Slug in the cells at the leading edge of scratch. •Treatment of M?CD increased cell stiffness, and inhibited cell motility and vimentin expression. •Inhibition of EMT phenotypes with EGCG is a mechanism-based inhibition of cancer metastasis. -- Abstract: Cell motility and cell stiffness are closely related to metastatic activity of cancer cells. (?)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has been shown to inhibit spontaneous metastasis of melanoma cell line into the lungs of mice, so we studied the effects of EGCG on cell motility, cell stiffness, and expression of vimentin and Slug, which are molecular phenotypes of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Treatments of human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines H1299 and Lu99 with 50 and 100 ?M EGCG reduced cell motility to 67.5% and 43.7% in H1299, and 71.7% and 31.5% in Lu99, respectively in in vitro wound healing assay. Studies on cell stiffness using atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that treatment with 50 ?M EGCG increased Young’s modulus of H1299 from 1.24 to 2.25 kPa and that of Lu99 from 1.29 to 2.28 kPa, showing a 2-fold increase in cell stiffness, i.e. rigid elasticity of cell membrane. Furthermore, treatment with 50 ?M EGCG inhibited high expression of vimentin and Slug in the cells at a leading edge of scratch. Methyl-?-cyclodextrin, a reagent to deplete cholesterol in plasma membrane, showed inhibition of EMT phenotypes similar that by EGCG, suggesting that EGCG induces inhibition of EMT phenotypes by alteration of membrane organization.

  18. Molecular cancer classification using an meta-sample-based regularized robust coding method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shu-Lin; Sun, Liuchao; Fang, Jianwen

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    (DLBCL) [28], Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) [29], GCM [30], Lung cancer (Lung) [31], and MLL [32]. The DLBCL dataset contains two subclasses, i.e., DLBCL and Follicular Lym- phoma (FL). The ALL dataset totally contains 248 samples that belong to six... SC, Relling MV, Patel A, Cheng C, Campana D, Wilkins D, Zhou X, Li J, Liu H, Pui CH, Evans WE, Naeve C, Wong L, Downing JR: Classification, subtype discovery, and prediction of outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia by gene expression...

  19. Bruce Walcheck: Role of neutrophils in acute lung injury, bacterial lung infection, and sepsis (cell based assays and in vivo studies in mice).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    Bruce Walcheck: Role of neutrophils in acute lung injury, bacterial lung infection, and sepsis, eosinophils, and macrophages in the ( ) oapplie lungs (cell based assays and in vivo studies in mice) Alice). Mike Murtaugh: Pathogenesis of lung inflammation during bacterial and viral pneumonia (cell based

  20. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliotta, Jason M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice andto 5.43% of cells within the lung are GFP CD45 , which weIn nonirradiated mice, homing to the lung was significantly

  1. THE KINETICS OF REVERSIBLE-SEQUESTRATION OF LEUKOCYTES BY THE ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT LUNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goliaei, Bahrain.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Granulocytes. , c. II. The Lung . . Material and Method . A.1954). "Role of Am. J. the Lungs in Regulation of the WhiteJ. R. ; eds. (1977). of the Lung. Marcel Dekker, Inc. , New

  2. Circulating fibrocytes traffic to the lungs in response to CXCL12 and mediate fibrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fibrocytes traffic to the lungs in response to CXCL12 andto CXCL12 and traffics to the lungs in a murine model of+ fibrocytes also traffic to the lungs in response to a

  3. Phenotypic Plasticity of the Lung Surfactant System at High Altitude in Deer Mice, Peromyscus maniculatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Sonia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfactant System. In The Lung: Development, Aging and theJr. and Martin, T. R. (1988). The lung at high altitude:Alveolar dimensions in the lungs of animals raised at high

  4. Laminin ?2 fragments are increased in the circulation of patients with early phase acute lung injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracellular matrix biology in the lung. Am J Physiol Lungstep in restoring the lung to its normal architecture [2,was inserted into the lungs. The bronchial micro-sampling

  5. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection in Mice Induces Chronic Lung Inflammation, iBALT Formation, and Fibrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lymphoid aggregates in the lungs To determine the kineticslocal host defence in the lung. The Journal of pathologyterm chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice

  6. Biomarkers of lung epithelial injury and inflammation distinguish severe sepsis patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as: Ware et al. : Biomarkers of lung epithelial injury andN, Ware LB: Biomarkers in acute lung injury–marking forwardMA, May AK, Ware LB: Acute lung injury in patients with

  7. Elevated PAI-1 is associated with poor clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with acute lung injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapru, Anil; Curley, Martha A.; Brady, Sandra; Matthay, Michael A.; Flori, Heidi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pediatric patients with acute lung injury Abstract Purpose:in part at the mark of acute lung injury (ALI). Society fordistress syndrome Á Acute lung injury Á Clinical studies Á

  8. The NOD/RIP2 Pathway Is Essential for Host Defenses Against Chlamydophila pneumoniae Lung Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production in Rip2 2/2 mice. Lung tissues of WT and Rip2 2/21610 6 IFU). After 5 days, lungs were collected and thebacterial counts in lung tissue homogenates were

  9. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliotta, Jason M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bone marrow production of lung cells: the impact of G-CSF,bone marrow to reconstitute lung epithelium. Am. J. Respirof Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells Mark S. Dooner 1 *,

  10. The ultrastructure of book lung development in the bark scorpion Centruroides gracilis (Scorpiones: Buthidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farley, Roger D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    channels of adult book lungs in scorpions and spiders [to the relationship of the lung-book of Scorpio to the gill-of scorpions. 5. The lungs. Q J Microsc Sci 1926, 70:135-

  11. Phenotypic Plasticity of the Lung Surfactant System at High Altitude in Deer Mice, Peromyscus maniculatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Sonia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    edema. Characteristics of lung lavage fluid. JAMA 256, 63-9.in cultured ATII cells and lung fibroblasts. Am J Physiolof oxygen effects on lung tissue. AMRL-TR-66-120. AMRL TR,

  12. Physiological and Computed Tomographic Predictors of Outcome from Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physiological and Computed Tomographic Predictors of Outcome from Lung Volume Reduction Surgery: Previous investigations have identified several potential predictors of outcomes from lung volume reduction: To identify objective radiographic and physiological indices of lung disease that have prognostic value

  13. Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis on High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis Care Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA Abstract. Regional assessment of lung disease specific to different lung regions on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) datasets. We present

  14. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Barrios, Roberto [Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, The Methodist Hospital Physician Organization, 6565 Fannin Street, Suite M227, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2?) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2? levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  15. CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells David Dingli and Martin A. Nowak Cancer cells are generally infectious agents and be transmitted between individuals. The current view of cancer development is that normal cells are transformed into tumour cells by sequential mutations that activate cancer- promoting

  16. The National Cancer Institute,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Cancer Institute, International Cancer Information Center Bldg. 82, Rm 123 Bethesda, MD 20892 The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the Federal Government. NCI coordinates the government's cancer research program. It is the largest of the 17 biomedical research institutes and centers

  17. CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, S. Murray

    CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER PROGRESS REPORT 2014 TRA NSFO RMING LIVES THRO UG H RE SE ARC H #12;CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER PROGRESS REPORT 2014 TRANSFORMING LIVES THROUGH RESEARCH #12;II AACR Cancer Progress Report 2014

  18. Cancer Statistics for Hispanics/Latinos, 2012 Rebecca Siegel, MPH1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    in the United States, accounting for 16.3% (50.5 million/310 million) of the US population in 2010 and 0.3% per year among women, while cancer death rates declined by 2.3% per year in men and 1.4% per year in women. Hispanics have lower incidence and death rates than non-Hispanic whites for all cancers

  19. 3D MRI of Non-Gaussian He Gas Diffusion in the Rat Lung. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results show that the non-Gaussian effects of ³He gas diffusion in healthy rat lungs are directly attributed to the anisotropic geometry of lung microstructure, and that...

  20. Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

  1. A Systematic Analysis of Epigenetic Genes across Different Stages of Lung Adenocarcinoma Akshay Desai1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    A Systematic Analysis of Epigenetic Genes across Different Stages of Lung Adenocarcinoma Akshay across different stages of lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD). Method: An integrative system biology approach

  2. Spatial and dose–response analysis of fibrotic lung changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevegeniy; Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is becoming the standard of care for early stage nonoperable lung cancers. Accurate dose–response modeling is challenging for SBRT because of the decreased number of clinical toxicity events. As a surrogate for a clinical toxicity endpoint, studies have proposed to use radiographic changes in follow up computed tomography (CT) scans to evaluate lung SBRT normal tissue effects. The purpose of the current study was to use local fibrotic lung regions to spatially and dosimetrically evaluate lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT.Methods: Forty seven SBRT patients treated at our institution from 2003 to 2009 were used for the current study. Our patient cohort had a total of 148 follow up CT scans ranging from 3 to 48 months post-therapy. Post-treatment scans were binned into intervals of 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after the completion of treatment. Deformable image registration was used to align the follow up CT scans with the pretreatment CT and dose distribution. Areas of visible fibrotic changes were contoured. The centroid of each gross tumor volume (GTV) and contoured fibrosis volume was calculated and the fibrosis volume location and movement (magnitude and direction) relative to the GTV and 30 Gy isodose centroid were analyzed. To perform a dose–response analysis, each voxel in the fibrosis volume was sorted into 10 Gy dose bins and the average CT number value for each dose bin was calculated. Dose–response curves were generated by plotting the CT number as a function of dose bin and time posttherapy.Results: Both fibrosis and GTV centroids were concentrated in the upper third of the lung. The average radial movement of fibrosis centroids relative to the GTV centroids was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm occurring in 11% of patients. Evaluating dose–response curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. The authors observed a CT number plateau at doses ranging from 30 to 50 Gy for the 3, 6, and 12 months posttherapy time points. There was no evident plateau for the dose–response curves generated using data from the 18, 24, 30, and 36 months posttherapy time points.Conclusions: Regions of local fibrotic lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT were evaluated spatially and dosimetrically. The authors found that the average fibrosis movement was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm possible. Evaluating dose–response curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. Furthermore, our dose–response data also suggest that one of the possible explanations of the CT number plateau effect may be the time posttherapy of the acquired data. Understanding normal tissue dose–response is important for reducing toxicity after SBRT, especially in cases where larger tumors are treated. The methods presented in the current work build on prior quantitative studies and further enhance the understanding of normal lung dose–response after SBRT.

  3. Lung tissue engineering : in vitro synthesis of lung tissue from neonatal and fetal rat lung cells cultured in a three-dimensional collagen matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Patty P., 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this study was to investigate the histology of tissue formed when fetal (16-20 days gestation) and neonatal (2 days old) rat lung cells were grown in a collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold. This project employed ...

  4. Correlation between Incident and Emission Polarization in Nanowire Surface Plasmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Correlation between Incident and Emission Polarization in Nanowire Surface Plasmon Waveguides Nanowire plasmons can be launched by illumination at one terminus of the nanowire and emission can waveguide, or as a polarization-rotating, nanoscale half-wave plate. The understanding of how plasmonic

  5. Violation of Laws, Losses, and Incidents of Security Concerns

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To set forth Department of Energy (DOE) procedures to assure timely and effective action relating to violations of criminal, laws, loses, and incidents of security concern to DOE. Cancels DOE O 5631.5. Canceled by DOE O 470.1 of 9-28-1995.

  6. Mapping incident photosynthetically active radiation from MODIS data over China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    of incident photosynthetically active radiation from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer data. Journal, nitrogen and energy in different natural systems. Since photosynthesis is the core process for energy as an input for modeling photosynthesis from single plant leaves to complex plant communities. For example

  7. A categorical model for traffic incident likelihood estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchangi, Shamanth

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis an incident prediction model is formulated and calibrated. The primary idea of the model developed is to correlate the expected number of crashes on any section of a freeway to a set of traffic stream characteristics, so that a...

  8. AT&TConsulting Incident Management Program Security Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    and best practices. The AT&T Incident Management Program service provides expert resources to assess overhaul. AT&T Consulting will create custom solutions that are practical, efficient and help address response to a proactive, preventative approach. Although new technology solutions, such as Intrusion

  9. Formal Analysis of Aviation Incidents Tibor Bosse1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosse, Tibor

    of the plane back despite stall warnings [10]. For the analysis of accidents and incidents in aviation, roughly two streams can be distinguished in the literature, namely accident analysis and risk analysis. Whilst purposes, a main difference is that accident analysis attempts to identify one specific combination

  10. Paul Workman Cancer Research UK Cancer Therapeutics Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Workman Cancer Research UK Cancer Therapeutics Unit Institute of Cancer Research/Royal Marsden Hospital Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG UK ian.collins@icr.ac.uk Drugging the cancer genome: The challenges therapeutic agents Personalised diagnosis and treatment Exploiting cancer biology and the cancer genome

  11. University of Bristol Incident & Crisis Management Framework Appendix L.2012 Appendix L Estates Incident Management Team: Roles & Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    ) Or the out of hours on call Maintenance Manager Manage shift resources and act as the first line technical the incident is over and water and power are restored ­ limiting the extent of re-commissioning so far Responsibilities / Actions Security Services Security Services staff as on duty Manage shift resources and act

  12. Studying Aviation Incidents by Agent-Based Simulation and Analysis A Case Study on a Runway Incursion Incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosse, Tibor

    in the analysis of accidents and incidents in aviation: even if detailed flight data from the `black box this approach mainly focuses on the analysis of existing accidents (also called accident analysis), the current paper also addresses analysis of potential future accidents (called risk analysis). This is done

  13. aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    explain the higher US survival rate. Aggressive treatment may also be a factor. 5. Colorectal cancer Risks--22000000 28 Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Col orectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal ca ncer Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Color ectal cancer

  14. Effect of Two Models of Intrauterine Growth Restriction on Alveolarization in Rat Lungs: Morphometric and Gene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of Two Models of Intrauterine Growth Restriction on Alveolarization in Rat Lungs L-NAME impairs lung development before alveolarization. Known growth factors involved in lung on Alveolarization in Rat Lungs: Morphometric and Gene Expression Analysis. PLoS ONE 8(11): e78326. doi:10

  15. Mesenchymal Nuclear factor I B regulates cell proliferation and epithelial differentiation during lung maturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gronostajski, Richard M.

    lung maturation Yu-Chih Hsu a , Jason Osinski a , Christine E. Campbell a , E. David Litwack b , Dan 2011 Accepted 6 April 2011 Available online 13 April 2011 Keywords: NFI-B Lung development Mesenchymal is expressed in both lung mesenchyme and epithelium and mice lacking Nfib have severe lung maturation defects

  16. Automatic Lung Nodule Detection from Chest CT Data Using Geometrical Features: Initial Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    Automatic Lung Nodule Detection from Chest CT Data Using Geometrical Features: Initial Results for automatic lung nodule detection from Chest CT data is proposed. The proposed system includes the methods of lung segmentation and nodule detection from CT data. The algorithm for lung segmentation consists

  17. Homogenization of a Multiscale Viscoelastic Model with Nonlocal Damping, Application to the Human Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lungs PAUL CAZEAUX, Laboratoire J.­L. Lions, UMR 7598, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 Place of the deformation of the human lung tissue, called the lung parenchyma, during the respiration process bronchi and enters the lungs. It is then distributed by the bronchial tree to the acini or alveolar

  18. He Lung Imaging in an Open Access, Very-Low-Field Human Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    3 He Lung Imaging in an Open Access, Very-Low-Field Human Magnetic Resonance Imaging System R. W. Butler,6 F. W. Hersman,4 and R. L. Walsworth1 The human lung and its functions are extremely sensitive lung restrict sub- jects to lying horizontally. Imaging of human lungs using inhaled laser-polarized 3

  19. Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage: Role of acoustic boundary conditions at the pleural surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage: Role of acoustic boundary conditions at the pleural surface intercostal tissue and lung was evaluated as a possible explanation for the enhanced lung damage the volume of air inspired and expired. The acoustic impedance difference between intercostal tissue and lung

  20. Impedance measurements of ex vivo rat lung at different volumes of inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Impedance measurements of ex vivo rat lung at different volumes of inflation Michael L. Oelze that the occurrence of ultrasonically induced lung hemorrhage in rats was directly correlated to the level of lung inflation. In that study, it was hypothesized that the lung could be modeled as two components consisting

  1. Elastin protein levels are a vital modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility to emphysema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Robert

    Elastin protein levels are a vital modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility to emphysema. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol-induced emphysema is highly variable, and numerous genetic and environmental factors are thought to mitigate lung

  2. NEURAL PCA NETWORK FOR LUNG OUTLINE RECONSTRUCTION IN VQ SCAN IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serpen, Gursel

    NEURAL PCA NETWORK FOR LUNG OUTLINE RECONSTRUCTION IN VQ SCAN IMAGES G. Serpen1 , Ph. D., R. Iyer1 system takes the digitized ventilation-perfusion scan images of lungs as input, identify a template according to the size and shape of the lungs and thereby approximate and reconstruct the outline of the lung

  3. Evaluation of a Pumping Assist Lung That Uses a Rotating Fiber Bundle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Evaluation of a Pumping Assist Lung That Uses a Rotating Fiber Bundle ROBERT G. SVITEK,* BRIAN J. FRANKOWSKI,* AND WILLIAM J. FEDERSPIEL,*§ A paracorporeal respiratory assist lung (PRAL) is being devel- oped for supplemental gas exchange to allow the native lungs of acute lung failure patients to heal. The device consists

  4. Synthetic Lung Tumor Data Sets for Comparison of Volumetric Algorithms1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Javier

    Synthetic Lung Tumor Data Sets for Comparison of Volumetric Algorithms1 Adele P. Peskin of synthetic lung tumor data in which synthetic tumors of known volume are embedded in clinical lung computerized tomographic (CT) data in different background settings in the lung. Because the change

  5. Automated Lung Nodule Segmentation Using Dynamic Programming and EM Based Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahuja, Narendra

    Automated Lung Nodule Segmentation Using Dynamic Programming and EM Based Classification Ning Xua a robust and automated algorithm to segment lung nodules in three dimensional (3D) Computed Tomography (CT nodules but also the nodules attached to lung walls and vessels. Keywords: Lung nodule, Segmentation

  6. Single-Session Radiofrequency Ablation of Bilateral Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: palussiere@bergonie.org; Gomez, Fernando; Cannella, Matthieu; Ferron, Stephane; Descat, Edouard [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology, Regional Cancer Centre (France); Fonck, Marianne [Institut Bergonie, Department of Digestive Oncology (France); Brouste, Veronique [Institut Bergonie, Clinical and Epidemiological Research Unit (France); Avril, Antoine [Institut Bergonie, Department of Surgery (France)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This retrospective study examined the feasibility and efficacy of bilateral lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) performed in a single session. Methods: From 2002-2009, patients with bilateral lung metastases were treated by RFA, where possible in a single session under general anesthesia with CT guidance. The second lung was punctured only if no complications occurred after treatment of the first lung. Five lung metastases maximum per patient were treated by RFA and prospectively followed. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of acute and delayed complications. Secondary endpoints were calculation of hospitalization duration, local efficacy, median survival, and median time to tumor progression. Local efficacy was evaluated on CT or positron emission tomography (PET) CT. Results: Sixty-seven patients were treated for bilateral lung metastases with RFA (mean age, 62 years). Single-session treatment was not possible in 40 due to severe pneumothoraces (n = 24), bilateral pleural contact (n = 14), and operational exclusions (n = 2). Twenty-seven (41%) received single-session RFA of lesions in both lungs for 66 metastases overall. Fourteen unilateral and four bilateral pneumothoraces occurred (18 overall, 66.7%). Unilateral (n = 13) and bilateral (n = 2) chest tube drainage was required. Median hospitalization was 3 (range, 2-8) days. Median survival was 26 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 19-33). Four recurrences on RFA sites were observed (4 patients). Median time to tumor progression was 9.5 months (95% CI, 4.2-23.5). Conclusions: Although performing single-session bilateral lung RFA is not always possible due to pneumothoraces after RFA of first lung, when it is performed, this technique is safe and effective.

  7. Cancer Research Beckman Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Cancer Research Beckman Institute FOR ADVANCED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY #12;T The medical and scientific worlds have known for many years that in order to truly understand and treat cancer, the fight has and cancerous tumors have to first be visualized at the smallest scales possible, and then treated in the most

  8. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from all four radiologists. These 2669 lesions include nodule outlines and subjective nodule characteristic ratings. Conclusions: The LIDC/IDRI Database is expected to provide an essential medical imaging research resource to spur CAD development, validation, and dissemination in clinical practice.

  9. Incident Energy Dependence of pt Correlations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar,A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de laBarca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi,R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak,Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti,M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez,J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes,E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov,E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, ({Delta}p{sub t,i}{Delta}p{sub t,j}), as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, jet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  10. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamada, Tomomi [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Translational Medicine (Japan); Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  11. Analysis of Assembly Bill 1000: Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of recurrent cancers, and treatment of cancers that cannotNeill VJ, Twelves CJ. Oral cancer treatment: Developments inchanging paradigm in cancer treatment: Oral chemotherapy.

  12. Analysis of Senate Bill 961: Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of recurrent cancers, and treatment of cancers that cannotNeill VJ, Twelves CJ. Oral cancer treatment: Developments inchanging paradigm in cancer treatment: Oral chemotherapy.

  13. Lymphatic and Angiogenic Candidate Genes Predict the Development of Secondary Lymphedema following Breast Cancer Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    following breast cancer treatment. Cancer Epidemiollymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Cancer Epidemiolfollowing breast cancer treatment. Clin Cancer Res 18: 232–

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 19, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 917 lung collapse and gas insufflation). To determine the effects of lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcomb, Louis L.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 19, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 917 lung collapse and gas insufflation). To determine the effects of lung collapse and insufflation, this port site

  15. Functional lung imaging in humans using Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layfield, Dominick, 1971-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis deals with a method of functional lung imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this technique, a radioactive tracer, nitrogen-13, is dissolved in saline solution, and injected into a peripheral ...

  16. Role of myeloid Hif-1? in acute lung injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDuff, Andrew

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Acute Lung Injury, characterised clinically as the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome is a catastrophic response to a range of pulmonary and non-pulmonary insults. Despite much work the key mechanisms involved in generating the exaggerated immune...

  17. a549 human lung: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human (more) Weems, Jessica Marie 2010-01-01 26 KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG Physics Websites Summary: to the epidemiologically derived value...

  18. aerosol lung inhalation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2...

  19. Classification of skin abnormalties using oblique incident diffuse reflectance spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Uribe, Alejandro

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benign from cancerous abnormalities. Genetic Algorithm was used to obtain the most effective set of image features for each classifier. A total of 584 images from 65 cases, 23 cases in group-1 and 42 cases in group-2, were used to train the classifiers. A...

  20. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    short-lived radon progeny are the main contributor to the radiation dose derived from our natural- tion with lung cancer incidence (e.g., Pavia et al., 2003). Radon risks (from radon progeny) can

  1. A statistical analysis of lead concentrations in human lung samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringer, Claude Allen

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF LEAD CONCENTRATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG SAMPLES A Thesis by CLAUDE ALLEN STRINGER, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Chemistry A STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF LEAD CONCENTRATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG SAMPLES A Thesis CLAUDE ALLEN STRINGER, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi e) (Head of Department) C Member (Memb...

  2. Combustion-derived flame generated ultrafine soot generates reactive oxygen species and activates Nrf2 antioxidants differently in neonatal and adult rat lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neonatal and adult rat lungs. Particle and Fibre Toxicologysensitivity of the postnatal lung to environmental insultsdevelopment of the human lung. Prog Clin Biol Res 1983, 140:

  3. Stat 301 Lab 7: Due October 27 Fall 2014 1. For many children with asthma, or other lung problems, measurement of lung function is an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carriquiry, Alicia

    1 Stat 301 Lab 7: Due October 27 Fall 2014 1. For many children with asthma, or other lung problems, measurement of lung function is an important part of staying healthy. Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV) is the volume of air that can be forcibly expelled from the lungs after full inspiration. A random sample of 100

  4. 60. LUNG .13 NORMAL VARIANT .31 BENIGN NEOPI,J.SM, CYST, 6l. RIGHT .131 NORMAL VARIANT, OTHER NEOPLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [ ~;{(, (1) Lungs 60. LUNG .13 NORMAL VARIANT .31 BENIGN NEOPI,J.SM, CYST, 6l. RIGHT .131 IN LUNG BRONCHI .221 SARCOIDOSIS, 672. SUPERIOR ADENOPATHY MEDIASTINUN .222 SARCOIDOSIS, 673 68. MORE THAN 1 LUNG PLRA, MEDIAST. , LOCATION (GNRLIZED) 69. OTHER-(LUNG, PLRA, MEDIAST

  5. Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools for the analysis of incident and accident reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools for the analysis of incident and accident reports, Analysis of accidents/incidents, Categorization, Textual similarity INTRODUCTION Learning valuable lessons, (ii) the analysis of reports regardless of the categorization in order to expand the analysis

  6. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  7. Do You Plan to Have Children? The Incidence of Potentially Illegal Questions during Resident Interviews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hern, Jr., H. Gene; Alter, Harrison J.; Wills, Charlotte P.; Snoey, Eric R.; Simon, Barry C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incidence of Potentially Illegal Questions During Residentor sexual preferences are potentially illegal. Littlethe prevalence of potentially illegal questions based on

  8. ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 FederalTransformers1Thomas LiuYashema MackIncident

  9. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  10. Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lucy L.

    Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the relation of health behaviors and psy- chosocial factors to the incidence of type 2 diabetes are not well established. Methods: Prospective occupational cohort study

  11. SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goksel, E; Cone, D; Kucucuk, H; Senkesen, O; Yilmaz, M; Aslay, I [Acibadem Kozyatgi Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Tezcanli, E; Garipagaoglu, M; Sengoz, M [Acibadem University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (42–86) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.4–70 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (26–86%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted.

  12. Cancer Due to Prolonged Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Werb J. Inflammation and cancer. Nature. 2002 December 19;J.T. , Szabo E. , et al. Cancer and inflammation: PromiseInflammation, a Key Event in Cancer Development. Molecular

  13. Bismuth 213 Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    See how INL scientists are increasing supplies of radioactive medical isotopes to treat cancer. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (*8,500of the two CARs on the lung transcriptome were further50 genes detected in the lungs of CS-exposed mice. These

  15. Phenotypic Plasticity in the Lungs of Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at High Altitude and the Relationship With Aerobic Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirkey, Nicholas Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    altitude exposure on the lungs of young rats. RespirationDiffusing capacity of the lung in Caucasians native to 3,100of the ultrastructure of the lungs of wild mice living at

  16. Integrated analysis of microRNA expression and mRNA transcriptome in lungs of avian influenza virus infected broilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expressed miRNAs in chicken lung and trachea with avianagainst Ventilator-induced Lung Injury. Am J Resp Crit Careand mRNA transcriptome in lungs of avian influenza virus

  17. Keratinocyte growth factor in acute lung injury to reduce pulmonary dysfunction ¿ a randomised placebo-controlled trial (KARE): study protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Laurence JM; O’Kane, Cecilia M; McDowell, Cliona; Elborn, Jospeh J; Matthay, Michael A; McAuley, Daniel F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    growth factor in acute lung injury to reduce pulmonaryV, Matthay MA: Acid-induced lung injury. Protective effectof patients with acute lung injury and the acute respiratory

  18. Figure 6: An MTAH for 11 lung tumor contours generated by MDISC based on area, circularity, and extrusiveness.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Figure 6: An MTAH for 11 lung tumor contours generated by M­DISC based on area, circularity, and extrusiveness. Figure 7: The CT scanned lung image for image 6 (in Figure 3) with the lung tumor contour

  19. Primary cystic lung light chain deposition disease: a clinicopathologic entity derived from unmutated B cells with a stereotyped IGHV4-34/IGKV1 receptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Primary cystic lung light chain deposition disease: a clinicopathologic entity derived from deposition disease (LCDD) presenting as a severe cystic lung disorder requiring lung transplantation lung transplantation and of serum free light chain ratio normalization after the procedure, we

  20. SU-E-J-185: Gated CBCT Imaging for Positioning Moving Lung Tumor in Lung SBRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X; Li, T; Zhang, Y; Burton, S; Karlovits, B; Clump, D; Heron, D; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Lung stereo-tactic body radiotherapy(SBRT) treatment requires high accuracy of lung tumor positioning during treatment, which is usually accomplished by free breathing Cone-Beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scan. However, respiratory motion induced image artifacts in free breathing CBCT may degrade such positioning accuracy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of gated CBCT imaging for lung SBRT treatment. Methods: Six Lung SBRT patients were selected for this study. The respiratory motion of the tumors ranged from 1.2cm to 3.5cm, and the gating windows for all patients were set between 35% and 65% of the respiratory phases. Each Lung SBRT patient underwent free-breathing CBCT scan using half-fan scan technique. The acquired projection images were transferred out for off-line analyses. An In-house semi-automatic algorithm was developed to trace the diaphragm movement from those projection images to acquire a patient's specific respiratory motion curve, which was used to correlate respiratory phases with each projection image. Afterwards, a filtered back-projection algorithm was utilized to reconstruct the gated CBCT images based on the projection images only within the gating window. Results: Target volumes determined by free breathing CBCT images were 71.9%±72% bigger than the volume shown in gated CBCT image. On the contrary, the target volume differences between gated CBCT and planning CT images at exhale stage were 5.8%±2.4%. The center to center distance of the targets shown in free breathing CBCT and gated CBCT images were 9.2±8.1mm. For one particular case, the superior boundary of the target was shifted 15mm between free breathing CBCT and gated CBCT. Conclusion: Gated CBCT imaging provides better representation of the moving lung tumor with less motion artifacts, and has the potential to improve the positioning accuracy in lung SBRT treatment.