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Sample records for lsc floorplan lsc

  1. United States Geological Survey, LSC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Facilities Name United States Geological Survey, LSC Address Leetown Science Center, Conte Anadromous Fish Laboratory, 1 Migratory Way Place Turners Falls,...

  2. Facility Floorplan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Floorplan

  3. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans:...

  4. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Hickory Drive by Glastonbury Housesmith |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Hickory Drive by Glastonbury Housesmith DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Hickory Drive by Glastonbury Housesmith DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Hickory Drive by Glastonbury Housesmith

  5. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development

  6. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Chamberlain Court #75 by High Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chamberlain Court 75 by High Performance Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Chamberlain Court 75 by High Performance Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Chamberlain Court 75 by...

  7. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Cobbler Lane by Addison Homes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cobbler Lane by Addison Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Cobbler Lane by Addison Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Cobbler Lane by Addison

  8. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes

  9. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #20 by Greenhill Contracting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0 by Greenhill Contracting DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #20 by Greenhill Contracting DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #20

  10. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #26 by Greenhill Contracting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6 by Greenhill Contracting DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #26 by Greenhill Contracting DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #26

  11. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #28 by Greenhill Contracting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 8 by Greenhill Contracting DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #28 by Greenhill Contracting DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Green Acres #28

  12. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Taft School by BPC Green Builders...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Taft School by BPC Green Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Taft School by BPC Green Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Taft School by BPC Green

  13. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View...

  14. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Port Hadlock by Clifton View Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Port Hadlock by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Port Hadlock by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Port Hadlock by Clifton View Homes...

  15. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Housing California | Department of Energy DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California DOE Tour of

  16. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at

  17. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and Green Extreme Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and Green Extreme Homes DOE...

  18. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House...

  19. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Anna Model by Charles Thomas Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Anna Model by Charles Thomas Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Anna Model by Charles Thomas Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Anna Model by Charles Thomas Homes

  20. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bates Avenue by Sunroc Builders | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Bates Avenue by Sunroc Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bates Avenue by Sunroc Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bates Avenue by Sunroc Builders

  1. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend

  2. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Chamberlain Court #75 by High Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes | Department of Energy Chamberlain Court #75 by High Performance Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Chamberlain Court #75 by High Performance Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Chamberlain Court #75 by High Performance

  3. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build

  4. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Pumpkin Ridge Passive House by Hammer and Hand

  5. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Shenandoah Circle by Mantell-Hecathorn

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Builders | Department of Energy Shenandoah Circle by Mantell-Hecathorn Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Shenandoah Circle by Mantell-Hecathorn Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Shenandoah Circle by Mantell-Hecathorn

  6. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Via del Cielo by Palo Duro Homes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Via del Cielo by Palo Duro Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Via del Cielo by Palo Duro Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Via del Cielo by Palo Duro

  7. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Vision Hill Lot 1 by Mandalay Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vision Hill Lot 1 by Mandalay Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Vision Hill Lot 1 by Mandalay Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Vision Hill Lot 1 by Mandalay Homes

  8. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Double ZeroHouse 3.0 by KB Home | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Double ZeroHouse 3.0 by KB Home DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Double ZeroHouse 3.0 by KB Home DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Double ZeroHouse 3.0 by KB Home

  9. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Laurel Gardens #794 by Habitat for Humanity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    South Sarasota County | Department of Energy Laurel Gardens #794 by Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Laurel Gardens #794 by Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Laurel Gardens #794 by Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County

  10. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McCormick Avenue by BrightLeaf Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy McCormick Avenue by BrightLeaf Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McCormick Avenue by BrightLeaf Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McCormick Avenue by BrightLeaf

  11. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Green Extreme Homes | Department of Energy McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and Green Extreme Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and Green Extreme Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: McKinley Project by Carl Franklin Homes and Green Extreme

  12. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long Island | Department of Energy Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island

  13. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: The Adaptation Home by Evolutionary Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Builders LLC | Department of Energy The Adaptation Home by Evolutionary Home Builders LLC DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: The Adaptation Home by Evolutionary Home Builders LLC DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: The Adaptation Home by Evolutionary Home Builders LLC

  14. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Laurel Gardens #794 by Habitat for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laurel Gardens 794 by Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Laurel Gardens 794 by Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County DOE Tour of Zero...

  15. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Floorplan ATLAS Floorplan

  16. Category:Testing Facility Operators | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey, LSC United States Naval Surface Warfare Center University of California, Berkeley University of California, San Diego (Scripps) U cont. University of Iowa University...

  17. Promising future of quantum dots explored in conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Promising future of quantum dots explored Promising future of quantum dots explored in conference Researchers are gathering to reflect on two decades of quantum dot research at a special topical conference, "20 Years of Quantum Dots at Los Alamos" April 13, 2015 Quantum dot LSC devices under ultraviolet illumination. Quantum dot LSC devices under ultraviolet illumination. Contact Los Alamos National Laboratory Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "This

  18. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bornstein, Jonathan G.; Friedman, Peter S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  19. Simulation of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier for broadband radiation production using a superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-10-02

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as harmful in free-electron lasers as they can seed unfavorable energy modulations that can result in density modulations with associated emittance dilution. It was pointed out, however, that such \\micro-bunching instabilities" could be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of controlling LSC induced density modulations. In the present paper we augment these previous investigations by combining a grid-less space charge algorithm with the popular particle-tracking program elegant. This high-fidelity model of the space charge is used to benchmark conventional LSC models. We then employ the developed model to optimize the performance of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier using beam parameters comparable to the ones achievable at Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility currently under commissioning at Fermilab

  20. Cathode side hardware for carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Gengfu (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

    2011-03-29

    Carbonate fuel cathode side hardware having a thin coating of a conductive ceramic formed from one of LSC (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2CoO.sub.3) and lithiated NiO (Li.sub.xNiO, where x is 0.1 to 1).

  1. Development of an Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for Trace Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Finn, Erin C.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Panisko, Mark E.; Shaff, Sarah M.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-09-01

    Low-level liquid scintillation counting (LSC) has been established as one of the radiation detection techniques useful in elucidating environmental processes and environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities. The Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter (ULB-LSC) under construction in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory aims to further reduce the MDAs and/or required sample processing. Through layers of passive shielding in conjunction with an active veto and 30 meters water equivalent overburden, the background reduction is expected to be 10 to 100 times below typical analytic low-background liquid scintillation systems. Simulations have shown an expected background of around 14 counts per day. A novel approach to the light collection will use a coated hollow light guide cut into the inner copper shielding. Demonstration LSC measurements will show low-energy detection, spectral deconvolution, and alpha/beta discrimination capabilities, from trials with standards of tritium, strontium-90, and actinium-227, respectively. An overview of the system design and expected demonstration measurements will emphasize the potential applications of the ULB-LSC in environmental monitoring for treaty verification, reach-back sample analysis, and facility inspections.

  2. Ultra-short longitudinal spatial coherence length of laser light with the combined effect of spatial, angular, and temporal diversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Azeem E-mail: mehtads@physics.iitd.ac.in; Dubey, Vishesh; Mehta, D. S. E-mail: mehtads@physics.iitd.ac.in; Srivastava, Vishal

    2015-03-02

    We demonstrate ultra-high axial-resolution topography and tomography of multilayered objects using pseudo thermal light source, i.e., laser. The longitudinal spatial coherence (LSC) length of light was significantly reduced by synthesizing a pseudo thermal source with the combined effect of spatial, angular, and temporal diversity. Thus, generating a low spatially coherent (i.e., broad angular frequency spectrum) light source having narrow temporal frequency spectrum. The LSC length was reduced less than 10??m using a very low magnification lens. Experimental results of optical sectioning of multilayer objects with high axial-resolution of the order of 4??m was achieved which is comparable to broadband light source. The present system does not require any dispersion compensation optical system for biological samples as a highly monochromatic light source is used.

  3. Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics | News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC News & Press Releases LANL Press Release: Capture sunlight with your windows R&D Magazine: Capture sunlight with your windows Phys.org: Quantum dot solar windows go non-toxic, colorless, with record efficiency Laser Focus World: Non-toxic quantum dots promise efficient LSC-based building-integrated solar windows and lighting IEEE Spectrum: A Clearer Outlook for Quantum Dot-Enabled Solar Windows LANL Press Release: Ultrafast photodetectors allow direct observation of multiple

  4. Bubble nucleation in simple and molecular liquids via the largest spherical cavity method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Bresme, Fernando

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we propose a methodology to compute bubble nucleation free energy barriers using trajectories generated via molecular dynamics simulations. We follow the bubble nucleation process by means of a local order parameter, defined by the volume of the largest spherical cavity (LSC) formed in the nucleating trajectories. This order parameter simplifies considerably the monitoring of the nucleation events, as compared with the previous approaches which require ad hoc criteria to classify the atoms and molecules as liquid or vapor. The combination of the LSC and the mean first passage time technique can then be used to obtain the free energy curves. Upon computation of the cavity distribution function the nucleation rate and free-energy barrier can then be computed. We test our method against recent computations of bubble nucleation in simple liquids and water at negative pressures. We obtain free-energy barriers in good agreement with the previous works. The LSC method provides a versatile and computationally efficient route to estimate the volume of critical bubbles the nucleation rate and to compute bubble nucleation free-energies in both simple and molecular liquids.

  5. Laser Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Facilities Current Schedule of Experiments Operation Schedule Janus Titan Europa COMET Facility Floorplan

  6. untitled

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    METALS AND ALLOYS Received 16 October 2014 Accepted 16 January 2015 Published 10 February 2015 Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to L.S.C. (lscui@cup.edu. cn); Y.N.L. (yinong. liu@uwa.edu.au) or X.D.L. (xl3p@virginia. edu) A biopolymer-like metal enabled hybrid material with exceptional mechanical prowess Junsong Zhang1, Lishan Cui1, Daqiang Jiang1, Yinong Liu2, Shijie Hao1, Yang Ren3, Xiaodong Han4, Zhenyang Liu1, Yunzhi Wang5,6, Cun Yu1, Yong Huan7, Xinqing Zhao8,

  7. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficient (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.

  8. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficientmore » (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.« less

  9. Luminescent solar concentrator development: Final subcontract report, 1 June 1982-31 December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, P.S.; Parent, C.R.

    1987-04-01

    An investigation of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) was begun by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Owens-Illinois, Inc., in 1978. Experimental and theoretical results of that investigation are summarized in this report. An assessment of the LSC technology was compiled to provide a concise description to guide future research in this field. Since 1978, tremendous progress was made in the development of this device as a practical nonimaging concentrator for achieving solar concentration ratios on the order of 10X. The two most important technical achievements appear to be first, the understanding that dye self-absorption of radiated energy is not as serious a problem as originally thought; and second, the demonstration that organic dyes in polymeric hosts are capable of surviving outdoors in bright sunlight for years without serious degradation. System efficiencies approaching 4% have been achieved for photovoltaic conversion and theoretical efficiencies on the order of 9% appear feasible for large-area devices.

  10. Double Power Output for GaAs Solar Cells Embedded in Luminescent Waveguides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Output for GaAs Solar Cells Embedded in Luminescent Waveguides Work w as p erformed a t U niversity o f I llinois X. S heng, L . S hen, T . K im, L . L i, X . W ang, R . D owdy, P . F roeter, K . S higeta, X . L i, R.G. N uzzo, N .C. G iebink, a nd J .A. R ogers, A dv. E nergy M ater., i n p ress ( 2013) GaAs cell transfer printed on a free standing LSC with a diffuse BSR separated by an air gap Scientific Achievement Double power output of bifacial thin-film GaAs microscale solar cells is

  11. Development of characterization protocol for mixed liquid radioactive waste classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakaria, Norasalwa; Wafa, Syed Asraf; Wo, Yii Mei; Mahat, Sarimah

    2015-04-29

    Mixed liquid organic waste generated from health-care and research activities containing tritium, carbon-14, and other radionuclides posed specific challenges in its management. Often, these wastes become legacy waste in many nuclear facilities and being considered as problematic waste. One of the most important recommendations made by IAEA is to perform multistage processes aiming at declassification of the waste. At this moment, approximately 3000 bottles of mixed liquid waste, with estimated volume of 6000 litres are currently stored at the National Radioactive Waste Management Centre, Malaysia and some have been stored for more than 25 years. The aim of this study is to develop a characterization protocol towards reclassification of these wastes. The characterization protocol entails waste identification, waste screening and segregation, and analytical radionuclides profiling using various analytical procedures including gross alpha/ gross beta, gamma spectrometry, and LSC method. The results obtained from the characterization protocol are used to establish criteria for speedy classification of the waste.

  12. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  13. Characterization of Atomic and Electronic Structures of Electrochemically Active SOFC Cathode Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Blinn; Yongman Choi; Meilin Liu

    2009-08-11

    The objective of this project is to gain a fundamental understanding of the oxygen-reduction mechanism on mixed conducting cathode materials by means of quantum-chemical calculations coupled with direct experimental measurements, such as vibrational spectroscopy. We have made progress in the elucidation of the mechanisms of oxygen reduction of perovkite-type cathode materials for SOFCs using these quantum chemical calculations. We established computational framework for predicting properties such as oxygen diffusivity and reaction rate constants for adsorption, incorporation, and TPB reactions, and formulated predictions for LSM- and LSC-based cathode materials. We have also further developed Raman spectroscopy as well as SERS as a characterization tool for SOFC cathode materials. Raman spectroscopy was used to detect chemical changes in the cathode from operation conditions, and SERS was used to probe for pertinent adsorbed species in oxygen reduction. However, much work on the subject of unraveling oxygen reduction for SOFC cathodes remains to be done.

  14. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-?} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  15. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used, reductant or complexant used for selectivity, and ionic liquids used as supportive media. To complete the extraction and recovery cycle, we then demonstrate uranium back extraction from the TBP loaded sc-CO2 phase into an aqueous phase and the characterization of the uranium complex formed at the end of this process. Another aspect of this project was to limit proliferation risks by either co-extracting uranium and plutonium, or by leaving plutonium behind by selectively extracting uranium. We report that the former is easily achieved, since plutonium is in the tetravalent or hexavalent oxidation state in the oxidizing environment created by the TBP-nitric acid complex, and is therefore co-extracted. The latter is more challenging, as a reductant or complexant to plutonium has to be used to selectively extract uranium. After undertaking experiments on different reducing or complexing systems (e.g., AcetoHydroxamic Acid (AHA), Fe(II), ascorbic acid), oxalic acid was chosen as it can complex tetravalent actinides (Pu, Np, Th) in the aqueous phase while allowing the extraction of hexavalent uranium in the sc-CO2 phase. Finally, we show results using an alternative media to commonly used aqueous phases: ionic liquids. We show the dissolution of uranium in ionic liquids and its extraction using sc-CO2 with and without the presence of AHA. The possible separation of trivalent actinides from uranium is also demonstrated in ionic liquids using neodymium as a surrogate and diglycolamides as the extractant.

  16. Overview of mixed waste issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Kempf, C.R.; MacKenzie, D.R.; Siskind, B.

    1986-01-01

    Based on BNL's study it was concluded that there are LLWs which contain chemically hazardous components. Scintillation liquids may be considered an EPA listed hazardous waste and are, therefore, potential mixed wastes. Since November, 1985 no operating LLW disposal site will accept these wastes for disposal. Unless such wastes contain de minimis quantities of radionuclides, they cannot be disposed of at an EPA an EPA permitted site. Currently generators of LSC wastes can ship de minimis wastes to be burned at commercial facilities. Oil wastes will also eventually be an EPA listed waste and thus will have to be considered a potential radioactive mixed wasted unless NRC establishes de minimis levels of radionuclides below which oils can be managed as hazardous wastes. Regarding wastes containing lead metal there is some question as to the extent of the hazard posed by lead disposed in a LLW burial trench. Chromium-containing wastes would have to be tested to determine whether they are potential mixed wastes. There may be other wastes that are mixed wastes; the responsibility for determining this rests with the waste generator. It is believed that there are management options for handling potential mixed wastes but there is no regulatory guidance. BNL has identified and evaluated a variety of treatment options for the management of potential radioactive mixed wastes. The findings of that study showed that application of a management option with the purpose of addressing EPA concern can, at the same time, address stabilization and volume reduction concerns of NRC.

  17. Next Generation Print-based Manufacturing for Photovoltaics and Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sue A. Carter

    2012-09-07

    For the grand challenge of reducing our energy and carbon footprint, the development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies offer a potential solution. Energy technologies can reduce our dependence on foreign oil as well as the energy consumed by the petroleum industry, the leading consumer of energy by a U.S. industry sector. Nonetheless, the manufacturing processes utilized to manufacture equipment for alternative energy technologies often involve energy-intensive processes. This undermines some of the advantages to moving to 'green' technologies in the first place. Our answer to the Industrial Technology Program's (ITP) Grand Challenge FOA was to develop a transformational low cost manufacturing process for plastic-based photovoltaics that will lower by over 50% both energy consumption and greenhouse emissions and offer a return-of-investment of over 20%. We demonstrated a Luminescent Solar Concentrator fabricated on a plastic acrylic substrate (i.e. no glass) that increases the power output of the PV cell by 2.2x with a 2% power efficiency as well as an LSC with a 7% power efficiency that increased the power output from the PV cells by 35%. S large area 20-inch x 60-inch building-integrated photovoltaic window was fabricated using contract manufacturing with a 4% power efficiency which improved the power output of the PV cell by over 50%. In addition, accelerated lifetimes of the luminescent material demonstrate lifetimes of 20-years.

  18. Development of the Low Swirl Injector for Fuel-Flexible GasTurbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlejohn, D.; Cheng, R.K.; Nazeer,W.A.; Smith, K.O

    2007-02-14

    Industrial gas turbines are primarily fueled with natural gas. However, changes in fuel cost and availability, and a desire to control carbon dioxide emissions, are creating pressure to utilize other fuels. There is an increased interest in the use of fuels from coal gasification, such as syngas and hydrogen, and renewable fuels, such as biogas and biodiesel. Current turbine fuel injectors have had years of development to optimize their performance with natural gas. The new fuels appearing on the horizon can have combustion properties that differ substantially from natural gas. Factors such as turbulent flame speed, heat content, autoignition characteristics, and range of flammability must be considered when evaluating injector performance. The low swirl injector utilizes a unique flame stabilization mechanism and is under development for gas turbine applications. Its design and mode of operation allow it to operate effectively over a wide range of conditions. Studies conducted at LBNL indicate that the LSI can operate on fuels with a wide range of flame speeds, including hydrogen. It can also utilize low heat content fuels, such as biogas and syngas. We will discuss the low swirl injector operating parameters, and how the LSC performs with various alternative fuels.

  19. Leak before break evaluation for main steam piping system made of SA106 Gr.C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kyoung Mo; Jee, Kye Kwang; Pyo, Chang Ryul; Ra, In Sik

    1997-04-01

    The basis of the leak before break (LBB) concept is to demonstrate that piping will leak significantly before a double ended guillotine break (DEGB) occurs. This is demonstrated by quantifying and evaluating the leak process and prescribing safe shutdown of the plant on the basis of the monitored leak rate. The application of LBB for power plant design has reduced plant cost while improving plant integrity. Several evaluations employing LBB analysis on system piping based on DEGB design have been completed. However, the application of LBB on main steam (MS) piping, which is LBB applicable piping, has not been performed due to several uncertainties associated with occurrence of steam hammer and dynamic strain aging (DSA). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of the LBB design concept to main steam lines manufactured with SA106 Gr.C carbon steel. Based on the material properties, including fracture toughness and tensile properties obtained from the comprehensive material tests for base and weld metals, a parametric study was performed as described in this paper. The PICEP code was used to determine leak size crack (LSC) and the FLET code was used to perform the stability assessment of MS piping. The effects of material properties obtained from tests were evaluated to determine the LBB applicability for the MS piping. It can be shown from this parametric study that the MS piping has a high possibility of design using LBB analysis.

  20. Mitigation Plans for the Microbunching-Instability-Related COTR at ASTA/FNAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Johnson, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    At the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) now under construction at Fermilab, we anticipate the appearance of the microbunching instability related to the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances. With a photoinjector source and up to two chicane compressors planned, the conditions should result in the shift of some microbunched features into the visible light regime. The presence of longitudinal microstructures (microbunching) in the electron beam or the leading edge spikes can result in strong, spatially localized coherent enhancements of optical transition radiation (COTR) that mask the actual beam profile. Several efforts on mitigation of the effects in the diagnostics task have been identified. At ASTA we have designed the beam profiling stations to have mitigation features based on spectral filtering, scintillator choice, and the timing of the trigger to the digital camera's CCD chip. Since the COTR is more intense in the NIR than UV we have selectable bandpass filters centered at 420 nm which also overlap the spectral emissions of the LYSO:Ce scintillators. By delaying the CCD trigger timing of the integration window by 40-50 ns, we can reject the prompt OTR signal and integrate on the delayed scintillator light predominately. This combination of options should allow mitigation of COTR enhancements of order 100-1000 in the distribution.

  1. A Bunch Compression Method for Free Electron Lasers that Avoids Parasitic Compressions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher D.; Wilson, Frederick G.; Nguyen, Dinh

    2015-09-01

    Virtually all existing high energy (>few MeV) linac-driven FELs compress the electron bunch length though the use of off-crest acceleration on the rising side of the RF waveform followed by transport through a magnetic chicane. This approach has at least three flaws: 1) it is difficult to correct aberrations- particularly RF curvature, 2) rising side acceleration exacerbates space charge-induced distortion of the longitudinal phase space, and 3) all achromatic "negative compaction" compressors create parasitic compression during the final compression process, increasing the CSR-induced emittance growth. One can avoid these deficiencies by using acceleration on the falling side of the RF waveform and a compressor with M56>0. This approach offers multiple advantages: 1) It is readily achieved in beam lines supporting simple schemes for aberration compensation, 2) Longitudinal space charge (LSC)-induced phase space distortion tends, on the falling side of the RF waveform, to enhance the chirp, and 3) Compressors with M56>0 can be configured to avoid spurious over-compression. We will discuss this bunch compression scheme in detail and give results of a successful beam test in April 2012 using the JLab UV Demo FEL

  2. Complete chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum: extensiverearrangements are associated with repeats and tRNAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberle, Rosemarie C.; Fourcade, Matthew L.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-09

    Chloroplast genome structure, gene order and content arehighly conserved in land plants. We sequenced the complete chloroplastgenome sequence of Trachelium caeruleum (Campanulaceae) a member of anangiosperm family known for highly rearranged chloroplast genomes. Thetotal genome size is 162,321 bp with an IR of 27,273 bp, LSC of 100,113bp and SSC of 7,661 bp. The genome encodes 115 unique genes, with 19duplicated in the IR, a tRNA (trnI-CAU) duplicated once in the LSC and aprotein coding gene (psbJ) duplicated twice, for a total of 137 genes.Four genes (ycf15, rpl23, infA and accD) are truncated and likelynonfunctional; three others (clpP, ycf1 and ycf2) are so highly divergedthat they may now be pseudogenes. The most conspicuous feature of theTrachelium genome is the presence of eighteen internally unrearrangedblocks of genes that have been inverted or relocated within the genome,relative to the typical gene order of most angiosperm chloroplastgenomes. Recombination between repeats or tRNAs has been suggested as twomeans of chloroplast genome rearrangements. We compared the relativenumber of repeats in Trachelium to eight other angiosperm chloroplastgenomes, and evaluated the location of repeats and tRNAs in relation torearrangements. Trachelium has the highest number and largest repeats,which are concentrated near inversion endpoints or other rearrangements.tRNAs occur at many but not all inversion endpoints. There is likely nosingle mechanism responsible for the remarkable number of alterations inthis genome, but both repeats and tRNAs are clearly associated with theserearrangements. Land plant chloroplast genomes are highly conserved instructure, gene order and content. The chloroplast genomes of ferns, thegymnosperm Ginkgo, and most angiosperms are nearly collinear, reflectingthe gene order in lineages that diverged from lycopsids and the ancestralchloroplast gene order over 350 million years ago (Raubeson and Jansen,1992). Although earlier mapping studies identified a number of taxa inwhich several rearrangements have occurred (reviewed in Raubeson andJansen, 2005), an extraordinary number of chloroplast genome alterationsare concentrated in several families in the angiosperm order Asterales(sensu APGII, Bremer et al., 2003). Gene mapping studies ofrepresentatives of the Campanulaceae (Cosner, 1993; Cosner et al.,1997,2004) and Lobeliaceae (Knox et al., 1993; Knox and Palmer, 1999)identified large inversions, contraction and expansion of the invertedrepeat regions, and several insertions and deletions in the cpDNAs ofthese closely related taxa. Detailed restriction site and gene mapping ofthe chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum (Campanulaceae) identifiedseven to ten large inversions, families of repeats associated withrearrangements, possible transpositions, and even the disruption ofoperons (Cosner et al., 1997). Seventeen other members of theCampanulaceae were mapped and exhibit many additional rearrangements(Cosner et al., 2004). What happened in this lineage that made itsusceptible to so many chloroplast genome rearrangements? How do normallyvery conserved chloroplast genomes change? The cause of rearrangements inthis group is unclear based on the limited resolution available withmapping techniques. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain howrearrangements occur: recombination between repeats, transposition, ortemporary instability due to loss of the inverted repeat (Raubeson andJansen, 2005). Sequencing whole chloroplast genomes within theCampanulaceae offers a unique opportunity to examine both the extent andmechanisms of rearrangements within a phylogenetic framework.We reporthere the first complete chloroplast genome sequence of a member of theCampanulaceae, Trachelium caeruleum. This work will serve as a benchmarkfor subsequent, comparative sequencing and analysis of other members ofthis family and close relatives, with the goal of further understandingchloroplast genome evolution. We confirmed features previously identifiedthrough mapping, and discovered many additional structural changes,i

  3. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the subsurface.

  4. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  5. Dead reckoning pedometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eakle, Jr., Robert F.; Hofstetter, Kenneth J.

    2003-04-15

    A system to determine the location of a person within a structure utilizes a magnetometer, magnets, pressure sensors and a CPU to calculate the length and direction of each step. The data may be displayed to the wearer, preferably on a map or floorplan and may be broadcast to persons outside the structure.

  6. Critical Causes of Degradation in Integrated Laboratory Scale Cells during High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.S. Sohal; J.E. O'Brien; C.M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; S. Elangovan; J.S. Herring; J.D. Carter; V.I. Sharma; B. Yildiz

    2009-05-01

    An ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory involves generating hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC). This report describes background information about SOECs, the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) testing of solid-oxide electrolysis stacks, ILS performance degradation, and post-test examination of SOECs by various researchers. The ILS test was a 720- cell, three-module test comprised of 12 stacks of 60 cells each. A peak H2 production rate of 5.7 Nm3/hr was achieved. Initially, the module area-specific resistance ranged from 1.25 Ocm2 to just over 2 Ocm2. Total H2 production rate decreased from 5.7 Nm3/hr to a steady state value of 0.7 Nm3/hr. The decrease was primarily due to cell degradation. Post test examination by Ceramatec showed that the hydrogen electrode appeared to be in good condition. The oxygen evolution electrode does show delamination in operation and an apparent foreign layer deposited at the electrolyte interface. Post test examination by Argonne National Laboratory showed that the O2-electrode delaminated from the electrolyte near the edge. One possible reason for this delamination is excessive pressure buildup with high O2 flow in the over-sintered region. According to post test examination at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the electrochemical reactions have been recognized as one of the prevalent causes of their degradation. Specifically, two important degradation mechanisms were examined: (1) transport of Crcontaining species from steel interconnects into the oxygen electrode and LSC bond layers in SOECs, and (2) cation segregation and phase separation in the bond layer. INL conducted a workshop October 27, 2008 to discuss possible causes of degradation in a SOEC stack. Generally, it was agreed that the following are major degradation issues relating to SOECs: Delamination of the O2-electrode and bond layer on the steam/O2-electrode side Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple phase boundary) Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte.

  7. ARM - CHAPS: Campaign Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHAPS: Campaign Resources Campaign Details News Field Participants Resources Status and Actions ARM Data Discovery Browse Data CHAPS: Campaign Resources CHAPS Status 4-4-2007 ASP Lessons Learned 2007 CHAPS Fact Sheet Daily Flight Plan Schedule Overview of Protocol and Flight Plans for the NASA King Air G-1 Floorplan G-1 Flight Hours G-1 Flight Plan G-1 Stack Patterns G-1 Calendar of Activities G-1 Payload Instruments and the Probes to which they are attached HSRL Fact Sheet

  8. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Stable Beams Radioactive Beams CARIBU Beams Floorplan Phone Map Experimental Equipment Control System (internal) The ATLAS Facility ATLAS Operations Group The ATLAS Operations Group. ATLAS (the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) is the world's first superconducting accelerator for projectiles heavier than the electron. This unique system is a DOE National Collaborative Research Facility open to scientists from all over the world. ATLAS consists of a sequence of machines where each

  9. $50 and up underground house book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehler, M.

    1981-01-01

    Earth-sheltered housing can be livable, compatible with nature, and inexpensive. Plans and designs for low-cost houses that are integrated with their environment make up most of this book. The author begins by outlining 23 advantages of underground housing and describing the histories of several unconventional buildings in the $50 to $500 price range. He also suggests where building materials can be bought and scrounged, describes construction techniques, and explains how to cope with building codes. Sketches, floorplans, and photographs illustrate the text. 8 references, 4 tables. (DCK)