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1

LQ Energy LDK Solar Q Cells JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LQ Energy LDK Solar Q Cells JV Jump to: navigation, search Name LQ Energy (LDK Solar & Q-Cells JV) Place Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Sector Solar Product Germany-based JV between LDK...

2

City of Palmyra, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Palmyra Palmyra Place Missouri Utility Id 14400 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Residential -Electric Heat Metered Separately Residential Residential- Partial or All- Electric Heat Residential Security Light Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.1050/kWh Commercial: $0.1020/kWh Industrial: $0.0951/kWh

3

Helix Atoll JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy Product California-based JV developing products and financing mechanisms for small wind turbines. References Helix & Atoll JV1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

4

5HVHDUFK $FWLYLWLHV LQ &RPSXWHU (QJLQHHULQJ DW WKH &RRUGLQDWHG 6FLHQFH /DERUDWRU\\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5HVHDUFK $FWLYLWLHV LQ &RPSXWHU (QJLQHHULQJ DW WKH &RRUGLQDWHG 6FLHQFH /DERUDWRU\\ Steven S. Lumetta (QJLQHHULQJ DW WKH 8QLYHUVLW\\ RI ,OOLQRLV · Computer Engineering specialization in ECE · faculty members

Lumetta, Steve

5

Manhattan Project: Operation Crossroads, Bikini Atoll, July 1946  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Crossroads Baker, Bikini Atoll, July 25, 1946 OPERATION CROSSROADS Crossroads Baker, Bikini Atoll, July 25, 1946 OPERATION CROSSROADS (Bikini Atoll, July 1946) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Even after the Trinity test and the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, military officials still knew far less than they would have liked about the effects, especially on naval targets, of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, the Joint Chiefs of Staff requested and received presidential approval to conduct a series of tests during summer 1946. Vice Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, head of the test series task force, proposed calling the series Operation "Crossroads." "It was apparent," he noted, "that warfare, perhaps civilization itself, had been brought to a turning point by this revolutionary weapon."

6

Characterization studies of actinide contamination on Johnston Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results that indicates that plutonium and americium contamination of Johnson Atoll soil and sludge from the cleanup plant settling pond is dispersed. The {sup 241}Am/{sup 239}Pu ratio was essentially identical for all analyzed material. Except for one ``hot particle,`` no discrete Pu particles were located in untreated coral soil by SEM even though our sample contained both {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu activity measurable by gammaray spectrometry. Alpha particle spectrometry analysis of sequentially filtered sludge showed small that activity is associated with particles as 0.4 {mu}m in diameter. Thin section analysis revealed that the ``hot particle`` was a fragment of stainless steel with a layer of oxidized Pu, U, and other metals deposited on the outside. This Pu-containing layer was covered with a layer of coral soil that formed on the oxidized Pu/U phase during the process of weathering on JA. Analyses of all samples except the ``hot particle`` with SEM or TEM coupled with EDS did not reveal the presence of any distinct Pu phases, despite measurable activity in these samples. Together, these findings are consistent with the Pu and Am being highly dispersed throughout the contaminated soil and sludge. Direct evidence for association of Pu with coral was observed in the thin section of the ``hot particle.`` A possible mechanism for the dispersal of contamination is that weathering of fragments from the aborted missile leads to complexation of Pu with calcium carbonate followed by adsorption onto the coral soil surface. This process has not led to measurable fractionation of Am from its Pu parent.

Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Gong, Meiling

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Radiological-dose assessments of atolls in the northern Marshall Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Marshall Islands in the Equatorial Pacific, specifically Enewetak and Bikini Atolls, were the site of US nuclear testing from 1946 through 1958. In 1978, the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey was conducted to evaluate the radiological conditions of two islands and ten atolls downwind of the proving grounds. The survey included aerial external gamma measurements and collection of soil, terrestrial, and marine samples for radionuclide analysis to determine the radiological dose from all exposure pathways. The methods and models used to estimate doses to a population in an environment where natural processes have acted on the source-term radionuclides for nearly 30 y, data bases developed for the models, and results of the radiological dose analyses are described.

Robison, W.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs  

SciTech Connect

The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll (Robison et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1997), and Utrok Island at Utrok Atoll (Robison, et al., 1999) indicate that about 95-99% of the total estimated dose to people who may return to live at the atolls today (Utrok Island is populated) is the result of exposure to {sup 137}Cs. External gamma exposure from {sup 137}Cs in the soil accounts for about 10 to 15% of the total dose and {sup 137}Cs ingested during consumption of local food crops such as drinking coconut meat and fluid (Cocos nucifera L.), copra meat and milk, Pandanus fruit, and breadfruit accounts for about 85 to 90%. The other 1 to 2% of the estimated dose is from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The {sup 90}Sr exposure is primarily through the food chain while the exposure to {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am is primarily via the inhalation pathway as a result of breathing re-suspended soil particles.

Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

9

Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining the cost and estimating the effectiveness of potential remedial measures, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for the Enewetak Atoll population group along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating in the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

10

An assessment of potential health impacts on Utrok Atoll from exposure to cesium-137 (137Cs) and plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Residual fallout contamination from the nuclear test program in the Marshall Islands is a concern to Marshall Islanders because of the potential health risks associated with exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment. Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been monitoring the amount of fallout radiation delivered to Utrok Atoll residents over the past 4 years. This briefing document gives an outline of our findings from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay monitoring programs. Additional information can be found on the Marshall Islands web site (http://eed.lnl.gov/mi/). Cesium-137 is an important radioactive isotope produced in nuclear detonations and can be taken up from coral soils into locally grown food crop products that form an important part of the Marshallese diet. The Marshall Islands whole body counting program has clearly demonstrated that the majority of Utrok Atoll residents acquire a very small but measurable quantity of cesium-137 in their bodies (Hamilton et al., 2006; Hamilton et. al., 2007a; 2007b;). During 2006, a typical resident of Utrok Atoll received about 3 mrem of radiation from internally deposited cesium-137 (Hamilton et al., 2007a). The population-average dose contribution from cesium-137 is around 2% of the total radiation dose that people normally experience from naturally occurring radiation sources in the Marshall Islands and is thousands of times lower than the level where radiation exposure is known to produce measurable health effects. The existing dose estimates from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay programs are also well below radiological protection standards for protection of the public as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies including the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claim Tribunal (NCT). Similarly, the level of internally deposited plutonium found in Utrok Atoll residents is well within the range normally expected for people living in the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the preliminary results of the bioassay program on Utrok Atoll (Hamilton et al., 2007b) provide clear evidence that residents of Utrok Atoll have never acquired a significant uptake of plutonium either through an acute exposure event or from long-term chronic exposure to plutonium in the environment. This information and data should provide a level of assurance to the Utrok Atoll population group and its leadership that the dose contribution from exposure to residual radioactive fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is very low, and is not likely to have any discernible impact on human health. We also estimate that the dose contribution based on current radiological exposure conditions will not produce any additional cancer fatalities (or any other measurable health condition) above that normally expected to arise in a population group of similar size. The potential risks from any genetic illnesses caused by exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment will be even lower still. In conclusion, the data and information developed from the radiological protection monitoring program on Utrok appear to support a consensus that it is safe to live on Utrok Atoll. The health risks from exposure to residual fallout contamination on the atoll are minimal when compared with other lifetime risks that people normally experience, and are very small when compared to the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people.

Hamilton, T

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

11

An updated dose assessment for a U.S. Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1975. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The corresponding 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.1 cSv, 13 cSv, and 15 cSv, respectively. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {plus_minus}35% of its expected value. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

GROSS BETA RADIOACTIVITY OF THE ALGAE AT ENIWETOK ATOLL, 1954-1956  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to determine the amounts of radioactivity in marine algae, water, and lagoon bottom sand collected at Eniwetok Atoll during the period April 1954 to April 1956. The highest levels of beta radioactivity of algae collected after the detonation of a nuclear device (Nectar) were in algae from those islands closest to the site of detonation and in the downwind path of the fallout. With time after detonation, the decline of radioactivity in the algae at Belle Island was faster than can be accounted for on the basis of physical decay alone. In March 1955, algae and bottom sand collected in the deeper waters (20 to 140 feet) of the lagoon, one half to two miles offshore, contained as much or more radioactivity than samples collected in the shallow water near shore. The radioactive decay rates of algae samples collected from Leroy and Henry Islands were greater than those of algae from other islands, indicating that there was less residual contamination from previous detonations at these two islands. Study of the radioactive decay rates of the algae at Belle Island showed that the radioactivity was decaying at a relatively low rate, which became slower with samples collected late in the survey. These observations indicate that the longer-lived isotopes were being taken up by the algae. (auth)

Palumbo, R.F.

1959-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor`s task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project.

Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A dose assessment for a U.S. nuclear test site -- Bikini Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. Here the authors provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 and strontium-90 to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The estimated maximum annual effective dose is 4.4 mSv y{sup {minus}1} when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 10 cSv, 14 cSv, and 16 cSv, respectively. An analysis of interindividual variability in 0- to 30-y expected integral dose indicates that 95% of Bikini residents would have expected doses within a factor of 3.4 above and 4.8 below the population-average value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {+-}35% of its expected value. The authors have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to less than 10% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Monitored plutonium aerosols at a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suspended plutonium in air was monitored for four periods near the operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. The monitoring periods were 14 October-14 November 1992, 20 October-15 November 1993, 16 August-3 November 1994, and 17 February-27 February 1995. Pairs of high volume air samplers were located at each of four locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quotes} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the hot soil gate of the sorter, the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved, and the {open_quotes}oversize soil{close_quotes} crushing area. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The median concentrations of Pu in {open_quotes}workplace{close_quotes} air (combined spoils pile, plant area, and clean pile sites) in 1992 was 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}), but increased to median values of 23000 aCi/m{sup 3} (852 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in August-November 1994 and 29800 aCi/m{sup 3} (1100 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in February 1995. The highest median value at the worksites (29800 aCi/m{sup 3}) was more than 200 times lower than the regulatory level. The highest observed value was 84200 aCi/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile site, and this was more than 70 times lower than the regulatory level. The conclusion was that, in spite of the dusty environment, and the increased level of specific activity, we did not find that the soil processing posed any significant risk to workers during the observation periods 1992-1995.

Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.O.; Johnson, J.S.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

16

Suspended plutonium aerosols near a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll in 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium aerosol monitoring was conducted for one month near the 1992 operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. Pairs of high volume cascade impactors and a high volume air sampler were located at each of three locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quote} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the-hot soil gate of the sorter, and the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, uncontaminated {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The three monitoring locations were extremely dusty, even though there were frequent rains during the period of operation. Total suspended particulate mass loadings were 178 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile, 93 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the plant area, and 79 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the clean pile during this period, when background mass loadings were 41 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. There was no practical difference in the aerosol specific activity between the three locations, however, which had a median value of 3.64 pCi/g (135 Bq/kg). The aerosol specific activity is enhanced by a factor of 3 over the specific activity of the processed contaminant soil. This is about the same enhancement factor as found by other studies of road traffic, bulldozing, and agricultural operations. Specific activity of processed soil was 1.35 pCi/g (50 Bq/kg). The median mass-loading of the three downwind sites was 109 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (uncorrected for the sea spray contribution), so that the median concentrations in air using the median aerosol specific activity was calculated to be 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}). Measured Pu concentrations ranged from 280 to 1508 aCi/m{sup 3} (10 to 56 {mu}Bq/m3).

Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.F.; Johnson, J.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Palmyra, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

402322°, -111.6988152° 402322°, -111.6988152° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1402322,"lon":-111.6988152,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Technical Basis Document: A Statistical Basis for Interpreting Urinary Excretion of Plutonium Based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for Selected Atoll Populations in the Marshall Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed refined statistical and modeling techniques to assess low-level uptake and urinary excretion of plutonium from different population group in the northern Marshall Islands. Urinary excretion rates of plutonium from the resident population on Enewetak Atoll and from resettlement workers living on Rongelap Atoll range from fallout. Consequently, the age-related trends in urinary excretion of plutonium from Marshallese populations can be described by either a long-term component from residual systemic burdens acquired from previous exposures to worldwide fallout or a prompt (and eventual long-term) component acquired from low-level systemic intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement of the northern Marshall Islands, or some combination of both.

Bogen, K; Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Martinelli, R E; Marchetti, A A; Kehl, S R; Langston, R G

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Technical Basis Document: A Statistical Basis for Interpreting Urinary Excretion of Plutonium Based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for Selected Atoll Populations in the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect

We have developed refined statistical and modeling techniques to assess low-level uptake and urinary excretion of plutonium from different population group in the northern Marshall Islands. Urinary excretion rates of plutonium from the resident population on Enewetak Atoll and from resettlement workers living on Rongelap Atoll range from <1 to 8 {micro}Bq per day and are well below action levels established under the latest Department regulation 10 CFR 835 in the United States for in vitro bioassay monitoring of {sup 239}Pu. However, our statistical analyses show that urinary excretion of plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) from both cohort groups is significantly positively associated with volunteer age, especially for the resident population living on Enewetak Atoll. Urinary excretion of {sup 239}Pu from the Enewetak cohort was also found to be positively associated with estimates of cumulative exposure to worldwide fallout. Consequently, the age-related trends in urinary excretion of plutonium from Marshallese populations can be described by either a long-term component from residual systemic burdens acquired from previous exposures to worldwide fallout or a prompt (and eventual long-term) component acquired from low-level systemic intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement of the northern Marshall Islands, or some combination of both.

Bogen, K; Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Martinelli, R E; Marchetti, A A; Kehl, S R; Langston, R G

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 1970 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4 % of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W; Stone, E; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

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21

Individual Radiological Protection Monitoring of Utrok Atoll Residents Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Bioassay  

SciTech Connect

This report contains individual radiological protection surveillance data developed during 2006 for adult members of a select group of families living on Utrok Atoll. These Group I volunteers all underwent a whole-body count to determine levels of internally deposited cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and supplied a bioassay sample for analysis of plutonium isotopes. Measurement data were obtained and the results compared with an equivalent set of measurement data for {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes from a second group of adult volunteers (Group II) who were long-term residents of Utrok Atoll. For the purposes of this comparison, Group II volunteers were considered representative of the general population on Utrok Atoll. The general aim of the study was to determine residual systemic burdens of fallout radionuclides in each volunteer group, develop data in response to addressing some specific concerns about the preferential uptake and potential health consequences of residual fallout radionuclides in Group I volunteers, and generally provide some perspective on the significance of radiation doses delivered to volunteers (and the general Utrok Atoll resident population) in terms of radiological protection standards and health risks. Based on dose estimates from measurements of internally deposited {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes, the data and information developed in this report clearly show that neither volunteer group has acquired levels of internally deposited fallout radionuclides specific to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands that are likely to have any consequence on human health. Moreover, the dose estimates are well below radiological protection standards as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies, and are very small when compared to doses from natural sources of radiation in the Marshall Islands and the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people. In general, the results from the whole-body counting measurements of 137Cs are consistent with our knowledge that a key pathway for exposure to residual fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is low-level chronic uptake of {sup 137}Cs from the consumption of locally grown produce (Robison et al., 1999). The error-weighted, average body burden of {sup 137}Cs measured in Group I and Group II volunteers was 0.31 kBq and 0.62 kBq, respectively. The associated average, annual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) delivered to Group I and Group II volunteers from {sup 137}Cs during the year of measurement was 2.1 and 4.0 mrem. For comparative purposes, the annual dose limit for members of the public as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is 100 mrem. Consequently, specific concerns about elevated levels of {sup 137}Cs uptake and higher risks from radiation exposure to Group I volunteers would be considered unfounded. Moreover, the urinary excretion of plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) from Group I and Group II volunteers is statistically indistinguishable. In this case, the error-weighted, average urinary excretion of {sup 239}Pu from Group I volunteers of 0.10 {mu}Bq per 24-h void with a range between -0.01 and 0.23 {mu}Bq per 24-h void compares with an error-weighted average from Group II volunteers of 0.11 {mu}Bq per 24-h void with a range between -0.20 and 0.47 {mu}Bq per 24-h void. The range in urinary excretion of {sup 239}Pu from Utrok Atoll residents is very similar to that observed for other population groups in the Marshall Islands (Bogen et al., 2006; Hamilton et al., 2006a; 2006b; 2006c, 2007a; 2007b; 2007c) and is generally considered representative of worldwide background.

Hamilton, T; Kehl, S; Brown, T; Martinelli, R; Hickman, D; Jue, T; Tumey, S; Langston, R

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

A comparison of independently conducted dose assessments to determine compliance and resettlement options for the people of Rongelap Atoll  

SciTech Connect

Rongelap Island was the home of Marshallese people numbering less than 120 in 1954; 67 were on the island and severely exposed to radioactive fallout from an atomic weapons test in March of that year. Those resident on Rongelap were evacuated 50 h after the test, returned 3 y later, then voluntarily left their home island in 1985 due to their ongoing fear of radiation exposure from residual radioactive contamination. Following international negotiations in 1991, a Memorandum of Understanding (NIOU) was signed in early 1992 between the Republic of the Marshall Islands Government, the Rongelap Atoll Local Government, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of the Interior. In this MOU it was agreed that the Republic of the Marshall Islands, with the aid of the U.S. Department of Energy, would carry out independent dose assessments for the purpose of assisting and advising the Rongelap community on radiological issues related to a safe resettlement of Rongelap. In 1994, four independent assessments were reported, including one from each of the following entities: Marshall Islands Nationwide Radiological Study; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; an independent advisor from the United Kingdom (MCT); and a committee of the National Research Council. All four assessments concluded that possibly more than 25% of the adult population could exceed the 1 mSv y{sup -1} dose level based on strict utilization of a local food diet. The purpose of this report is to summarize the methodology, assumptions, and findings from each of four assessments; to summarize the recommendations related to mitigation and resettlement options; to discuss unique programmatic aspects of the study; and to consider the implications of the findings to the future of the Rongelap people. 63 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Simon, S.L.; Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thorne, M.C. [Electrowatt Engineering Services, Sussex (United Kingdom)] [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Analysis of radiation exposure - service personnel on Rongerik Atoll: Operation Castle - Shot Bravo. Technical report, 12 March 1985-12 June 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

External and internal doses are reconstructed for the 28 American servicemen stationed on Rongerik Atoll, Marshall Islands, who were exposed to fallout on 1-2 March 1954 from Shot Bravo of Operation CASTLE. External doses are determined from limited radiation survey and film-badge information. Internal-dose commitments are derived from urinalysis data. The magnitude of the calculated activity intake suggests the principal pathways. Reconstructed film-badge doses are approximately 40 rem, with adjustments from individual activity scenarios, as available. Internal dose commitments to the thyroid and large intestine (nearly all first-year dose) provide the only significant increments to the external dose. Total doses are approximately 230 rem to the thyroid, 115 rem to the lower large intestine, 85 rem to the upper large intestine, and about 40 to 50 rem to all other organs.

Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.; Phillips, J.; Thomas, C.

1987-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium-Contaminated Soil Remediation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m{sup 3} of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain with 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity. In previous IV tasks, ORNL has (1) evaluated and tested the soil sorter system software and hardware and (2) evaluated the quality control (QC) program used at the soil sorter plant. The IV has found that the soil sorter decontamination was effective and significantly reduced plutonium contamination in the soil processed at the JA site. The Field Command Defense Threat Reduction Agency currently plans to re-use soil from the clean pile as a cover to remaining contamination in portions of the radiological control area. Therefore, ORNL was requested to provide an IV. The survey team collected samples from 103 random locations within the top 4 ft of the clean storage pile. The samples were analyzed in the on-site radioanalytical counting laboratory with an American Nuclear Systems (ANS) field instrument used for the detection of low-energy radiation. Nine results exceeded the JA soil screening guideline for distributed contamination of 13.5 pCi/g for total TRUs, ranging from 13.7 to 125.9 pCi/g. Because of these results, the goal of showing with 95% confidence that 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to 13.5 pCi/g-TRU activity cannot be met. The value of 13.5 pCi/g represents the 88th percentile rather than the 95th percentile in a nonparametric one-sided upper 90% confidence limit. Therefore, at the 95% confidence level, 88% of the clean pile is projected to be below the 13.5-pCi/g goal. The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual recommends use of a nonparametric statistical ''Sign Test'' to demonstrate compliance with release criteria for TRU. Although this survey was not designed to use the sign test, the data herein would demonstrate that the median (50%) of the clean storage pile is below the l3.5-pCi/g derived concentration guideline level. In other words, with the caveat that additional investigation of elevated concentrations was not performed, the data pass the sign test at the 13.5-pCi/g level. Additionally, the lateral extent of the pile was gridded, and 10% of the grid blocks was scanned with field instruments for the detection of low-energy radiation coupled to ratemeter/scalers to screen for the presence of hot particles. No hot particles were detected in the top 1 cm of the grid blocks surveyed.

Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

LQ Optimal Control of Wind Turbines in Hybrid Power Systems N.A. Cutululis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, "Dunrea de Jos" University of Galati, Abstract: Wind ­ diesel taken into account for the design of a wind ­ diesel power system is the wind power penetration, which electrical load. However, the penetration of wind power into small diesel-based grids is limited because

26

Adaptive Statistical Language Modeling: A Maximum Entropy Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Jordan and Syria · Explore ancient Aleppo, bustling Damascus and the desert city of Palmyra · Enjoy

27

Comparison of Two Satellite-based Rainfall Algorithms Using Pacific Atoll Raingage Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall estimates for two simple satellite-based rainfall algorithms are verified over the tropical Pacific using a new method that incorporates sparsely distributed raingages. The resulting linear regression relationship between monthly areal ...

Mark L. Morrissey; J. Scott Greene

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Uncharted Waters: Bivalves of Midway Atoll and Integrating Mathematics into Biology Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Academies Press. NRC (National Research Council). (Education Standards. Washington, D.C. NRC (National ResearchEngineering Education. NRC (National Research Council). (

McCully, Kristin M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

http://au.news.yahoo.com//051130/3/x0lq.html Wednesday November 30, 05:37 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to negotiations this week for a six-nation project to build an experimental nuclear fusion reactor in France its first nuclear reactor in Cadarache, France. Operation of the plant from 2016 is hoped will result Talks For Int'l Nuclear Fusion Project SEOUL, Nov 30 Asia Pulse - South Korea is to play host

30

Bayesian Estimation of Risk-Premia in an APT Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Darsinos, Theofanis; Satchell, Stephen E

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

INTEGRAL spectral variability study of the atoll 4U 1820-30: first detection of hard X-ray emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the 4-200 keV spectral and temporal behaviour of the low mass X-ray binary 4U 1820-30 with INTEGRAL during 2003-2005. This source as been observed in both the soft (banana) and hard (island) spectral states. A high energy tail, above 50 keV, in the hard state has been observed for the first time. This places the source in the category of X-ray bursters showing high-energy emission. The tail can be modeled as a soft power law component, with the photon index of ~2.4, on top of thermal Comptonization emission from a plasma with the electron temperature of kT_e~6 keV and optical depth of \\tau~4. Alternatively, but at a lower goodness of the fit, the hard-state broad band spectrum can be accounted for by emission from a hybrid, thermal-nonthermal, plasma. During this monitoring the source spent most of the time in the soft state, usual for this source, and the >~4 keV spectra are represented by thermal Comptonization with kT_e~3 keV and \\tau~6-7.

Antonella Tarana; Angela Bazzano; Pietro Ubertini; Andrzej A. Zdziarski

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

Policy Myopia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Aidt, Toke S; Dutta, J; Loukoianova, Elena

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

Marshall Islands Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the accidental exposure of people present on two atolls, Rongelap and Utrk, to fallout from the U.S. nuclear test at the Bikini atoll. The program has two components: A...

34

Search for 3rd Generation Vector Leptoquarks in the Di-tau Di-jet Channel in Proton Antiproton Collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We search for third generation vector leptoquarks (V LQ3) produced in colliding p{bar p} beams operating at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. We use 322 pb{sup -1} of data to search for the V LQ3 signal in the di-tau plus di-jet channel. For the first time, the full matrix element is used in the Monte Carlo simulation of this signal. With no events observed in the signal region, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the V LQ3 pair production cross section of {sigma} < 344fb, assuming Yang-Mills couplings and Br(V LQ3 {yields} b{tau}) = 1, and a lower limit on the V LQ3 mass of m{sub V LQ3} > 317 GeV=c{sup 2}. If theoretical uncertainties on the cross section are applied in the least favorable manner the results are {sigma} < 360fb and m{sub V LQ3} > 294 GeV=c{sup 2}. The Minimal coupling V LQ3 result is an upper limit on the cross section of {sigma} < 493fb ({sigma} < 610fb) and the lower limit on the mass is m{sub V LQ3} > 251 GeV=c{sup 2} (m{sub V LQ3} > 223 GeV=c{sup 2}) for the nominal (1{sigma} varied) theoretical expectation.

Forrester, Stanley Scott; /UC, Davis

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Memories of War: Exploring Victim-Victimizer Perspectives in Critical Content-Based Instruction in Japanese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

online materials on Bravo nuclear test and other incidentsbomb test in Bikini Atoll prompted a major anti-nuclear

Kubota, Ryuko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Optimal congestion treatment for bilateral electricity trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Neuhoff, Karsten

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Output, Inflation and the New Keynesian Phillips Curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Chadha, Jagjit S; Nolan, Charles

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

Instrumentation and Quench Protection for LARP Nb3Sn Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instrumentation and Quench Protection for LARP Nb 3 Snis a primary goal. The instrumentation is consequently a keydetails of the LQ instrumentation and its implementation

Felice, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Kingman reef  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum describes the search for an acceptable test site for surface detonations of nuclear devices. Concern is expressed over possible Tsunami hazards. Kingman Reef is recommended as a designated target area, and it is recommended that Palmyra Island be investigated as to availability.

Gilbert, F. C.

1965-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

Optimal Simple Rules for the Conduct of Monetary and Fiscal Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Chadha, Jagjit S; Nolan, Charles

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lq palmyra atoll" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Productivity and Preferences in a Small Open Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Chadha, Jagjit S; Janssen, N; Nolan, Charles

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

(Hemi)cellulose degradation by microorganisms from the . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comparison of Drop Size Distribution Parameter (D0) and Rain Rate from S-Band Dual-Polarized Ground Radar, TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), and Combined PRTMI: Two Events from Kwajalein Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of the drop size distribution parameter [median volume diameter (D0)] and rain rate (R) from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) as well as from combined PRTRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) algorithms ...

V. N. Bringi; Gwo-Jong Huang; S. Joseph Munchak; Christian D. Kummerow; David A. Marks; David B. Wolff

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Policy Compromises: Corruption and Regulation in a Dynamic Democracy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Aidt, Toke S

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Kurt M. Schaefer Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission. Scripps Institution of Oceanography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kurt M. Schaefer Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission. Scripps Institution of Oceanography 8604 of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, near Clipperton Atoll in the eastern Pacific Ocean 98 Abstract.-Spawning of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, around Clipperton Atoll, in the eastern Pacific Ocean, occurred between

46

ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

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47

New Test Statistics for Market Timing with Application to Emerging markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Sancetta, Alessio; Satchell, Stephen E

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effect of Elastic Interaction Energy on the Distribution of Coherent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom ..... Y. Wang, L.-Q. Chen, and A. G. Khachaturyan, Shape Evolution of a Precipitate during Strain-. Induced...

49

FortyPoint Seven | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name FortyPoint Seven Place England, United Kingdom Zip BH14 8LQ Sector Biofuels Product A Biofuels company founded by John Nicholas, one of Biofuels Corporation...

50

CeCap LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name CeCap LLP Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1S 2LQ Product London-based investment boutique which provides investment advice to, and invests in, small to mediun size...

51

Reefs and islands of the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean: why it is the world's largest no-take marine protected area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are standard error bars. Figure 6. Change in reef fish species richness across seven countries in the Indian out in 2006 in all atolls (Tamelander et al., 2009) based on standard port survey methods (Hewitt

Purkis, Sam

52

The accretion process in neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There had been long-standing fundamental problems in the spectral studies of accreting neutron stars (NSs) in low-mass X-ray binaries involving the X-ray spectral decomposition, the relations between subtypes (mainly atoll ...

Lin, Dacheng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Ghost of the Bomb : the Bravo Medical Program, scientific uncertainty, and the legacy of U.S. Cold War science, 1954-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure form Pacific Nuclear Test. 24 February 1994.A. Blowing on the Wind: The Nuclear Test Ban Debate, 1954 Islanders Returning to Nuclear Test Atoll After an Exile of

Harkewicz, Laura J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Seach for second - generation leptoquarks in proton - anti-proton collisions  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the search for second-generation leptoquarks (LQ{sub 2}) in around 114pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions, recorded with the D0 detector between September 2002 and June 2003 at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96TeV. The predictions of the Standard Model and models including scalar leptoquark production are compared to the data for various kinematic distributions. Since no excess of data over the Standard Model prediction has been observed, a lower limit on the leptoquark mass of M{sub LQ{sub 2}}{sup {beta}=1} > 200GeV has been calculated at 95% confidence level (C.L.), assuming a branching fraction of {beta} = BF(LQ{sub 2} {yields} {mu}j) = 100% into a charged lepton and a quark. The corresponding limit for {beta} = 1/2 is M{sub LQ{sub 2}}{sup {beta}=1/2} > 152 GeV. Finally, the results were combined with those from the search in the same channel at D0 Run I. This combination yields the exclusion limit of M{sub LQ{sub 2}}{sup {beta}=1} > 222 GeV (177GeV) for (beta) = 1 (1/2) at 95% C.L., which is the best exclusion limit for scalar second-generation leptoquarks (for {beta} = 1) from a single experiment to date.

Christiansen, Tim U.; /Munich U.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Large improved Wick rotation prescription in stochastic quantization of dissipative systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply Stochastic Quantization Method to dissipative systems at finite temperature. Especially, the relation of SQM to the Caldeira-Leggett model is clarified ensuring that the naive Wick rotation is improved in this context. We show that the Langevin system obtained by the \\lq\\lq Improved Wick Rotation " prescription is equivalent to an ideal friction case ( low temperature limit) in the C-L model. We derive, based on our approach, a general formula on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for higher derivative frictions.

Nakazawa, N; Naohito Nakazawa; Eisaku Sakane

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Large Improved Wick Rotation Prescription in Stochastic Quantization of Dissipative Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply Stochastic Quantization Method to dissipative systems at finite temperature. Especially, the relation of SQM to the Caldeira-Leggett model is clarified ensuring that the naive Wick rotation is improved in this context. We show that the Langevin system obtained by the \\lq\\lq Improved Wick Rotation " prescription is equivalent to an ideal friction case ( low temperature limit) in the C-L model. We derive, based on our approach, a general formula on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for higher derivative frictions.

Naohito Nakazawa; Eisaku Sakane

1994-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Restructuring and Privatisation of Electricity Distribution and Supply Business in Brazil: A Social Cost-Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ exw xqiruwx0 qdwho| grhv qrw fdswxuh wkh srvvleoh gl#30;huhqw delolw| ri sulydwh frpsdqlhv lq frqwudfwlqj wkhlu hohfwulflw| sxufkdvhv1 Doo yduldeohv duh h{suhvvhg lq uhdo ydoxhv1 61 Surmhfwhg qhw rshudwlqj uhyhqxh shu nZk xqghu sulydwh rzqhuvkls nhhsv... ; uhylhzv ri Hvfhovd1 Dsshqgl{ 8 frqwdlqv ghwdlov rq sulfh frqwurov1 71 Qhw rshudwlqj frqwuroodeoh frvwv shu nZk idoo dw wkh h{shfwhg udwh ri sur0 gxfwlylw| jurzwk1 Wklv lv jlyhq e| wkh uhjxodwru dv [ s +whfkqlfdo surgxf0 59 Iru pruh ghwdlov rq wkh...

Mota, Raffaella L

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

58

Unions: Rent Extractors or Creators?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

| surylglqj djhqf| vhuylfhv wkdw lqfuhdvh zrunsodfh surgxfwlylw|1 Lq rxu prgho/ wkh xqlrq ohdghuvkls pdnhv d fkrlfh ehwzhhq wkh wzr w|shv ri dfwlylwlhv/ dqg zh ghprqvwudwh zk| lw lv rswl0 pdo wr hqjdjh lq erwk= uhqw h{wudfwlrq lqfuhdvhv wkh edujdlqhg zdjh udwh... | vshdnlqj rqo| dssolhv wr wkh vkruw0uxq/ lw srlqwv wr dqrwkhu uhdvrq zk| surgxfw pdunhw ghuhjxodwlrq pljkw kdyh odvwlqj h#30;hfwv rq hpsor|phqw= wkh irfxv ri xqlrqv lv vkliwhg wrzdugv zrunsodfh lqqrydwlrqv wkdw lqfuhdvh surgxfwlylw| dqg xowlpdwho| hpsor...

Aidt, Toke S; Sena, Vania

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

Can Drugs Enhance Hypofractionated Radiotherapy? A Novel Method of Modeling Radiosensitization Using In Vitro Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy (hRT) is being explored for a number of malignancies. The potential benefit of giving concurrent chemotherapy with hRT is not known. We sought to predict the effects of combined modality treatments by using mathematical models derived from laboratory data. Methods and Materials: Data from 26 published clonogenic survival assays for cancer cell lines with and without the use of radiosensitizing chemotherapy were collected. The first three data points of the RT arm of each assay were used to derive parameters for the linear quadratic (LQ) model, the multitarget (MT) model, and the generalized linear quadratic (gLQ) model. For each assay and model, the difference between the predicted and observed surviving fractions at the highest tested RT dose was calculated. The gLQ model was fitted to all the data from each RT cell survival assay, and the biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2s) of clinically relevant hRT regimens were calculated. The increase in cell kill conferred by the addition of chemotherapy was used to estimate the EQD2 of hRT along with a radiosensitizing agent. For comparison, this was repeated using conventionally fractionated RT regimens. Results: At a mean RT dose of 8.0 Gy, the average errors for the LQ, MT, and gLQ models were 1.63, 0.83, and 0.56 log units, respectively, favoring the gLQ model (p < 0.05). Radiosensitizing chemotherapy increased the EQD2 of hRT schedules by an average of 28% to 82%, depending on disease site. This increase was similar to the gains predicted for the addition of chemotherapy to conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: Based on published in vitro assays, the gLQ equation is superior to the LQ and MT models in predicting cell kill at high doses of RT. Modeling exercises demonstrate that significant increases in biologically equivalent dose may be achieved with the addition of radiosensitizing agents to hRT. Clinical study of this approach is warranted.

Ohri, Nitin; Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Translational Research in Radiation Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer (Israel)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nonparametric Estimation of Multivariate Distributions with Given Marginals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ri wklv qdwxuh/ lw zrxog eh frqyhqlhqw wr eh deoh qrw rqo| wr hvwlpdwh wkh pdujlqdov vhsdudwho| iurp wkh zkroh mrlqw glvwulexwlrq/ ru frsxod/ exw dovr wr #31;qg zd|v wkdw uhtxluh ihzhu dvvxpswlrqv rq wkh vlgh ri wkh sudfwlwlrqhu1 Qrqsdudphwulf... dv wkh rqh iru wkh klvwrjudp hvwlpdwru1 Lq wklv uhvshfw/ nhuqho vprrwkhuv zrxog ohdg wr d eldv qrw kljkhu wkdq #17; E6 32 #28; #23; Wkh uhdvrq iru qrw fdofxodwlqj wkh frqvwdqw lv wkdw lq rughu wr #31;qg wkh whup wkdw lv #17; E6 3 #28; c lw lv...

Sancetta, Alessio

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lq palmyra atoll" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sustainable Future for Bioenergy To meet the mandated national bioenergy goals, the evolving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Future for Bioenergy To meet the mandated national bioenergy goals, the evolving region. While bioenergy demand and end use may be FRQFHQWUDWHG LQ KLJKO\\ SRSXODWHG DUHDV LWV SURGXFWLRQ Mapping the future of bioenergy with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and other cutting edge data

62

Climate Coalitions in an IntegratedAssessment Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytically tractable approximation of a numerical model is used to investigate coalition formation between nine major world regions with regard to their policies for greenhouse gas emission reduction. Full cooperation is not individually rational. ... Keywords: LQ games, climate change, coalition formation, optimal emission control

Richard S. J. Tol

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Best Approximation in the Mean by Analytic and Harmonic Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* *ng the annihilator Ann (Hp) in Lq(T, d`)as Hq0= {f 2 Hq : f(0) = 0}, q = __p__pt-u1rns* * out is organized as follows. In Section 2we prove the exi* *stence of best approximations and characterize them

McCarthy, John E.

64

Digital Resource Center Text Topic - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2007 ... Print this topic. Topic Title Article and Instructional Tutorial: An integrated framework for multi-scale materials simulation and design ... A detailed example is provided for the Al-Cu binary system. CITATION: Z.-K. Liu, L.-Q. Chen...

65

A Model-Based Evaluation of Sorptive Reactivities of Hydrous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vittata Land monitoring of phytoremoval efficiency. Environ Sci Technol. 37:5008­5014. Fransson AM. 2001. Commun Soil Sci Plant Anal. 32:2469­2484. Golberg S, Glaubig RA. 1988. Anion Sorption on a calcareous, montmorillonitic soil- Arsenic. Soil Sci Soc Am J. 52:1297­1300. Gonzaga MIS, Santos JAG, Ma LQ. 2006. Arsenic

Burgos, William

66

Inflation and Price Level Targeting in a New Keynesian Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wkh ohyho lpsolhg e| XN pdunhw uhdo lqwhuhvw udwhv/ 31:8(1 Zh fdq fdofxodwh wkh uhpdlqlqj sdudphwhuv/ qc Kc Sc +c #16;c ,c #7;cu dqg w lq wxuq1 Iluvw zh kdyh 5 w w #3; Eo n #6;#28; r & #21; g #7; #22; r & 3 c +6158, zkhuh zh kdyh xvhg wkh vwhdg...

Chadha, Jagjit S; Nolan, Charles

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Strategic Consensus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

| frqvwudlqwv dv iroorzv= X S iE#4; | c #4; 2| #28; G #28;E#4; | c #4; 2| #28; q-c#28; E#4; | #28; #24; Rq-c#28; 2 E#4; 2| #28; #24; E#3; R#28;q-j#23; Dq lqfuhdvh lq uhvrxufh dydlodelolw| vkliwv wkh xwlolw| iurqwlhu rxw1 Wklv lv ehfdxvh - udlvhv wkh...

Aidt, Toke S

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

DISSIPATIVITY AND STABILITY OF INTERCONNECTIONS Jan C. Willems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that exchanges supply (of energy, or mass, or whatever is relevant for the situation at hand) with its the rate of supply absorbed by the system, while the component V : ' d ' models the supply stored. V in the non-symmetric case. In the LQ case, dissipativity involves a supply rate that is a QDF. Thus we

69

Bernstein Approximations to the Copula Function and Portfolio Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surri ri wkhruhp 5 lq wkh dsshqgl{,/ wklv lv zk| zh fdq mxvw vxewudfw #4; #4; #4; #4; #4; & iurp #28;E#4; c #23;#23;#23;c #4; & #28; dqg dgg lw rxwvlgh wkh Ehuqvwhlq rshudwru1 Wkhq/ zkdw zh rewdlq lv +9,1 Wkh uhdvrq iru h{solflwo| h{wudfwlqj wkh whup...

Sancetta, Alessio; Satchell, Stephen E

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman approach to optimal trade execution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optimal trade execution problem is formulated in terms of a mean-variance tradeoff, as seen at the initial time. The mean-variance problem can be embedded in a linear-quadratic (LQ) optimal stochastic control problem. A semi-Lagrangian scheme is ... Keywords: HJB equation, Mean-variance tradeoff, Optimal execution, Semi-Lagrangian discretization, Viscosity solution

Peter A. Forsyth

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Real Time Econometrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

<<9, lqwurgxfhv wkh lghd ri wkh colihwlph* ri dq hfrqrphwulf prgho1 Shvdudq dqg Wlpphupdqq +5333, sorw rxw d vhtxhqfh ri lqglfdwru yduldeohv wudfnlqj wkh lqfoxvlrq ru h{foxvlrq ri d sduwlfxodu uhjuhvvru lq wkh iruhfdvwlqj prgho dqg #31;qg wkdw vrph yduldeohv gurs...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Timmermann, Allan

72

Forecasting Time Series Subject to Multiple Structural Breaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suhglfwlrqv duh iruphg e| lqwhjudwlqj ryhu wkh k|shu sdudphwhuv iurp wkh phwd glvwulexwlrqv wkdw fkdudfwhul}h wkh vwrfkdv0 wlf euhdn srlqw surfhvv1 Lq dq dssolfdwlrq wr XV Wuhdvxu| eloo udwhv/ zh #31;qg wkdw wkh phwkrg ohdgv wr ehwwhu rxw0ri0vdpsoh iruhfdvwv...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Pettenuzzo, Davide; Timmermann, Allan

73

Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Pareto Optimal Solutions of Cooperative Differential Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present necessary as well as sufficient conditions for the existence of a Pareto optimum for cooperative differential games. The obtained results are used to analyze the regular indefinite linear quadratic differential game. For the ... Keywords: LQ theory, Pareto efficiency, cooperative differential games, dynamic optimization

Jacob Engwerda

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

When I began this project in 1998, I sought to challenge conventional narratives of "the nuclear age" as a technological and a geopolitical rupture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atom promulgated a new world order that replaced imperialism with "the bomb." But it was clear woven into the fabric of the nuclear age. Congolese uranium powered the Hiroshima bomb. Uranium of atomic test sites makes the point: Bikini Atoll, Semipalatinsk, Australian Aboriginal lands, the Sahara

75

Operation REDWING 1956. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

REDWING was a 17-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapons test series conducted in the Marshall Islands at Enewetak and Bikini atolls in spring and summer 1956. This is a report of DOD personnel in REDWING with an emphasis on operations and radiological safety.

Bruce-Henderson, S.; Gladeck, F.R.; Hallowell, J.H.; Martin, E.J.; McMullan, F.W.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Magnetic Confinement Fusion at the Crossroads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atoll: 15MT yield References - "Dark Sun" by Richard Rhodes, 1995 "History of Soviet Fusion", V = 12m ­ Pfusion = 880 MW Ref: V.D. Shafranov, "History of Soviet Fusion" Physics-Uspekhi 4 835, culminating in TFTR (US), JET (EU), JT-60 (Japan) #12;MGB / UT / 070307 19 1973 Oil Embargo - Energy R

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

78

Mountain Waves in the Tropical Pacific Atmosphere: A Comparison of Vertical Wind Fluctuations over Pohnpei and Christmas Island Using VHF Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare vertical wind fluctuations observed by VHF radar wind profilers in the tropical troposphere over a large, mountainous island (Pohnpei, at 7N, 158E) and a large, low-profile atoll (Christmas Island, at 2N, 157W). The major ...

Ben B. Balsley; David A. Carter

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pleistocene hinterland evolution of the active Banda Arc: Surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia AND Hinterland emergence of the active Banda arc-continent collision: Metamorphism, geochronology, and structure of the uplifted Kisar Atoll, Indonesia and related Banda Arc: surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

Seamons, Kent E.

80

Quality Control and Calibration of the Dual-Polarization Radar at Kwajalein, RMI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dual-polarization weather radar on the Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (KPOL) is one of the only full-time (24/7) operational S-band dual-polarimetric (DP) radars in the tropics. Through the use of KPOL DP and ...

David A. Marks; David B. Wolff; Lawrence D. Carey; Ali Tokay

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lq palmyra atoll" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CX-005999: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

999: Categorical Exclusion Determination 999: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Continental Casting, LLC - Compressed Air Improvements CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/31/2011 Location(s): Monroe City, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Missouri Department of Natural Resources proposes to provide $69,066 of State Energy Program funds to Continental Casting, LLC, at the Monroe City Plant and the Palmyra Plant. Continental Castings is proposing lighting replacement and compressed air system improvement projects. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005999.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005998: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006024: Categorical Exclusion Determination

82

Implementation of supersymmetric processes in the HERWIG event generator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. [4, 5, 6], the mass and decay spectra are fed in from a data file. In particular, we have provided a separate code (ISAWIG) for the conversion of data from ISAJET [9]. This way, the masses of the sparticles and their R-parity conserving decay rates... ), and the following coefficients C?? : CLL = Lq sin 2?W Ni4Nj4 ?Ni3Nj3 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z + LqiLqj u?M2qL ; (3.30) 15 CLR = Lq sin 2?W Ni3Nj3 ?Ni4Nj4 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z ? LqiLqjt?M2qL ; (3.31) CRL = Rq sin 2?W Ni4Nj4 ?Ni3Nj3 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z ? RqiRqjt?M2qR ; (3...

Moretti, Stefano; Odagiri, Kosuke; Richardson, P; Seymour, Michael H; Webber, Bryan R

83

STUDIES ON LARGE AREA SUB-FABRIC BURNS  

SciTech Connect

The detonation of shot one at Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954, produced a fallout of radioactive ash upon Rongelap Atoll, Marshall Islands. The distribution of the radioactive ash on the islands and in the plants and animals of the area has been studied and evaluated. During the first expedition to Rongelap Atoll on March 26, 1954, biological samples were collected and measurements made of the radiation contamination. On three additional expeditions extensive collections of material were made for this study, the last on January 25-30, 1955. The decline in radioactivity was measured in 1499 samples of fish, invertebrates, land plants, algae, birds, plankton, soil, and water from the Rongelap area. During this study particular emphasis was placed upon evaluation of the radioactivity in food used by the natives. Coconut milk collected on March 26, 1954, contained 1.03 microcuries per kilogram of wet tissue while the coconut meat had 1.16 mu c/kg. By January 25-30, 1955, the level in coconut milk had declined to 0.041 mu c/kg and the meat to 0.036 mu c/ kg. Fish muscle on March 26, 1954, averaged 2.74 mu c/kg and fish liver 204.0 mu c/kg. The decline to January 25-30 was 0.10 mu c/kg for the muscle and 3.52 mu c/kg for the liver of fish. Somewhat similar declines were found for clam muscle, crab muscle, bird muscle and liver, and for squash, papaya, arrowroot and pandanus. The level of radioactivity was highest in the northern portion of the atoll, except for samples of algae and fish-eating birds, collected during January 1955 from the southern part of the atoll, which had higher levels of radioactivity than samples collected from the northern islands on the same date. This may indicate a translocation of radioactive materials within the lagoon. (auth)

Berkley, K.M.; Pearse, H.E.

1957-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Augus t 5, 1986 CORNELL UNDULATOR/SUMMARY OF DISCUSSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; 97 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 99 99 93 ~ ~ ~ 6 I 4 41 ttl 00 00 93 $ 97 ~ 99 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 99 99 ~ ffi 63 59 ~ ~ ~ ~ 16 44 LQ ~ ~ ~ 'Jl ~ ~ 34 l3 12 I 18 55 ~ 63 ro 57 54 51 ~ ~ ~ ~ ttl ~ ~ ]) ~ ~ l3 l 16 ~ ~ 55 53 ~ 47 4'1 ~ ttl ~ 37 :E ~ l3 32 31 1I 29 28 28 17 I 15 47 54 54 51 ~ Ii) ~ ~ ~ 'Jl ~ 34 l

Kemner, Ken

85

Poincare_and_DNA - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V 9I&H%F-$!31#=)4@@B!G\\"F-7%$\\"3g?FMQNPFSF-$!3t(*f$e&p*y\\"RF-$\\"3,bZu; y) fi'F[[t7%$\\"3!R!GiY2([d%F-$!3QJ<lq.:)[$F-$\\"3wCwEJi!fF\\"F-7%$\\"3w!f'3?

86

The Evolution of Climate Sensitivity and Climate Feedbacks in the Community Atmosphere Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also be decomposed into SW and LW components (ASCF and ALCF, respectively). The radiative kernels used the albedo TABLE 2. Feedbacks (lX; W m22 K21 ), ALCF and ASCF cloud feedback and geff (K) from CAM4 and CAM5 SOM runs and Cess experiments as described in the text. Simulation la lTs lTp lLR lq ALCF ASCF geff

Gettelman, Andrew

87

Search for single production of scalar leptoquarks in p anti-p collisions decaying into muons and quarks with the D0 detector  

SciTech Connect

We report on a search for second generation leptoquarks (LQ{sub 2}) which decay into a muon plus quark in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the D0 detector using an integrated luminosity of about 300 pb{sup -1}. No evidence for a leptoquark signal is observed and an upper bound on the product of the cross section for single leptoquark production times branching fraction {beta} into a quark and a muon was determined for second generation scalar leptoquarks as a function of the leptoquark mass. This result has been combined with a previously published D0 search for leptoquark pair production to obtain leptoquark mass limits as a function of the leptoquark-muon-quark coupling, {lambda}. Assuming {lambda} = 1, lower limits on the mass of a second generation scalar leptoquark coupling to a u quark and a muon are m{sub LQ{sub 2}} > 274 GeV and m{sub LQ{sub 2}} > 226 GeV for {beta} = 1 and {beta} = 1/2, respectively.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A generalized linear-quadratic model incorporating reciprocal time pattern of radiation damage repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: It has been conventionally assumed that the repair rate for sublethal damage (SLD) remains constant during the entire radiation course. However, increasing evidence from animal studies suggest that this may not the case. Rather, it appears that the repair rate for radiation-induced SLD slows down with increasing time. Such a slowdown in repair would suggest that the exponential repair pattern would not necessarily accurately predict repair process. As a result, the purpose of this study was to investigate a new generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model incorporating a repair pattern with reciprocal time. The new formulas were tested with published experimental data. Methods: The LQ model has been widely used in radiation therapy, and the parameter G in the surviving fraction represents the repair process of sublethal damage with T{sub r} as the repair half-time. When a reciprocal pattern of repair process was adopted, a closed form of G was derived analytically for arbitrary radiation schemes. The published animal data adopted to test the reciprocal formulas. Results: A generalized LQ model to describe the repair process in a reciprocal pattern was obtained. Subsequently, formulas for special cases were derived from this general form. The reciprocal model showed a better fit to the animal data than the exponential model, particularly for the ED50 data (reduced {chi}{sup 2}{sub min} of 2.0 vs 4.3, p = 0.11 vs 0.006), with the following gLQ parameters: {alpha}/{beta} = 2.6-4.8 Gy, T{sub r} = 3.2-3.9 h for rat feet skin, and {alpha}/{beta} = 0.9 Gy, T{sub r} = 1.1 h for rat spinal cord. Conclusions: These results of repair process following a reciprocal time suggest that the generalized LQ model incorporating the reciprocal time of sublethal damage repair shows a better fit than the exponential repair model. These formulas can be used to analyze the experimental and clinical data, where a slowing-down repair process appears during the course of radiation therapy.

Huang, Zhibin; Mayr, Nina A.; Lo, Simon S.; Wang, Jian Z.; Jia Guang; Yuh, William T. C.; Johnke, Roberta [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, 27834 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Reconstruction of chronic dose equivalents for Rongelap and Utirik residents: 1954 to 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From June 1946 to August 1958, the US Department of Defense and Atomic Energy Commission conducted nuclear weapons tests in the Northern Marshall Islands. BRAVO, an aboveground test in the Castle series, resulted in radioactive fallout contaminating Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. On March 3, 1954, the inhabitants of these atolls were relocated until radiation exposure rates declined to acceptable levels. Environmental and personnel radiological monitoring programs were begun in the mid 1950's by Brookhaven National Laboratory to ensure that dose equivalents received or committed remained within US Federal Radiation Council Guidelines for members of the general public. Body burden and dose equivalent histories along with activity ingestion patterns post return are presented. Dosimetric methods, results, and internal dose equivalent distributions for subgroups of the population are also described.

Lessard, E.T.; Greenhouse, N.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Precise Measurements of the Kilohertz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in 4U 1728-34  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have analyzed seventeen observations of the low-mass X-ray binary and atoll source 4U 1728-34, carried out by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in 1996 and 1997. We obtain precise measurements of the frequencies of the two simultaneous kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in this source. We show that the frequency separation between the two QPO, $\\Delta \

Mariano Mendez; Michiel van der Klis

1999-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

91

Integrating Transmission and Energy Markets Mitigates Market Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Neuhoff, Karsten

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

Identifying and Interpreting Convergence Clusters Across Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Corrado, Luisa; Martin, Ron; Weeks, Melvyn

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Estimation in Hazard Regression Models under Ordered Departures from Proportionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Bhattacharjee, Arnab

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

On the Interaction of Monetary and Fiscal Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Chadha, Jagjit S; Nolan, Charles

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Business Cycle, Macroeconomic Shocks and the Cross Section: The Growth of UK Quoted Companies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Higson, Chris; Holly, Sean; Kattuman, Paul; Platis, S

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Open Quantum to classical phases transition in the stochastic hydrodynamic analogy: the explanation of the Lindemann relation and the analogies between the maximum of density at He lambda point and that one at water-ice phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper the gas, liquid and solid phases made of structureless particles, are visited to the light of the quantum stochastic hydrodynamic analogy (SQHA). The SQHA shows that the open quantum mechanical behavior is maintained on a distance shorter than the theory-defined quantum correlation length (lc). When, the physical length of the problem is larger than lc, the model shows that the quantum (potential) interactions may have a finite range of interaction maintaining the non-local behavior on a finite distance quantum non-locality length lq. The present work shows that when the mean molecular distance is larger than the quantum non-locality length we have a classical phases (gas and van der Waals liquids) while when the mean molecular distance becomes smaller than lq or than lc we have phases such as the solid crystal or the superfluid one, respectively, that show quantum characteristics. The model agrees with Lindemann empirical law (and explains it), for the mean square deviation of atom from the equilibrium position at melting point of crystal, and shows a connection between the maximum density at the He lambda point and that one near the water-ice solidification point.

Piero Chiarelli

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

XTE J1701-462 AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE NATURE OF SUBCLASSES IN LOW-MAGNETIC-FIELD NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES  

SciTech Connect

We report on an analysis of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) XTE J1701-462, obtained during its 2006-2007 outburst. The X-ray properties of the source changed between those of various types of NS-LMXB subclasses. At high luminosities, the source switched between two types of Z source behavior and at low luminosities we observed a transition from Z source to atoll source behavior. These transitions between subclasses primarily manifest themselves as changes in the shapes of the tracks in X-ray color-color (CD) and hardness-intensity diagrams (HID), but they are accompanied by changes in the kHz quasi-periodic oscillations, broadband variability, burst behavior, and/or X-ray spectra. We find that for most of the outburst the low-energy X-ray flux is a good parameter to track the gradual evolution of the tracks in CD and HID, allowing us to resolve the evolution of the source in greater detail than before and relate the observed properties to other NS-LMXBs. We further find that during the transition from Z to atoll, characteristic behavior known as the atoll upper banana can equivalently be described as the final stage of a weakening Z source flaring branch, thereby blurring the line between the two subclasses. Our findings strongly suggest that the wide variety in behavior observed in NS-LXMBs with different luminosities can be linked through changes in a single variable parameter, namely the mass accretion rate, without the need for additional differences in the neutron star parameters or viewing angle. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the spectral changes observed in NS-LMXBs and suggest that, contrary to what is often assumed, the position along the color-color tracks of Z sources is not determined by the instantaneous mass accretion rate.

Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Lewin, Walter H. G. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Van der Klis, Michiel; Wijnands, Rudy; Altamirano, Diego [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mendez, Mariano [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Groningen University, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands); Lin Dacheng [Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, UMR 5187, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Casella, Piergiorgio [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Belloni, Tomaso M., E-mail: jeroen@space.mit.ed [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested December 31, 1952 Enewetak Atoll First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested

99

Operation redwing: Report to the scientific director. Timing and firing (sanitized version)  

SciTech Connect

Task Unit 5 (YU-5) was organized to accomplish the following tasks during Operation Redwing (May - June 1956): (1) To supply timing signals and voice count-down to meet the principal requirements of the experimental programs; (2) To supply the arming and firing pulses to the devices tested; (3) To furnish personnel as members of the arming and firing parties; (4) To provide and maintain the Task Group 7.1 (TG 7.1) short-range commercial radio communications at Bikini and Eniwetok atolls; and (5) To perform such scientific measurements and photography as provided for under existing contractual agreements.

NONE

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lq palmyra atoll" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Review of medical findings in a Marshallese population twenty-six years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout  

SciTech Connect

In March 1954, radioactive debris from a thermonuclear weapon test at Bikini Atoll deviated from predicted trajectories and contaminated several atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. As a result, 239 native inhabitants of these islands along with 28 American servicemen and 23 Japanese fishermen received variably severe exposures to diverse ionizing radiations. Fallout material consisted largely of mixed fission products with small amounts of neutron-induced radionuclides and minimal amounts of fissionable elements, producing a complex spectrum of electromagnetic and particulate radiation. Individuals were exposed to deeply penetrating, whole-body gamma irradiation, to internal radiation emitters assimilated either by inhalation or by ingestion of contaminated water and food, and to direct radiation from material accumulating on body surfaces. That accident initiated a cascade of events, medical, social and political, which continue in varying forms to this day. Most of these have been discussed in the open medical literature and in periodic reports issued by the medical team headquartered at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report attempts to summarize some of the principal findings of medical significnce that have been observed during the subsequent 26 years with particular emphasis on the last six years.

Conard, R.A.; Paglia, D.E.; Larsen, P.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tru-ly Clean - What Does It Mean?  

SciTech Connect

The evolution and genesis of the definition of transuranic waste (known as TRU) and its application to the cleanup criteria applied to soils contaminated with transuranics, specifically plutonium, has been a matter of discussion at contaminated sites in the United States and elsewhere. Cleanup decisions and the processes that led up to those decisions have varied at several plutonium contaminated sites within the United States and without the pacific region. The sites with radionuclide soil action levels include Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, Republic of the Marshall Islands; Johnston Atoll, Hawaii; the Hanford Site in Washington State; the Nevada Test Site; the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado; the Chariot Site in north Alaska; and the Maralinga Site in Australia. The soil-action level developed for Rocky Flats by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment for plutonium is one of the higher soil-action levels approved by regulatory agencies that is considered protective for future use of land at a cleanup site. The Republic of the Marshall Islands has adopted a relatively conservative cleanup standard to accommodate the subsistence lifestyle of the islanders, while the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has been transferred to the U.S. Department of the Interior to be used as a fish and wildlife refuge, a land use that resulted in a less conservative plutonium soil cleanup level. (authors)

Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1980-December 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates, for 1980 through 1982, the results of continuing medical surveillance of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in March 1954. The originally exposed Marshallese population comprised 64 persons on Rongelap Atoll who each received, on the average, an estimated 190 rads of absorbed external gamma radiation, 18 on Ailingnae Atoll who received 110 rads, and 159 on Utirik who received 11 rads. There were, in addition, 3 persons in utero on Rongelap, 1 person in utero on Ailingnae, and 8 persons in utero on Utirik who are considered exposed. The recipients of primary medical care include exposed and comparison populations as well as a rather large number of additional beneficiaries who are seen on a humanitarian basis of practical need and resource availability. In recent years, about 1400 people have been seen annually. This report, however, deals with four clearly defined groups: the remaining individuals who were exposed to radioactive fallout on Rongelap, Ailingnae, and Utirik in 1954 (including those in utero), and a comparison population of individuals from Rongelap who were unexposed. The number of persons now in each exposure category are 51, 12, 116, and 137, respectively. 100 references, 4 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DISTRIBU'~ICN:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DISTRIBU'~ICN: DISTRIBU'~ICN: Document R-3. w/encl. State Health (Lit. only) JUN 2 19&---%Lq@. W/enCl. flCompliance, Reg. III, w/end. N. Ibulos, DXL, v/end. (3) Br. Reading File w/encl, Div. Reading File w/o encl. D.lillois 60604 .' m. J, J. mnovaa Emcutive Vice hmiaent ' , ,. __ . - 14 of Form IiEfc-2* plerise provide ._". . ..-^- UNITED STATES ' ATOMIC ENERGY COMPilISSION , . .' -- .'. SaUnCE l!fi~T%~IBI lriEmSE : . . Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Chupter 1, Fur& 40, "Licensing cf Source Material, " and h reliance on ' statements and representations heretofore made by the licensee, a license is hereby issued uuthorizing the licensee to receive, possess and import the source matorial de:;ignated below; to use such material for the purpose(s) and at the place(s)

105

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Environmental Review Form for Argonne National Laboratory i ; t Clig,k on the blue question marks (?) for instructions, contacts, and additional information on specific line items. I J?)Proiect/Activitv Title: Enhanced Energv Storage Facilities to Support Expanding DOE Program I [?)AS0 NEPA Tracking No. - C i c - & 7 (?)Tvm of Fundinp: DOE - EERE B&R Code J?)Identifving number: WFO proposal # CRADA proposal # Work Project # ANL accounting # (item 3a in Field Work Proposal) 4968 1 Other (explain) (?)Project Mana~er: Dennis Dees Signature: ~3 . I&-, A , f?)NEPA Owner: Roberta Riel Signature: &duc&+ &/ Date: +//?/Id 47L. \C-mu y. ANL NEPA Reviewer: S i g n a t u r e : Date: l.q ' La a I. J?)Descriution of Prowsed Action: Two laboratory facilities are to be operated under this effort in Building #205 of the Chemical Sciences

106

Microsoft Word - CX_Clark_Fork_River_Delta.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$XJXVW   $XJXVW   REPLY TO ATTN OF: .(& SUBJECT: (QYLURQPHQWDO &OHDUDQFH 0HPRUDQGXP /HH :DWWV 3URMHFW 0DQDJHU ± .(:0 Proposed Action: 3URYLVLRQ RI IXQGV WR WKH ,GDKR 'HSDUWPHQW RI )LVK DQG *DPH IRU 3XUFKDVH RI &ODUN )RUN 5LYHU 'HOWD :KLWH ,VODQG 3URSHUW\ Fish and Wildlife Project No.:  &RQWUDFW %3$ Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 7UDQVIHU OHDVH GLVSRVLWLRQ RU DFTXLVLWLRQ RI LQWHUHVWV LQ XQFRQWDLPLQDWHG ODQG IRU KDELWDW SUHVHUYDWLRQ RU ZLOGOLIH PDQDJHPHQW DQG RQO\ DVVRFLDWHG EXLOGLQJV WKDW VXSSRUW WKHVH SXUSRVHV

107

; United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Don F 1328.8 Don F 1328.8 . . .449J ' Em wm ; United States Government , % - memorandum L c*m Al.)G 2 9 a34 yz;; EM-421 (If. A. Willlams, 427-1719) lq,iMAL Department of Energy m5 MA, \i& SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utllized Sites Remedial A&Ion Prograa ' a The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Htchelle L&is, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald faclllty as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoarwndations were ude to eliainate thm from further consideratton under Formerly Utilized Sites Reaedial Actlon Progrm (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or revlewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

108

CnLrJGD  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

l&o-1760 l&o-1760 CnLrJGD 8CURCEN4%4UALLfCE!8SE Licenee Bo. c-3862 tnted: J. T. Baker Chemical Compfuq Phillipsburg, New Jersey Attention: Mr. Joseph L. MetcenQrf Osntlewn: Rvsunnt to the Attalc &orgy Act of 1954 au4 Section 40.21 of t& &&e of Federal Negulationr, Title 10 Control of &urea Matsrial, -Atomic !Znergy, Chapter 1, part40 - P me hereby llc need to nc lve poere of and title to up to one ld ogrem of urai~~ t t&SIG gradef for use slou R etndier on the pmparatlon of sodium diurenetar You are further liceneed-~~tnmef~~~~~-Qe~i~r-~~~e~:lq?l of an& title to refined source maataried to any pereon licensed. by the Atalc Baergy ~emionj within the llmlte of his license. ?hie llccnee fe eubject to all the provieione of the Atopic Energy Act of

109

Section 81  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mq Mq Mt '&LC(Vq)& M Mp (Tq)%P LCV% MT Mp '0 Mq Mt '&VCLq&T Mq Mp %P. Mq Mt '&VCLq&T Mq Mp %P% (qobs&q) J , Mq Mt '&VCLq&qLCV& M Mp (Tq)%P. LCV &VC(Lq) &VCLq &T Mq Mp VCLq LCV LCV &LCVq&qVCL &LCVq &VCL Session Papers 355 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Prescribing Advection in Single-Column Models D. A. Randall and D. Cripe Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Ft. Collins, Colorado Introduction Both single-column models (SCMs) and cloud ensemble models (CEMs) are often forced with observed, objectively analyzed fields (Randall et al. 1996). Consider an arbitrary scalar variable, q, satisfying a flux-form conservation equation: Here P represents the "physics" that affects q. The corresponding continuity equation is

110

Sociology and Anthropology Curriculum and The Needs of Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/anthropology curriculum (IHSS, 1986). The CDAC prepared a curriculum for a Master of Arts degree in sociology/anthropology which was approved by the .Subject Committee of IHSS and the Faculty Board of Tnbhuvan University. Q Q Qff Q SQci l siQ Q iQIQ Qc Qci Ql Q Q Q QCUS... Q SQc QIQg Q lQ J SQciQIQgist Q ,' Q SQc QIQ QCUS Q Q r QIQgi Qr Q Q Q tiQ Q iQ Q tiQ Q Q Q iQ Q QO, Q ~ r Q Q CQIQ Q m Qcl Q QIQ rQ Q Q rQw awa Qgraphy Q QIQgi Q s.Q Q t Qr Q CQIQg SQur e IQ l Q CQncer Qr ti iQIQ Q Q Q Q Qc QIQ Qr Ql Q IQglc I Q Q...

Bhattachan, Krishna B

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Alternative Mechanical Structure for LARP Nb3Sn Quadrupoles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative structure for the 120 mm Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet presently under development for use in the upgrade for LHC at CERN is presented. The goals of this structure are to build on the existing technology developed in LARP with the LQ and HQ series magnets and to further optimize the features required for operation in the accelerator. These features include mechanical alignment needed for field quality and provisions for cold mass cooling with 1.9 K helium in a helium pressure vessel. The structure will also optimize coil azimuthal and axial pre-load for high gradient operation, and will incorporate features intended to improve manufacturability, thereby improving reliability and reducing cost.

Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.; Ambrosio, G.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Kovach, P.; Lamm, M.; Sabbi, G.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Radcalc for Windows 2.0 transportation packaging software to determine hydrogen generation and transportation classification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radclac for Windows is a user friendly menu-driven Windows compatible software program with applications in the transportation of radioactive materials. It calculates the radiolytic generation of hydrogen gas in the matrix of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes. It also calculates pressure buildup due to hydrogen and the decay heat generated in a package at seal time. It computes the quantity of a radionuclide and its associated products for a given period of time. In addition, the code categorizes shipment quantities as reportable quantity (RQ), radioactive Type A or Type B, limited quality (LQ), low specific activity (LSA), highway road controlled quality (HRCQ), and fissile excepted using US Department of Transportation (DOT) definitions and methodologies.

Green, J.R.

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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114

NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs - NREL Helps the Navy with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site Assessment at Indian Ocean NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site Assessment at Indian Ocean Base December 20, 2013 Reaching Diego Garcia, a remote island in the middle of the Indian Ocean, is not easy, but recently NREL's Otto VanGeet and Owen Roberts embarked on the long journey there. As part of an integrated Navy and NREL team, their goal was to help the Navy reduce costs by integrating wind and solar power with fossil fuel generators. NREL staff, along with members of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, conducted a net-zero renewable energy site assessment in November at the atoll which stretches about 40 miles in a thin U-shape. The island's renewable energy potential-along with the possibilities for energy systems integration-really excited the team. "Because of its locale, the base is all diesel-powered," VanGeet said.

115

ARM - TWP Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Contacts Site Oversight - Kim Nitschke, Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Manager - Paul Ortega, Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Operations Manager - Matt Gould, Australian Bureau of Meteorology Site Scientist - Chuck Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Tropical Western Pacific Office Mailing Address: Los Alamos National Laboratory PO Box 1663, MS J577 Los Alamos, NM 87545 U.S.A. Shipping Address: SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road TA-51, Bldg. 82, DP 01U Attn: NAME, MS J577 Los Alamos, NM 87545 U.S.A. Phone: 505.667.1186

116

J-(_5A.-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

014 !-PI-j I ii f , i- .:-I' I :c ( Ii' 014 !-PI-j I ii f , i- .:-I' I :c ( Ii' iUC ./<: ./ /i' J-(_5A.- - n -Il&.L-, ($1 (.' j / +P ' , Cd , - $' -- 4 . NATIONAL LEAD COMPAN\r OF OHIO P. 0. BOX 158 MT. HEALTHY STATION CINCINNATI 31. OHIO Letter Subecmtract # s-19 Dated: October Ql,l952 Under Prime Contract AT(~O-l-)-1.1.56 ~0: Mr. A. M. Kinney, President Processes Research, Inc. 2905 Vernon Place Cincinnati 19, Ohio Gentlemen: 1. This letter, subject to your written acceptance and the approval of the Atmic Energy Comnission (hereinafter called the "Commission"), sets forth the initial agreement between the National Lead Ccaupany of Ohio (hereinafter referred to as the ptContpactop") and Processes Research, Inc. (hereinafter referred to as the "Subcontractor"), in anticipation of a definitive

117

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results, including these noteworthy results, including these noteworthy successes from fiscal year 2011: AHW Launch Advanced Hypersonic Weapon test flight In the early hours of Nov. 17, 2011, Sandia conducted a highly successful first test flight of the Advanced Hypersonic Weapon (AHW) concept for the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command. Designed to fly within the earth's atmosphere at hypersonic speed and long range, the first-of-its-kind glide vehicle launched from Sandia's Kauai Test Facility in Kauai, Hawaii, using a three-stage booster system developed at Sandia. The hypersonic glide vehicle, which was also designed and developed by Sandia, successfully flew at hypersonic speed to the planned impact location at the Reagan Test Site, U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll. The test flight allowed researchers to collect data on hypersonic boost-glide

118

NEL-2013-02, LANS Enforcement Letter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 20 13 2, 20 13 Dr. Charles F. McMillan Laboratory Director Los Alamos National Security, LLC Mail Stop A-1 00, Drop Point 03 14007 1 S Bikini Atoll Road, T A-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1 663 NEL-2013 -02 Dear Dr. McMillan: The Office ofHealth, Safety and Security' s Office of Enforcement and Oversight conducted an evaluation of the deficiencies at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) described in the Los A lamos National Security, LLC (LANS) Noncomplia nce Tracking System (NTS) report NTS --LASO-LANS-LANL-2012-00 18, LANSCE Contamination Event, dated September I 0, 20 12. Our evaluation included a review of the Federal accident investigation report, Accident Investigation into Contamination at the Los Alamos Ne utron Science Center on or about August 21, 2012,

119

Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Letter issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC, related to Worker Beryllium Exposure during Machining at the Los Alamos National Laboratorys Beryllium Technology Facility, May 29, 2013 (WEL-2013-01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2013 29, 2013 Dr. Charles F. McMillan, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A 100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87454 WEL-2013-01 Dear Dr. McMillan: The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight evaluated the circumstances surrounding a work evolution performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 3, Building 141, Beryllium Technology Facility (BTF), on July 11, 2012. The work evolution resulted in a worker exposure to beryllium in excess of the Department of Energy (DOE) action level of 0.2 micrograms per cubic meter for an 8-hour, time-weighted average. Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), which manages and

120

NREL: Buildings Research - NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site Assessment at Indian Ocean NREL Helps the Navy with Renewable Energy Site Assessment at Indian Ocean Base December 20, 2013 Reaching Diego Garcia, a remote island in the middle of the Indian Ocean, is not easy, but recently NREL's Otto VanGeet and Owen Roberts embarked on the long journey there. As part of an integrated Navy and NREL team, their goal was to help the Navy reduce costs by integrating wind and solar power with fossil fuel generators. NREL staff, along with members of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, conducted a net-zero renewable energy site assessment in November at the atoll which stretches about 40 miles in a thin U-shape. The island's renewable energy potential-along with the possibilities for energy systems integration-really excited the team. "Because of its locale, the base is all diesel-powered," VanGeet said.

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121

Timeline of Events: 1951 to 1970 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 to 1970 51 to 1970 Timeline of Events: 1951 to 1970 October 31, 1952: Mike Test The Atomic Energy Commission detonates the first thermonuclear device, code-named "Mike," at Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific. Read more December 23, 1957: Shippingport The Shippingport Atomic Power Station, the world's first full-scale nuclear power plant, becomes operational. Read more March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope The Atlantic Richfield Company and Humble Oil and Refining Company announce the discovery of oil on the North Slope of Alaska at Prudhoe Bay. Read more Return to Timeline of Events: 1939 to 1950 Continue to Timeline of Events: 1971 to 1980 December 20, 1951 The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the National Reactor Testing Station near Arco, Idaho, produces the first electric power from a

122

Compliance Order issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12,2007 12,2007 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Dr. Michael T. Anastasio Laboratory Director Los Alamos National Laboratory MS-A1 00 SM-30, Bikini Atoll Road Los Alamos, NM 87545 Dear Dr. Anastasio: Pursuant to the authority of the Secretary of Energy under section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and 10 C.F.R. 5 824.4(b) of the Department's Procedural Rules for the Assessment of Civil Penalties for Classzjied Information Security Violations, I am today issuing the enclosed Compliance Order to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The Compliance Order directs LANS to implement specific corrective actions to remediate both the laboratory management deficiencies that contributed to the thumb drive security incident at Los Alarnos National Laboratory (LANL) discovered in

123

RXTE Observations of 1A 1744-361: Correlated Spectral and Timing Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) data of the transient low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system 1A 1744-361. We explore the X-ray intensity and spectral evolution of the source, perform timing analysis, and find that 1A 1744-361 shows `atoll' behavior during the outbursts. The color-color diagram indicates that this LMXB was observed in a low intensity spectrally hard (low-hard) state and in a high intensity `banana' state. The low-hard state shows a horizontal pattern in the color-color diagram, and the previously reported `dipper QPO' appears only during this state. We also perform energy spectral analyses, and report the first detection of broad iron emission line and iron absorption edge from 1A 1744-361.

Sudip Bhattacharyya; Tod E. Strohmayer; Jean H. Swank; Craig B. Markwardt

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation, January 1983-December 1984  

SciTech Connect

March 1, 1984, was the 30th anniversary of the Bravo thermonuclear test that resulted in the accidental exposure of the populations of Rongelap and Utirik atolls to radioactive fallout. The chronicling of the medical events resulting from that exposure is continued in this report, which covers the period from January 1983 through December 1984. An updated listing of all relevant publications from the Medical Department Brookhaven National Laboratory, is presented in the Reference Section. Thirty years of observation continue to show no detectable increase in mortality in the exposed population as a result of that exposure. The survival curves of the high-exposure Rongelap group, the low-exposure Utirik population, and an unexposed group of Rongelap people matched by age and sex to the exposed Rongelap group in 1957 continue to be similar. 89 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Adams, W.H.; Engle, J.R.; Harper, J.A.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Science and Technology Review July/August 2010  

SciTech Connect

This issue has the following articles: (1) Deterrence with a Minimum Nuclear Stockpile - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Enhancing Confidence in the Nation's Nuclear Stockpile - Livermore experts are participating in a national effort aimed at predicting how nuclear weapon materials and systems will likely change over time; (3) Narrowing Uncertainties - For climate modeling and many other fields, understanding uncertainty, or margin of error, is critical; (4) Insight into a Deadly Disease - Laboratory experiments reveal the pathogenesis of tularemia in host cells, bringing scientists closer to developing a vaccine for this debilitating disease. (5) Return to Rongelap - On the Rongelap Atoll, Livermore scientists are working to minimize radiological exposure for natives now living on or wishing to return to the islands.

Blobaum, K M

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

WEA-2010-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 18, 2010 October 18, 2010 OFFICE OF THE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Dr. Michael R. Anastasio, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1663 WEA-20 1 0-04 Dear Dr. Anastasio: This letter refers to a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the electrical shock event that occurred in building 300 at Technical Area 16 (TA-16) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on March 20,2009. The results of the investigation were provided to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in an Investigation Report dated March 2, 2010. An enforcement conference was held on March 23,

127

Standard Form 129  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

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128

NEPA Review Routing Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Composting Facility North Composting Facility Document Number: 299 Date of Routing: 12/01/2010 (after MJT review 11/30/2010) Name Reviewed Signature Forwarded To Forwarded Date ..... Date Anne Theriault 12/01/2010 tl-i.A 1 ../\ _/ ~ Steve Ames 12/01/2010 Steve Ames 12/01/2010 t.::}wtLA Email MJT 12/01/2010 Steve Ames 12/01/2010 .LZ..L.-1 Jeff Christiansen 12/01/2010 . ~ "/ / / Jeff Christiansen 12/01/2010 ,(J,U y n--(/' Mike Taylor 12/01/2010 '~"' --r7j I{ LLtJ I? JZ../2../!b Nr_4l./)5 w&ll. K .S T£ v C AIV\ cs 12../2.../ I 0 ( .e:.,~:,/t.; AM IF s I t-fi. /,,s (J.,..,.M ·/A,_r_, 7AYtoJ- IZ....(z../lq ~ .... / --r-?JY~e t<.j .z..j / e:> I#'~ y ../"'~--< 5Tt: \J C /1 J111 C 5 t<-./z_j/0

129

RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 , 4 , RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V : w ~?g+QZ FM USAEC NYK @5 TO USAEC LEMUMT Ill.. AEC WWC ; I _. _' FOR A TAMwsflO h@G NR tt0 PD Tti18~18~~10 APPROVE pf TWJNTY GRAM8 ENRICHED 1 '. , URANlUM TO 8YLyANI~q FOR W8E. IWTREPARIWG~F~VE U&AN,!UU SLUGS 7/.8 lF4j34 ' .' : ' . ~ , . LQ~JG m S/8 1%~ ~IAhiiilER pa THE-DIE WI& CW!. APOROX 300 DOLLARS Am " , SIX ~uN-~Y# WILL BE REQI!!REl! FW WJG FA~ICf' TlW PD ?eJJRCt+A= @ fmR woull] BE m OUT to 8YLVANIA AND WNT TO, V L PAf?SEGIAN Cy ,NYOO CP tN .I. . THE AMOUNT OF ?j50 DOLLARS fOR COIUIPLE~~W~RK,, PI) THE- ENR ICHED MATER I AL ,_ ..o ._ 8tiotlLD BE SHIPPEB TO W 4% DQNO@@ CMU SYLVANA ELECTR lc PiMDUCTS~ INC * * . .i. ,. ., .,, I&@40 WlLLhT8 PTJUUkEVARD MY84~d#EW~Y~K CMIU AM) ACCOUWfdBlLtTY

130

To: J. Chipman Frm: John P. Howe In Her Visit to Graseelli Laboratories, Cleveland, Ohio, August 30, 1943  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ij& 3-l ij& 3-l v-y m Consisting of % pages containing 0 figures copy No.&of 12 copies. Series A' . September 9, 1943 To: J. Chipman Frm: John P. Howe In Her Visit to Graseelli Laboratories, Cleveland, Ohio, August 30, 1943 This meeting was the usual biweekly review of the coating work dono at the Grascrelli Laboratories. LOT DIP - reported by 3. R. bl&er 1 ' 2 / r; 4 I-I 3 -4 cn 14 CD 4 E L> -4 v) 4 -+ CT :2 z -J L3 t 4 F=o Q) A Cl ri z + 2 k fi ii lr= e.2 v i $ & k 0 2 5 c w s .G 0 b :LQ $ q id -r Id 2 2 1% ,a 0) s I - 63 4 g :$j I ?I! Jacketing Dou'ble Tests on apecimena hot dipped in 85-15 ?&-Al gnd canned immediately afterwards nt the Aluminum Company were reported. The following is a summary of the tests at the end of 25 daysz-

131

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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132

STon pa gShen rab: Six Marriages and Many More Funerals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#20;#26;#15;#3; LQ#3; 'XQKXDQJ#15;#3; (DVWHUQ#3; 7XUNHVWDQ#17;#3;0DQ\\#3;KDYH#3;DOVR#3;QRWHG#3;WKDW#3;WKHVH#3;EULHI#3;UHIHUHQFHV#3;WR#3;ULWXDOLVWV#3; UHODWH#3; WR#3; WKH#3; QDPH#3; RI#3; WKH#3; IRXQGHU#3; RI#3; %RQ#15;#3; V7RQ#3; SD#3; J6KHQ#3; UDE#3;PL#3; ER#15; & #3... -/:#26;> O?\\!O > -=HSU8/1]O-/ZK:#26;Q WY12-/1#3;Bd8/E^- Q E.m8/Q Q!> 3#7;THWT SU- T 1]8/:#26;:U> 3#26;RY6?WY.#15;8/3#26;8742S 12WY3#7;> 62B9\\}T 1]8KO#7;> T > WY3#26;8/Q#7;-7ZN-7R}-762> 6AF 4].Ca7:#21;a L7Kh/\\?3;a uKIKJ

Blezer, Henk

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities  

SciTech Connect

A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U r r b b a a n n A A t t m m o o s s p p h h e e r r i i c c O O b b s s e e r r v v a a t t o o r r y y ( ( U U A A O O ) ) F F i i r r s s t t P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g W W o o r r k k s s h h o o p p - - A A t t t t e e n n d d e e e e s s 2 2 7 7 - - 2 2 8 8 J J a a n n u u a a r r y y , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 ****************************************************************** Sean Ahearn Hunter College North Bldg., 10 th Floor New York City, NY sca@everest.hunter.cuny.edu (W) 212-772-5327 Robert Bornstein San Jose State University Dept. of Meteorology San Jose, CA 951920-0104 pblmodel@hotmail.com (W) 408-924-5205 (F) 408-924-5191 David Brown Argonne National Lab 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 dbrown@anl.gov (W) 608-442-1249 Michael Brown LANL, Drop Point 19S, SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road Group D4-MS F604 Los Alamos, NM 87545 mbrown@lanl.gov (W) 505- 667-1788

135

Marshall Islands radiological followup  

SciTech Connect

In August, 1968, President Johnson announced that the people of Bikini Atoll would be able to return to their homeland. Thereafter, similar approval was given for the return of the peoples of Enewetak. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, will probably be repopulated by the original inhabitants and their families within the next year. As part of its continuing responsibility to insure the public health and safety in connection with the nuclear programs under its sponsorship, ERDA (formerly AEC) has contracted Brookhaven National Laboratory to establish radiological safety and environmental monitoring programs for the returning Bikini and Enewetak peoples. These programs are described in the following paper. They are designed to define the external radiation environment, assess radiation doses from internal emitters in the human food chain, make long range predictions of total doses and dose commitments to individuals and to each population group, and to suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways. (auth)

Greenhouse, N.A.; McCraw, T.F.

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

Robison, W. L., LLNL

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Relation between Kilohertz QPOs and Inferred Mass Accretion Rate in 4 LMXBs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I summarize the available RXTE data of the 4 low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and Atoll sources Aql X-1, 4U 1728-34, 4U 1608-52, and 4U 1636-53. I concentrate on the relation between the frequencies of the quasi-periodic oscillations at kilohertz frequencies (kHz QPOs) and the X-ray flux and colors of these sources. In these 4 sources the kHz QPOs are only observed in a narrow range of spectral states (as defined from the X-ray color-color diagrams). I show that despite its complex dependence upon the X-ray flux, the frequency of the kHz QPOs is monotonically related to the position of the source in the color-color diagram. These findings strengthen the idea that in LMXBs the X-ray flux is not a good indicator of the mass accretion rate, $\\dot M$, and that the observed changes in the frequency of the kHz QPOs in LMXBs are driven by changes in $\\dot M$.

Mariano Mendez

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of standard and alternative methods for the decontamination of VX and HD in chemical agent disposal facilities. Final report, February 1992-February 1993  

SciTech Connect

Standard decontaminant formulations, aqueous sodium hydroxide and aqueous sodium hypochlorite, were providing slow and incomplete results when used to decontaminate certain operating facilities at the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System and the Chemical Agent Disposal System (Utah). A study was undertaken to define the capabilities and limitations of using concentrated sodium hydroxide to decontaminate VX, the effect of adding hydrogen peroxide to the sodium hydroxide for the decontamination of VX, the efficacy of aqueous oxone for the decontamination of VX, and the efficacy of oxone in a water/1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (MP) mixture for the decontamination of HD. Using aqueous sodium hydroxide alone was not desirable since the formation of toxic EA2192 could not be averted. However, the addition of hydrogen peroxide resulted in effective VX decontamination without EA2192 formation. Aqueous oxone was also found to be effective for both VX and HD. The incorporation of MP did little to improve HD dissolution and reacted with the oxone to reduce the effective usable life of the decontamination solution. Thus, the use of MP in HD decontamination was not recommended.

Hovanec, J.W.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Albizo, J.M.; Beaudry, W.T.; Henderson, V.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Whole-body counting in the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect

In 1978 the Marshall Islands Radiological Safety Program was organized to perform radiation measurements and assess radiation doses for the people of the Bikini, Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. One of the major field components of this program is whole- body counting (WBC). WBC is used to monitor the quantity of gamma- emitting radionuclides present in individuals. A primary objective of the program was to establish {sup 137}Cesium body contents among the Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik populations. {sup 137}Cs was the only gamma-emitting fission radionuclide detected in the 1,967 persons monitored. {sup 137}Cs body burdens tended to increase with age for both sexes, and were higher in males. The average {sup 137}Cs dose Annual Effective Dose for the three populations was as follows: For Enewetak, the dose was 22{+-}4 {mu}Sv. For Utirik, the dose was 33{+-} 3 {mu}Sv. Since 1985 the Rongelap people have been self-exiled to Mejatto. Biological elimination should have reduced their dose to virtually zero, and the measured dose was 2{+-}2 {mu}Sv. If they had remained on Rongelap Island, the calculated dose would have been 99 {mu}Sv, which is about one-third of the background dose. 7 refs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Sun, L.C.; Clinton, J.; Kaplan, E.; Meinhold, C.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

SciTech Connect

A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lq palmyra atoll" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Fifteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This collection contains 173 abstracts from presented papers and poster sessions. The five sessions of the conference were on the subjects of: (1) Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing, (2) Applied Biological Research, (3) Bioprocessing Research (4), Process Economics and Commercialization, and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Examples of specific topics in the first session include the kinetics of ripening cheese, microbial liquefaction of lignite, and wheat as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. Typical topics in the second session were synergism studies of bacterial and fungal celluloses, conversion of inulin from jerusalem artichokes to sorbitol and ethanol by saccharomyces cerevisiae, and microbial conversion of high rank coals to methane. The third session entertained topics such as hydrodynamic modeling of a liquid fluidized bed bioreactor for coal biosolubilization, aqueous biphasic systems for biological particle partitioning, and arabinose utilization by xylose-fermenting yeast and fungi. The fourth session included such topics as silage processing of forage biomass to alcohol fuels, economics of molasses to ethanol in India, and production of lactic acid from renewable resources. the final session contained papers on such subjects as bioluminescent detection of contaminants in soils, characterization of petroleum contaminated soils in coral atolls in the south Pacific, and landfill management for methane generation and emission control.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. Volume 10, Nickel-63  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the basic radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of nickel-63 ({sup 63}Ni) and examines how these characteristics affect the behavior of {sup 63}Ni in various environmental media, such as soils, groundwater, plants, animals, the atmosphere, and the human body. Discussions also include methods of {sup 63}Ni production, waste types, and waste forms that contain {sup 63}Ni. The primary source of {sup 63}Ni in the environment has been low-level radioactive waste material generated as a result of neutron activation of stable {sup 62}Ni that is present in the structural components of nuclear reactor vessels. {sup 63}Ni enters the environment from the dismantling activities associated with nuclear reactor decommissioning. However, small amounts of {sup 63}Ni have been detected in the environment following the testing of thermonuclear weapons in the South Pacific. Concentrations as high as 2.7 Bq{sup a} per gram of sample (or equivalently 0.0022 parts per billion) were observed on Bikini Atoll (May 1954). {sup 63}Ni was not created as a fission product species (e.g., from {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu fissions), but instead was produced as a result of neutron capture in {sup 63}Ni, a common nickel isotope present in the stainless steel components of nuclear weapons (e.g., stainless-304 contains {approximately}9% total Ni or {approximately}0.3% {sup 63}Ni).

Carboneau, M.L.; Adams, J.P.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Annual Program Progress Report under DOE/PHRI Cooperative Agreement: (July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Annual Program Progress Report. The DOE Marshall Islands Medical Program continued, in this it's 48th year, to provide medical surveillance for the exposed population from Rongelap and Utrik and the additional DOE patients. The program was inaugurated in 1954 by the Atomic Energy Commission following the exposure of Marshallese to fallout from a nuclear test (Castle Bravo) at Bikini Atoll. This year marks the fourth year in which the program has been carried out by PHRI under a cooperative agreement with DOE. The DOERHRI Special Medical Care Program, awarded the cooperative agreement on August 28, 1998, commenced its health care program on January 15, 1999, on Kwajalein and January 22, 1999, on Majuro. This report details the program for the July 1, 2001, through the June 30, 2002, period. The program provides year-round, on-site medical care to the DOE patient population residing in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and annual examinations to those patients living in Hawaii and on the Continental U.S.

Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bioremediation demonstration on Kwajalein Island: Site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies  

SciTech Connect

An environmental study was conducted during February 1991 on Kwajalein Island, a US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). This study was undertaken for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) acting in behalf of USAKA. The purpose of the study was to determine if selected locations for new construction on Kwajalein Island were contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons as suspected and, if so, whether bioremediation appeared to be a feasible technology for environmental restoration. Two different sites were evaluated: (1) the site planned freshwater production facility and (2) a site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank. Within the proposed construction zone for the freshwater production facility (a.k.a desalination plant), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) where either absent or at low levels. Characterization data for another potential construction site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank southeast of the old diesel power plant revealed high concentrations of diesel fuel in the soil and groundwater beneath the site. Results of this investigation indicate that there are petroleum-contaminated soils on Kwajalein Island and bioremediation appears to be a viable environmental restoration technique. Further experimentation and field demonstration are required to determine the design and operating conditions that provide for optimum biodegradation and restoration of the petroleum-contaminated soils. 17 refs., 7 figs., 26 figs.

Siegrist, R.L.; Korte, N.E.; Pickering, D.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Phelps, T.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Interim readiness plan  

SciTech Connect

This report provides rough designs and costs for 3 payloads which can be built on a relatively fast time scale. With these, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (LRL) could measure neutrons and X-rays from high altitude shots. No measurements of soft X-rays (less than or approximately equal to 5 kev), hard X- rays (greater than or approximately equal to 60 kev), or gamma rays would be made. Plans could be made to fly the Simplex payload as part of the spring Lapwing exercise. Some interim capability exists from other sources which might compliment the above measurements. Sandia has developed a mylar sail sampler which could be used for debris experiments. There is a LASL/Sandia scan converter which could be fielded to make fast time-history measurements of the X-ray or gamma ray pulse. Interval time could be measured with a ground based EMP detector. The LRL cost of this interim rocket program is approximately 5 man years of effort and about $140,000 of major procurement. Sandia would need approximately $450,000 to stockpile payloads. I believe the necessary rockets are already stockpiled but some work on the ranges might be required. For example, more launchers are needed on Johnston Atoll. All this money and effort would be expended in FY- 1970 and these rocket experiments would be ready (`on the shelf` or close) by June 1970.

Seward, F. D.

1969-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Characterization of Habitat for Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) in Los Roques Archipelago National Park, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information on the locations for feeding, reproductions, and resting, are essential to effectively protect sea turtle populations and implement conservation efforts. This type of ecological information is critically important for hawksbill turtle conservation in Los Roques Archipelago National Park (LRANP) where turtles have been declining in spite of habitat protection efforts. The goal of this research was to produce a benthic habitat map of LRANP employing in situ visual surveys, remote sensing and geographic information system techniques, and to spatially characterize sea turtle occupancy and patterns of usage by habitat type. Between June and August of 2008, turtle behavior and habitat use were recorded during 159 h of observation, comprising 46 sighting events (n = 20 juveniles, n = 26 female adults). Observed activities were grouped into 4 categories: foraging, resting, swimming, and reproductive behavior. The benthic habitat at each turtle sighting was recorded as one of three categories: coral reef, sand or marine vegetation. Results suggest that the population of turtles within LRANP is comprised primarily of female adults and juvenile individuals and that coral reef is the most important habitat for this species. The most important foraging area in the atoll is a coral patch reef that connects Dos Mosquises Sur and Dos Mosquises Norte. The data in this thesis have been made available in digital and map form to the managers of LRANP for management purposes.

Hunt, Luciana E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Jellyfish and Their Kin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jellyfish and Their Kin Jellyfish and Their Kin Nature Bulletin No. 278-A October 14, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation JELLYFISH AND THEIR KIN The creatures that live in the sea are entirely different from those in fresh water. An inlander, a "landlubber", is fascinated by them. It is a thrilling experience to find one's first starfish, or a flower-like sea anemone. Among the strangest of marine animals are the jellyfish, which are not fish at all but relatives of the sea anemones and of the many kinds of coral that form rock-like skeletons and slowly build such enormous structures as coral reefs and coral atolls. There are many, many kinds of jellyfish. Some are tiny; others are as large as half a grapefruit; a few rare ones are as large as a bushel basket and have been known to be seven feet in diameter. Some are transparent; others are brown, pink, blue or white; and some are phosphorescent. The common kinds are shaped like a bell or like an umbrella, with a fringe around the edge, and some of them have numerous long streamers that trail behind. The mouth and stomach are where the handle of an umbrella would be. The animal slowly swims by contracting the bell or half closing the umbrella, thus forcing it forward, and then leisurely expanding it. Ocean bathers avoid the big ones because their tentacles, used to paralyze smaller marine animals, cause a painful sting.

148

ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY 4U 1608-522 IN THE UPPER-BANANA STATE  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the physics of mass accretion onto weakly magnetized neutron stars (NSs), 95 archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data sets of an atoll source 4U 1608-522, acquired over 1996-2004 in the so-called upper-banana state, were analyzed. The object meantime exhibited 3-30 keV luminosity in the range of {approx}< 10{sup 35}-4 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}, assuming a distance of 3.6 kpc. The 3-30 keV Proportional Counter Array spectra, produced one from each data set, were represented successfully with a combination of a soft and a hard component, the presence of which was revealed in a model-independent manner by studying spectral variations among the observations. The soft component is expressed by the so-called multi-color disk model with a temperature of {approx}1.8 keV, and is attributed to the emission from an optically thick standard accretion disk. The hard component is a blackbody (BB) emission with a temperature of {approx}2.7 keV, thought to be emitted from the NS surface. As the total luminosity increases, a continuous decrease is observed in the ratio of the BB luminosity to that of the disk component. This property suggests that it gradually becomes difficult for the matter flowing through the accretion disk to reach the NS surface, presumably forming outflows driven by the increased radiation pressure. On timescales of hours to days, the overall source variability was found to be controlled by two independent variables: the mass accretion rate and the innermost disk radius, which changes both physically and artificially.

Takahashi, Hiromitsu [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Sakurai, Soki; Makishima, Kazuo, E-mail: hirotaka@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Estimation of Radiation Doses in the Marshall Islands Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Urinalysis  

SciTech Connect

Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have recently implemented a series of initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former nuclear test sites in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The aim of this radiological surveillance monitoring program (RSMP) is to provide timely radiation protection for individuals in the Marshall Islands with respect to two of the most important internally deposited fallout radionuclides-cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and long-lived isotopes 239 and 240 of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) (Robison et al., 1997 and references therein). Therefore, whole-body counting for {sup 137}Cs and a sensitive bioassay for the presence of {sup 239+240}Pu excreted in urine were adopted as the two most applicable in vivo analytical methods to assess radiation doses for individuals in the RMI from internally deposited fallout radionuclides (see Hamilton et al., 2006a-c; Bell et al., 2002). Through 2005, the USDOE has established three permanent whole-body counting facilities in the Marshall Islands: the Enewetak Radiological Laboratory on Enewetak Atoll, the Utrok Whole-Body Counting Facility on Majuro Atoll, and the Rongelap Whole-Body Counting Facility on Rongelap Atoll. These whole-body counting facilities are operated and maintained by trained Marshallese technicians. Scientists from LLNL provide the technical support and training necessary for maintaining quality assurance for data acquisition and dose reporting. This technical basis document summarizes the methodologies used to calculate the annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE; or dose for the calendar year of measurement) based on whole-body counting of internally deposited {sup 137}Cs and the measurement of {sup 239+240}Pu excreted in urine. Whole-body counting provides a direct measure of the total amount (or burden) of {sup 137}Cs present in the human body at the time of measurement. The amount of {sup 137}Cs detected is often reported in activity units of kilo-Becquerel (kBq), where 1 kBq equals 1000 Bq and 1 Bq = 1 nuclear transformation per second (t s{sup -1}). [However, in the United States the Curie (Ci) continues to be used as the unit of radioactivity; where 1 Ci = 3.7 x 10{sup 10} Bq.] The detection of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu in bioassay (urine) samples indicates the presence of internally deposited (systemic) plutonium in the body. Urine samples that are collected in the Marshall Islands from volunteers participating in the RSMP are transported to LLNL, where measurements for {sup 239+240}Pu are performed using a state-of-the-art technology based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) (Hamilton et al., 2004, 2007; Brown et al., 2004). The urinary excretion of plutonium by RSMP volunteers is usually described in activity units, expressed as micro-Becquerel ({micro}Bq) of {sup 239+240}Pu (i.e., representing the sum of the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu activity) excreted (lost) per day (d{sup -1}), where 1 {micro}Bq d{sup -1} = 10{sup -6} Bq d{sup -1} and 1 Bq = 1 t s{sup -1}. The systemic burden of plutonium is then estimated from biokinetic relationships as described by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (e.g., see ICRP, 1990). In general, nuclear transformations are accompanied by the emission of energy and/or particles in the form of gamma rays ({gamma}), beta particles ({beta}), and/or alpha particles ({alpha}). Tissues in the human body may adsorb these emissions, where there is a potential for any deposited energy to cause biological damage. The general term used to quantify the extent of any radiation exposure is referred to as the dose. The equivalent dose is defined by the average absorbed dose in an organ or tissue weighted by the average quality factor for the type and energy of the emission causing the dose. The effective dose equivalent (EDE; as applied to the whole body), is the sum of the average dose equivalent for each tissue weighted by each applicable tissue-specific weighing factor

Daniels, J; Hickman, D; Kehl, S; Hamilton, T

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Plutonium in Sediment and Seawater from the Marshall Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer 2000, I was given the opportunity to work for about three months as a technical trainee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, or LLNL as I will refer to it hereafter. University of California runs this Department of Energy laboratory, which is located 70 km east of San Francisco, in the small city of Livermore. This master thesis in Radioecology is based on the work I did here. LLNL, as a second U.S.-facility for development of nuclear weapons, was built in Livermore in the beginning of the 1950's (Los Alamos in New Mexico was the other one). It has since then also become a 'science center' for a number of areas like magnetic and laser fusion energy, non-nuclear energy, biomedicine, and environmental science. The Laboratory's mission has changed over the years to meet new national needs. The following two statements were found on the homepage of LLNL (http://www.llnl.gov), at 2001-03-05, where also information about the laboratory and the scientific projects that takes place there, can be found. 'Our primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide'. 'Our goal is to apply the best science and technology to enhance the security and well-being of the nation and to make the world a safer place.' The Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology group at the Health and Ecological Assessments division employed me, and I also worked to some extent with the Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) group. The work I did at LLNL can be divided into two parts. In the first part Plutonium (Pu) measurements in sediments from the Rongelap atoll in Marshall Islands, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) were done. The method for measuring these kinds of samples is well understood at LLNL since soil samples have been measured with AMS for Pu in the past. Therefore it was the results that were of main interest and not the technique. The second part was to take advantage of AMS's very high sensitivity by measure the Pu-concentrations in small volumes (0.04-1 L) of seawater. The technique for using AMS at Pu-measurements in seawater is relatively new and the main task for me was to find out a method that could work in practice. The area where the sediment samples and the water samples were collected are high above background levels for many radionuclides, including Pu, because of the detonation of the nuclear bomb code-named Castle Bravo, in 1954.

Leisvik, M; Hamilton, T

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Utilization of Sorghum in El Salvador: Grain, Flour and End-Product Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is limited information on the utilization of sorghum for human consumption in El Salvador. Increased wheat prices have driven the baking industry to seek alternative cereals for manufacturing of their products. The white color and bland taste characteristics of Salvadorian sorghum is ideal for use as a partial substitute of wheat (up to 50 percent) or alone in baked goods and a wide variety of foods. Further information on the grain quality, milling characteristics and impact on end-product was assessed to make better use of the available grain. Three different varieties of improved and local cultivars (RCV, Native and ZAM 912) were evaluated for their grain, flour and end-product quality. Grain hardness, color and composition of the grains varied from hard to intermediate to soft. Burr, hammer and roller milling were used for sorghum flour production. Impact of grain characteristics and milling quality was evaluated through the flours produced and their end-product quality. Grain hardness significantly affects flour and final product characteristics. Harder grain, RCV, produced flours more difficult to cook and with a grittier texture than those produced from Native cultivars (floury endosperm). Cupcakes produced from harder grain flours had lower volume and harder texture than cupcakes made from the Native varieties. ZAM 912 was an intermediate hard sorghum variety and produced the darkest flour and darkest cupcakes due to its pericarp hue. Appropriate use of this grains flour can be used in baked products with a darker hue (e.g. chocolate pastries). Harder grain flours can be utilized in coarse crumb products (e.g. cookies, horchata, and atole). Hammer mills produced the coarsest particles for all the varieties evaluated. Burr mills produced flour with similar cooking and end-product texture qualities as the roller mill. However, burr mills are not suitable for production of large quantities of whole sorghum flour. Nevertheless, they are more affordable for small entrepreneurs. Cultivars analyzed produce quality flour that can be used in an array of baked foods, i.e. ethnic beverages, porridges, cookies, flour mixes, tortillas, sweet breads. Whole sorghum flour substitution as low as 25 percent in wheat-based foods can represent significant cost savings for its users.

Pinilla, Luz Eliana

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Modern Sorters for Soil Segregation on Large Scale Remediation Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the mid-1940's, Dr. C. Lapointe developed a Geiger tube based uranium ore scanner and picker to replace hand-cobbing. In the 1990's, a modern version of the Lapointe Picker for soil sorting was developed around the need to clean the Johnston Atoll of plutonium. It worked well with sand, but these systems are ineffective with soil, especially with wet conditions. Additionally, several other constraints limited throughput. Slow moving belts and thin layers of material on the belt coupled with the use of multiple small detectors and small sorting gates make these systems ineffective for high throughput. Soil sorting of clay-bearing soils and building debris requires a new look at both the material handling equipment, and the radiation detection methodology. A new class of Super-Sorters has attained throughput of one hundred times that of the old designs. Higher throughput means shorter schedules which reduce costs substantially. The planning, cost, implementation, and other site considerations for these new Super-Sorters are discussed. Modern soil segregation was developed by Ed Bramlitt of the Defense Nuclear Agency for clean up at Johnston Atoll. The process eventually became the Segmented Gate System (SGS). This system uses an array of small sodium iodide (NaI) detectors, each viewing a small volume (segment), that control a gate. The volume in the gate is approximately one kg. This system works well when the material to be processed is sand; however, when the material is wet and sticky (soils with clays) the system has difficulty moving the material through the gates. Super-Sorters are a new class of machine designed to take advantage of high throughput aggregate processing conveyors, large acquisition volumes, and large NaI detectors using gamma spectroscopy. By using commercially available material handling equipment, the system can attain processing rates of up to 400 metric tons/hr with spectrum acquisition approximately every 0.5 sec, so the acquisition volume is 50 kilograms or less. Smaller sorting volumes can be obtained with lower throughput or by re-sorting the diverted material. This equipment can also handle large objects. The use of spectroscopy systems allows several regions of- interest to be set. Super-Sorters can bring waste processing charges down to less than $30/ metric ton on smaller jobs and can save hundreds of dollars per metric ton in disposal charges. The largest effect on the overall project cost occurs during planning and implementation. The overall goal is reduction of the length of the project, which dictates the most efficient soil processing. With all sorting systems the parameters that need to be accounted for are matrix type, soil feed rate, soil pre-processing, site conditions, and regulatory issues. The soil matrix and its ability to flow are extremely crucial to operations. It is also important to consider that as conditions change (i.e., moisture), the flowability of the soil matrix will change. Many soil parameters have to be considered: cohesive strength, internal and wall friction, permeability, and bulk density as a function of consolidating pressure. Clay bearing soils have very low permeability and high cohesive strength which makes them difficult to process, especially when wet. Soil feed speed is dependent on the equipment present and the ability to move the soil in the Super-Sorter processing area. When a Super-Sorter is running at 400 metric tons per hour it is difficult to feed the system. As an example, front-end loaders with large buckets would move approximately 5-10 metric tons of material, and 400 metric tons per hour would require 50-100 bucket-loads per hour to attain. Because the flowability of the soil matrix is important, poor material is often pre-processed before it is added to the feed hopper of the 'survey' conveyor. This pre-processing can consist of a 'grizzly' to remove large objects from the soil matrix, followed screening plant to prepare the soil so that it feeds well. Hydrated lime can be added to improve material properties. Site conditions (site

Shonka, J.J.; Kelley, J.E.; O'Brien, J.M. [Shonka Research Associates, Inc., 4939 Lower Roswell Road, Suite 106, Marietta, Georgia 3006 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications  

SciTech Connect

Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age is logarithmic but K remobilization is linear in K-treated trees where K concentration is high. As a result of K treatment the {sup 137}Cs concentration in K-treated fronds is extremely low and constant with frond age. Fronds of K treated trees contain a greater amount of K than control tree fronds. As they fall to the ground and decay they provide a small continuing pool of K that is about 3% of the natural K in soil under the tree canopy. Results of K and {sup 137}Cs concentration and distribution in control and K-treated coconut trees suggest that the application of K reduces {sup 137}Cs uptake both in the short term immediately following K fertilization and in the long term, after soil K levels have returned to normal but while plant K stores remain high. These results suggests that high internal K concentration and not high soil K is primarily responsible for long-term reduction of {sup 137}Cs in edible fruits, and plays a significant role in limiting further uptake of {sup 137}Cs by roots, and affects allocation of {sup 137}Cs to edible fruits for years. Coconut trees are capable of luxury K accumulation when provided with excess K and in this example the additional K can effectively provide the K requirements of the plant for in excess of 10 years. The reduction of {sup 137}Cs uptake lasts for at least 10 y after K is last applied and greatly reduces the estimated radiation dose to people consuming local tree foods. Effectiveness and duration of K treatment provides important assurances that reduction in {sup 137}Cs is long term and the radiation dose from consuming local plant foods will remain low.

Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Low-Level Plutonium Bioassay Measurements at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) are important alpha emitting radionuclides contained in radioactive debris from nuclear weapons testing. {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu are long-lived radionuclides with half-lives of 24,400 years and 6580 years, respectively. Concerns over human exposure to plutonium stem from knowledge about the persistence of plutonium isotopes in the environment and the high relative effectiveness of alpha-radiation to cause potential harm to cells once incorporated into the human body. In vitro bioassay tests have been developed to assess uptakes of plutonium based on measured urinary excretion patterns and modeled metabolic behaviors of the absorbed radionuclides. Systemic plutonium absorbed by the deep lung or from the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion is either excreted or distributed to other organs, primarily to the liver and skeleton, where it is retained for biological half-times of around 20 and 50 years, respectively. Dose assessment and atoll rehabilitation programs in the Marshall Islands have historically given special consideration to residual concentrations of plutonium in the environment even though the predicted dose from inhalation and/or ingestion of plutonium accounts for less than 5% of the annual effective dose from exposure to fallout contamination. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a state-of-the-art bioassay test to assess urinary excretion rates of plutonium from Marshallese populations. This new heavy-isotope measurement system is based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The AMS system at LLNL far exceeds the standard measurement requirements established under the latest United States Department of Energy (DOE) regulation, 10CFR 835, for occupational monitoring of plutonium, and offers several advantages over classical as well as competing new technologies for low-level detection and measurement of plutonium isotopes. The United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has independently verified the accuracy and precision of the AMS detection system for low-level bioassay measurements of plutonium isotopes through participation in an intercomparison exercise whereby performance evaluation samples were prepared in a synthetic urine matrix and submitted to participating laboratories for blind analysis. The results of the analyses were then sent to the NIST to independently evaluate the performance of laboratory participants. At LLNL, the AMS measurements of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu met ANSI 13.30 criteria for both precision and accuracy at all sample test levels. Livermore scientists continue to test the performance of the Marshall Islands Plutonium Urinalysis Program by routine blind analysis of externally prepared quality control test samples, and through the rigorous implementation of standardized methods and procedures. Although not addressed directly in the report, AMS measurements show that the urinary excretion of plutonium by selected Marshallese populations fall into a low and reproducible range. Moreover, there appears to be no evidence of small incremental intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement activities - past or present. The improved quality, reliability and detection sensitivity of AMS for low-level plutonium isotope measurements will enable DOE to develop high-quality, baseline urinary excretion data for Marshallese populations, and accurately assess and track potential uptakes of plutonium. associated with resettlement activities and/or from long-term changes in plutonium exposure conditions in the Marshall Islands.

Hamilton, T; Brown, T; Hickman, D; Marchetti, A; Williams, R; Kehl, S

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z