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Sample records for lsc floorplan lsc

  1. LSC Users Manual David W. Ignat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the computer program LSC was funded by the United States Department of Energy, Oce of Fusion Energy, under Usage 18 3.1 Preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.2 Description

  2. LSC Users Manual David W. Ignat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the computer program LSC was funded by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, under Usage 18 3.1 Preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.2 Description

  3. Linear Vlasov solver for microbunching gain estimation with inclusion of CSR, LSC and linac geometric impedances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Chris

    2015-01-01

    As is known, microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in designs of magnetic chicanes for short-wavelength free-electron lasers or linear colliders, as well as those of transport lines for recirculating or energy recovery linac machines. To more accurately quantify MBI in a single-pass system and for more complete analyses, we further extend and continue to increase the capabilities of our previously developed linear Vlasov solver [1] to incorporate more relevant impedance models into the code, including transient and steady-state free-space and/or shielding coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) impedances, the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances, and the linac geometric impedances with extension of the existing formulation to include beam acceleration [2]. Then, we directly solve the linearized Vlasov equation numerically for microbunching gain amplification factor. In this study we apply this code to a beamline lattice of transport arc [3] following an upstream linac...

  4. United States Geological Survey, LSC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. SAMPLE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY DOUBLE MAJOR (LSC requirements not included)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashline, George

    ED 251 Child Development PS 214 Statistics & Research Methods I PS 200-level ED 335 Literacy in Elem. Classroom PS 216 Statistics & Research Methods II PS 200-level Pass Praxis I Junior Fall Spring courses) ED 429 Senior Seminar For more specific information about Psychology course options and program

  6. HOW GOOD ARE SLICING FLOORPLANS? F. Y. Young and D.F. Wong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Evangeline Fun Yu

    with flexibility in shape, we show that there exists a slicing floorplan F such that area(F) 5 min{(l + & ), 2, (1 + cr)}Atotoz where Atotal is the total area of all the modules, A,,, is the maximum module area, (Y= J floorplans. As a re- sult, slicing floorplans are used in many existing floorplan- ning systems [4, 3, 6, 51

  7. Net Balanced Floorplanning Based on Elastic Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    Net Balanced Floorplanning Based on Elastic Energy Model Wei Liu and Alberto Nannarelli Dept variations can introduce extra signal skew, it is desirable to have floorplans with balanced net delays based on the elastic energy model. The B*-tree, which is based on an ordered binary tree, is used

  8. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House...

  9. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and Green Extreme Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and Green Extreme Homes DOE...

  10. Thermal Signature: A Simple Yet Accurate Thermal Index for Floorplan Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    Thermal Signature: A Simple Yet Accurate Thermal Index for Floorplan Optimization ABSTRACT evaluation should be done extremely fast with high accuracy. A new thermal index, named thermal signature's function and power density in- tegrated over space. The correlation coefficient between thermal signature

  11. Bus-Aware Microarchitectural Floorplanning Dae Hyun Kim Sung Kyu Lim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Sung Kyu

    and long, thereby consuming significant area, delay, and power. In our architecture, we have 51 buses on other important floorplanning objectives including area, performance, power, and thermal. We developed on area, performance, and power objectives under thermal constraint. I. INTRODUCTION Microarchitectural

  12. Facility Floorplan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergy Technologies | Blandinenewsand Privacy

  13. Lake Survey DETROIT, MICH.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · Lake Survey Center DETROIT, MICH. NOAA TM NOS LSC 06 NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS LSC 06 U. S Winter 1971_72 R. A. Ass.,i Lake Survey Center National Ocean Survey, NOAA Detroit, Michigan I ABSTRACT

  14. Chromium (III), Titanium (III), and Vanadium (IV) sensitization of rare earth complexes for luminescent solar concentrator applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Nicholas John

    2011-01-01

    High optical concentrations without excess heating in a stationary system can be achieved with a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Neodymium (Nd) and ytterbium (Yb) are excellent infrared LSC materials: inexpensive, ...

  15. Methods for measurement of heterogeneous materials with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effenberger, Andrew Jay

    2009-01-01

    pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy ICCD – intensified charge-coupled device LSC – laser-supported combustion

  16. Engineering Exploration Day Saturday, February 13, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Engineering Exploration Day Saturday, February 13, 2010 Fort Collins, Colorado #12;2 EXPLORATION Engineering, Dr. Ken Reardon LSC Room 224-226 Electrical & Computer Engineering, Karen Ungerer LSC Room 228 Environmental Engineering, Dr. Sybil Sharvelle LSC Room 230 Mechanical Engineering, Dr. Patrick Fitzhorn

  17. Hadronic production of thermal photons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turbide, S.; Rapp, Ralf; Gale, C.

    2004-01-01

    )]. ................................................................................ 11? Figure 2-5. Internal Strain Gage Locations on Transverse Reinforcement, Concrete Core, and Concrete Cover [taken from Alberson (2009)]. .......................... 12? Figure 2-6. Brass Insert with Tip Installed in the Surface of the LSC [taken...-7. Transverse and Longitudinal Strain Locations on the LSC Specimens? Small Face 1 and Large Face 1 during the Initial Orientation. .................... 26? Figure 3-8. Transverse Surface Strains on the LSC Specimens? Small Face 1 and Large Face 1...

  18. Efficiency enhancement of luminescent solar concentrations for photovoltaic technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunhua

    2011-01-01

    for generating low-cost solar power, LSC development facesand lowering the cost, luminescent solar concentrations (cells. Using solar concentrators, the cost of solar energy

  19. Chemical Heterogeneities on La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-Thin FilmsCorrelations to Cathode Surface Activity and Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    Interfaces, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77. reported pulsed laser deposited (PLD) LSC thin film cathodes on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ

  20. Analysis of a small sample geometry for concurrent identification and quantification of mixed-nuclide samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krieger, Kenneth Vincent

    1999-01-01

    sample, each emitting a different type of radiation. High purity germanium detectors (HPGe) and liquid scintillation counters (LSC) can be used to quantify activities of several known sources. This can be done without buying more or expensive equipment...

  1. Sterically Engineered Perylene Dyes for High Efficiency Oriented Fluorophore Luminescent Solar Concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, David L.

    Sterically Engineered Perylene Dyes for High Efficiency Oriented Fluorophore Luminescent Solar Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) collect and concentrate sunlight for use in solar power generation.1 or interior lighting, increasing the combined-cycle efficiency. Accordingly, LSC performance is expressed

  2. UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Purpose UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN College of Engineering Local Safety Committee College of Engineering Administrative Committee The Local Safety Committee (LSC) is established to review and address health and safety concerns in the College of Engineering. The committee is one component

  3. The role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer in luminescent solar concentrator efficiency and color tunability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaban, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    design," Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells Vol. 111,Solar Energy for the Built Environment," Advanced Energy Materials,energy transfer (FRET) is demonstrated in a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) material

  4. Dye-doped polymer nanoparticles for flexible, bulk luminescent solar concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Ron, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Bulk luminescent solar concentrators (LSC) cannot make use of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) due to necessarily low dye concentrations. In this thesis, we attempt to present a poly-vinylalcohol (PVA) waveguide ...

  5. Applications of non-imaging micro-optic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Katherine Anne

    2012-01-01

    LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AR CPV CSP DEP F F/# ITO LSC Nm PMSCadapt the solar concentrator for CSP using (a) two parabolicfor concentrated solar power (CSP), also known as solar

  6. Simulation of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier for broadband radiation production using a superconducting linac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halavanau, A

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as harmful in free-electron lasers as they can seed unfavorable energy modulations that can result in density modulations with associated emittance dilution. It was pointed out, however, that such "micro-bunching instabilities'' could be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of controlling LSC induced density modulations. In the present paper we augment these previous investigations by combining a grid-less space charge algorithm with the popular particle-tracking program {\\sc elegant}. This high-fidelity model of the space charge is used to benchmark conventional LSC models. We finally employ the developed model to optimize the performance of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier using beam parameters comparable to the ones achievable at Fermilab Accelerator Science \\& Technology (FAST) facility current...

  7. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bornstein, Jonathan G. (Miami, FL); Friedman, Peter S. (Toledo, OH)

    1985-01-01

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  8. FABSYN: Floorplan-aware bus architecture synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasricha, S; Dutt, N D; Bozorgzadeh, E; Ben-Romdhane, M

    2006-01-01

    on-chip communication architectures,” in Proc. CODES-ISSS,application-speci?c architectures for heterogeneous multi-the SoC communication architecture design space,” in Proc.

  9. Greenhouse Policies and Procedures Dept. of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    Greenhouse Policies and Procedures Dept. of Biology Syracuse University Implemented 1 March 2012 Greenhouse manager: Paul Logue Greenhouse Committee: David Althoff, Heather Coleman, Jason Fridley, Paul Logue #12;2 Facilities The state of the art greenhouse on the 5th floor of LSC has ten independently

  10. Complete plastome sequences of Equisetum arvense and Isoetes flaccida: implications for phylogeny and plastid genome evolution of early land plant lineages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    psbF psbK psbT b petB* b, e petN b atpB atpI b atpE atpF*UUG, and translocation of petN from the LSC to the SSC [35].

  11. Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic continuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic procedure to be a very significant enhancement of the LSC-IVR for correlation functions of both linear method is used to extend the range of accuracy of the linearized semiclassical initial value

  12. The Generic Graph Component Library Dr. Dobb's Journal September 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    by Jeremy G. Siek and Andrew Lumsdaine). The most important aspect of designing the library was to defineThe Generic Graph Component Library Dr. Dobb's Journal September 2000 Generic programming for graph.nd.edu, and lumsg@lsc.nd.edu, respectively. The Standard Template Library has established a solid foundation

  13. DRAFT LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER March, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    DRAFT LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER March, 2014 Function The Laser Safety Committee (LSC and advice to the LBNL Laser Safety Officer (LSO) on policies and practices regarding the safe conduct and regulatory compliance of laser-related work at LBNL. The goal of the Committee is to assure effective

  14. Tensile Lattice Strain Accelerates Oxygen Surface Exchange and Diffusion in La[subscript 1-x]Sr[subscript x]CoO[subscript 3-?] Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kubicek, Markus

    The influence of lattice strain on the oxygen exchange kinetics and diffusion in oxides was investigated on (100) epitaxial La[subscript 1–x]Sr[subscript x]CoO[subscript 3??] (LSC) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. ...

  15. Advances in Micro-Scale Laser Peening Technology Y. Lawrence Yao, Wenwu Zhang, and Hongqiang Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    . In modeling improvements, plasma expansion is modeled as laser supported combustion wave, in which radial laser supported combustion (LSC) wave [3]. The 1D results are then modified to consider spatial by an intense (>1GW/cm2 ) laser pulse, the surface layer instantane- ously vaporizes into a high temperature

  16. Nov. 21, 1999 Neutron Irradiation Tests of an S-LINK-over-G-link System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nov. 21, 1999 Neutron Irradiation Tests of an S-LINK-over-G-link System K. Anderson, J. Pilcher, H and was carefully monitored. 2. Neutron Source Characteristics The test was performed at the National Institute, MD 1. Objective This note describes neutron irradiation tests of an S-LINK [1] source card (LSC

  17. Verifying a Virtual Component Interface-based PCI Bus Wrapper Using an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying a Virtual Component Interface-based PCI Bus Wrapper Using an LSC-Based Specification Peripheral Component Interface (PCI) transaction as the VSIA expected integrators to use the VCI standard safety properties. We then specify both the VCI protocol and the PCI protocol using Live Sequence Charts

  18. Plant, Cell and Environment {^992) 15, 471-477 Hydraulic architecture of sugarcane in relation to patterns of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    transpiration were also measured in intact plants as a function of plant size. Leaf specific hydraulic surface area; E, transpiration per unit leaf area; L, hydraulic conductance; Lsc. leaf specific as the hydraulic conductance (L) per unit segment length L = q/{AP/Ax) (1) where q is the rate of water flow

  19. Trade-off Analysis of Regenerative Power Source for Long Duration Loitering Airship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by their excessive drag. Flat solar technologies (i.e. thin film, LSC, and flat panel PV) are ranked the highest power to satisfy these requirements. Analysis includes the following solar power technologies is needed for the airship. The technology considered in this paper is solar power. The system must generate

  20. ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "Considerations for Curriculum Planning and Revitalization in Engineering" by Prof. Michael A. de Miranda School of Education and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Colorado State University Monday, Feb. 20, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Location: LSC 210 Abstract

  1. Stochastic 3D Modeling of La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-Cathodes Based on Structural Segmentation of FIB-SEM Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Volker

    Graph, SOFC, Sphere Representation, Watershed Transformation 1. Introduction In this paper the microstructure of La0.6Sr0.4CoO3- (LSC) cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is investigated. For classical SOFC electrodes (e.g. Ni- YSZ anodes or LSM-YSZ cathodes) microstructure effects are widely discussed

  2. Cathode side hardware for carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Gengfu (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

    2011-03-29

    Carbonate fuel cathode side hardware having a thin coating of a conductive ceramic formed from one of LSC (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2CoO.sub.3) and lithiated NiO (Li.sub.xNiO, where x is 0.1 to 1).

  3. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Hickory Drive by Glastonbury Housesmith |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  4. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes onandField

  5. Performance of La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 coated NiO as cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Performance of La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 coated NiO as cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells Prabhu Ganesan.2CoO3; Nickel oxide 1. Introduction The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is a promising power current density of 160 mA/cm2 . The LSC­NiO shows promise as an alternate cathode in molten carbonate fuel

  6. Effect of tilting on turbulent convection: Cylindrical samples with aspect ratio $\\Gamma=0.50$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We report measurements of properties of turbulent thermal convection of a fluid with a Prandtl number $\\Pra=4.38$ in a cylindrical cell with an aspect ratio $\\Gamma=0.50$. The rotational symmetry was broken by a small tilt of the sample axis relative to gravity. Measurements of the heat transport (as expressed by the Nusselt number \\Nu), as well as of large-scale-circulation (LSC) properties by means of temperature measurements along the sidewall, are presented. In contradistinction to similar experiments using containers of aspect ratio $\\Gamma=1.00$ \\cite[]{ABN06} and $\\Gamma=0.50$ \\cite[]{CRCC04,SXX05,RGKS10}, we see a very small increase of the heat transport for tilt angles up to about 0.1 rad. Based on measurements of properties of the LSC we explain this increase by a stabilization of the single-roll state (SRS) of the LSC and a de-stabilization of the double-roll state (DRS) (it is known from previous work that the SRS has a slightly larger heat transport than the DRS). Further, we present quantitativ...

  7. Development of an expert system for generating optimum floorplans for VLSI circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Ketan R

    1987-01-01

    in the implementation of my system is also discussed. A. CURRENT VLSI DESIGN SYSTEMS The Hughes Automated Layout System The Hughes Automated Layout System (HAL) is an example of an in-house, custom built system for the specific needs of an organization... to thank my parents and my brother for their support and encouragement throughout my study at Texas A & M University. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page INTRODUCTION A. CURRENT VLSI DESIGN SYSTEMS The Hughes Automated Layout System Timberwolf Placement...

  8. Application of FPGA Emulation to SoC Floorplan and Packaging Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    , as opposed to SW simulators. I. INTRODUCTION The increasing complexity of recent SoC designs has definitely for meeting the processing demands of upcoming generations of user applications. MPSoCs are complex to design design constraints (energy consumption, time-to-market). When an integrated system is built for a certain

  9. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Anna Model by Charles Thomas Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  10. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bates Avenue by Sunroc Builders | Department

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  11. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  12. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Chamberlain Court #75 by High Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  13. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Cobbler Lane by Addison Homes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  14. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Double ZeroHouse 3.0 by KB Home | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  15. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  16. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  17. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #20 by Greenhill Contracting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  18. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #26 by Greenhill Contracting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  19. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #28 by Greenhill Contracting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  20. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Laurel Gardens #794 by Habitat for Humanity

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  1. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  2. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McCormick Avenue by BrightLeaf Homes |

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  3. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  4. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual

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  5. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of

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  6. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Port Hadlock by Clifton View Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  7. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  8. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  9. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Shenandoah Circle by Mantell-Hecathorn

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  10. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Taft School by BPC Green Builders | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  11. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: The Adaptation Home by Evolutionary Home

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  12. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Via del Cielo by Palo Duro Homes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  13. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Vision Hill Lot 1 by Mandalay Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  14. Lowering the background level and the energy threshold of Micromegas x-ray detectors for axion searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Iguaz; S. Aune; F. Aznar; J. F. Castel; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galan; J. A. Garcia; J. G. Garza; I. Giomataris; I. G. Irastorza; T. Papaevangelou; A. Rodriguez; A. Tomas; T. Vafeiadis; S. C. Yildiz

    2015-01-07

    Axion helioscopes search for solar axions by their conversion in x-rays in the presence of high magnetic fields. The use of low background x-ray detectors is an essential component contributing to the sensitivity of these searches. In this work, we review the recent advances on Micromegas detectors used in the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) and proposed for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The actual setup in CAST has achieved background levels below 10$^{-6}$ keV$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. This reduction is based on active and passive shielding techniques, the selection of radiopure materials, offline discrimination techniques and the high granularity of the readout. We describe in detail the background model of the detector, based on its operation at CAST site and at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC), as well as on Geant4 simulations. The best levels currently achieved at LSC are low than 10$^{-7}$ keV$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and show good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. Finally, we present some ideas and results for reducing the energy threshold of these detectors below 1 keV, using high-transparent windows, autotrigger electronics and studying the cluster shape at different energies. As a high flux of axion-like-particles is expected in this energy range, a sub-keV threshold detector could enlarge the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  15. Status of ArDM-1t: First observations from operation with a full ton-scale liquid argon target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ArDM Collaboration; J. Calvo; C. Cantini; M. Daniel; U. Degunda; S. Di Luise; L. Epprecht; A. Gendotti; S. Horikawa; L. Knecht; B. Montes; W. Mu; M. Munoz; S. Murphy; G. Natterer; K. Nguyen; K. Nikolics; L. Periale; C. Regenfus; L. Romero; A. Rubbia; R. Santorelli; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; T. Viant; S. Wu

    2015-05-10

    ArDM-1t is the first operating ton-scale liquid argon detector for direct search of Dark Matter particles. Developed at CERN as Recognized Experiment RE18, the experiment has been approved in 2010 to be installed in the Spanish underground site LSC (Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc). Under the label of LSC EXP-08-2010 the ArDM detector underwent an intensive period of technical completion and safety approval until the recent filling of the target vessel with almost 2 ton of liquid argon. This report describes the experimental achievements during commissioning of ArDM and the transition into a stage of first physics data taking in single phase operational mode. We present preliminary observations from this run. A first indication for the background discrimination power of LAr detectors at the ton-scale is shown. We present an outlook for completing the detector with the electric drift field and upgrade of the scintillation light readout system with novel detector modules based on SiPMs in order to improve the light yield.

  16. Broadband enhancement of light harvesting in luminescent solar concentrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yun-Feng; Xiao, Lixin; Sun, Fang-Wen; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) can absorb large-area incident sunlight, then emit luminescence with high quantum efficiency, which finally be collected by a small photovoltaic (PV) system. The light-harvesting area of the PV system is much smaller than that of the LSC system, potentially improving the efficiency and reducing the cost of solar cells. Here, based on Fermi-golden rule, we present a theoretical description of the luminescent process in nanoscale LSCs where the conventional ray-optics model is no longer applicable. As an example calculated with this new model, we demonstrate that a slot waveguide consisting of a nanometer-sized low-index slot region sandwiched by two high-index regions provides a broadband enhancement of light harvesting by the luminescent centers in the slot region. This is because the slot waveguide can (1) greatly enhance the spontaneous emission due to the Purcell effect, (2) dramatically increase the effective absorption cross-section of luminescent centers, and (3) str...

  17. 90Sr liquid scintillation urine analysis utilizing different approaches for tracer recovery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piraner, Olga [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA; Preston, Rose T. [Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM; Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Jones, Robert [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

    2010-08-01

    90Sr is one of the isotopes most commonly produced by nuclear fission. This medium lived isotope presents serious challenges to radiation workers, the environment, and following a nuclear event, the general public. Methods of identifying this nuclide have been in existence for a number of years (e.g. Horwitz, E.P. [1], Maxwell, S.L.[2], EPA 905.0 [3]) which are time consuming, requiring a month or more for full analysis. This time frame is unacceptable in the present security environment. It is therefore important to have a dependable and rapid method for the determination of Sr. The purposes of this study are to reduce analysis time to less than half a day by utilizing a single method of radiation measurement while continuing to yield precise results. This paper presents findings on three methods that can meet this criteria; (1) stable Sr carrier, (2) 85Sr by gamma spectroscopy, and (3) 85Sr by LSC. Two methods of analyzing and calculating the 85Sr tracer recovery were investigated (gamma spectroscopy and a low energy window-Sr85LEBAB by LSC) as well as the use of two different types of Sr tracer (85Sr and stable Sr carrier). Three separate stock blank urine samples were spiked with various activity levels of 239Pu, 137Cs, 90Sr /90Y to determine the effectiveness of the Eichrome Sr-spec%C2%AE resin 2mL extractive columns. The objective was to compare the recoveries of 85Sr versus a stable strontium carrier, attempt to compare the rate at which samples can be processed by evaluating evaporation, neutralization, and removing the use of another instrument (gamma spectrometer) by using the LSC spectrometer to obtain 85Sr recovery. It was found that when using a calibration curve comprised of a different cocktail and a non-optimum discriminator setting reasonable results (bias of %C2%B1 25%) were achieved. The results from spiked samples containing 85Sr demonstrated that a higher recovery is obtained when using gamma spectroscopy (89-95%) than when using the LEB window from LSC (120-470%). The high recovery for 85Sr by LSC analysis may be due to the interference/cross talk from the alpha region since alpha counts were observed in all sample sets. After further investigation it was determined that the alpha counts were due to 239Pu breakthrough on the Sr-spec%C2%AE column. This requires further development to purify the Sr before an accurate tracer recovery determination can be made. Sample preparation times varied and ranged from 4-6 hours depending on the specific sample preparation process. The results from the spiked samples containing stable strontium nitrate Sr(NO3)2 carrier demonstrate that gravimetric analysis yields the most consistent high recoveries (97-101%) when evaporation is carefully performed. Since this method did not have a variation on the tracer recovery method, the samples were counted in 1) LEB/Alpha/Beta mode optimized for Sr-90, 2) DPM for Sr-90, and 3) general LEB/Alpha/Beta mode. The results (from the known) ranged from 79-104%, 107-177%, and 85-89% for 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Counting the prepared samples in a generic low energy beta/alpha/beta protocol yielded more accurate and consistent results and also yielded the shortest sample preparation turn-around-time of 3.5 hours.

  18. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficientmore »(LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.« less

  19. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficient (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.

  20. The NEXT experiment: A high pressure xenon gas TPC for neutrinoless double beta decay searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Lorca; J. Martín-Albo; F. Monrabal; for the NEXT Collaboration

    2012-10-15

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a hypothetical, very slow nuclear transition in which two neutrons undergo beta decay simultaneously and without the emission of neutrinos. The importance of this process goes beyond its intrinsic interest: an unambiguous observation would establish a Majorana nature for the neutrino and prove the violation of lepton number. NEXT is a new experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay using a radiopure high-pressure xenon gas TPC, filled with 100 kg of Xe enriched in Xe-136. NEXT will be the first large high-pressure gas TPC to use electroluminescence readout with SOFT (Separated, Optimized FuncTions) technology. The design consists in asymmetric TPC, with photomultipliers behind a transparent cathode and position-sensitive light pixels behind the anode. The experiment is approved to start data taking at the Laboratorio Subterr\\'aneo de Canfranc (LSC), Spain, in 2014.

  1. Light Collection in the Prototypes of the ANAIS Dark Matter Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaré, Julio; Cuesta, Clara; García, Eduardo; Martínez, María; Oliván, Miguel A; Ortigoza, Ysrael; de Solórzano, Alfonso Ortíz; Pobes, Carlos; Puimedón, Jorge; Sarsa, María Luisa; Villar, José Ángel; Villar, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The ANAIS experiment aims at the confirmation of the DAMA/LIBRA signal using the same target and technique at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) in Spain. ANAIS detectors consist of large NaI crystals coupled to two photomultipliers (PMTs). In this work we present Single Electron Response (SER) data for several units of the Hamamatsu R12669SEL2 PMT model extracted from normal operation data of ANAIS underground prototypes and we compare them with PMT SER characterization previously done at surface lab before coupling them to NaI crystal. Moreover, total light collection for different ANAIS prototypes has been calculated, producing an excellent average result of 15 phe/keV, which has a good impact in both energy resolution and threshold.

  2. Luminescent solar concentrator development: Final subcontract report, 1 June 1982-31 December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, P.S.; Parent, C.R.

    1987-04-01

    An investigation of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) was begun by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Owens-Illinois, Inc., in 1978. Experimental and theoretical results of that investigation are summarized in this report. An assessment of the LSC technology was compiled to provide a concise description to guide future research in this field. Since 1978, tremendous progress was made in the development of this device as a practical nonimaging concentrator for achieving solar concentration ratios on the order of 10X. The two most important technical achievements appear to be first, the understanding that dye self-absorption of radiated energy is not as serious a problem as originally thought; and second, the demonstration that organic dyes in polymeric hosts are capable of surviving outdoors in bright sunlight for years without serious degradation. System efficiencies approaching 4% have been achieved for photovoltaic conversion and theoretical efficiencies on the order of 9% appear feasible for large-area devices.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  4. Characterization of Atomic and Electronic Structures of Electrochemically Active SOFC Cathode Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Blinn; Yongman Choi; Meilin Liu

    2009-08-11

    The objective of this project is to gain a fundamental understanding of the oxygen-reduction mechanism on mixed conducting cathode materials by means of quantum-chemical calculations coupled with direct experimental measurements, such as vibrational spectroscopy. We have made progress in the elucidation of the mechanisms of oxygen reduction of perovkite-type cathode materials for SOFCs using these quantum chemical calculations. We established computational framework for predicting properties such as oxygen diffusivity and reaction rate constants for adsorption, incorporation, and TPB reactions, and formulated predictions for LSM- and LSC-based cathode materials. We have also further developed Raman spectroscopy as well as SERS as a characterization tool for SOFC cathode materials. Raman spectroscopy was used to detect chemical changes in the cathode from operation conditions, and SERS was used to probe for pertinent adsorbed species in oxygen reduction. However, much work on the subject of unraveling oxygen reduction for SOFC cathodes remains to be done.

  5. Floor-Plan Priors for Monocular Layout Estimation Chenxi Liu1, Alexander Schwing2, Kaustav Kundu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    collections or video Cabral & Furukawa, 2014 Brualla et al., 2014 Indoor localization (video, depth sensors) Project Tango SLAM work Lee et al., 2010 Xiao & Furukawa, 2012 Cabral & Furukawa, 2014 Liu, Schwing, Kundu & Furukawa, 2012 3D indoor reconstruction from large photo collections or video Cabral & Furukawa, 2014

  6. Managing Research Data in Big Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman Gray; Tobia Carozzi; Graham Woan

    2012-07-17

    The project which led to this report was funded by JISC in 2010--2011 as part of its 'Managing Research Data' programme, to examine the way in which Big Science data is managed, and produce any recommendations which may be appropriate. Big science data is different: it comes in large volumes, and it is shared and exploited in ways which may differ from other disciplines. This project has explored these differences using as a case-study Gravitational Wave data generated by the LSC, and has produced recommendations intended to be useful variously to JISC, the funding council (STFC) and the LSC community. In Sect. 1 we define what we mean by 'big science', describe the overall data culture there, laying stress on how it necessarily or contingently differs from other disciplines. In Sect. 2 we discuss the benefits of a formal data-preservation strategy, and the cases for open data and for well-preserved data that follow from that. This leads to our recommendations that, in essence, funders should adopt rather light-touch prescriptions regarding data preservation planning: normal data management practice, in the areas under study, corresponds to notably good practice in most other areas, so that the only change we suggest is to make this planning more formal, which makes it more easily auditable, and more amenable to constructive criticism. In Sect. 3 we briefly discuss the LIGO data management plan, and pull together whatever information is available on the estimation of digital preservation costs. The report is informed, throughout, by the OAIS reference model for an open archive.

  7. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-?} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  8. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used, reductant or complexant used for selectivity, and ionic liquids used as supportive media. To complete the extraction and recovery cycle, we then demonstrate uranium back extraction from the TBP loaded sc-CO2 phase into an aqueous phase and the characterization of the uranium complex formed at the end of this process. Another aspect of this project was to limit proliferation risks by either co-extracting uranium and plutonium, or by leaving plutonium behind by selectively extracting uranium. We report that the former is easily achieved, since plutonium is in the tetravalent or hexavalent oxidation state in the oxidizing environment created by the TBP-nitric acid complex, and is therefore co-extracted. The latter is more challenging, as a reductant or complexant to plutonium has to be used to selectively extract uranium. After undertaking experiments on different reducing or complexing systems (e.g., AcetoHydroxamic Acid (AHA), Fe(II), ascorbic acid), oxalic acid was chosen as it can complex tetravalent actinides (Pu, Np, Th) in the aqueous phase while allowing the extraction of hexavalent uranium in the sc-CO2 phase. Finally, we show results using an alternative media to commonly used aqueous phases: ionic liquids. We show the dissolution of uranium in ionic liquids and its extraction using sc-CO2 with and without the presence of AHA. The possible separation of trivalent actinides from uranium is also demonstrated in ionic liquids using neodymium as a surrogate and diglycolamides as the extractant.

  9. B9783rdFLOORPLAN E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory -Building 978: JBEI & ABPDU, 5885 Hollis Street, Suite 320 & 400, Berkeley, CA 94608 -WASTE QUANTITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    50% 108-95-2 551 chloroform 50% 67-66-3 VACUUM PUMP OIL oil - 100% 000826-00-0 N N C WASTE LIQ 221 - Building 978: JBEI & ABPDU, 5885 Hollis Street, Suite 320 & 400, Berkeley, CA 94608 - WASTE QUANTITIES 9 8 Max Ave Ann Common Name Cas N Secret EHS Class Mix State Haz Cat Waste days Cont Unit Daily Daily

  10. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, J G; Calvet, D; Castel, J F; Christensen, F E; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Decker, T; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galán, J; García, J A; Giomataris, I; Hill, R M; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jakobsen, A C; Jourde, D; Mirallas, H; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M J; Ruz, J; Tomás, A; Vafeiadis, T; Vogel, J K

    2015-01-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as ...

  11. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Garza; S. Aune; D. Calvet; J. F. Castel; F. E. Christensen; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; T. Decker; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galán; J. A. García; I. Giomataris; R. M. Hill; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; A. C. Jakobsen; D. Jourde; H. Mirallas; I. Ortega; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; J. Ruz; A. Tomás; T. Vafeiadis; J. K. Vogel

    2015-03-17

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  12. Mitigation Plans for the Microbunching-Instability-Related COTR at ASTA/FNAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Johnson, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    At the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) now under construction at Fermilab, we anticipate the appearance of the microbunching instability related to the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances. With a photoinjector source and up to two chicane compressors planned, the conditions should result in the shift of some microbunched features into the visible light regime. The presence of longitudinal microstructures (microbunching) in the electron beam or the leading edge spikes can result in strong, spatially localized coherent enhancements of optical transition radiation (COTR) that mask the actual beam profile. Several efforts on mitigation of the effects in the diagnostics task have been identified. At ASTA we have designed the beam profiling stations to have mitigation features based on spectral filtering, scintillator choice, and the timing of the trigger to the digital camera's CCD chip. Since the COTR is more intense in the NIR than UV we have selectable bandpass filters centered at 420 nm which also overlap the spectral emissions of the LYSO:Ce scintillators. By delaying the CCD trigger timing of the integration window by 40-50 ns, we can reject the prompt OTR signal and integrate on the delayed scintillator light predominately. This combination of options should allow mitigation of COTR enhancements of order 100-1000 in the distribution.

  13. Next Generation Print-based Manufacturing for Photovoltaics and Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sue A. Carter

    2012-09-07

    For the grand challenge of reducing our energy and carbon footprint, the development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies offer a potential solution. Energy technologies can reduce our dependence on foreign oil as well as the energy consumed by the petroleum industry, the leading consumer of energy by a U.S. industry sector. Nonetheless, the manufacturing processes utilized to manufacture equipment for alternative energy technologies often involve energy-intensive processes. This undermines some of the advantages to moving to 'green' technologies in the first place. Our answer to the Industrial Technology Program's (ITP) Grand Challenge FOA was to develop a transformational low cost manufacturing process for plastic-based photovoltaics that will lower by over 50% both energy consumption and greenhouse emissions and offer a return-of-investment of over 20%. We demonstrated a Luminescent Solar Concentrator fabricated on a plastic acrylic substrate (i.e. no glass) that increases the power output of the PV cell by 2.2x with a 2% power efficiency as well as an LSC with a 7% power efficiency that increased the power output from the PV cells by 35%. S large area 20-inch x 60-inch building-integrated photovoltaic window was fabricated using contract manufacturing with a 4% power efficiency which improved the power output of the PV cell by over 50%. In addition, accelerated lifetimes of the luminescent material demonstrate lifetimes of 20-years.

  14. NEXT-100 Technical Design Report (TDR). Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEXT Collaboration; V. Álvarez; F. I. G. M. Borges; S. Cárcel; J. M. Carmona; J. Castel; J. M. Catalá; S. Cebrián; A. Cervera; D. Chan; C. A. N. Conde; T. Dafni; T. H. V. T. Dias; J. Díaz; M. Egorov; R. Esteve; P. Evtoukhovitch; L. M. P. Fernandes; P. Ferrario; A. L. Ferreira; E. Ferrer-Ribas; E. D. C. Freitas; V. M. Gehman; A. Gil; I. Giomataris; A. Goldschmidt; H. Gómez; J. J. Gómez-Cadenas; K. González; D. González-Díaz; R. M. Gutiérrez; J. Hauptman; J. A. Hernando Morata; D. C. Herrera; V. Herrero; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; V. Kalinnikov; D. Kiang; L. Labarga; I. Liubarsky; J. A. M. Lopes; D. Lorca; M. Losada; G. Luzón; A. Marí; J. Martín-Albo; A. Martínez; T. Miller; A. Moiseenko; F. Monrabal; C. M. B. Monteiro; J. M. Monzó; F. J. Mora; L. M. Moutinho; J. Muñoz Vidal; H. Natal da Luz; G. Navarro; M. Nebot; D. Nygren; C. A. B. Oliveira; R. Palma; J. Pérez; J. L. Pérez Aparicio; J. Renner; L. Ripoll; A. Rodríguez; J. Rodríguez; F. P. Santos; J. M. F. dos Santos; L. Segui; L. Serra; D. Shuman; C. Sofka; M. Sorel; J. F. Toledo; A. Tomás; J. Torrent; Z. Tsamalaidze; D. Vázquez; E. Velicheva; J. F. C. A. Veloso; J. A. Villar; R. C. Webb; T. Weber; J. White; N. Yahlali

    2012-04-16

    In this Technical Design Report (TDR) we describe the NEXT-100 detector that will search for neutrinoless double beta decay (bbonu) in Xe-136 at the Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc (LSC), in Spain. The document formalizes the design presented in our Conceptual Design Report (CDR): an electroluminescence time projection chamber, with separate readout planes for calorimetry and tracking, located, respectively, behind cathode and anode. The detector is designed to hold a maximum of about 150 kg of xenon at 15 bar, or 100 kg at 10 bar. This option builds in the capability to increase the total isotope mass by 50% while keeping the operating pressure at a manageable level. The readout plane performing the energy measurement is composed of Hamamatsu R11410-10 photomultipliers, specially designed for operation in low-background, xenon-based detectors. Each individual PMT will be isolated from the gas by an individual, pressure resistant enclosure and will be coupled to the sensitive volume through a sapphire window. The tracking plane consists in an array of Hamamatsu S10362-11-050P MPPCs used as tracking pixels. They will be arranged in square boards holding 64 sensors (8 times8) with a 1-cm pitch. The inner walls of the TPC, the sapphire windows and the boards holding the MPPCs will be coated with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB), a wavelength shifter, to improve the light collection.

  15. Leak before break evaluation for main steam piping system made of SA106 Gr.C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kyoung Mo; Jee, Kye Kwang; Pyo, Chang Ryul; Ra, In Sik

    1997-04-01

    The basis of the leak before break (LBB) concept is to demonstrate that piping will leak significantly before a double ended guillotine break (DEGB) occurs. This is demonstrated by quantifying and evaluating the leak process and prescribing safe shutdown of the plant on the basis of the monitored leak rate. The application of LBB for power plant design has reduced plant cost while improving plant integrity. Several evaluations employing LBB analysis on system piping based on DEGB design have been completed. However, the application of LBB on main steam (MS) piping, which is LBB applicable piping, has not been performed due to several uncertainties associated with occurrence of steam hammer and dynamic strain aging (DSA). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of the LBB design concept to main steam lines manufactured with SA106 Gr.C carbon steel. Based on the material properties, including fracture toughness and tensile properties obtained from the comprehensive material tests for base and weld metals, a parametric study was performed as described in this paper. The PICEP code was used to determine leak size crack (LSC) and the FLET code was used to perform the stability assessment of MS piping. The effects of material properties obtained from tests were evaluated to determine the LBB applicability for the MS piping. It can be shown from this parametric study that the MS piping has a high possibility of design using LBB analysis.

  16. Development of the Low Swirl Injector for Fuel-Flexible GasTurbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlejohn, D.; Cheng, R.K.; Nazeer,W.A.; Smith, K.O

    2007-02-14

    Industrial gas turbines are primarily fueled with natural gas. However, changes in fuel cost and availability, and a desire to control carbon dioxide emissions, are creating pressure to utilize other fuels. There is an increased interest in the use of fuels from coal gasification, such as syngas and hydrogen, and renewable fuels, such as biogas and biodiesel. Current turbine fuel injectors have had years of development to optimize their performance with natural gas. The new fuels appearing on the horizon can have combustion properties that differ substantially from natural gas. Factors such as turbulent flame speed, heat content, autoignition characteristics, and range of flammability must be considered when evaluating injector performance. The low swirl injector utilizes a unique flame stabilization mechanism and is under development for gas turbine applications. Its design and mode of operation allow it to operate effectively over a wide range of conditions. Studies conducted at LBNL indicate that the LSI can operate on fuels with a wide range of flame speeds, including hydrogen. It can also utilize low heat content fuels, such as biogas and syngas. We will discuss the low swirl injector operating parameters, and how the LSC performs with various alternative fuels.

  17. A Re-Examination of the Origins of the Peculiar Velocity Field Within the Local Supercluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Burstein

    1999-08-30

    The recent re-evaulation of the peculiar velocity field outside the Local Supercluster (Dekel et al. 1999, ApJ 522) has permitted a re-examination of the origins of the peculiar velocity field within the Local Supercluster using the Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities for spiral galaxies. It is shown that the large-scale coherent pattern of peculiar velocities within the LSC are well-fit by a combination of the Outside-Region-(generated)-Motions (O-R-M) from the Potent model with a Virgocentric infall pattern that produces 220 km/s of Virgocentric infall at the Local Group (LG) towards the Virgo cluster moving at 88 km/s towards the LG. The part of the Cosmic Microwave Background motion of the LG this model cannot fit is that perpendicular to the Supergalactic plane (the SGZ direction). On what size scale the remaing 270 km/s CMB SGZ motion of the LG is shared by neighboring galaxies cannot be determined from the present data set, but may be found if we can accurately measure galaxy distances close to the Galactic plane.

  18. Complete chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum: extensiverearrangements are associated with repeats and tRNAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberle, Rosemarie C.; Fourcade, Matthew L.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-09

    Chloroplast genome structure, gene order and content arehighly conserved in land plants. We sequenced the complete chloroplastgenome sequence of Trachelium caeruleum (Campanulaceae) a member of anangiosperm family known for highly rearranged chloroplast genomes. Thetotal genome size is 162,321 bp with an IR of 27,273 bp, LSC of 100,113bp and SSC of 7,661 bp. The genome encodes 115 unique genes, with 19duplicated in the IR, a tRNA (trnI-CAU) duplicated once in the LSC and aprotein coding gene (psbJ) duplicated twice, for a total of 137 genes.Four genes (ycf15, rpl23, infA and accD) are truncated and likelynonfunctional; three others (clpP, ycf1 and ycf2) are so highly divergedthat they may now be pseudogenes. The most conspicuous feature of theTrachelium genome is the presence of eighteen internally unrearrangedblocks of genes that have been inverted or relocated within the genome,relative to the typical gene order of most angiosperm chloroplastgenomes. Recombination between repeats or tRNAs has been suggested as twomeans of chloroplast genome rearrangements. We compared the relativenumber of repeats in Trachelium to eight other angiosperm chloroplastgenomes, and evaluated the location of repeats and tRNAs in relation torearrangements. Trachelium has the highest number and largest repeats,which are concentrated near inversion endpoints or other rearrangements.tRNAs occur at many but not all inversion endpoints. There is likely nosingle mechanism responsible for the remarkable number of alterations inthis genome, but both repeats and tRNAs are clearly associated with theserearrangements. Land plant chloroplast genomes are highly conserved instructure, gene order and content. The chloroplast genomes of ferns, thegymnosperm Ginkgo, and most angiosperms are nearly collinear, reflectingthe gene order in lineages that diverged from lycopsids and the ancestralchloroplast gene order over 350 million years ago (Raubeson and Jansen,1992). Although earlier mapping studies identified a number of taxa inwhich several rearrangements have occurred (reviewed in Raubeson andJansen, 2005), an extraordinary number of chloroplast genome alterationsare concentrated in several families in the angiosperm order Asterales(sensu APGII, Bremer et al., 2003). Gene mapping studies ofrepresentatives of the Campanulaceae (Cosner, 1993; Cosner et al.,1997,2004) and Lobeliaceae (Knox et al., 1993; Knox and Palmer, 1999)identified large inversions, contraction and expansion of the invertedrepeat regions, and several insertions and deletions in the cpDNAs ofthese closely related taxa. Detailed restriction site and gene mapping ofthe chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum (Campanulaceae) identifiedseven to ten large inversions, families of repeats associated withrearrangements, possible transpositions, and even the disruption ofoperons (Cosner et al., 1997). Seventeen other members of theCampanulaceae were mapped and exhibit many additional rearrangements(Cosner et al., 2004). What happened in this lineage that made itsusceptible to so many chloroplast genome rearrangements? How do normallyvery conserved chloroplast genomes change? The cause of rearrangements inthis group is unclear based on the limited resolution available withmapping techniques. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain howrearrangements occur: recombination between repeats, transposition, ortemporary instability due to loss of the inverted repeat (Raubeson andJansen, 2005). Sequencing whole chloroplast genomes within theCampanulaceae offers a unique opportunity to examine both the extent andmechanisms of rearrangements within a phylogenetic framework.We reporthere the first complete chloroplast genome sequence of a member of theCampanulaceae, Trachelium caeruleum. This work will serve as a benchmarkfor subsequent, comparative sequencing and analysis of other members ofthis family and close relatives, with the goal of further understandingchloroplast genome evolution. We confirmed features previously identifiedthrough mapping, and discovered many additional structural changes,i

  19. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the subsurface.

  20. Upper and lower limits on the Crab pulsar's astrophysical parameters set from gravitational wave observations by LIGO: braking index and energy considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Santostasi

    2008-07-16

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO) has recently reached the end of its fifth science run (S5), having collected more than a year worth of data. Analysis of the data is still ongoing but a positive detection of gravitational waves, while possible, is not realistically expected for most likely sources. This is particularly true for what concerns gravitational waves from known pulsars. In fact, even under the most optimistic (and not very realistic) assumption that all the pulsar's observed spin-down is due to gravitational waves, the gravitational wave strain at earth from all the known isolated pulsars (with the only notable exception of the Crab pulsar) would not be strong enough to be detectable by existing detectors. By August 2006, LIGO had produced enough data for a coherent integration capable to extract signal from noise that was weaker than the one expected from the Crab pulsar's spin-down limit. No signal was detected, but beating the spin-down limit is a considerable achievement for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). It is customary to translate the upper limit on strain from a pulsar into a more astrophysically significant upper limit on ellipticity. Once the spin-down limit has been beaten, it is possible to release the constraint that all the spin-down is due to gravitational wave emission. A more complete model with diverse braking mechanisms can be used to set limits on several astrophysical parameters of the pulsar. This paper shows possible values of such parameters for the Crab pulsar given the current limit on gravitational waves from this neutron star.

  1. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  2. Demo Abstract: A Cooja-based Tool for Maintaining Sensor Network Coverage Requirements in a Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) simulator, but it lacks support for modelling sens- ing coverage. We introduce WSN-Maintain, a Cooja-based tool for maintaining coverage requirements in an in-building WSN. To analyse the coverage of a building, WSN-Maintain takes as input the floorplan of the building

  3. Generating Circuit Current Constraints to Guarantee Power Grid Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Generating Circuit Current Constraints to Guarantee Power Grid Safety Zahi Moudallal ECE Dept, as well as power grid-aware placement and floorplanning. We give a rigorous problem definition and develop of power grids is a necessity in modern chip design. We will use the term "power grid" to refer to either

  4. Quantum Dynamical Behaviour in Complex Systems - A Semiclassical Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gliebe, Cheryn E; Ananth, Nandini

    2008-05-22

    One of the biggest challenges in Chemical Dynamics is describing the behavior of complex systems accurately. Classical MD simulations have evolved to a point where calculations involving thousands of atoms are routinely carried out. Capturing coherence, tunneling and other such quantum effects for these systems, however, has proven considerably harder. Semiclassical methods such as the Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) provide a practical way to include quantum effects while still utilizing only classical trajectory information. For smaller systems, this method has been proven to be most effective, encouraging the hope that it can be extended to deal with a large number of degrees of freedom. Several variations upon the original idea of the SCIVR have been developed to help make these larger calculations more tractable; these range from the simplest, classical limit form, the Linearized IVR (LSC-IVR) to the quantum limit form, the Exact Forward-Backward version (EFB-IVR). In this thesis a method to tune between these limits is described which allows us to choose exactly which degrees of freedom we wish to treat in a more quantum mechanical fashion and to what extent. This formulation is called the Tuning IVR (TIVR). We further describe methodology being developed to evaluate the prefactor term that appears in the IVR formalism. The regular prefactor is composed of the Monodromy matrices (jacobians of the transformation from initial to finial coordinates and momenta) which are time evolved using the Hessian. Standard MD simulations require the potential surfaces and their gradients, but very rarely is there any information on the second derivative. We would like to be able to carry out the SC-IVR calculation without this information too. With this in mind a finite difference scheme to obtain the Hessian on-the-fly is proposed. Wealso apply the IVR formalism to a few problems of current interest. A method to obtain energy eigenvalues accurately for complex systems is described. We proposed the use of a semiclassical correction term to a preliminary quantum calculation using, for instance, a variational approach. This allows us to increase the accuracy significantly. Modeling Nonadiabatic dynamics has always been a challenge to classical simulations because the multi-state nature of the dynamics cannot be described accurately by the time evolution on a single average surface, as is the classical approach. We show that using the Meyer-Miller-Stock-Thoss (MMST) representation of the exact vibronic Hamiltonian in combination with the IVR allows us to accurately describe dynamics where the non Born-Oppenheimer regime. One final problem that we address is that of extending this method to the long time regime. We propose the use of a time independent sampling function in the Monte Carlo integration over the phase space of initial trajectory conditions. This allows us to better choose the regions of importance at the various points in time; by using more trajectories in the important regions, we show that the integration can be converged much easier. An algorithm based loosely on the methods of Diffusion Monte Carlo is developed that allows us to carry out this time dependent sampling in a most efficient manner.

  5. $50 and up underground house book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehler, M.

    1981-01-01

    Earth-sheltered housing can be livable, compatible with nature, and inexpensive. Plans and designs for low-cost houses that are integrated with their environment make up most of this book. The author begins by outlining 23 advantages of underground housing and describing the histories of several unconventional buildings in the $50 to $500 price range. He also suggests where building materials can be bought and scrounged, describes construction techniques, and explains how to cope with building codes. Sketches, floorplans, and photographs illustrate the text. 8 references, 4 tables. (DCK)