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Sample records for luba-lulua luiseno lule

  1. Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians would like to begin to focus on renewable sources for electricity and to actively target lowering the energy usage of the community.

  2. Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    N. Marengo Avenue, Suite 362 Pasadena, CA 91101 May 6 th , 2015 Soboba History  Tribal members of Cahuilla and Luiseno Ancestry  Recognized as established Indian community since 1815  Formally organized in 1883 by executive order of President Chester Arthur Soboba History  Tribe consisting of 1200 members  7000 acres of land  400 acres of residential developments Economic Development  Resource Planning  Environmental Assessment & Planning  Economic & Real

  3. Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    North Marengo Ave., Suite 362 Pasadena, CA 91101 February 11 th , 2016 Soboba History Soboba History  Tribe consisting of 1200 members  Tribal members of Cahuilla and Luiseno Ancestry  7000 acres of land Soboba History Soboba Today Soboba Today Soboba Today Soboba Today Soboba Today Soboba Today Soboba Today Soboba Today OPTIMUM GROUP Optimum Group LLC 215 North Marengo Ave., Suite 362 Pasadena, CA 91101 February 11 th , 2015 Economic Development  Resource Planning  Environmental

  4. Project Reports for Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians would like to begin to focus on renewable sources for electricity and to actively target lowering the energy usage of the community.

  5. Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians - Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal Energy Program Review Denver, CO November, 2 012 By: Erica Helms---Schenk, Environmental Director Soboba Energy Efficiency and ConservaKon Project Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians Our Champions - Who is Involved? Gerald Wilson Soboba Tribal Environmental & Brian McDonald - Department our SCE RepresentaKves Soboba Tribal Council IT --- Steven Nino Public Works - Ken McLaughlin and Summer Willis Project Goals and ObjecKves

  6. Caldwell County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Caldwell County, Texas Lockhart, Texas Luling, Texas Martindale, Texas Mustang Ridge, Texas Niederwald, Texas San Marcos, Texas Uhland, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Final Report for the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Kim

    2013-09-17

    In 2011 the Tribe was awarded funds from the Department of Energy to formulate the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan. This will be a guiding document used throughout the planning of projects focused on energy reduction on the Reservation. The Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan's goal is to create a Five Year Energy Plan for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians in San Jacinto, California. This plan will guide the decision making process towards consistent progress leading to the Tribal goal of a 25% reduction in energy consumption in the next five years. It will additionally outline energy usage/patterns and will edentify areas the Tribe can decrease energy use and increase efficiency. The report documents activities undertaken under the grant, as well as incldues the Tribe's strategif energy plan.

  8. Integration of geothermal data along the Balcones/Ouachita trend, central Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, C.M. Jr.; Gever, C.; Snyder, Fred R.; Wuerch, David Robert

    1983-01-01

    This report presents data that address possible controls on warm-water resources. Data are presented on a series of maps, and interpretations appear in the brief text accompanying the maps. It is thought that structural controls provided by the Balcones Fault Zone on the west and by the Luling-Mexia-Talco Fault Zone on the east localize the warm waters. The ultimate controlling attribute is the foundered Ouachita structural belt, which, in turn, has controlled the orientation and magnitude of displacement of the superjacent normal fault systems. This thesis is supported by maps (in pocket) showing the following: distribution of thermal waters measured in wells along the Balcones/Ouachita structural trend showing water temperature in /sup 0/F, total depth of the well measured, water salinity in parts per million, and the geologic formation producing the water; structural contours on the base of the Cretaceous System showing the configuration of the Paleozoic Ouachita basement; structural configuration of the Balcones and Luling Fault Zone, Mexia and Talco Fault Zone, and foreland areas adjacent to the Ouachita Orogen using data from the Buda Limestone, Sligo Formation, and Ellenburger Group; Landsat lineaments and Bouguer gravity contours; and geothermal gradient contours of the Balcones/Ouachita trend based on thermal values from Paleozoic and selected Mesozoic formations.

  9. Deep structure of the Texas Gulf passive margin and its Ouachita-Precambrian basement: Results of the COCORP San Marcos arch survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culotta, R.; Latham, T.; Oliver, J.; Brown, L.; Kaufman, S. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Sydow, M. (Pennzoil, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-02-01

    This COCORP deep seismic survey provides a comprehensive image of the southeast-Texas part of the Gulf passive margin and its accreted Ouachita arc foundation. Beneath the updip limit of the Cenozoic sediment wedge, a prominent antiformal structure is imaged within the interior zone of the buried late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen. The structure appears to involve Precambrian Grenville basement. The crest of the antiform is coincident with the Cretaceous-Tertiary Luling-Mexia-Talco fault zone. Some of these faults dip to the northwest, counter to the general regional pattern of down-to-the-basin faulting, and appear to sole into the top of the antiform, suggesting that the Ouachita structure has been reactivated as a hingeline to the subsiding passive margin. The antiform may be tied via this fault system and the Ouachita gravity gradient to the similar Devils River, Waco, and Benton uplifts, interpreted as Precambrian basement-cored massifs. Above the Paleozoic sequence, a possible rift-related graben is imaged near the updip limit of Jurassic salt. Paleoshelf edges of the major Tertiary depositional sequences are marked by expanded sections disrupted by growth faults and shale diapirs. Within the Wilcox Formation, the transect crosses the mouth of the 900-m-deep Yoakum Canyon, a principal pathway of sediment delivery from the Laramide belt to the Gulf. Beneath the Wilcox, the Comanchean (Lower Cretaceous) shelf edge, capped by the Stuart City reef, is imaged as a pronounced topographic break onlapped by several moundy sediment packages. Because this segment of the line parallels strike, the topographic break may be interpreted as a 2,000-m-deep embayment in the Cretaceous shelf-edge, and possibly a major submarine canyon older and deeper than the Yoakum Canyon.