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Sample records for lq palmyra atoll

  1. LQ Energy LDK Solar Q Cells JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LQ Energy LDK Solar Q Cells JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: LQ Energy (LDK Solar & Q-Cells JV) Place: Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Sector: Solar Product: Germany-based JV between...

  2. Palmyra, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Registered Energy Companies in Palmyra, New Jersey Solatec LLC formerly Solar Aero References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population...

  3. City of Palmyra, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Missouri (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Palmyra Place: Missouri Phone Number: (573) 769-2104 Website: www.morec.org Outage Hotline: (888) 558-1077...

  4. Radiological cleanup of Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    For 8 years, from 1972 until 1980, the United States planned and carried out the radiological cleanup, rehabilitation, and resettlement of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. This documentary records, from the perspective of DOD, the background, decisions, actions, and results of this major national and international effort. The documentary is designed: First, to provide a historical document which records with accuracy this major event in the history of Enewetak Atoll, the Marshall Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Micronesia, the Pacific Basin, and the United States. Second, to provide a definitive record of the radiological contamination of the Atoll. Third, to provide a detailed record of the radiological exposure of the cleanup forces themselves. Fourth, to provide a useful guide for subsequent radiological cleanup efforts elsewhere.

  5. Circulation in Enewetak Atoll lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, M.; Smith, S.V.; Stroup, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Currents at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, were measured on the reef margins, in the channels, and in the lagoon. Lagoon circulation is dominated by wind-driven downwind surface flow and an upwind middepth return flow. This wind-driven flow has the characteristics of an Ekman spiral in an enclosed sea. Lagoon flushing is accomplished primarily by surf-driven water input over the windward (eastern) reefs and southerly drift out the South Channel. Mean water residence time is 1 month, while water entering the northern portion of the atoll takes about 4 months to exit.

  6. Helix Atoll JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Product: California-based JV developing products and financing mechanisms for small wind turbines. References: Helix & Atoll JV1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  7. Resettlement of Bikini Atoll U.S. Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.; Stoker, A.C.; Hamilton, T.F.

    1999-09-09

    The US conducted a nuclear testing program at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands from 1946 through 1958. Several atolls, including Bikini, were contaminated as a result of the nuclear detonations. Since 1974 the authors have conducted an extensive research and monitoring program to determine the radiological conditions at the atolls, identify the critical radionuclides and pathways, estimate the radiological dose to current or resettling populations, and develop remedial measures to reduce the dose to atoll populations. This paper describes exposure pathways and radionuclides; composition of atoll soils; radionuclide transport and dose estimates; remedial measures; and reduction in dose from a combined option.

  8. Clean soil at Eniwetok and Johnston Atolls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramlitt, E.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency has managed two large-scale soil cleanups (landmass decontaminations) of plutonium contamination. Both are at Pacific Ocean atolls formerly used for nuclear weapons tests. The Eniwetok Atoll (EA) cleanup between 1977 and 1980 evaluated 390 ha of contaminated land and cleaned 50 ha by removing 80,000 m[sup 3] of contaminated soil. The Johnston Atoll (JA) cleanup is in process. It has checked 270 ha, will clean 15 ha, and plans for removal of 80,000 m[sup 3] of soil. The cleanups are similar in other respects including carbonate-based soil, in situ radiation surveys, contamination characteristics, soil excavation methods, safety, and weather. The two cleanups are in contrast relative to planning time, agencies involved, funding, documentation, environmental considerations, cleanup workforce, site beneficiaries, waste characterization, regulatory permits, management, and project duration. The most noteworthy differences are the rationale for cleanup, the cleanup process, the definition of clean, and the cost.

  9. Geohydrology of Enewetak Atoll islands and reefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-05-06

    Extensive tidal studies in island wells and the lagoon at Enewetak Atoll have shown that island ground water dynamics are controlled by a layered aquifer system. The surface aquifer of unconsolidated Holocene material extends to a depth of approximately 15 m, and has a hydraulic conductivity K = 60 m/day. From 15 to 60 m (approximate lagoon depth) the reef structure consists of successive layers of altered Pleistocene materials, with bulk permeability substantially higher than that of the surface aquifer. Because of wave set-up over the windward reef and the limited pass area for outflow at the south end of the atoll, lagoon tides rise in phase with the ocean tides but fall later than the ocean water level. This results in a net lagoon-to-ocean head which can act as the driving force for outflow through the permeable Pleistocene aquifer. This model suggests that fresh water, nutrients or radioactive contaminants found in island ground water or reef interstitial water may be discharged primarily into the ocean rather than the lagoon. Atoll island fresh water resources are controlled by recharge, seawater dilution due to vertical tidal mixing between the surface and deeper aquifers, and by loss due to entrainment by the outflowing water in the deeper aquifers. Estimated lagoon-ot-ocean transit times through the deep aquifer are on the order of a few years, which corresponds well to the freshwater residence time estimates based on inventory and recharge. Islands in close proximity to reef channels have more fresh ground water than others, which is consistent with a locally reduced hydraulic gradient and slower flow through the Pleistocene aquifers.

  10. Introduction: Enewetak Atoll and the PEACE program. [Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, T.W.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    An extensive study was made from June 1984 through August 1985 of the surface and subsurface configurations of two large nuclear craters on the northern side of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. These craters, KOA and OAK, resulted from the near-surface detonation of two high-yield thermonuclear devices in 1958, when the atoll was part of the Pacific Proving Grounds. This multidisciplinary study was designed to produce a broad well-documented geologic, geophysical, and materials-properties data base for use in answering critical questions concerning craters formed by high-yield bursts. The study was part of a larger research initiative by the US Department of Defense to better understand high-yield, strategic-scale nuclear bursts and how Pacific Proving Grounds craters relate to the basing and targeting of nuclear-weapon systems and related national defense issues. The data gathered during the study of the Enewetak craters are applicable to many scientific topics well beyond cratering mechanics and other related strategic concerns of the US DOD. These scientific topics include the geologic evolution of the Pacific Basin, the biologic and geologic history of a coral atoll, the fluctuation of sea level in response to glaciation and deglaciation, the diagenetic history of carbonate rocks in relation to sea-level changes and the differing substrate-water geochemistries thus produced, the speciation and migration of marine biotas, and the biostratigraphic succession of biotas through time and the calibration of these events with an absolute isotopic time scale, to name a few.

  11. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands. Utrok Atoll (2010-2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T. F.; Kehl, S. R.; Martinelli, R. E.; Hickman, R. E.; Hickman, D. P.; Tumey, S. J.; Brown, T. A.; Langston, R. G.; Tamblin, M. W.; Tibon, S.; Chee, L.; Aisek, Jr., A.; DeDrum, Z.; Mettao, M.; Henson, J.

    2014-12-15

    As a hard copy supplement to the Marshall Islands Program website (https://marshallislands.llnl.gov), this document provides an overview of the individual radiological surveillance monitoring program established in support of residents of Utrōk Atoll and nonresident citizens of the Utrōk Atoll population group, along with full disclosure of verified measurement data (2010-2012). The Utrōk Atoll Whole Body Counting Facility has been temporarily stationed on Majuro Atoll and, in cooperation with the Utrōk Atoll Local Government, serves as a national radiological facility open to the general public.

  12. Strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, K.R.; Halley, R.B.; Simmons, K.R.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1988-02-01

    /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios determined for samples from a 350 m core of Neogene lagoonal, shallow-water limestones from Enewetak Atoll display a remarkably informative trend. Like the recently published data for Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) carbonates, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr at Enewetak increases monotonically but not smoothly from the early Miocene to the Pleistocene. The data show intervals of little or no change in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr, punctuated by sharp transitions to lower values toward greater core depths. The sharp transitions correlate with observed solution disconformities caused by periods of subaerial erosion, whereas the intervals of little or no change in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr correspond to intervals of rapid accumulation of shallow-water carbonate sediments. When converted to numerical ages using the published DSDP 590B trend, the best-resolved time breaks are at 282 m (12.3 to 18.2 Ma missing) and 121.6 m (3.0 to 5.3 Ma missing) below the lagoon floor. At Enewetak, Sr isotopes offer a stratigraphic resolution for these shallow-marine Neogene carbonates comparable to that of nannofossil zonation in deep-sea carbonates (0.3-3 m.y.). In addition, the correlation of times of Sr-isotope breaks at Enewetak with times of rapid Sr-isotope change in the DSDP 590B samples confirms the importance of sea-level changes in the evolution of global-marine Sr isotopes and shows that the Sr-isotope response to sea-level falls is rapid.

  13. Bikini Atoll ionizing radiation survey, May 1985-May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shingleton, K.L.; Cate, J.L.; Trent, M.G.; Robison, W.L.

    1987-10-01

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States conducted 23 nuclear tests at the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, which resulted in extensive radioactive contamination of a number of islands in the atoll and prevented the timely resettlement of the native population. Although the external dose rates from beta and gamma radiation have been previously determined by aerial survey and a variety of ground measurement techniques, technical constraints limited the assessment of external beta dose rates that result from the /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr//sup 90/Y contamination on the islands. Now, because of the recent development of very thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), the external beta dose rates can be measured. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers from Enewetak Atoll, Western Pacific Ocean: Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bybell, L.M.; Poore, R.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Boring of the carbonate sequence at the northern end of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, was conducted in 1985, as part of the Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) Program. The overall goal of the program was to characterize physical effects of large-scale nuclear blasts, which were conducted in the early 1950's, on the sediments of the atoll. In the report the authors document the occurrences of stratigraphically diagnostic planktic microfossils in samples from Enewetak (generally referred to as core) and outline the rationale for incorporating all available diagnostic planktic assemblages into a composite sequence that was used to date the Enewetak benthic zonation.

  15. Sediment facies of Enewetak Atoll lagoon. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardlaw, B.R.; Henry, T.W.; Martin, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two sets of benthic (bottom-surface) samples were taken from the lagoon on Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, during the PEACE Program (1984-1985). These samples were collected to (1) familiarize project geologists with the distribution of sediment types and facies within Enewetak lagoon, (2) increase understanding of the distribution of modern microfaunas in the lagoon, and (3) supplement studies of the sea-floor features both within and near OAK and KOA craters. The benthic sample studies aided both evaluation of the stratigraphic sequence penetrated during the Drilling Phase and interpretation of the litho- and biostratigraphic framework used in analysis of OAK and KOA.

  16. Plutonium and americium behavior in coral atoll environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Inventories of /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. Quantities of /sup 239 +240/Pu and lesser amounts of /sup 241/Am are continuously mobilizing from these sedimentary reservoirs. The amount of /sup 239 +240/Pu mobilized to solution at any time represents 0.08 to 0.09% of the sediment inventories to a depth of 16 cm. The mobilized /sup 239 +240/Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Further, any characteristics of /sup 239 +240/Pu described at one location may not necessarily be relevant in describing its behavior elsewhere following mobilization and migration. The relative amounts of /sup 241/Am to /sup 239 +240/Pu in the sedimentary deposits at Enewetak and Bikini may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay. Mobilization of /sup 239 +240/Pu is not a process unique to these atolls, and quantities in solution derived from sedimentary deposits can be found at other global sites. These studies in the equatorial Pacific have significance in assessing the long-term behavior of the transuranics in any marine environment. 22 references, 1 figure, 13 tables.

  17. Larger foraminifer biostratigraphy of PEACE boreholes, Enewetak Atoll, Western Pacific Ocean. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, T.G.; Margerum, R.

    1991-01-01

    Larger foraminiferal assemblages, including Lepidocyclina orientalis, Miogypsina thecideaeformis, Miogypsinoides dehaartii, etc., and a smaller foraminifer, Austrotrillina striata, are used to correlate upper Oligocene and lower Miocene strata in the Pacific Atoll Exploration Program (PEACE) boreholes at Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, western Pacific Ocean, with the Te and Tf zones of the previously established Tertiary Far East Letter Zonation. Correlation using these two benthic groups is critical because calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers are absent in the lower Miocene strata. Biostratigraphic data from these boreholes delineate a thick (greater than 700 feet) sequence of upper Oligocene and lower Miocene strata corresponding to lower and upper Te zone. These strata document a major period of carbonate accumulation at Enewetak during the Late Oligocene and early Miocene (26 to 18 million years ago).

  18. The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 2, Biogeography and systematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaney, D.M.; Reese, E.S.; Burch, B.L.; Helfrich, P.

    1987-01-01

    The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. Volume 2 of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll provides information on the taxonomy of animals and plants known to occur at Enewetak Atoll. The collections on which the checklists in each chapter are based are housed at the Bernice P. Bishop Museum in Honolulu and the US National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. In addition to the species checklists, each chapter in Volume 2 provides a succinct summary of the biota with respect to endemism, range extensions, and other features that set the Enewetak biota apart from those one might expect to find on equivalent Indo-Pacific islands. This compendium of taxonomic information for an atoll should prove of immense value to scientists interested in biogeography and evolutionary biology of island ecosystems for years to come. Individual chapters are processed separately for the data base.

  19. Reassessment of the potential radiological doses for residents resettling Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Phillips, W.A.; Mount, M.E.; Clegg, B.R.; Conrado, C.L.

    1980-10-30

    The purpose of this report is to refine the dose predictions, subsequent to the cleanup effort, for alternate living patterns proposed for resettlement of Enewetak Atoll. The most recent data developed from projects at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls for concentration and uptake of Cs, Sr, Pu, and Am were used in conjunction with recent dietary information and current dose models to predict annual dose rates and 30- and 50-y integral doses (dose commitments). The terrestrial food chain in the most significant exposure pathway - it contributes more than 50% of the total dose - and external gamma exposure is the second most significant pathway. Other pathways evaluated are the marine food chain, drinking water, and inhalation.

  20. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

    2009-04-20

    The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at

  1. Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

    1988-05-31

    This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

  2. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

    2006-01-17

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental

  3. The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 1, The ecosystem: Environments, biotas, and processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaney, D.M.; Reese, E.S.; Burch, B.L.; Helfrich, P.

    1987-01-01

    The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. The history of the laboratory and the reasons for its support by the United States Department of Energy are described in Chapter 1 of Volume 1. Volume 1 provides a synthesis of the research carried out under the subject headings of the respective chapters. Certain of the chapters, e.g., those on geology, subtidal and intertidal environments and ecology, and those on reef processes and trophic relationships, summarize a great diversity of research carried out by many scientists for many years. In contrast, the chapters on meteorology and oceanography summarize research carried out under one integrated program involving fewer scientists working over a shorter period. Individual chapters are processed separately for the data base.

  4. An updated dose assessment for a U.S. Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1975. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The corresponding 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.1 cSv, 13 cSv, and 15 cSv, respectively. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {plus_minus}35% of its expected value. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

  5. Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) Program, Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Part 4. Analysis of borehole gravity surveys and other geologic and bathymetric studies in vicinity of Oak and Koa craters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, T.W.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) Program was established to resolve a number of questions for the Department of Defense (DOD) about the geologic and material-properties parameters of two craters (KOA and OAK), formed by near-surface bursts of high-yield thermonuclear devices on the northern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, in 1958. The multidisciplinary studies conducted by the USGS in collaboration with other organizations during 1984 through 1987 were part of a much larger research initiative by the DNA to better understand the dynamic properties of strategic-scale nuclear bursts and the relevance of the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG) craters to issues of strategic basing and targeting of nuclear weapons. Major topics include: Borehole gravity; Palentologic evidence for mixing; Electron paramagnetic resonance studies; Bathymetric studies of OAK crater; Constraints on densification and piping for OAK; and Additional studies of geologic crater models.

  6. 137Cs Inter-Plant Concentration Ratios Provide a Predictive Tool for Coral Atolls with Distinct Benefits Over Transfer Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Bogen, K; Corado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2007-07-17

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR), [Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll tree food-crops/Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume], can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict {sup 137}Cs concentration in tree food-crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact tree roots naturally integrate 137Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of {sup 137}Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in {sup 137}Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSD's of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10 to 20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples.

  7. ''A ground water resources study of a Pacific Ocean atoll - Tarawa, Gilbert Islands,'' by J. W. Lloyd, J. C. Miles, G. R. Chessmand, and S. F. Bugg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatcraft, S.W.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-10-01

    Several inherent problems in the methodology employed in the ground water resource study of Tarawa Atoll (Lloyd, et al., 1981) are described. Studies of Enewetak Atoll have provided data that require a significantly different conceptual model of the atoll hydrogeology system. Comparison of well, lagoon, and ocean tidal observations with a mathematical model that assumes horizontal tidal propagation indicates that the observed results are more consistent with a system that is controlled by vertical coupling between the unconsolidated surface aquifer and an underlying aquifer of more permeable limestone. This indicates that most fresh water recharged to the aquifer migrates downward and mixes with the sea water in a deeper aquifer providing easy exchange with the ocean. Lloyd, et al., do not take tidal mixing or vertical transport into account and it therefore seems likely that fresh water inventories are significantly overestimated. Failure to include these significant loss terms in the island water budget may also account for calculated heads above ground level. (JMT)

  8. Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

    1998-05-01

    The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor`s task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project.

  9. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 2. inventories of transuranium elements in surface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Robison, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    This is the second of three reports on Bikini sediment studies, which discusses the concentrations and inventories of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in sediments from the lagoon. Surface sediment samples were collected from 87 locations over the entire lagoon at Bikini Atoll during 1979. The collections were made to map the distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred in the composition of the sediment as a result of the testing program. Present inventories for {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in the surface 2 cm of sediment are estimated to be 14 and 17 TBq, respectively. These values are estimated to represent only 14% of the total inventory in the sediment column. Sediment inventories of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are changing only slowly with time through chemical- physical processes that continuously mobilize small amounts of the transuranics to the water column. The lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with deposits logoonward of the eastern reef.

  10. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239 +240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102//sup m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the apropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  11. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239+240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the appropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  12. Analysis of radiation exposure for personnel on the residence islands of Enewetak Atoll after Operation Greenhouse, 1951-1952. Technical report, 3 December 85-20 April 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.

    1987-04-20

    The radiological environments and reconstructed for the residence islands of Enewetak Atoll following the roll-up phase of Operation GREENHOUSE in May 1951. The residence islands received fallout during Operation GREEHOUSE (April/May 1951) as a result of Shots, DOG, EASY, and ITEM. From the reconstructed radiological environments and assumed personnel activity scenarios, equivalent personnel film badge doses are calculated, by month, from June 1951 to June 1952. For a individual assigned to Enewetak Atoll during this period, a mean dose of 1.5-2.0 rem would have been accrued, depending on the residence island to which he was assigned.

  13. Monitored plutonium aerosols at a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.O.; Johnson, J.S.

    1996-01-23

    Suspended plutonium in air was monitored for four periods near the operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. The monitoring periods were 14 October-14 November 1992, 20 October-15 November 1993, 16 August-3 November 1994, and 17 February-27 February 1995. Pairs of high volume air samplers were located at each of four locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quotes} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the hot soil gate of the sorter, the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved, and the {open_quotes}oversize soil{close_quotes} crushing area. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The median concentrations of Pu in {open_quotes}workplace{close_quotes} air (combined spoils pile, plant area, and clean pile sites) in 1992 was 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}), but increased to median values of 23000 aCi/m{sup 3} (852 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in August-November 1994 and 29800 aCi/m{sup 3} (1100 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in February 1995. The highest median value at the worksites (29800 aCi/m{sup 3}) was more than 200 times lower than the regulatory level. The highest observed value was 84200 aCi/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile site, and this was more than 70 times lower than the regulatory level. The conclusion was that, in spite of the dusty environment, and the increased level of specific activity, we did not find that the soil processing posed any significant risk to workers during the observation periods 1992-1995.

  14. Suspended plutonium aerosols near a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll in 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.F.; Johnson, J.S.

    1994-02-01

    Plutonium aerosol monitoring was conducted for one month near the 1992 operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. Pairs of high volume cascade impactors and a high volume air sampler were located at each of three locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quote} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the-hot soil gate of the sorter, and the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, uncontaminated {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The three monitoring locations were extremely dusty, even though there were frequent rains during the period of operation. Total suspended particulate mass loadings were 178 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile, 93 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the plant area, and 79 {mu}g/m{sup 3} at the clean pile during this period, when background mass loadings were 41 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. There was no practical difference in the aerosol specific activity between the three locations, however, which had a median value of 3.64 pCi/g (135 Bq/kg). The aerosol specific activity is enhanced by a factor of 3 over the specific activity of the processed contaminant soil. This is about the same enhancement factor as found by other studies of road traffic, bulldozing, and agricultural operations. Specific activity of processed soil was 1.35 pCi/g (50 Bq/kg). The median mass-loading of the three downwind sites was 109 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (uncorrected for the sea spray contribution), so that the median concentrations in air using the median aerosol specific activity was calculated to be 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}). Measured Pu concentrations ranged from 280 to 1508 aCi/m{sup 3} (10 to 56 {mu}Bq/m3).

  15. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  16. In situ determination of /sup 241/Am on Enewetak Atoll. Date of survey: July 1977-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, W.J.; Fritzsche, A.E.; Jaffe, R.J.; Villaire, A.E.

    1981-11-01

    An in situ gamma ray spectrometer system was operated at Enewetak Atoll from July 1977 to December 1979 in support of the Enewetak Cleanup Project. The system employed a high purity germanium planar detector suspended at a height of 7.4 m above ground. Conversion factors were established to relate measured photopeak count rate data to source concentration in the soil. Data obtained for /sup 241/Am, together with plutonium-to-americium ratios obtained from soil sample analyses, were used to establish area-averaged surface (0 to 3 cm) transuranic concentration values. In areas which exceeded cleanup criteria, measurements were made in an iterative fashion to guide soil removal until levels were reduced below the cleanup criteria. Final measurements made after soil removal had been completed were used to document remaining surface transuranic concentration values and to establish external exposure rate levels due to /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co.

  17. Technical Basis Document: A Statistical Basis for Interpreting Urinary Excretion of Plutonium Based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for Selected Atoll Populations in the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogen, K; Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Martinelli, R E; Marchetti, A A; Kehl, S R; Langston, R G

    2007-05-01

    We have developed refined statistical and modeling techniques to assess low-level uptake and urinary excretion of plutonium from different population group in the northern Marshall Islands. Urinary excretion rates of plutonium from the resident population on Enewetak Atoll and from resettlement workers living on Rongelap Atoll range from <1 to 8 {micro}Bq per day and are well below action levels established under the latest Department regulation 10 CFR 835 in the United States for in vitro bioassay monitoring of {sup 239}Pu. However, our statistical analyses show that urinary excretion of plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) from both cohort groups is significantly positively associated with volunteer age, especially for the resident population living on Enewetak Atoll. Urinary excretion of {sup 239}Pu from the Enewetak cohort was also found to be positively associated with estimates of cumulative exposure to worldwide fallout. Consequently, the age-related trends in urinary excretion of plutonium from Marshallese populations can be described by either a long-term component from residual systemic burdens acquired from previous exposures to worldwide fallout or a prompt (and eventual long-term) component acquired from low-level systemic intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement of the northern Marshall Islands, or some combination of both.

  18. Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) program, Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Part 1. Drilling operations and descriptions of boreholes in vicinity of KOA and OAK craters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, T.W.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Skipp, B.; Major, R.P.; Tracey, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    From mid-1984 through mid-1985, the United States Geological Survey engaged in an investigation of two craters formed from high-yield, near-surface nuclear bursts at Enewatak Atoll. The craters studied, KOA and OAK, resulted from 1.4- and 8.9-megaton, near-surface bursts detonated near the northern perimeter of the Enewetak lagoon on May 12 and June 28, 1958, respectively. At that time, Enewetak was a part of the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG). OAK and KOA are among the only high-yield nuclear explosion craters available for studies of cratering processes and crater-related effects. The objects of this program were: (1) to identify major crater dimensions, morphology, and structures; (2) to provide a data base for material-properties, shock-metamorphic, and other types of related studies; and (3) to gain a better understanding of both the process that formed the excavational crater and that altered that initial feature to its present form. These data from the Enewetak craters are needed for verification of cratering prediction models (code validation), which is important to the analysis of survivability of various strategic defense systems.

  19. Individual Radiological Protection Monitoring of Utrok Atoll Residents Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Bioassay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T; Kehl, S; Brown, T; Martinelli, R; Hickman, D; Jue, T; Tumey, S; Langston, R

    2007-06-08

    This report contains individual radiological protection surveillance data developed during 2006 for adult members of a select group of families living on Utrok Atoll. These Group I volunteers all underwent a whole-body count to determine levels of internally deposited cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and supplied a bioassay sample for analysis of plutonium isotopes. Measurement data were obtained and the results compared with an equivalent set of measurement data for {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes from a second group of adult volunteers (Group II) who were long-term residents of Utrok Atoll. For the purposes of this comparison, Group II volunteers were considered representative of the general population on Utrok Atoll. The general aim of the study was to determine residual systemic burdens of fallout radionuclides in each volunteer group, develop data in response to addressing some specific concerns about the preferential uptake and potential health consequences of residual fallout radionuclides in Group I volunteers, and generally provide some perspective on the significance of radiation doses delivered to volunteers (and the general Utrok Atoll resident population) in terms of radiological protection standards and health risks. Based on dose estimates from measurements of internally deposited {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes, the data and information developed in this report clearly show that neither volunteer group has acquired levels of internally deposited fallout radionuclides specific to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands that are likely to have any consequence on human health. Moreover, the dose estimates are well below radiological protection standards as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies, and are very small when compared to doses from natural sources of radiation in the Marshall Islands and the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a

  20. The Concentration and Distribution of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Air on Illeginni Island at Kwajalein Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Gouveia, F J; Lindman, T R; Yakuma, S C

    2006-04-27

    Re-entry vehicles on missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force base in California re-enter at the Western Test Range, the Regan Test Site (RTS) at Kwajalein Atoll. An environmental Assessment (EA) was written at the beginning of the program to assess potential impact of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be), the major RV materials of interest from a health and environmental perspective. The chemical and structural form of DU and Be in RVs is such that they are insoluble in soil water and sea water. Consequently, residual concentrations of DU and Be observed in soil on the island are not expected to be toxic to plant life because there is essentially no soil to plant uptake. Similarly, due to their insolubility in sea water there is no uptake of either element by marine biota including fish, mollusks, shellfish and sea mammals. No increase in either element has been observed in sea life around Illeginni Island where deposition of DU and Be has occurred. The critical terrestrial exposure pathway for U and Be is inhalation. Concentration of both elements in air over the test period (1989 to 2006) is lower by a factor of 10,000 than the most restrictive U.S. guideline for the general public. Uranium concentrations in air are also lower by factors of 10 to 100 than concentrations of U in air in the U.S. measured by the EPA (Keith et al., 1999). U and Be concentrations in air downwind of deposition areas on Illeginni Island are essentially indistinguishable from natural background concentrations of U in air at the atolls. Thus, there are no health related issues associated with people using the island.

  1. Concetration and Distribution of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Air on Illeginni Island at Kwajalein Atoll after the Final Land-Impact Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Gouveia, F J; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R; Yakuma, S C

    2010-04-22

    Re-entry vehicles on missiles launched from Vandenberg Air Force base in California re-enter at the Western Test Range, the Regan Test Site (RTS) at Kwajalein Atoll. An Environmental Assessment (EA) was written at the beginning of the program to assess potential impact of DU and Be, the major RV materials of interest from a health and environmental perspective, for both ocean and land impacts. The chemical and structural form of Be and DU in RVs is such that they are insoluble in soil water and seawater. Thus, they are not toxic to plant life on the isalnd (no soil to plant uptake.) Similarly, due to their insolubility in sea water there is no uptake of either element by fish, mollusks, shellfish, sea mammals, etc. No increase in either element has been observed in sea life around Illeginnin Island where deposition of DU and Be has occured. The critical terrestrial exposure pathway for U and Be is inhalation. Concentration of both elements in air over the test period (1989 to 2006) is lower by a factor of nearly 10,000 than the most restrictive U.S. guideline for the general public. Uranium concentrations in air are also lower by factors of 10 to 100 than concentrations of U in air in the U.S. measured by the EPA (Keith et al., 1999). U and Be concentrations in air downwind of deposition areas on Illeginni Island are essentially indistinguishable from natural background concentrations of U in air at the atolls. Thus, there are no health related issues associated with people using the island.

  2. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 3. Inventories of some long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides associated with lagoon surface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.

    1997-12-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected during 1979 from 87 locations in the lagoon at Bikini Atoll. The collections were made to better define the concentrations and distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred to the composition of the surface sediment from the nuclear testing program conducted by the United States at the Atoll between 1946 and 1958. This is the last of three reports on Bikini sediment studies. In this report, we discuss the concentrations and inventories of the residual long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediments from the lagoon. The gamma-emitting radionuclides detected most frequently in sediments collected in 1979, in addition to Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) (discussed in the second report of this series), included Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Bismuth-207 ({sup 207}Bi), Europium-155 ({sup 155}Eu), and Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Other man-made, gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Europium-152,154 ({sup 152,154}Eu), Antimony-125 ({sup 125}Sb), and Rhodium-101,102m ({sup 101,102m}Rh) were occasionally measured above detection limits in sediments near test site locations. The mean inventories for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 207}Ei, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 60}Co in the surface 4 cm of the lagoon sediment to be 1.7, 0.56, 7.76, and 0.74 TBq, respectively. By June 1997, radioactive decay would reduce these values to 1.1, 0.38, 0.62, and 0.07 TBq, respectively. Some additional loss results from a combination of different processes that continuously mobilize and return some amount of the radionuclides to the water column. The water and dissolved constituents are removed from the lagoon through channels and exchange with the surface waters of the north equatorial Pacific Ocean. Highest levels of these radionuclides are found in surface deposits lagoonward of the Bravo Crater. Lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with sediment lagoonward of the eastern reef. The quantities in

  3. Radionuclide characterization and associated dose from long-lived radionuclides in close-in fallout delivered to the marine environment at Bikini and Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V. E.; Robison, W. L.

    1998-09-01

    Between June 1946 and October 1958, Enewetak and Bikini Atolls were used by the United States as testing grounds for 66 nuclear devices. The combined explosive yield from these tests was 107 Mt (Mt TNT equivalents). This testing produced close-in fallout debris that was contaminated with quantities of radioactive fission and particle activated products, and unspent radioactive nuclear fuel that entered the aquatic environment of the atolls. Today, the sediments in the lagoons are reservoirs for 10's of TBq of the transuranics and some long-lived fission and activation products. The larger amounts of contamination are associated with fine and coarse sediment material adjacent to the locations of the high yield explosions. Radionuclides are also distributed vertically in the sediment column to various depths in all regions of the lagoons. Concentrations greater than fallout background levels are found in filtered water sampled over several decades from all locations and depths in the lagoons. This is a direct indication that the radionuclides are continuously mobilized to solution from the solid phases. Of particular importance is the fact that the long-lived radionuclides are accumulated to different levels by indigenous aquatic plants and organisms that are used as food by resident people. One might anticipate finding continuous high contamination levels in many of the edible marine organisms from the lagoons, since the radionuclides associated with the sediments are not contained and are available to the different organisms in a relatively shallow water environment. This is not the case. We estimate that the radiological dose from consumption of the edible parts of marine foods at Enewetak and Bikini is presently about 0.05% of the total 50-year integral effective dose from all other exposure pathways that include ingestion of terrestrial foods and drinking water, external exposure and inhalation. The total radiological dose from the marine pathway is dominated by

  4. Concentration of Beryllium (Be) and Depleted Uranium (DU) in Marine Fauna and Sediment Samples from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands at Kwajalein Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R

    2005-02-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel have supported US Air Force (USAF) ballistic missile flight tests for about 15 years for Peacekeeper and Minuteman missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). Associated re-entry vehicles (RV's) re-enter at Regan Test Site (RTS) at the US Army base at Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) where LLNL has supported scoring, recovery operations for RV materials, and environmental assessments. As part of ongoing USAF ballistic missile flight test programs, LLNL is participating in an updated EA being written for flights originating at VFAB. Marine fauna and sediments (beach-sand samples) were collected by US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and LLNL at Illeginni Island and Boggerik Island (serving as a control site) at Kwajalein Atoll. Data on the concentration of DU (hereafter, U) and Be in collected samples was requested by USFWS and NMFS to determine whether or not U and Be in RV's entering the Illeginni area are increasing U and Be concentrations in marine fauna and sediments. LLNL agreed to do the analyses for U and Be in support of the EA process and provide a report of the results. There is no statistically significant difference in the concentration of U and Be in six species of marine fauna from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands (p - 0.14 for U and p = 0.34 for Be). Thus, there is no evidence that there has been any increase in U and Be concentrations in marine fauna as a result of the missile flight test program. Concentration of U in beach sand at Illeginni is the same as soil and beach sand in the rest of the Marshall Islands and again reflects an insignificant impact from the flight test program. Beach sand from Illeginni has a mean concentration of Be higher than that from the control site, Boggeik Island. Seven of 21 samples from Ileginni had detectable Be. Four samples had a concentration of Be ranging from 4 to 7 ng g {sup -1} (4 to 7 parts per billion (ppb

  5. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  6. Field Quality Study of the LARP Nb3Sn 3.7m-Long Quadrupole Models of LQ Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AMbrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; DiMarco, J.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Prebys, E.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab /LBL, Berkeley /Brookhaven

    2011-09-01

    After the successful test of the first long Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet (LQS01), the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has assembled and tested a new 3.7 m-long Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole (LQS02). This magnet has four new coils made of the same conductor as LQS01 coils, and it is using the same support structure. LQS02 was tested at the Fermilab Vertical Magnet Test Facility with the main goal to confirm that the long models can achieve field gradient above 200 T/m, LARP target for 90-mm aperture, as well as to measure the field quality. These long models lack some alignment features and it is important to study the field harmonics. Previous field quality measurements of LQS01 showed higher than expected differences between measured and calculated harmonics compared to the short models (TQS) assembled in a similar structure. These differences could be explained by the use of two different impregnation fixtures during coil fabrication. In this paper, we present a comparison of the field quality measurements between LQS01 and LQS02 as well as a comparison with the short TQS models. If the result supports the coil fabrication hypothesis, another LQS assembly with all coils fabricated in the same fixture will be produced for understanding the cause of the discrepancy between short and long models.

  7. Pacific Enewetak Atoll cratering exploration completion report. [PEACE Program - Pacific-Enewetak Atoll Cratering Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The primary objectives of this seaborne drilling operation were to obtain sufficient quantities of continuous, high quality carbonate core/samples, an integrated suite of geophysical logs, and other sub-sea floor data from within and adjacent to the KOA and OAK craters. This information is vital to refinement of previous interpretation and model studies detailing the dynamics of crater formation and to confirm residual postshot changes of the underlying formations. Specifically, the information obtained will provide an accurate understanding of the original dimensions of the transient craters and through precise analysis of material property samples will lead to an understanding of the response behavior of the lagoon sediments beneath the craters. All program objectives were accomplished. A total of 32 precisely positioned exploratory holes were completed in KOA and OAK craters from a drill ship in water depths of 30 to 200 ft. (Reference Appendix I for summary drilling curves of each borehole.)

  8. Manhattan Project: Operation Crossroads, Bikini Atoll, July 1946

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, ... The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, ...

  9. Search for first-generation scalar leptoquarks in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on a search for pair production of first-generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 252 pb{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the D0 detector. They observe no evidence for LQ production in the topologies arising from LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} eqeq and LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} eqvq, and derive 95% C.L. lower limits on the LQ mass as a function of {beta}, where {beta} is the branching fraction for LQ {yields} eq. The limits are 241 and 218 GeV/c{sup 2} for {beta} = 1 and 0.5, respectively. These results are combined with those obtained by D0 at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV, which increases these LQ mass limits to 256 and 234 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Analysis of core soil and water samples from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1981-02-18

    Core soil samples and water samples were collected from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak for analysis of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am by both gamma spectroscopy and, through a contractor laboratory, by wet chemistry procedures. The samples processing methods, the analytical methods and the analytical quality control are all procedures developed for the continuing Marshall Island radioecology and dose assessment work.

  11. Solatec LLC formerly Solar Aero | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (formerly Solar Aero) Place: Palmyra, New Jersey Zip: 8065 Product: Alternative energy research and development company. References: Solatec LLC (formerly Solar Aero)1 This...

  12. From: Angie Smith To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Please...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Angie Smith To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Please Read Date: Sunday, September 21, ... Transmission Corridors. Thank you, Angie Smith 2800 Palmyra Rd 555 Hannibal, MO 63401

  13. Exotic physics: search for first-generation scalar leptoquarks in ppbar collisions at sqrt = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-06-29

    We report on a search for pair production of first-generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 203 pb{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF experiment. We observe no evidence for LQ production in the topologies arising from LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} eqeq and LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} eq{nu}q, and derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the LQ production cross section. The results are combined with those obtained from a separately reported CDF search in the topology arising from LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {nu}q{nu}q and 95% C.L. lower limits on the LQ mass as a function of {beta} = BR(LQ {yields} eq) are derived. The limits are 236, 205 and 145 GeV/c{sup 2} for {beta} = 1, {beta} = 0.5 and {beta} = 0.1, respectively.

  14. Lab-Corps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DR. RALPH T. MUEHLEISEN SonicLQ - Evolution of The Value Proposition 2 DOE Proposal Post Lab-Corps Mid Lab-Corps 3 What Has Happened To SonicLQ? SonicLQ is now being recruited to other pitch competitions including Cleantech Open, SXSW Eco, and others SonicLQ was a finalist in the Clean Energy Trust Challenge w/ over $1M of investment awards. 4 * Using Lab-Corps methods as part of T2M in my proposals * New relationships within Argonne * New relationships with industry How has Lab-Corps changed my

  15. Wayne County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Macedon, New York Marion, New York Newark, New York Ontario, New York Palmyra, New York Red Creek, New York Rose, New York Savannah, New York Sodus Point, New York Sodus, New York...

  16. FortyPoint Seven | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: FortyPoint Seven Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: BH14 8LQ Sector: Biofuels Product: A Biofuels company founded by John Nicholas, one of Biofuels Corporation...

  17. Microsoft Word - Tacoma-Raver-Substation-Antenna-CX.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EH ZRUNLQJ ZLWKLQ WKH HLVWLQJ&15; JUDYHOHG VXEVWDWLRQ DUGV DQG FRQWURO KRXVHV&30; WKHUH LV QR YHJHWDWLRQ LQ WKH DUGV DQG QR KDELWDW RU VSHFLDO DUHDV RI LQWHUHVW WKDW ZRXOG EH...

  18. Search for second-generation scalar leptoquarks in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U.

    2005-12-01

    Results on a search for pair production of second generation scalar leptoquark in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV are reported. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF detector during the 2002-2003 Tevatron Run II and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 198 pb{sup -1}. Leptoquarks (LQ) are sought through their decay into (charged) leptons and quarks, with final state signatures represented by two muons and jets and one muon, large transverse missing energy and jets. We observe no evidence for LQ production and derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the LQ production cross sections as well as lower limits on their mass as a function of {beta}, where {beta} is the branching fraction for LQ {yields} {mu}q.

  19. U. S. Atoudo Energy Comudseion

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    U. S. Atoudo Energy Comudseion P. 0. Box 30, Anscmla Station New York 23, 8. Y. . I i;. i ... aoteber 27, lq ( 7 - Core Seotiona (density testa) (be 1 - Plate (step-section) ...

  20. L.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Au*ority Of .asw *-----a-m*-m-m-ma L.Q ..' ) , ;s ' -.L - This ihzt,rnr consis:s 0) T. 0. lhd?, m mm- - -. ..Pairrs No.. .. d...ot --.. o.cool+s. Ccrto -- '.. ,"...

  1. CeCap LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: CeCap LLP Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: W1S 2LQ Product: London-based investment boutique which provides investment advice to, and invests in, small to mediun size...

  2. Search for 1st Generation Leptoquarks in the eejj channel with the DZero experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; /Marseille, CPPM

    2008-09-01

    An evidence of the existence of leptoquarks (LQ) would prove the validity of various extensions of the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM). The search for first generation leptoquarks presented in this dissertation has been performed by analyzing a 1.02 fb{sup -1} sample of data collected by the D0 detector, events with a final state comprising two light jets and two electrons. The absence of an excess of events in comparison to SM expectations leads to exclude scalar LQ masses up to 292 GeV and vector LQ masses from 350 to 458 GeV, depending on the LQ-l-q coupling type. The great importance of a good jet energy measurement motivated the study of the instrumental backgrounds correlated to the calorimeter, as much as studies of the hadronic showers energy resolution in {gamma} + jets events.

  3. Select Bank Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bank Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Select Bank Plc Place: Mayfair, England, United Kingdom Zip: W1J 8LQ Sector: Renewable Energy Product: England-based firm that promotes...

  4. Search for pair production of second generation scalar leptoquarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2008-08-01

    We report on a search for the pair production of second generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in p{bar p} collisions at the center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96TeV using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Topologies arising from the LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {mu}q{nu}q and LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {mu}q{mu}q decay modes are investigated. No excess of data over the standard model prediction is observed and upper limits on the leptoquark pair production cross section are derived at the 95% C.L. as a function of the leptoquark mass and the branching fraction {beta} for the decay LQ {yields} {mu}q. These are interpreted as lower limits on the leptoquark mass as a function of {beta}. For {beta} = 1 (0.5), scalar second generation leptoquarks with masses up to 316GeV (270GeV) are excluded.

  5. Search for pair production of first-generation leptoquarks in p pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, : V.

    2009-07-01

    A search for pair production of first-generation leptoquarks (LQ) is performed with data collected by the D0 experiment in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. In a sample of data corresponding to {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} the search has been performed on the final states with two electrons and two jets or one electron, two jets and missing transverse energy. We find our data consistent with standard model expectations. The results are combined with those found in a previous analysis of events with two jets and missing transverse energy to obtain scalar LQ mass limits. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on a scalar LQ mass of 299 GeV, 284 GeV and 216 GeV for {beta} = 1, {beta} = 0.5 and {beta} = 0.02 respectively, where {beta} is the LQ branching ratio in the eq channel. This improves the results obtained with a lower luminosity sample from Run II of the Tevatron. Lower limits on vector LQ masses with different couplings from 357 GeV to 464 GeV for {beta} = 0.5 are also set using this analysis.

  6. Enewetak fact book (a resume of pre-cleanup information)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, W.

    1982-09-01

    The book contains a group of short treatises on the precleanup condition of the islands in Enewetak Atoll. Their purpose was to provide brief guidance to the radiological history and radiological condition of the islands for use in cleanup of the atoll. (ACR)

  7. Search for pair production of second generation scalar leptoquarks in ppbar collisions at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calfayan, Philippe; /Munich U.

    2008-05-01

    As predicted by numerous extensions of the Standard Model, leptoquarks (LQ) are hypothetical bosons allowing lepton-quark transitions. Under the assumption that they couple only to quarks and leptons of the same generation, three generations of leptoquarks can be distinguished. The search for the pair production of second generation scalar leptoquarks has been carried out in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96TeV, using an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron collider between August 2002 and February 2006. Topologies arising from the LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {mu}q{nu}q and LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {mu}q{mu}q decay modes have been investigated. In order to maximize the available statistics, a method for the combination of various prescaled triggers with an inclusive OR has been developed. Since no excess of data over the Standard Model prediction has been observed, upper limits on the leptoquark pair production cross section have been derived at 95% confidence level as function of the leptoquark mass and the branching fraction {beta} = Br(LQ {yields} {mu}q), and are interpreted as lower limits on the leptoquark mass as function of {beta}. For {beta} = 1, {beta} = 1/2 and {beta} = 0.1, the combination of the two channels excludes scalar second generation leptoquarks with masses up to 309GeV, 262GeV, and 174GeV, respectively. The lower bounds on the scalar second generation leptoquark mass obtained for {beta} {ge} 0.1 are the best exclusion limits to date.

  8. VEBA-cracking-processes for upgrading heavy oils and refinery residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graeser, U.; Niemann, K.

    1983-03-01

    More than 20 different heavy oils and residues have been processed by the VEBA-Combi-Cracking and VEBA-LQ-Cracking high pressure hydrocracking processes, in a bench scale unit. Conversions up to 99 wt % of to a syncrude, consisting of naphtha middle distillate and vacuum gas oil were obtained. Conversions correlate with space velocity at a given temperature and product pattern depends upon degree of conversion. The VEBA-LQ-Cracking process produces a stable syncrude whereas the products of the VEBA-Combi process are very low in sulfur and nitrogen.

  9. A search for charge 1/3 third generation leptoquarks in muon channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzunyan, Sergey A.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2006-08-01

    Leptoquarks are exotic particles that have color, electric charge, and lepton number and appear in extended gauge theories and composite models. Current theory suggests that leptoquarks would come in three different generations corresponding to the three quark and lepton generations. We are searching for charge 1/3 third generation leptoquarks produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the D0 detector. Such leptoquarks would decay into either a tau-neutrino plus a b-quark or, if heavy enough, to a tau-lepton plus a t-quark. We present preliminary results on an analysis where both leptoquarks decay into neutrinos giving a final state with missing energy and two b-quarks using 367 pb{sup -1} of Run II D0 data taken between August 2002 and September 2004. We place upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} LQ{ovr LQ})B{sup 2} as a function of the leptoquark mass M{sub LQ}. Assuming B = 1, we exclude at the 95% confidence level third generation leptoquarks with M{sub LQ} < 197 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. 35,9$&<$&767$7(0(17

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5(48,6,7,21&3;180%(5&3;1'&3;'7( 8VH&3;FRQWLQXDWLRQ&3;VKHHW V &3;LI&3;QHFHVVDU 3DHH&3;PXVW&3;127&3;XVH&3;WKH&3;VSDFH&3;EHORZ 727 3<0(17&29; 3XUVXDQW&3;WR&3;DXWKRULW&3;YHVWHG&3;LQ&3;PH&15;&3;,&3;FHUWLI...

  11. Searches for scalar leptoquarks in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-05

    In this study, searches for pair-produced scalar leptoquarks are performed using 20 fb-1 of proton–proton collision data provided by the LHC and recorded by the ATLAS detector at √s = 8 TeV. Events with two electrons (muons) and two or more jets in the final state are used to search for first (second)-generation leptoquarks. The results from two previously published ATLAS analyses are interpreted in terms of third-generation leptoquarks decaying to bντb¯ν¯τ and tντt¯ν¯τ final states. No statistically significant excess above the Standard Model expectation is observed in any channel and scalar leptoquarks are excluded at 95 % CL withmore » masses up to mLQ1 < 1050 GeV for first-generation leptoquarks, mLQ2 < 1000 GeV for second-generation leptoquarks, mLQ3 < 625 GeV for third-generation leptoquarks in the bντb¯ν¯τ channel, and 200 mLQ3 < 640 GeV in the tντt¯ν¯τ.« less

  12. FINAL DOE/OR/21950-1016 RESPONSIVENESS SUMMARY= PRAXAIR INTERIM...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... lQ6Q. 0.01 rem&. 1 in3.000 10. Drinking water ...

  13. ITP Aluminum: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Aluminum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... SODQWV LQ WKH 8&17;6&17; KDYH EHHQ HVWLPDWHG DW &20;&22;&22; PHWULF WRQV &20;&23;&26; WRQV (3 &20;&28;&28;&25;D &17; Dry Coke Scrubber Can Collect Up To 99.8% of POM Emissions 320 HPLVVLRQV JHQHUDWHG GXULQJ DQRGH ...

  14. Notice of Intent to Investigate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4, 2014 Dr. Charles F. McMillan President and Laboratory Director Los Alamos National Security, LLC Mail Stop A-100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New...

  15. Notice of Intent to Investigate, Los Alamos National Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charles F. McMillan, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A 100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico ...

  16. NEL-2013-02, LANS Enforcement Letter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charles F. McMillan Laboratory Director Los Alamos National Security, LLC Mail Stop A-1 00, Drop Point 03 14007 1 S Bikini Atoll Road, T A-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1 663 ...

  17. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base. (ACR)

  18. Castle series, 1954. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, E.J.; Rowland, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    CASTLE was an atmospheric nuclear weapons test series held in the Marshall Islands at Enewetak and Bikini atolls in 1954. This is a report of DOD peronnel in CASTLE with an emphasis on operations and radiological safety.

  19. Better Buildings Network View

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...RP&3;WZR&3;FDOOV&3;HDFK&3;VHFRQG&3;DQG&3;IRXUWK 7KXUVGDV&3;RI&3;WKH&3;PRQWK&3;WR&3;RQH&3;FDOO&3;SHU&3;ZHHN&3;IRXU&3;WLPHV... KDYH&3;EHHQ&3;VHUYHG&3;LQ&3;WKH&3;SDVW&3;ILYH&3;HDUV&17;&3; V&3;D&3;IRUPHU&3;%HWWHU&3;%XLOGLQJV&3;1HLJKERUKRRG&3;3URJU...

  20. The biological effect of inhomogeneous dose distributions in fractionated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaes, R.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The linear quadratic (LQ) model is applied to an organ receiving a fractionated course of radiotherapy with an inhomogeneous dose distribution. It is shown that the gradient in the extrapolated response dose (ERD) will be steeper than the gradient in the physical dose. This effect will be greatest for an organ with a small alpha/beta ratio treated with large dose fractions. Clinical implications are discussed with an emphasis on radiation myelitis.

  1. Lab-Corps Cohort 1 Teams | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Teams Lab-Corps Cohort 1 Teams Oct. 11-Nov. 19, 2015 Golden, CO Information about the Lab-Corps cohort 1 teams, their technologies, and how Lab-Corps is helping the teams fine-tune their commercialization approaches are highlighted here. Argonne National Laboratory - Dynamic Aperture Argonne National Laboratory - Sonic LQ Idaho National Laboratory - ARAI Idaho National Laboratory - Switchable Polarity Solvent Forward Osmosis Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Ring Burner Lawrence

  2. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

    1981-07-23

    A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for /sup 241/Am, 6569 for /sup 137/Cs, 4535 for /sup 239 +240/Pu, 4431 for /sup 90/Sr, 1146 for /sup 238/Pu, 269 for /sup 241/Pu, and 114 each for /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included.

  3. Search for Second Generation Leptoquark Pairs Decaying to [mu][nu] + jets in p[ovr p] Collisions at [radical] (s) =1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R. ); Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A. ); Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V. ); Mao, H.S. ); Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P. ); Hoeneisen, B. ); Parua, N. ); Ducros, Y. ); Beri, S.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kohli, J.M.; Singh, J.B. ); Shivpuri, R.K. ); Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar,

    1999-10-01

    We report on a search for second generation leptoquarks (LQ) produced in p[ovr p] collisions at [radical] (s) =1.8 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab. Second generation leptoquarks are assumed to be produced in pairs and to decay to either [mu] or [nu] and either a strange or a charm quark (q) . Limits are placed on [sigma](p[ovr p][r arrow] LQ[ovr LQ][r arrow][mu][nu]+jets) as a function of the mass of the leptoquark. For equal branching ratios to [mu]q and [nu]q , second generation scalar leptoquarks with a mass below 160 GeV/c[sup 2] , vector leptoquarks with anomalous minimal vector couplings with a mass below 240 GeV/c[sup 2] , and vector leptoquarks with Yang-Mills couplings with a mass below 290 GeV/c[sup 2] , are excluded at the 95[percent] confidence level. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  4. Search for Second Generation Leptoquark Pairs Decaying to {mu}{nu} + jets in p{ovr p} Collisions at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R.; Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A.; Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V.; Mao, H.S.; Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P.; Hoeneisen, B.; Parua, N.; Ducros, Y.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar, H.C.; Park, Y.M.; Choi, S.; Kim, S.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Pawlik, B.; Akimov, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Belyaev, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Knuteson, B.; Leflat, A.; Manankov, V.; Merkin, M.; Shabalina, E.; Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bojko, N.I.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Denisov, S.P.; Dyshkant, A.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Galyaev, A.N.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Mayorov, A.A.; Bertram, I.; and others

    1999-10-01

    We report on a search for second generation leptoquarks (LQ) produced in p{ovr p} collisions at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab. Second generation leptoquarks are assumed to be produced in pairs and to decay to either {mu} or {nu} and either a strange or a charm quark (q) . Limits are placed on {sigma}(p{ovr p}{r_arrow} LQ{ovr LQ}{r_arrow}{mu}{nu}+jets) as a function of the mass of the leptoquark. For equal branching ratios to {mu}q and {nu}q , second generation scalar leptoquarks with a mass below 160 GeV/c{sup 2} , vector leptoquarks with anomalous minimal vector couplings with a mass below 240 GeV/c{sup 2} , and vector leptoquarks with Yang-Mills couplings with a mass below 290 GeV/c{sup 2} , are excluded at the 95{percent} confidence level. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  5. Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, V. ); Schultz, S.C. ); Robison, W.L. )

    1991-05-01

    A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. This document is the bibliography.

  6. October 31, 1952: Mike Test | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    31, 1952: Mike Test October 31, 1952: Mike Test October 31, 1952: Mike Test October 31, 1952 The Atomic Energy Commission detonates the first thermonuclear device, code-named "Mike," at Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific. The device explodes with a yield of 10.4 megatons.

  7. CX-100508 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wind Resource Study for US Army at Kwajalein Atoll; Marshall Islands; NREL Tracking No. 14-005 Award Number: DE-AC36-08GO28308 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date: 04/09/14 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office

  8. Transuranic concentrations in reef and pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands. [/sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.

    1980-09-01

    Concentrations of /sup 239 + 240/Pu are reported in tissues of several species of reef and pelagic fish caught at 14 different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Several regularities that are species dependent are evident in the distribution of /sup 239 + 240/Pu among different body tissues. Concentrations in liver always exceeded those in bone and concentrations were lowest in the muscle of all fish analyzed. A progressive discrimination against /sup 239 + 240/Pu was observed at successive trophic levels at all atolls except Bikini and Enewetak, where it was difficult to conclude if any real difference exists between the average concentration factor for /sup 239 + 240/Pu among all fish, which include bottom feeding and grazing herbivores, bottom feeding carnivores, and pelagic carnivores from different atoll locations. The average concentration of /sup 239 + 240/Pu in the muscle of surgeonfish from Bikini and Enewetak was not significantly different from the average concentrations determined in these fish at the other, lesser contaminated atolls. Concentrations among all 3rd, 4th, and 5th trophic level species are highest at Bikini where higher environmental concentrations are found. The reasons for the anomalously low concentrations in herbivores from Bikini and Enewetak are not known.

  9. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY BLASTS FROM THE PAST Twenty-five U.S. atmospheric nuclear weapons operations (each a series of tests) were conducted from 1945 to 1963, primarily at the Pacific Proving Grounds and at the Nevada Test Site, southeastern Nevada. Below, observers witness Operation Greenhouse, Eniwetok Atoll, spring 1951. Greenhouse was a series of four tests. 16 Los Alamos National Laboratory

  10. Operation Sandstone: 1948. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkhouse, L.H.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

    1983-12-19

    SANDSTONE was a three-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during the spring of 1948 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  11. Operation Ivy: 1952. Technical rept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladeck, F.R.; Hallowell, J.H.; Martin, E.J.; McMullan, F.W.; Miller, R.H.

    1982-12-01

    Ivy was a two-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during October and November of 1952 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. One of the two events was designated Mike and was the first thermonuclear or hydrogen bomb. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  12. Operation Ivy. Joint Task Force 132, 1952. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    This report covers the activities of the Joint Task Force 132 in Operation Ivy, in 1952 at Eniwetok Atoll. Shots Mike and King were detonated in conjunction with eleven experimental programs. This report describes the device, weapon, and experimental programs, giving as many preliminary conclusions as can be drawn from early analysis of the data.

  13. United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

  14. Search for first generation leptoquark pair production in the electron + missing energy + jets final state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-10-11

    We present a search for the pair production of first generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. In the channel LQLQ → eqνeq, where q,q are u or d quarks, no significant excess of data over background is observed, and we set a 95% C.L. lower limit of 326 GeV on the leptoquark mass, assuming equal probabilities of leptoquark decays to eq and νeq.

  15. DISTRIBU'~ICN:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DISTRIBU'~ICN: Document R-3. w/encl. State Health (Lit. only) JUN 2 19&---%Lq@. W/enCl. flCompliance, Reg. III, w/end. N. Ibulos, DXL, v/end. (3) Br. Reading File w/encl, Div. Reading File w/o encl. D.lillois 60604 .' m. J, J. mnovaa Emcutive Vice hmiaent ' , ,. __ . - 14 of Form IiEfc-2* plerise provide ._". . ..-^- UNITED STATES ' ATOMIC ENERGY COMPilISSION , . .' -- .'. SaUnCE l!fi~T%~IBI lriEmSE : . . Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10 Code of Federal

  16. Green's function evaluation for three-dimensional exponentially graded elasticity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criado Portero, Rafael M; Gray, Leonard J; Mantic, Vladislav; Paris, Federico

    2008-01-01

    The numerical implementation of the Green's function for an isotropic exponentially graded three dimensional elastic solid is reported. The formulas for the nonsingular {\\lq}grading term{\\rq} in this Green's function, originally deduced by Martin et al., \\emph{Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, 458, 1931-1947, 2000}, are quite complicated, and a small error in one of the formulas is corrected. The evaluation of the fundamental solution is tested by employing indirect boundary integral formulation using a Galerkin approximation to solve several problems having analytic solutions. The numerical results indicate that the Green's function formulas, and their evaluation, are correct.

  17. Finite Energy and Bounded Attacks on Control System Sensor Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Melin, Alexander M; Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A

    2014-01-01

    Control system networks are increasingly being connected to enterprise level networks. These connections leave critical industrial controls systems vulnerable to cyber-attacks. Most of the effort in protecting these cyber-physical systems (CPS) has been in securing the networks using information security techniques and protection and reliability concerns at the control system level against random hardware and software failures. However, besides these failures the inability of information security techniques to protect against all intrusions means that the control system must be resilient to various signal attacks for which new analysis and detection methods need to be developed. In this paper, sensor signal attacks are analyzed for observer-based controlled systems. The threat surface for sensor signal attacks is subdivided into denial of service, finite energy, and bounded attacks. In particular, the error signals between states of attack free systems and systems subject to these attacks are quantified. Optimal sensor and actuator signal attacks for the finite and infinite horizon linear quadratic (LQ) control in terms of maximizing the corresponding cost functions are computed. The closed-loop system under optimal signal attacks are provided. Illustrative numerical examples are provided together with an application to a power network with distributed LQ controllers.

  18. LARP Long Quadrupole: A "Long" Step Toward an LHC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Giorgio Ambrosio

    2010-01-08

    The beginning of the development of Nb3Sn magnets for particle accelerators goes back to the 1960?s. But only very recently has this development begun to face the challenges of fabricating Nb3Sn magnets which can meet the requirements of modern particle accelerators. LARP (the LHC Accelerator Research Program) is leading this effort focusing on long models of the Interaction Region quadrupoles for a possible luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. A major milestone in this development is to test, by the end of 2009, 4m-long quadrupole models, which will be the first Nb3Sn accelerator-type magnets approaching the length of real accelerator magnets. The Long Quadrupoles (LQ) are ?Proof-of-Principle? magnets which are to demonstrate that Nb3Sn technology is sufficiently mature for use in high energy particle accelerators. Their design is based on the LARP Technological Quadrupole (TQ) models, under development at FNAL and LBNL, which have design gradients higher than 200 T/m and an aperture of 90 mm. Several challenges must be addressed for the successful fabrication of long Nb3Sn coils and magnets. These challenges and the solutions adopted will be presented together with the main features of the LQ magnets. Several R&D lines are participating to this effort and their contributions will be also presented.

  19. Finite Energy and Bounded Actuator Attacks on Cyber-Physical Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Melin, Alexander M; Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A; Dong, Jin; Drira, Anis

    2015-01-01

    As control system networks are being connected to enterprise level networks for remote monitoring, operation, and system-wide performance optimization, these same connections are providing vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious actors for attack, financial gain, and theft of intellectual property. Much effort in cyber-physical system (CPS) protection has focused on protecting the borders of the system through traditional information security techniques. Less effort has been applied to the protection of cyber-physical systems from intelligent attacks launched after an attacker has defeated the information security protections to gain access to the control system. In this paper, attacks on actuator signals are analyzed from a system theoretic context. The threat surface is classified into finite energy and bounded attacks. These two broad classes encompass a large range of potential attacks. The effect of theses attacks on a linear quadratic (LQ) control are analyzed, and the optimal actuator attacks for both finite and infinite horizon LQ control are derived, therefore the worst case attack signals are obtained. The closed-loop system under the optimal attack signals is given and a numerical example illustrating the effect of an optimal bounded attack is provided.

  20. Direct Searches for Scalar Leptoquarks at the Run II Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, Daniel E

    2004-11-01

    This dissertation sets new limits on the mass of the scalar leptoquark from direct searches carried out at the Run II CDF detector using data from March 2001 to October 2003. The data analyzed has a total time-integrated measured luminosity of 198 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Leptoquarks are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into a lepton and a quark of the same generation. They consider two possible leptoquark decays: (1) {beta} = BR(LQ {yields} {mu}q) = 1.0, and (2) {beta} = BR(LQ {yields} {mu}q) = 0.5. For the {beta} = 1 channel, they focus on the signature represented by two isolated high-p{sub T} muons and two isolated high-p{sub T} jets. For the {beta} = 1/2 channel, they focus on the signature represented by one isolated high-p{sub T} muon, large missing transverse energy, and two isolated high-p{sub T} jets. No leptoquark signal is experimentally detected for either signature. Using the next to leading order theoretical cross section for scalar leptoquark production in p{bar p} collisions [1], they set new mass limits on second generation scalar leptoquarks. They exclude the existence of second generation scalar leptoquarks with masses below 221(175) GeV/c{sup 2} for the {beta} = 1(1/2) channels.

  1. Analysis of radiation exposure for naval personnel at Operation GREENHOUSE. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.; Weitz, R.; Gminder, R.; Goetz, J.; Stuart, J.

    1982-07-30

    The radiological environments are reconstructed for seven ships and the residence islands of Eniwetok Atoll that received fallout during operation GREENHOUSE (April-May 1951) as a result of Shots DOG, EASY, and ITEM. From the reconstructed operations and radiological environments, equivalent personnel film-badge doses are calculated and compared with actual film-badge data available for six of the ships. Considering the increased time spent topside by badged personnel as opposed to an average crewmember, correlation between calculations and dosimetry is good. Average shipboard doses range from a low of 0.13 rem for the crew of the USNS LT. ROBERT CRAIG to a high of 1.14 rem for the crew of the USNS SGT. CHARLES E. MOWER. Average doses on the residence islands of Eniwetok Atoll range from 2.75 rem to 3.10 rem.

  2. Timeline of Events: 1951 to 1970 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    51 to 1970 Timeline of Events: 1951 to 1970 October 31, 1952: Mike Test October 31, 1952: Mike Test The Atomic Energy Commission detonates the first thermonuclear device, code-named "Mike," at Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific. Read more December 23, 1957: Shippingport December 23, 1957: Shippingport The Shippingport Atomic Power Station, the world's first full-scale nuclear power plant, becomes operational. Read more March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope March 13, 1968:

  3. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library NNSS History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevada National Security Site History NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - Nevada National Security Site History The Nevada National Security Site story begins in 1948 after the atomic test series Operation Sandstone in the Enewetak atoll. In 1950, a more complete survey of the south site, amid the Las Vegas Bombing and Gunnery Range, was conducted and resulted in test officials' endorsements. In December, the United States Air Force, landlord of the

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHY BLASTS FROM THE PAST BLASTS FROM THE PAST Twenty-five U.S. atmospheric nuclear weapons operations (each a series of tests) were conducted from 1945 to 1963, primarily at the Pacific Proving Grounds and at the Nevada Test Site, southeastern Nevada. Below, observers witness Operation Greenhouse, Eniwetok Atoll, spring 1951. Greenhouse was a series of four tests. 17 Proof of principle for thermonuclear weapons, the 225-kiloton George test, May 8, 1951, of

  5. An Assessment of the Current Day Impact of Various Materials Associated with the U.S. Nuclear Test Program in the Marshall Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Bogen, K T

    2001-05-01

    Different stable elements, and some natural and man-made radionuclides, were used as tracers or associated in other ways with nuclear devices that were detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls as part of the U.S. nuclear testing program from 1946 through 1958. The question has been raised whether any of these materials dispersed by the explosions could be of sufficient concentration in either the marine environment or on the coral islands to be of a health concern to people living, or planning to live, on the atolls. This report addresses that concern. An inventory of the materials involved during the test period was prepared and provided to us by the Office of Defense Programs (DP) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The materials that the DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) ask to be evaluated are--sulfur, arsenic, yttrium, tantalum, gold, rhodium, indium, tungsten, thallium, thorium-230,232 ({sup 230,232}Th), uranium-233,238 ({sup 233,238}U), polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po), curium-232 ({sup 232}Cu), and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). The stable elements were used primarily as tracers for determining neutron energy and flux, and for other diagnostic purposes in the larger yield, multistage devices. It is reasonable to assume that these materials would be distributed in a similar manner as the fission products subsequent to detonation. A large inventory of fission product and uranium data was available for assessment. Detailed calculations show only a very small fraction of the fission products produced during the entire test series remain at the test site atolls. Consequently, based on the information provided, we conclude that the concentration of these materials in the atoll environment pose no adverse health effects to humans.

  6. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Following the Trinity test and the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, military officials still knew very little about the effects, especially on naval targets, of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, the Joint Chiefs of Staff requested and received Presidential approval to conduct a test series during summer 1946. The test series, named Crossroads, was conducted at Bikini atoll in the Marshall Islands, which was far from population centers in the middle of the Pacific. Pacific testing offered ample

  7. RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 , RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V : w ~?g+QZ FM USAEC NYK @5 TO USAEC LEMUMT Ill.. AEC WWC ; I _. _' FOR A TAMwsflO h@G NR tt0 PD Tti18~18~~10 APPROVE pf TWJNTY GRAM8 ENRICHED 1 '. , URANlUM TO 8YLyANI~q FOR W8E. IWTREPARIWG~F~VE U&AN,!UU SLUGS 7/.8 lF4j34 ' .' : ' . ~ , . LQ~JG m S/8 1%~ ~IAhiiilER pa THE-DIE WI& CW!. APOROX 300 DOLLARS Am " , SIX ~uN-~Y# WILL BE REQI!!REl! FW WJG FA~ICf' TlW PD ?eJJRCt+A= @ fmR woull] BE m OUT to 8YLVANIA AND WNT TO, V L PAf?SEGIAN Cy

  8. Search for Scalar Top Quark Pair-Production in Scenario with Violated R-parity in ppbar Collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    A search for the pair production of supersymmetric partner of the top quark in scenario with R-parity violation is presented. The quantum number called R-parity distinguishes particles in standard model from supersymmetric particles. A scalar top quark (stop) is assumed to decay only via R{sub p}-violating supersymmetric coupling into tau lepton and b-quark. To collect events with multiple taus, a new special tau trigger (the lepton plus track trigger) is installed in Run II experiment of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The goal of the lepton plus track trigger is to collect generic dilepton ({ell}{ell}, {ell}{tau}, {tau}{tau}) events with lower p{sub T} threshold (8 GeV/c) and without prescale even at high luminosity. The Z {yields} {tau}{tau} event, where one {tau}-lepton decays leptonically and the other hadronically, is a good benchmark to calibrate the lepton plus track trigger and {tau} identification. The data sample of 72 pb{sup -1}, collected using the electron plus track trigger, contains clear a {tau} signal from Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events. The data used in stop search correspond to 200 pb{sup -1}. The lower stop mass bound of 134 GeV/c{sup 2} at a 95% confidence level is obtained. This limit is also directly applicable to the case of the third generation scalar leptoquark (LQ{sub 3}) assuming a 100% branching for the LQ{sub 3} {yields} {tau}b decay mode.

  9. Search for the Decays B0(s) ---> e+ mu- and B0(s) ---> e+ e- in CDF Run. II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report results from a search for the lepton flavor violating decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and the flavor-changing neutral-current decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}. The analysis uses data corresponding to 2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the upgraded Collider Detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron. The observed number of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} candidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting bayesian upper limits on the branching ratios at 90% credibility level are {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 2.0 x 10{sup -7}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 6.4 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -7} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 8.3 x 10{sup -8}. From the limits on {Beta}(B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}), the following lower bounds on the Pati-Salam leptoquark masses are also derived: M{sub LQ}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 47.8 TeV/c{sup 2}, and M{sub LQ}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 59.3 TeV/c{sup 2}, at 90% credibility level.

  10. SU-E-T-385: 4D Radiobiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fourkal, E; Hossain, M; Veltchev, I; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Horwitz, E; Nahum, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The linear-quadratic model is the most prevalent model for planning dose fractionation in radiation therapy in the low dose per fraction regimens. However for high-dose fractions, used in SRS/SBRT/HDR treatments the LQ model does not yield accurate predictions, due to neglecting the reduction in the number of sublethal lesions as a result of their conversion to lethal lesions with subsequent irradiation. Proper accounting for this reduction in the number of sublethally damaged lesions leads to the dependence of the survival fraction on the temporal structure of the dose. The main objective of this work is to show that the functional dependence of the dose rate on time in each voxel is an important additional factor that can significantly influence the TCP. Methods: Two SBRT lung plans have been used to calculate the TCPs for the same patient. One plan is a 3D conformal plan and the other is an IMRT plan. Both plans are normalized so that 99.5% of PTV volume receives the same prescription dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The dose rate in each individual voxel is calculated as a function of treatment time and subsequently used in the calculation of TCP. Results: The calculated TCPs show that shorter delivery times lead to greater TCP, despite all delivery times being short compared to the repair half-time for sublethal lesions. Furthermore, calculated TCP(IMRT) =0.308 for the IMRT plan is smaller than TCP(3D) =0.425 for 3D conformal, even though it shows greater tumor hot spots and equal PTV coverage. The calculated TCPs are considerably lower compared to those based on the LQ model for which TCP=1 for both plans. Conclusion: The functional dependence of the voxel-by-voxel dose rate on time may be an important factor in predicting the treatment outcome and cannot be neglected in radiobiological modeling.

  11. VIA OVERNIGHT UPS MAIL CARRIER Dr. Charles F. McMillan, President

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 2016 VIA OVERNIGHT UPS MAIL CARRIER Dr. Charles F. McMillan, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A 100, Drop Point 03140071S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1663 WEA-2016-02 Dear Dr. McMillan: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) electrical safety program as evidenced by a series of

  12. Final Notice of Violation issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 28, 2015 VIA OVERNIGHT CARRIER Dr. Charles F. McMillan, President Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory Mailstop A 100, Drop Point 31 S Bikini Atoll Road, TA-3 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-1663 SEA-2015-02 (FNOV) Dear Dr. McMillan: Pursuant to section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (the Act), 42 U.S.C. § 2282b, and the Department of Energy (DOE) regulations at //IA. **~~If~ llV~~~*41\ National Nuclear Security Administration 10 C.F.R. Part 824,

  13. National Security Science April 2016 Down

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Science April 2016 Down 1. Operation conducted at the Marshallese atoll of Bikini 2. Millionths of a second 3. Naturally occurring seismic event (usually) 4. A loud noise and the sudden going away of things from the place where they have been 6. Number of U.S. national laboratories 7. The Lab does _____ (3 words) for the nation. 9. February 2014 DHS threat 10. Captain William Sterling Parsons aka 12. Italian physicist who used Pond Cabin for plutonium chemistry research 15. USS

  14. Microsoft Word - Shipping Info_2016.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shipping Information and Display Setup Prior to the Career Fair: Your displays and materials can be shipped to the following address; you should arrange for your packages to arrive no later than August 18th so there is no issue with receiving your shipment by the Career Fair: LANL Attn: Betsy Coronado/Mary Anne With Bikini Atoll Road, SM-30 MS M714 TA-00, Bldg. 199 Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 Questions: Contact Mary Anne With at (505) 665-5306 or postdocprogram@lanl.gov. The displays and materials

  15. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Perspective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Historical Perspective Before the Nevada Proving Grounds (NPG) -- forerunner of the Nevada Test Site -- was established, five tests ranging in size from 18 to 49 kilotons had been conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Pacific Ocean from June 1946 through 1948. However, with the outbreak of hostilities in Korea in 1950, renewed attention was focused on the need for a continental test site. Relying on a top-secret feasibility study code-named "Nutmeg," conducted in 1946 by

  16. Definitional mission: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, S.R.; Ross, J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the commercial viability of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) electric power plant at the Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. It was concluded that various technology improvements and economic factors have converged to present a feasible opportunity. United States industrial and research organizations are technically capable of developing a commercial OTEC industry for domestic and export markets. It is estimated that 100% of OTEC equipment and services could be supplied by United States firms. However, Japan has aggressively pursued OTEC development with an apparent goal of dominating the export market.

  17. J-(_5A.-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    014 !-PI-j I ii f , i- .:-I' I :c ( Ii' iUC ./<: ./ /i' J-(_5A.- - n -Il&.L-, ($1 (.' j / +P ' , Cd , - $' -- 4 . NATIONAL LEAD COMPAN\r OF OHIO P. 0. BOX 158 MT. HEALTHY STATION CINCINNATI 31. OHIO Letter Subecmtract # s-19 Dated: October Ql,l952 Under Prime Contract AT(~O-l-)-1.1.56 ~0: Mr. A. M. Kinney, President Processes Research, Inc. 2905 Vernon Place Cincinnati 19, Ohio Gentlemen: 1. This letter, subject to your written acceptance and the approval of the Atmic Energy Comnission

  18. Operation redwing: Report to the scientific director. Timing and firing (sanitized version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-29

    Task Unit 5 (YU-5) was organized to accomplish the following tasks during Operation Redwing (May - June 1956): (1) To supply timing signals and voice count-down to meet the principal requirements of the experimental programs; (2) To supply the arming and firing pulses to the devices tested; (3) To furnish personnel as members of the arming and firing parties; (4) To provide and maintain the Task Group 7.1 (TG 7.1) short-range commercial radio communications at Bikini and Eniwetok atolls; and (5) To perform such scientific measurements and photography as provided for under existing contractual agreements.

  19. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 11. Timing and firing and fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grier, H.E.

    1985-09-01

    An automatic remote-control system armed and fired the bomb and sent out a sequence of time signals to experimental equipment on the atoll. A central station at Parry Island sent signals via submarine cables to a timer station on a shot island. The timer station controlled signals to the zero station and to experiments on the island, and through auxiliary stations, it also controlled signal distribution on adjacent islands. Light-sensitive triggering units for apparatus and for accurate standard zero-time reference were provided in the form of Blue Boxes, or fiducial markers.

  20. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  1. Earth and Environmental Sciences 1999 Annual Report Meeting National Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonker, L.; Dannevik, B.

    2000-07-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Earth and Environmental Sciences 1999 Annual Report covers the following topics: (1) Nuclear Materials--Modeling Thermohydrologic Processes at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear-Waste Repository; Dose Assessments and Resettlement Support on Rongelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands. (2) Climate, Carbon, and Energy--Incorporating Surprise into Models of Global Climate Change: A Simple Climate Demonstrator Model; (3) Environmental Risk Reduction--The NASA Global Modeling Initiative: Analyzing the Atmospheric Impacts of Supersonic Aircraft; (4) National Security--Atmospheric Release Assessment Programs; and (5) Cross-Cutting Technologies/Capabilities--Advances in Technology at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry; Experimental Geophysics: Investigating Material Properties at Extreme Conditions.

  2. Internal Revenue Service Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANS 401(k) Retirement Plan 1b Three-digit plan 001 001 number (PN) 4 1c Effective date of plan YYY06/01/2006-MM-DD 2a Plan sponsor's name and address; include room or suite number (employer, if for a single-employer plan) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC BIKINI ATOLL RD, SM 30 LOS ALAMOS, NM 87545 2b Employer Identification 01 Number (EIN) 20-3104541 2c Plan Sponsor's telephone number 505-665-9651 2d Business code (see instructions) 541990 Caution: A penalty for the late or incomplete filing

  3. Internal Revenue Service Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lans 401(K) Savings Plan 1b Three-digit plan 002 001 number (PN) 4 1c Effective date of plan YYY06/01/2006-MM-DD 2a Plan sponsor's name and address; include room or suite number (employer, if for a single-employer plan) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC BIKINI ATOLL RD, SM 30 LOS ALAMOS, NM 87545 2b Employer Identification 01 Number (EIN) 20-3104541 2c Plan Sponsor's telephone number 505-665-9651 2d Business code (see instructions) 541990 Caution: A penalty for the late or incomplete filing of

  4. Fine and coarse components in surface sediments from Bikini Lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V. E., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    In 1979, 21 years after the moratorium on nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, surface sediment samples (to depths of 2 and 4 cm) were collected from 87 locations in the lagoon of Bikini Atoll, one of the two sites in the Marshall Islands used by the United States to test nuclear devices from 1946 through 1958. The main purpose for the collections was to map the distribution of long-lived man-made radionuclides associated with the bottom material. In addition the samples were processed to estimate the fraction of fine and coarse components to show, by comparison, what modifications occurred in the composition since the sediments were first described in samples collected before testing in 1946. Nuclear testing produced more finely divided material that is now found in the surface sediment layer over large areas of the lagoon and especially in regions of the lagoon and reef adjacent to test sites. The 5 cratering events alone at Bikini Atoll redistributed sufficient material to account for the higher inventory of fine material found over the surface 4 cm of the sediment of the lagoon. Although the fraction of fine material in the bottom sediments was altered by the nuclear events, the combined processes of formation, transport and deposition were not sufficiently dynamic to greatly change the general geographical features of the major sedimentary components over most of the lagoon floor.

  5. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  6. Enewetak radiological support project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, B.

    1982-09-01

    From 1972 through 1980, the Department of Energy acted in an advisory role to the Defense Nuclear Agency during planning for and execution of the cleanup of Enewetak Atoll. The Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy was responsible for the radiological characterization of the atoll and for certification of radiological condition of each island upon completion of the project. In-situ measurements of gamma rays emitted by americium-241 were utilized along with wet chemistry separation of plutonium from soil samples to identify and delineate surface areas requiring removal of soil. Military forces removed over 100,000 cubic yards of soil from the surface of five islands and deposited this material in a crater remaining from the nuclear testing period. Subsurface soil was excavated and removed from several locations where measurements indicated the presence of radionuclides above predetermined criteria. The methodologies of data acquisition, analysis and interpretation are described and detailed results are provided in text, figures and microfiche. The final radiological condition of each of 43 islets is reported.

  7. Comparative behavior of plutonium and americium in the equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Inventories of /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. The amount of /sup 239 +240/Pu mobilized to solution at the atolls can be predicted from a distribution coefficient K/sub d/ of 2.3 x 10/sup 5/ and the mean sediment concentrations. The mobilized /sup 239 +240/Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Characteristics of /sup 239 +240/Pu described at one location may not necessarily describe its behavior elsewhere. The relative amounts of /sup 241/Am to /sup 239 +240/Pu may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay.

  8. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Island Resettlement Support (May-December 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T; Hickman, D; Conrado, C; Brown, T; Brunk, J; Marchetti, A; Cox, C; Martinelli, R; Kehl, S; Johannes, K; Henry, D; Bell, R T; Petersen, G

    2002-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former US test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection programs for resettled and resettling populations. Using pooled resources of the US Department of Energy and local atoll governments, individual radiation protection programs have been developed in whole-body counting and plutonium urinalysis to assess potential intakes of radionuclides from residual fallout contamination. The whole-body counting systems are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians. Samples of urine are collected from resettlement workers and island residents under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using advanced accelerator based measurement technologies. This web site provides an overview of the methodologies, a full disclosure of the measurement data, and a yearly assessment of estimated radiation doses to resettlement workers and island residents.

  9. An Evaluation of Activated Bismuth Isotopes in Environmental Samples From the Former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Brunk, J.A.; Jokela, T.A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 207}Bi (t{sub 1/2}=32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few ''clean'' nuclear tests at the U.S. Western Pacific Proving Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of {sup 207}Bi were analyzed by gamma spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of {sup 208}Bi (t{sup 1/2} = 3.68 x 10{sup 5} y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the ''clean'', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of {sup 208}Bi to {sup 207}Bi (R value) ranges from {approx}12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10.

  10. Effect of shading by the table coral Acropora Hyacinthus on understory corals. [Acropora; Pocillopora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimson, J.

    1985-02-01

    Field surveys at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, show that coral density and diversity is much lower beneath Acropora table corals than in adjacent unshaded areas. Additionally, the understory community is predominantly composed of massive and encrusting species, while branching Acropora and Pocillopora predominate in unshaded areas. Results of experiments in which coral fragments were transferred to the shade of table Acropora and to adjacent unshaded areas show that shading slows the growth and leads to higher mortality of branching species, while massive and encrusting species are unaffected. Light measurements made beneath table Acropora show that illumination and irradiance values fall to levels at which most hermatypic corals do not occur. The fast-growing but fragile table Acropora are abundant in a wide variety of atoll habitats and grow rapidly to form a canopy approx. = 50 cm above the substrate. However, table Acropora also have high mortality rates, so that there is continuous production of unshaded areas. The growth and death of tables thus create local disturbances, and the resulting patchwork of recently shaded and unshaded areas may enhance coral diversity in areas of high coral cover.

  11. Tru-ly Clean - What Does It Mean?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.

    2008-07-01

    The evolution and genesis of the definition of transuranic waste (known as TRU) and its application to the cleanup criteria applied to soils contaminated with transuranics, specifically plutonium, has been a matter of discussion at contaminated sites in the United States and elsewhere. Cleanup decisions and the processes that led up to those decisions have varied at several plutonium contaminated sites within the United States and without the pacific region. The sites with radionuclide soil action levels include Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, Republic of the Marshall Islands; Johnston Atoll, Hawaii; the Hanford Site in Washington State; the Nevada Test Site; the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado; the Chariot Site in north Alaska; and the Maralinga Site in Australia. The soil-action level developed for Rocky Flats by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment for plutonium is one of the higher soil-action levels approved by regulatory agencies that is considered protective for future use of land at a cleanup site. The Republic of the Marshall Islands has adopted a relatively conservative cleanup standard to accommodate the subsistence lifestyle of the islanders, while the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has been transferred to the U.S. Department of the Interior to be used as a fish and wildlife refuge, a land use that resulted in a less conservative plutonium soil cleanup level. (authors)

  12. Climate change: Effects on reef island resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberdorfer, J.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1988-06-27

    The salinity, depth, quantity, and reliability of fresh groundwater resources on coral reef islands and coastlines are environmentally important parameters. Groundwater influences or controls the terrestrial flora, salinity, and nutrient levels in the near-shore benthic environment, the rate and nature of sediment diagenesis, and the density of human habitation. Data from a number of Indo-Pacific reef islands suggest that freshwater inventory is a function of rainfall and island dimensions. A numerical model (SUTRA) has been used to simulate the responses of atoll island groundwater to changes in recharge (precipitation), sea level, and loss of island area due to flooding. The model has been calibrated for Enjebi Island, Enewetak Atoll, where a moderately permeable, water-table aquifer overlies a high-permeability formation. Total freshwater inventory is a monotonic but nonlinear function of recharge. If recharge and island area are constant, rising sea level increases the inventory of fresh water by increasing the useful volume of the aquifer above the high-permeability zone. Flooding of land area reduces the total freshwater inventory approximately in proportion to the loss of recharge area. The most significant results of the model simulation, however, are the findings that the inventory of low-salinity water (and by extrapolation, potable water) is disproportionately sensitive to changes in recharge, island dimensions, or recharge. Island freshwater resources may therefore be unexpectedly vulnerable to climate change.

  13. VEBA-Combi-cracking - A technology for upgrading of heavy oils and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doehler, W.; Kretschmar, D.I.K.; Merz, L.; Niemann, K. )

    1987-04-01

    Based on experiences with liquid phase hydrogenation for coal liquefaction according to the Berguis-Pier-Process as well as crude oil residue hydrogenation in the Fifties and Sixties, VEBA OEL in recent years developed the VEBA-LQ-Cracking (VLC) and the VEBA-Combi-Cracking (VCC) Processes. Since 1978, more than 20 different feedstocks have been converted in small scale plants with a capacity of 3-20 kg/h. Together with LURGI GmbH, Frankfurt, the next steps were taken: the design and construction of a 1 t/h Pilot Plant located at the RUHR OEL refinery in Gelsenkirchen. After 18 months of construction, the heavy oil pilot plant was put on stream in May 1983. Since the beginning of 1983, the plant has been funded and owned by LURGI GmbH, VEBA OEL AG and INTEVEP S.A., the research institute of Petroleos de Venezuela, all of whom have participated in the development of the VLC/VCC process. Reported here are the results of the intensive experimental work for the development of the VLC/VCC-processes in a scale covering all aspects relevant for a scale-up, demonstrate the technical maturity of the processes developed by VEBA OEL to convert refinery residues and natural heavy crude oils.

  14. Search for scalar bottom quarks and third-generation leptoquarks in p p-bar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2010-05-01

    We report the results of a search for pair production of scalar bottom quarks ({tilde b}{sub 1}) and scalar third-generation leptoquarks (LQ{sub 3}) in 5.2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at the D0 experiment of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Scalar bottom quarks are assumed to decay to a neutralino ({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) and a b quark, and we set 95% C.L. lower limits on their production in the (m{sub {tilde b}{sub 1}}, m{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}}) mass plane such as m{sub {tilde b}{sub 1}} > 247 GeV for m{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}} = 0 and m{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}} > 110 GeV for 160 < m{sub {tilde b}{sub 1}} < 200 GeV. The leptoquarks are assumed to decay to a tau neutrino and a b quark, and we set a 95% C.L. lower limit of 247 GeV on the mass of a charge-1/3 third-generation scalar leptoquark.

  15. Science and Technology Review July/August 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blobaum, K M

    2010-05-27

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Deterrence with a Minimum Nuclear Stockpile - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Enhancing Confidence in the Nation's Nuclear Stockpile - Livermore experts are participating in a national effort aimed at predicting how nuclear weapon materials and systems will likely change over time; (3) Narrowing Uncertainties - For climate modeling and many other fields, understanding uncertainty, or margin of error, is critical; (4) Insight into a Deadly Disease - Laboratory experiments reveal the pathogenesis of tularemia in host cells, bringing scientists closer to developing a vaccine for this debilitating disease. (5) Return to Rongelap - On the Rongelap Atoll, Livermore scientists are working to minimize radiological exposure for natives now living on or wishing to return to the islands.

  16. Mission hazard assessment for STARS Mission 1 (M1) in the Marshall Islands area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Outka, D.E.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    A mission hazard assessment has been performed for the Strategic Target System Mission 1 (known as STARS M1) for hazards due to potential debris impact in the Marshall Islands area. The work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories as a result of discussion with Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) safety officers. The STARS M1 rocket will be launched from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), Hawaii, and deliver two payloads to within the viewing range of sensors located on the Kwajalein Atoll. The purpose of this work has been to estimate upper bounds for expected casualty rates and impact probability or the Marshall Islands areas which adjoin the STARS M1 instantaneous impact point (IIP) trace. This report documents the methodology and results of the analysis.

  17. The impact of atmospheric aerosols on trace metal chemistry in open ocean surface seawater 3. Lead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maring, H.B.; Duce, R.A. )

    1990-04-15

    Atmospheric aerosols collected at Enewetak Atoll in the tropical North Pacific were exposed to seawater in laboratory experiments to assess the impact of atmospheric aerosols on lead chemistry in surface seawater. The net atmospheric flux of soluble lead to the ocean is between 16 and 32 pmol cm{sup {minus}2}/yr at Enewetak. The stable lead isotopic composition of soluble aerosol lead indicates that it is of anthropogenic origin. Anthropogenic aerosol lead from Central and North America appears to be less soluble and/or to dissolve less rapidly than that from Asia. Dissolved organic matter and possibly lower pH appear to increase the nonaluminosilicate aerosol lead solubility and/or dissolution rate. The isotopic composition of lead in air, seawater and dry deposition suggests that after deposition in the ocean, nonaluminosilicate particulate lead can be reinjected into the atmosphere during sea salt aerosol production.

  18. Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colin, P.L.; Harrison, J.T. III

    1982-02-01

    Fiscal year 1983 marked the end of on-site operations of the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory at Enewetak Atoll in the Northern Marshall Islands. With the departure of the laboratory staff from Enewetak on 22 September, research conducted by the resident scientific staff ceased. Henceforth, MPRL will exist in the form of a research readiness program involving a part-time technician at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology who will inventory and maintain residual scientific assets and be available to support expeditionary research efforts in the Pacific area. A summary of research efforts in FY 83 is reported including descriptions of the redistribution of coarse surface particles by callianassid to deeper layers of the sediment. The relationship of this bioturbation to the redistribution of Bravo event fallout is related.

  19. Subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Bryan, J.B.; Glenn, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Ground are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Attempts to explain the difference in terms of device yield (which was much larger in the Pacific tests than at NTS) have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 41 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  20. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  1. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 4. 1. Cloud studies. Part 1. Cloud physics. Part 2. Development of the atomic cloud. Part 3. Cloud-tracking photography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.E.; Gustafson, P.E.; Kellogg, W.W.; McKown, R.E.; McPherson, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    The cloud-physics project was primarily intended to fulfill a requirements for detailed information on the meteorological microstructure of atomic clouds. By means of a tracking and photographic network extending halfway around Eniwetok Atoll, the behavior of the first three clouds of Operation Greenhouse were observed and recorded. The rise of the fourth cloud was observed visually from only one site. The analysis of these observations, combined with information about the local weather conditions, gives a fairly complete picture of the development of each of the clouds. Particular emphasis was placed on the earlier phases of development, and the heights and sizes of the cloud parts have been determined as functions of time. A summary of important features of some previous atomic clouds are included for comparison.

  2. Blast induced subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests over coral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Glenn, H.D.; Bryan, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site and elsewhere. Attempts to account for the differences quantitatively have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Prototyping Regional Discrimination Tools with Matseis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chael, Eric; Harris, Mark; Young, Chris; Mayeda, Kevin; Walter, William; Taylor, Steve; Velasco, Aaron

    1999-08-03

    To facilitate the development testing and comparison of regional seismic discriminants, we have implemented some of the most promising techniques in Matseis, a-Matlab-based seismic processing toolkit. The existing Matseis package provides graphical tools for analyzing seismic data from a network of stations. It can access data via a CSS 3.0 database, or from static files in a format defined by the user. Waveforms are displayed in a record-section format, with overlays for IASPE191 travel-time curves. The user can pick arrivals and locate events, then show the results on a map. Tools are available for spectral and polarization measurements, as well as beam forming and f-k analysis with array data. Additionally, one has full access to the Matlab environment and any functions available there, as well as to portions of the U.S. Department of Energy Knowledge Base. Recently, we have added some new tools to Matseis for calculating regional discrimination measurements. The first of these performs Lg coda analysis as developed by Mayeda and coworkers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Lg coda magnitudes are calculated from the amplitudes of the coda envelopes in narrow frequency bands. Ratios of these amplitudes between high- and low-frequency bands provide a spectral-ratio discriminant for regional events. The second tool we have implemented measures P/Lg phase ratios, using the MDAC technique of Taylor (Los Alamos National Laboratory) and Walter (LLNL). P and Lg amplitudes are obtained at select frequencies, then corrected for source magnitude and propagation path. Finally, we added a tool for analyzing long-period Rayleigh and Love arrivals, useful for moment:magnitude and LQ:LR discrimination. Because all these tools have been written as Matlab functions, they can be easily modified to experiment with different processing details. The performance of the discriminants can be evaluated using any event available in the database.

  4. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, I.A.

    2005-12-01

    In the first phase of our study, we focused on the use of simple organics to raise the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in high alkaline aqueous solvents. In a limited survey of common organic acids, we determined that citric acid had the highest potential to achieve our goal. However, our subsequent investigation revealed that the citric acid appeared to play two roles in the solutions: first, raising the concentration of aluminum in highly alkaline solutions by breaking up or inhibiting ''seed'' polycations and thereby delaying the nucleation and growth of particles; and second, stabilizing nanometer-sized particles in suspension when nucleation did occur. The results of this work were recently published in Langmuir: D.M. Dabbs, U. Ramachandran, S. Lu, J. Liu, L.-Q. Wang, I.A. Aksay, ''Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid'' Langmuir, 21, 11690-11695 (2005). The second phase of our work involved the solvation of silicon, again in solutions of high alkalinity. Citric acid, due to its unfavorable pKa values, was not expected to be useful with silicon-containing solutions. Here, the use of polyols was determined to be effective in maintaining silicon-containing particles under high pH conditions but at smaller size with respect to standard suspensions of silicon-containing particles. There were a number of difficulties working with highly alkaline silicon-containing solutions, particularly in solutions at or near the saturation limit. Small deviations in pH resulted in particle formation or dissolution in the absence of the organic agents. One of the more significant observations was that the polyols appeared to stabilize small particles of silicon oxyhydroxides across a wider range of pH, albeit this was difficult to quantify due to the instability of the solutions.

  5. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs

  6. Validation and analysis of microwave-derived rainfall over the tropics. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleishauer, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    A recently developed single channel microwave rain rate retrieval algorithm exists to measure global precipitation over the data-sparse tropical oceans. The objective of this study is to retrieve and validate rainfall using this algorithm, followed by an analysis of the derived rainfall fields. Retrieval consists of applying the algorithm technique to the extraction of four years worth of achieved data from the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) instrument flown aboard the NIMBUS 5 satellite. The Pacific Atoll Raingage Data Set is chosen as a ground truth measure to validate the ESMR-Derived rainfall data against, comparing slope, intercept and correlation between 5 deg x 5 deg area average. Despite limitations imposed by the comparison of point measurements to area-averaged rainfall, results show a 0.80 correlation. Monthly and quarterly climatological mean rainfall estimates are produced, with a consequent analysis of prominent signals, especially in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and the Indian monsoon. Latent heat flux is computed, using the ESMR-derived rainfall, and plotted to show qualitatively where seasonal latent thermodynamic energy sources and sinks exist in the atmosphere. A comparison of the summer and winter quarterly composites of the above products with previously compiled climatologies and Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) showed only minor discrepancies in location and intensity, which are discussed in some detail.

  7. Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W. L., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

  8. Role of the statistician in the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory and other nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1980-12-01

    This report examines what the statistician can contribute to decommissioning operations, with particular emphasis on the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) currently scheduled for decommissioning beginning in FY81. In the opinion of the author, a professional statistician should be a full member of the planning team directing decommissioning operations at the New Brunswick Laboratory. This opinion is based in part on the familiarity with the valuable contributions made by statisticians toward the cleanup of transuranics in soil on the Enewetak Atoll. More generally, however, the professional statistician can help plan the decommissioning effort to help ensure that representative data are obtained, analyzed and, interpreted in appropriate ways so that RA decisions can be made with the required confidence. The statistician's contributions at the NBL could include providing guidance on the number and location of samples and in-situ measurements, analyzing and interpreting these data, designing a data management and documentation system, interfacing with the certification contractor's statistician, and assisting in writing documentation and final reports. In all cases, the statistician should work closely with the professional health physicist and others on the planning team in a closely coordinated effort of planning and data analysis.

  9. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF THE 2009 JULY 22 ECLIPSE WHITE-LIGHT CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Druckmuellerova, H. E-mail: bryce.a.babcock@williams.edu E-mail: msaniga@ta3.sk

    2011-11-20

    The white-light corona (WLC) during the total solar eclipse of 2009 July 22 was observed by several teams in the Moon's shadow stretching from India and China across the Pacific Ocean with its many isolated islands. We present a comparison of the WLC as observed by eclipse teams located in China (Shanghai region) and on the Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands, with observations taken 112 minutes apart, combined with near-simultaneous space observations. The eclipse was observed at the beginning of solar cycle 24, during a deep solar minimum (officially estimated as 2008 December according to the smoothed sunspot number, but very extended). The solar corona shows several different types of features (coronal holes, polar rays, helmet streamers, faint loops, voids, etc.), though it was extremely sparse in streamers as shown from Large-Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph data. No large-scale dynamical phenomena were seen when comparing the observations from the two sites, confirming that the corona was quiescent. We measure a Ludendorff flattening coefficient of 0.238, typical of solar minimum.

  10. Biomonitoring of heavy metals in the Pacific Basin using avian feathers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, J.; Gochfeld, M.

    1995-07-01

    The authors used avian feathers to biomonitor heavy-metal distribution in several areas in the Pacific Basin including Papua New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, China, Johnston Atoll, Hawaii, and Costa Rica. This paper is a preliminary synthesis of data gathered by the Pacific Basin Biomonitoring Project. They examined levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, selenium, chromium, and manganese. For sooty terns (Sterna fuscata) and brown noddy (Anous stolidus) mercury levels were lower in the Pacific than in Puerto Rico in the Atlantic, but his was reversed for lead and cadmium. Adult birds had higher metal levels in their feathers than did young birds of the same species from the same area. Cadmium levels were higher in terrestrial species; lead, chromium, and manganese were highest in coastal species; and mercury and selenium were highest in marine species. Mercury levels were lowest in forest species, intermediate in species that eat insects and small vertebrates, and highest in species that eat intermediate to large fish. Lead levels were highest in species feeding in industrialized estuaries of Hong Kong.

  11. Fifteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This collection contains 173 abstracts from presented papers and poster sessions. The five sessions of the conference were on the subjects of: (1) Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing, (2) Applied Biological Research, (3) Bioprocessing Research (4), Process Economics and Commercialization, and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Examples of specific topics in the first session include the kinetics of ripening cheese, microbial liquefaction of lignite, and wheat as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. Typical topics in the second session were synergism studies of bacterial and fungal celluloses, conversion of inulin from jerusalem artichokes to sorbitol and ethanol by saccharomyces cerevisiae, and microbial conversion of high rank coals to methane. The third session entertained topics such as hydrodynamic modeling of a liquid fluidized bed bioreactor for coal biosolubilization, aqueous biphasic systems for biological particle partitioning, and arabinose utilization by xylose-fermenting yeast and fungi. The fourth session included such topics as silage processing of forage biomass to alcohol fuels, economics of molasses to ethanol in India, and production of lactic acid from renewable resources. the final session contained papers on such subjects as bioluminescent detection of contaminants in soils, characterization of petroleum contaminated soils in coral atolls in the south Pacific, and landfill management for methane generation and emission control.

  12. Prediction of hydrocarbon-bearing structures based on remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnova, I.; Gololobov, Yu.; Rusanova, A. )

    1993-09-01

    The technology we developed is based on the use of remotely sensed data and has proved to be effective for identification of structures that appear promising for oil and gas, in particular, reefs in the hydrocarbon-bearing basin of central Asia (Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan). It implements the [open quotes]geoindication[close quotes] concept, the main idea being that landscape components (geoindicators) and subsurface geological features are correlated and depend on each other. Subsurface features (uplifts, depressions, faults, reefs, and other lithological and structural heterogeneities) cause physical and chemical alterations in overlying rocks up to the land surface; thus, they are reflected in distribution of landscape components and observed on airborne and satellite images as specific patterns. The following identified geoindicators are related to different subsurface geological features: definite formations, anticlines, and reefs (barrier, atoll, and bioherm). The geoindicators are extracted from images either visually or by using computer systems. Specially developed software is applied to analyze geoindicator distribution and calculate their characteristics. In the course of processing, it is possible to distinguish folds from reefs. Distribution of geoindicator characteristics is examined on the well studied reefs, and from the regularities, established promising areas with reefs are revealed. When applying the technology in central Asia, the results were successfully verified by field works, seismic methods, and drilling.

  13. Annual Program Progress Report under DOE/PHRI Cooperative Agreement: (July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

    2002-07-31

    OAK B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Annual Program Progress Report. The DOE Marshall Islands Medical Program continued, in this it's 48th year, to provide medical surveillance for the exposed population from Rongelap and Utrik and the additional DOE patients. The program was inaugurated in 1954 by the Atomic Energy Commission following the exposure of Marshallese to fallout from a nuclear test (Castle Bravo) at Bikini Atoll. This year marks the fourth year in which the program has been carried out by PHRI under a cooperative agreement with DOE. The DOERHRI Special Medical Care Program, awarded the cooperative agreement on August 28, 1998, commenced its health care program on January 15, 1999, on Kwajalein and January 22, 1999, on Majuro. This report details the program for the July 1, 2001, through the June 30, 2002, period. The program provides year-round, on-site medical care to the DOE patient population residing in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and annual examinations to those patients living in Hawaii and on the Continental U.S.

  14. Permian basin gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeberle, F.R.

    1995-06-01

    Of the 242 major gas fields in the Permian basin, 67 are on the Central Basin Platform, 59 are in the Delaware basin, 44 are in the Midland basin, 28 are in the Val Verde basin, 24 are on the Eastern Shelf, 12 are in the Horshoe Atoll and eight are on the Northwest Shelf. Eleven fields have produced over one trillion cubic feet of gas, 61 have produced between 100 billion and one trillion cubic feet of gas and 170 have produced less than 100 billion cubic feet. Highlights of the study show 11% of the gas comes from reservoirs with temperatures over 300 degrees F. and 11% comes from depths between 19,000 and 20,000 feet. Twenty percent of the gas comes from reservoirs with pressures between 1000 and 2000 psi, 22% comes from reservoirs with 20-24% water saturation and 24% comes from reservoirs between 125 and 150 feet thick. Fifty-three reservoirs in the Ellenburger formation have produced 30% of the gas, 33% comes from 88 reservoirs in the Delaware basin and 33% comes from reservoirs with porosities of less than five percent. Forty percent is solution gas and 46% comes from combination traps. Over 50% of the production comes from reservoirs with five millidarcys or less permeability, and 60% of the gas comes from reservoirs in which dolomite is the dominant lithology. Over 50% of the gas production comes from fields discovered before 1957 although 50% of the producing fields were not discovered until 1958.

  15. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

    2003-04-01

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  16. Equatorial hydrology studies by satellite telemetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robison, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-12-30

    We are using a geostationary satellite functioning as a transponder to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Enewetak and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely measure net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water-flux model predicted wet season plant-transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6- to 7-mm/d evaporation-pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. From the microclimate data we estimated a 1:3 and 1:20 /sup 137/Cs dry-matter concentration ratio, which was later confirmed by radioisotopic analysis. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  17. Origin of particulate organic carbon in the marine atmosphere as indicated by it stable carbon isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesselet, R.; Fontugne, M.; Buat-Menard, P.; Ezat, U.; Lambert, C.E.

    1981-04-01

    Organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition were determined in samples of atmospheric particulate matter collected in 1979 at remote marine locations (Enewetak atoll, Sargasso Sea) during the SEAREX (Sea-Air Exchange) program field experiments. Atmospheric Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) concentrations were found to be in the range of 0.3 to 1.2 mg. m/sup -3/, in agreement with previous literature data. The major mass of POC was found on the smallest particles (r<0.5 mm). The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of the small particles is close to the one expected (d/sup 13/C = 26 +- 2/sup 0///sub infinity/) for atmospheric POC of continental origin. For all the samples analysed so far, it appears that more than 80% of atmospheric POC over remote marine areas is of continental origin. This can be explained either by long-range transport of small sized continental organic aserosols or by the production of POC in the marine atmosphere from a vapor phase organic carbon pool of continental origin. The POC in the large size fraction of marine aerosols (<20% of the total concentration) is likely to have a direct marine origin since its carbon isotopic composition is close to the expected value (d/sup 13/C = -21 +- 2/sup 0///sub 00/) for POC associated with sea-salt droplets transported to the marine atmosphere.

  18. Assessment of plutonium exposure in the Enewetak population by urinalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, L.C.; Meinhold, C.B.; Moorthy, A.R.

    1997-07-01

    Since 1980, the inhabitants of Enewetak Atoll have been monitored periodically by scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory for internally deposited radioactive material. In 1989, the establishment of fission track analysis and of a protocol for shipboard collection of 24-h urine samples significantly improved our ability to assess the internal uptake of plutonium. The purpose of this report is to show the distribution of plutonium concentrations in urine collected in 1989 and 1991, and to assess the associated committed effective doses for the Enewetak population based on a long-term chronic uptake of low-level plutonium. To estimate dose, we derived the plutonium dose-per-unit-uptake coefficients based on the dosimetric system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Assuming a continuous uptake, an integrated Jones`s plutonium urine excretion function was developed to interpret the Enewetak urine data. The Appendix shows how these values were derived. The committed effective doses were 0.2 mSv, calculated from the 1991 average plutonium content in 69 urine samples. 29 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. Volume 10, Nickel-63

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carboneau, M.L.; Adams, J.P.

    1995-02-01

    This report outlines the basic radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of nickel-63 ({sup 63}Ni) and examines how these characteristics affect the behavior of {sup 63}Ni in various environmental media, such as soils, groundwater, plants, animals, the atmosphere, and the human body. Discussions also include methods of {sup 63}Ni production, waste types, and waste forms that contain {sup 63}Ni. The primary source of {sup 63}Ni in the environment has been low-level radioactive waste material generated as a result of neutron activation of stable {sup 62}Ni that is present in the structural components of nuclear reactor vessels. {sup 63}Ni enters the environment from the dismantling activities associated with nuclear reactor decommissioning. However, small amounts of {sup 63}Ni have been detected in the environment following the testing of thermonuclear weapons in the South Pacific. Concentrations as high as 2.7 Bq{sup a} per gram of sample (or equivalently 0.0022 parts per billion) were observed on Bikini Atoll (May 1954). {sup 63}Ni was not created as a fission product species (e.g., from {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu fissions), but instead was produced as a result of neutron capture in {sup 63}Ni, a common nickel isotope present in the stainless steel components of nuclear weapons (e.g., stainless-304 contains {approximately}9% total Ni or {approximately}0.3% {sup 63}Ni).

  20. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Phillips, W.A.

    1987-07-01

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and /sup 137/Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  1. Bomb tests attack the food chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruff, T. )

    1990-03-01

    Ciguatera poisoning, the most common type of fish poisoning in the world, has become a major public health problem in some parts of the South Pacific. This area has always been the site of periodic outbreaks, especially after severe storms or natural disasters that damage core reefs. But since World War II it has become evident that military activities and major construction projects that wreak havoc on corals also lead to ciguatera outbreaks. Extraordinarily high rates of ciguatera poisoning have occurred on the small Pacific islands that have been used for nuclear tests and on the islands that host the military infrastructures and activities that accompany the tests. This is true for both the Marshall Islands near Bikini and Eniwetok, where U.S. tests took place, and in French Polynesia, in the area around Moruroa Atoll where the French government continues to test. Ciguatera poisoning has a disastrous effect on people who depend on fishing as a way of life and on fish as the major source of protein. 10 refs.

  2. Possible differences in biological availability of isotopes of plutonium: Report of a workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, J.R.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a workshop conducted on the apparent different bioavailability of isotopes {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu. There is a substantial body of evidence that {sup 238}Pu as commonly found in the environment is more biologically available than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Trinity Site, Nevada Test Site from nonnuclear and nuclear events, Rocky Flats, Enewetak and Bikini, and the arctic tundra support this conclusion and indicate that the bioavailability of {sup 238}Pu is more than an order of magnitude greater than that of {sup 239}Pu. Plant and soil studies from controlled environments and from Savannah River indicate no isotopic difference in availability of Pu to plants; whereas studies at the Trinity Site do suggest a difference. While it is possible that these observations can be explained by problems in the experimental procedure and analytical techniques, this possibility is remote given the ubiquitous nature of the observations. Studies of solubility of Pu in the stomach contents of cattle grazing at the Nevada Test Site and from fish from Bikini Atoll both found that {sup 238}Pu was more soluble than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Los Alamos effluent stream indicate that as particle size decreases, the content of {sup 238}Pu relative to {sup 239}Pu increases.

  3. Source of the tsunami associated with the Kalapana (Hawaii) earthquake of November 1975

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.C.

    1980-12-01

    The travel times of the tsunami generated on 29 November 1975 off the Kau-Puna coast of Hawaii to the tide gages at Hilo, Kahului, Honolulu, and Nawiliwili have been calculated from the arrival times indicated on the tide-gage records, applying gage-time corrections, assuming that the tsunami was generated at the time of the earthquake it accompanied. Travel times have also been calculated similarly to other places on the coast of Hawaii where arrival times of the tsunami were reported, and to Johnston Atoll. Inverse tsunami refraction diagrams have been constructed by graphical means for the path of the tsunami between the vicinity of its source and the places of known arrival times. The isochrones of the refraction diagrams corresponding to the respective calculated travel times for the tsunami front have been used to define the boundary of the area of upward sea-floor displacement from which the tsunami propagated. This area is about 15 or 20 miles long (parallel to the southeast coast of Hawaii) and on the order of 14 or 15 miles wide, considerably smaller than the area earlier considered the tsunami source. Coastal subsidence measured soon after the earthquake indicates that the area of initial upward displacement was separated from the coast by a narrow belt of downward displacement. Comparisons between the crest arrival times and the travel times indicated by the inverse refraction diagrams indicate a lag of about four minutes between the time of the earthquake and the accomplishment of the maximum upward displacement. Accuracies of estimation are insufficient to determine whether the maximum upward displacement occurred within the area of initial displacement or seaward of it within a distance of about 15 miles. Displacement resulting from a mega-landslide cannot be distinguished from strictly tectonic displacement by the comparison of arrival times and travel times. 14 references, 19 figures, 8 tables.

  4. kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM THE 2000 AND 2010 X-RAY TRANSIENTS LOCATED IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER TERZAN 5: EXO1745-248 AND IGR J17480-2446

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barret, Didier

    2012-07-01

    EXO1745-248 is a transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. It was in outburst in 2000 and displayed during one Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observation a highly coherent quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) at frequencies between 670 and 715 Hz. Applying a maximum likelihood method to fit the X-ray power density spectrum, we show that the QPO can be detected on segments as short as T = 48 s. We find that its width is consistent with being constant, while previous analysis based on longer segment duration (200 s) found it variable. If the QPO frequency variations in EXO1745-248 follow a random walk (i.e., the contribution of the drift to the measured width increases like {radical}T), we derive an intrinsic width of {approx}2.3 Hz. This corresponds to an intrinsic quality factor of Q {approx} 297 {+-} 50 at 691 Hz. We also show that Q is consistent with being constant between 2.5 and 25 keV. IGR J17480-2446 is another X-ray transient located in Terzan 5. It is a very interesting object showing accretion-powered pulsations and burst oscillations at 11 Hz. We report on the properties of its kHz QPOs detected between October 18 and October 23, soon after the source had moved from the so-called Atoll state to the Z state. Its QPOs are typical of persistent Z sources; in the sense that they have low Q factors ({approx}30) and low rms amplitudes ({approx}5%). The highest frequency (at 870 Hz), if orbital, sets a lower limit on the inner disk radius of {approx}18.5 km and an upper limit to the dipole moment of the magnetic field {mu} {<=} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 26} G cm{sup 3}.

  5. Facies architecture of Spraberry submarine fan reservoirs (Permian), Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, E.H.; Tyler, N.

    1989-03-01

    Facies of mud-rich submarine fans of the Spraberry formation (Permian, Leonardian) form oil reservoirs in the central part of the Midland basin, west Texas. The principal reservoirs are submarine-channel and associated facies in the upper parts of generally upward-coarsening and upward-thickening sequences of the Jo Mill (lower Spraberry) and Driver and overlying Floyd (upper Spraberry) fans. They are naturally fractured, massive and laminated, very fine-grained, calcareous sandstones and siltstones usually occurring in beds 2 to approximately 12 ft thick. Two main subdivisions, inner and middle to outer fan, are recognized using isoliths, log motifs, and cores of predominantly terrigenous clastic, mostly basin-wide genetic intervals. The boundary between the subdivisions approximately coincides with the location of the subjacent Horseshoe atoll (Pennsylvanian). The narrow range in grain size of the fans results in limited basinward variations in texture and sedimentary structures and paucity of Bouma sequences. Facies architecture strongly influences hydrocarbon distribution and recovery. Wells having the best cumulative productions generally occur in sandstone depositional axes. Most accumulations in inner fan facies are scattered structural traps having relatively high recovery efficiencies (24%, Jo Mill field). The largest accumulations in mid to outer fan facies are stratigraphic traps in meandering to anastomosing channel sandstone belts 1-3 mi wide occurring in a widespread area. Recovery efficiencies range from 5% (Spraberry trend, stratigraphic trap) to 15% (Benedum field, combined stratigraphic-structural trap). Additional reserves can be recovered from partly drained and untapped reservoir compartments, especially in layered and compartmentalized middle to outer fan facies.

  6. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  7. University of Washington`s radioecological studies in the Marshall Islands, 1946-1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, L.R.; Seymour, A.H.; Nevissi, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    Since 1946, personnel from the School of Fisheries, University of Washington, have studied the effects of nuclear detonations and the ensuing radioactivity on the marine and terrestrial environments throughout the Central Pacific. A collection of reports and publications about these activities plus a collection of several thousand samples from these periods are kept at the School of Fisheries. General findings from the surveys show that (1) fission products were prevalent in organisms of the terrestrial environment whereas activation products were prevalent in marine organisms; (2) the best biological indicators of fallout radionuclides by environments were (a) terrestrial-coconuts, land crabs; (b) reef-algae, invertebrates; and (c) marine-plankton, fish. Studies of plutonium and americium in Bikini Atoll showed that during 1971-1977 the highest concentrations of {sup 241}Am, 2.85 Bq g-{close_quote} (77 pCi g{sup -1}) and {sup 239,240}Pu, 4.44 Bq g{sup -1} (120 pCi g{sup -1}), in surface sediments were found in the northwest part of the lagoon. The concentrations in the bomb craters were substantially lower than these values. Concentrations of soluble and particulate plutonium and americium in surface and deep water samples showed distributions similar to the sediment samples. That is, the highest concentration of these radionuclides in the water column were at locations with highest sediment concentration. Continuous circulation of water in the lagoon and exchange of water with open ocean resulted in removal of 111 G Bq y{sup -1} (3 Ci y{sup -1}) {sup 241}Am and 222 G Bq y{sup -1} (6 Ci y{sup -1}) {sup 239,240}Pu into the North Equatorial Current. A summary of the surveys, findings, and the historical role of the Laboratory in radioecological studies of the Marshall Islands are presented. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres

  10. Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2008-05-19

    Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age