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Sample records for lp sea breeze

  1. PP-299-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP PP-299-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP Presidential permit authorizing Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canada border. PDF icon PP-299-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP More Documents & Publications PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc PP-10 Bonneville Power Administrator PP-10-1

  2. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc Presidental Permit authorizing Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canada border. PDF icon PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc More Documents & Publications PP-299-1 Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299

  3. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Transmission System, INC | Department of Energy 99 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System, INC Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System, INC TBDApplication from Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System, INC to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilitites at the U.S. - Canada PDF icon Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission

  4. Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc.: Federal Register Notice Volume 70, No. 33- Feb. 18, 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application from Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canada border. - Federal Register Notice

  5. Breeze Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Breeze Ltd Place: United Kingdom Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind project developer active in the UK. References: Breeze Ltd1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  6. SF-BREEZE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BREEZE - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  7. Breeze System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Gothenburg Country: Sweden Zip: 41137 Sector: Wind energy Product: Breeze wind software Year Founded: 2010 Phone Number: +46 31 788 03 00 Website: www.breezesystem.com...

  8. EIS-0378: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0378: Final Environmental Impact Statement Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP (Sea Breeze) has...

  9. For Cape Wind, Summer Breeze Makes Offshore Wind Feel Fine |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For Cape Wind, Summer Breeze Makes Offshore Wind Feel Fine For Cape Wind, Summer Breeze Makes ... one of the world's largest wind farms, the Department's Loan Programs Office ...

  10. PP-299_Sea_Breeze.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  11. BreezElectric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Electricity supplier for small grids on remote islands using a hybrid wind-diesel power system. References: BreezElectric1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  12. Maritime Hydrogen & SF-BREEZE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & SF-BREEZE - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  13. Sustainable Technology Capital, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capital, LP Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Sustainable Technology Capital, LP Name: Sustainable Technology Capital, LP Address: 625 Liberty Ave., Suite 3200 Place: Pittsburgh,...

  14. 'Shifter' Makes Container-based HPC a Breeze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC's 'Shifter' Makes Container-based HPC a Breeze 'Shifter' Makes Container-based HPC a Breeze NERSC Unveils Scalable Tool for Deploying Linux Containers and User-defined Images in an HPC Environment August 11, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov Shifter logo The explosive growth in data coming out of experiments in cosmology, particle physics, bioinformatics and nuclear physics is pushing computational scientists to design novel software tools that will help users

  15. PP-299-1_Sea_Breeze.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  16. Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Corpus Christi Cogeneration LP Place: Texas Phone Number: 408-995-5115 Website: www.calpine.com Outage Hotline:...

  17. SRW Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SRW Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: SRW Cogeneration LP Place: Texas Phone Number: 281-293-1000 Website: www.puc.texas.govindustryele Outage Hotline:...

  18. Hunterdon Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hunterdon Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hunterdon Cogeneration LP Place: New Jersey References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA...

  19. Future Energy Assets LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assets LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Assets LP Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78701 Product: String representation "Future Energy A ... S and in China." is too...

  20. Texas Power, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Texas Power, LP Place: Texas Website: www.texaspoweronline.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesTexas-Power-LP110752578951516 References: EIA Form...

  1. EA-303-A Saracen Merchant Energy, LP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-A Saracen Merchant Energy, LP EA-303-A Saracen Merchant Energy, LP Order authorizing Saracen Merchant Energy, LP to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-303-A Saracen Merchant Energy, LP More Documents & Publications EA-409 Saracen Power LP EA-340 Saracen Energy Partners, LP EA-340-A Saracen Energy Partners, LP

  2. Dunbarton Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dunbarton Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Dunbarton Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility Facility Dunbarton Energy Partners LP Sector Biomass...

  3. Smithtown Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smithtown Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Smithtown Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility Facility Smithtown Energy Partners LP Sector Biomass...

  4. Suffolk Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Suffolk Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility Facility Suffolk Energy Partners LP Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  5. Biomass One LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass One LP Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One LP Sector Biomass Location Jackson County, Oregon Coordinates 42.334535,...

  6. Bridgewater Power LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bridgewater Power LP Biomass Facility Facility Bridgewater Power LP Sector Biomass Location Grafton County, New Hampshire...

  7. Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montenay Montgomery LP Biomass Facility Facility Montenay Montgomery LP Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  8. Biomass One LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biomass One LP Place: White City, Oregon Product: Owner and operator of a 25MW wood fired cogeneration plant in Oregon. References: Biomass One...

  9. Clear Lake Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cogeneration LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clear Lake Cogeneration LP Place: Idaho Phone Number: 281-474-7611 Outage Hotline: 281-474-7611 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  10. MMA LA Power LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MMA LA Power LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: MMA LA Power LP -- ELACC Photovoltaic Power Facility Place: California Phone Number: 415-986-8038 or 800-331-1534 Website:...

  11. MMA GDC Power LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: MMA GDC Power LP -- Gap Pacific Distribution Center Place: California Phone Number: 415-986-8038 or 800-331-1534 Website:...

  12. MMA WBF Power LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: MMA WBF Power LP -- Bolthouse S&P and Rowen Farms Solar Place: California Phone Number: 415-986-8038 or 800-331-1534 Website:...

  13. MMA Fresno Power LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MMA Fresno Power LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: MMA Fresno Power LP -- CSU Fresno Solar Project Place: California Phone Number: 415-986-8038 or 800-331-1534 Website:...

  14. LP Hoying, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LP Hoying, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: LP Hoying, LLC Address: P.O. Box 258 Place: Fort Loramie, Ohio Zip: 45845-0258 Sector: Solar Product: Retail, Supplier - PC Power...

  15. EA-340 Saracen Energy Partners, LP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Saracen Energy Partners, LP EA-340 Saracen Energy Partners, LP Order authorizing Saracen Energy Partners, LP to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-340 Saracen Energy Partners, LP More Documents & Publications EA-340-A

  16. EA-340-A Saracen Energy Partners, LP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    -A Saracen Energy Partners, LP EA-340-A Saracen Energy Partners, LP Order authorizing Saracen Energy Partners, LP to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-340-A Saracen Energy Partners, LP More Documents & Publications EA-340

  17. EA-353 Boralex Ashland LP | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    53 Boralex Ashland LP EA-353 Boralex Ashland LP Order authorizing Boralex Ashland LP to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA- 353 Boralex Ashland LP More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP: Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151 EA-344 Twin Cities Power-Canada,

  18. American Photovoltaics LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Photovoltaics LP Place: Houston, Texas Product: Manufactures and markets thin-film photovoltaic modules. Coordinates: 29.76045, -95.369784 Show Map Loading map......

  19. Heartland Grain Fuels LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Heartland Grain Fuels LP Place: Aberdeen, South Dakota Zip: 57401 Sector: Bioenergy Product: Heartland Grain Fuels is a cooperatively-owned producer of corn-derived...

  20. Access Fund Partners LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Partners, LP Place: San Juan Capistrano, California Zip: 92675 Product: Boutique investment banking and investment advisory firm with clean energy focus References: Access Fund...

  1. Crimson Renewable Energy LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crimson Renewable Energy LP Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80202 Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product: Focused on biodiesel production and conversion of waste biomass into...

  2. Hydrogenica Partners LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Hydrogenica Partners LP Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: CO 80202 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy Product: A small venture capital company focusing on clean,...

  3. Fulcrum Power Services LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Fulcrum Power Services LP Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77056 Product: fulcrum is an energy management solutions provider for managing power generation assets and load serving...

  4. WTU Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy, LP Place: Texas Phone Number: 1-866-322-5563 Website: www.wturetailenergy.com Twitter: @wtuenergy Facebook: https:www.facebook.comWTUenergy Outage Hotline:...

  5. Spark Energy, LP (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Spark Energy, LP Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-877-547-7275 Website: www.sparkenergy.comenconnect Outage Hotline:...

  6. EA-368 Brookfield Energy Marketing LP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Brookfield Energy Marketing LP EA-368 Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Order authorizing Brookfield Energy Marketing LP to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-368 Brookfield Energy Marketing LP More Documents & Publications Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-368 Brookfield Energy Marketing LP EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP EA-258-D Brookfield Energy

  7. Ridge Energy Storage and Grid Services LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Storage and Grid Services LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ridge Energy Storage and Grid Services LP Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77027 Product: Developer of compressed...

  8. KMS Joliet Power Partners LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name KMS Joliet Power Partners LP Biomass Facility Facility KMS Joliet Power Partners LP Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Will County, Illinois...

  9. El Paso Merchant Energy LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: El Paso Merchant Energy LP Place: Texas Phone Number: (713) 369-9000 Website: www.kindermorgan.compagesse Outage Hotline: (713)...

  10. Pattern Energy Group LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and operates renewable and transmission energy assets across North America and parts of Latin America. References: Pattern Energy Group LP1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  11. Onsite Recovered Energy LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Onsite Recovered Energy LP Address: Centurion Region: South Africa Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year Founded: 2009 Phone Number: +27 (0)83 526-3767...

  12. Direct Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct Energy, LP Place: Texas Website: www.directenergy.com Twitter: @directenergy Facebook: https:www.facebook.comDirectEnergy Outage Hotline: 1-855-461-1926 References: EIA...

  13. EA-328-A RBC Energy Services LP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    -A RBC Energy Services LP EA-328-A RBC Energy Services LP Order authorizing RBC Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-328-A RBC Energy CN.pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328-A RBC Energy Services LP EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P. EA-171-D Powerex Corp.

  14. PP-285 Sharyland Utilities LP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Sharyland Utilities LP PP-285 Sharyland Utilities LP Presidential permit authorizing Sharyland Utilities LP to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexico border. PDF icon PP-285 Sharyland Utilities LP More Documents & Publications PP-35 Trico Electric Cooperative Inc PP-107-1 Arizona Public Service Company PP-317 AEP Texas Central

  15. SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bloomberg LP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bloomberg LP Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bloomberg LP Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bloomberg LP An important objective of Bloomberg LP's sustainability efforts is to reduce carbon emissions from employees' commutes. The majority of Bloomberg LP's offices are located in dense urban areas, and the company encourages the use of public transportation and biking whenever possible. Since these options are not possible for a number of the employees at Bloomberg's Skillman, NJ

  17. WARM BREEZE FROM THE STARBOARD BOW: A NEW POPULATION OF NEUTRAL HELIUM IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubiak, M. A.; Bzowski, M.; Sok?, J. M.; Swaczyna, P.; Grzedzielski, S.; Alexashov, D. B.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Mbius, E.; Leonard, T.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Wurz, P.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the signals from neutral helium atoms observed in situ from Earth orbit in 2010 by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). The full helium signal observed during the 2010 observation season can be explained as a superposition of pristine neutral interstellar He gas and an additional population of neutral helium that we call the Warm Breeze. The Warm Breeze is approximately 2 times slower and 2.5 times warmer than the primary interstellar He population, and its density in front of the heliosphere is ?7% that of the neutral interstellar helium. The inflow direction of the Warm Breeze differs by ?19 from the inflow direction of interstellar gas. The Warm Breeze seems to be a long-term, perhaps permanent feature of the heliospheric environment. It has not been detected earlier because it is strongly ionized inside the heliosphere. This effect brings it below the threshold of detection via pickup ion and heliospheric backscatter glow observations, as well as by the direct sampling of GAS/Ulysses. We discuss possible sources for the Warm Breeze, including (1) the secondary population of interstellar helium, created via charge exchange and perhaps elastic scattering of neutral interstellar He atoms on interstellar He{sup +} ions in the outer heliosheath, or (2) a gust of interstellar He originating from a hypothetic wave train in the Local Interstellar Cloud. A secondary population is expected from models, but the characteristics of the Warm Breeze do not fully conform to modeling results. If, nevertheless, this is the explanation, IBEX-Lo observations of the Warm Breeze provide key insights into the physical state of plasma in the outer heliosheath. If the second hypothesis is true, the source is likely to be located within a few thousand AU from the Sun, which is the propagation range of possible gusts of interstellar neutral helium with the Warm Breeze characteristics against dissipation via elastic scattering in the Local Cloud. Whatever the nature of the Warm Breeze, its discovery exposes a critical new feature of our heliospheric environment.

  18. EIS-0378: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0378: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project Sea Breeze Olympic Converter LP (Sea Breeze) has applied to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for authorizations and approvals necessary to construct the U.S. portion of a proposed international electric power transmission cable. Specifically, Sea Breeze has applied to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), an organizational

  19. Little Sioux Corn Processors LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LP Place: Iowa Zip: 51035 Product: Owners and operators of the 40m gallon per year bioethanol plant in Marcus, Iowa. References: Little Sioux Corn Processors LP1 This article...

  20. Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP GBB | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP GBB Jump to: navigation, search Name: Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP (GBB) Place: Houston, Texas Product: Developer of a 75.8m litre per year biodiesel...

  1. APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) Jump to: navigation, search Name: APN Starfirst, L.P. Place: Ohio Phone Number: (877) 977-2636 or (610) 372-8500 Website: www.americanpowernet.com...

  2. Cooperative L&P Assn Lake Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cooperative L&P Assn Lake Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cooperative L&P Assn Lake Cnty Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 800-580-5881 Website: www.clpower.com Facebook:...

  3. Minnesota Valley Coop L&P Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minnesota Valley Coop L&P Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name: Minnesota Valley Coop L&P Assn Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 320-269-2163 or 1-800-247-5051 Website:...

  4. File:Wind-turbine-economics-lp.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind-turbine-economics-lp.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Wind-turbine-economics-lp.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other...

  5. FreshTracks Capital LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FreshTracks Capital LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: FreshTracks Capital LP Address: 29 Harbor Road, Suite 200 Place: Shelburne, New Hampshire Zip: 05482 Product: Venture...

  6. FRV SI Transport Solar LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SI Transport Solar LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: FRV SI Transport Solar LP Place: Arizona References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861...

  7. EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 42 - ...

  8. EA-409 Saracen Power LP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    9 Saracen Power LP EA-409 Saracen Power LP Order authorizing Saracen Power to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-409 Saracen Power (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-409 Sararcen Power LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-409 Saracen Power LP: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 70 - April 13, 2015 EA-196-D Minnesota Power

  9. EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RBC Energy Services L.P. EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P. Order authorizing RBC Energy Services L.P. to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P. ...

  10. Photovoltaic at Hollywood and Desert Breeze Recreational Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Shane

    2015-09-24

    Executive Summary Renewable Energy Initiatives for Clark County Parks and Recreation Solar Project DOE grant # DE-EE0003180 In accordance with the goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for promoting solar energy as clean, carbon-free and cost-effective, the County believed that a recreational center was an ideal place to promote solar energy technologies to the public. This project included the construction of solar electricity generation facilities (40kW) at two Clark County facility sites, Desert Breeze Recreational Center and Hollywood Recreational Center, with educational kiosks and Green Boxes for classroom instruction. The major objectives and goals of this Solar Project include demonstration of state of the art technologies for the generation of electricity from solar technology and the creation of an informative and educational tool in regards to the benefits and process of generating alternative energy. Clark County partnered with Anne Johnson (design architect/consultant), Affiliated Engineers Inc. (AEI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Morse Electric. The latest photovoltaic technologies were used in the project to help create the greatest expected energy savings for60443 each recreational center. This coupled with the data created from the monitoring system will help Clark County and NREL further understand the real time outputs from the system. The educational portion created with AEI and DRI incorporates material for all ages with a focus on K - 12. The AEI component is an animated story telling the fundamentals of how sunlight is turned into electricity and DRI‘s creation of Solar Green Boxes brings environmental education into the classroom. In addition to the educational component for the public, the energy that is created through the photovoltaic system also translates into saved money and health benefits for the general public. This project has helped Clark County to further add to its own energy reduction goals created by the energy management agenda (Resolution to Encourage Sustainability) and the County’s Eco-initiative. Each site has installed photovoltaic panels on the existing roof structures that exhibit suitable solar exposure. The generation systems utilize solar energy creating electricity used for the facility’s lighting system and other electrical requirements. Unused electricity is sent to the electric utility grid, often at peak demand times. Educational signage, kiosks and information have been included to inform and expand the public’s understanding of solar energy technology. The Solar Green Boxes were created for further hands on classroom education of solar power. In addition, data is sent by a Long Term PV performance monitoring system, complete with data transmission to NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), located in Golden, CO. This system correlates local solar irradiance and weather with power production. The expected outcomes of this Solar Project are as follows: (1) Successful photovoltaic electricity generation technologies to capture solar energy in a useful form of electrical energy. (2) Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and environmental degradation resulting from reduced energy demand from traditional electricity sources such as fossil fuel fired and nuclear power plants. (3) Advance the research and development of solar electricity generation. (4) The education of the general public in regards to the benefits of environmentally friendly electricity generation and Clark County’s efforts to encourage sustainable living practices. (5) To provide momentum for the nexus for future solar generation facilities in Clark County facilities and buildings and further the County’s energy reduction goals. (6) To ultimately contribute to the reduction of dependence on foreign oil and other unsustainable sources of energy. This Solar Project addresses several objectives and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technology Program. The project improves the integration and performance of solar electricity directly through implementation of cutting edge technology. The project further addresses this goal by laying important ground work and infrastructure for integration into the utility grid in future related projects. There will also be added security, reliability, and diversity to the energy system by providing and using reliable, secure, distributed electricity in Clark County facilities as well as sending such electricity back into the utility electric grid. A final major objective met by the Solar Project will be the displacement of energy derived by fossil fuels with clean renewable energy created by photovoltaic panels.

  11. SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily

  12. Lab makes understanding the complexity of wind power "A breeze"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding the Complexity of Wind Power Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab makes understanding the complexity of wind power "A breeze" Loren Toole has been working with a group of ranchers and other landowners in eastern New Mexico to help them evaluate their renewable energy resources. October 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman

  13. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP: Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application from Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151

  14. Update on Mammoth Pacific, LP Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Update on Mammoth Pacific, LP Operations Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Charlene L. Wardlow Published Publisher Not Provided, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  15. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. Order authorizing Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon ...

  16. EA-339 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-339 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Order authorizing Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. to export electric energy to Canada PDF...

  17. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas...

  18. APN Starfirst, L.P. (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    APN Starfirst, L.P. Place: Texas Phone Number: 877-977-2636 Website: www.puc.texas.govindustryele Outage Hotline: 877-977-2636 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  19. Ambit Energy, L.P. (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New York) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ambit Energy, L.P. Place: New York Phone Number: (877) 282-6248 Website: ww2.ambitenergy.com Twitter: @AmbitEnergy Facebook: https:...

  20. APN Starfirst, L.P. (Illinois) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    APN Starfirst, L.P. Place: Illinois Phone Number: (877) 977-2636 Website: www.americanpowernet.comindex Outage Hotline: (877) 977-2636 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File...

  1. Ambit Energy, L.P. (Maryland) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ambit Energy, L.P. Place: Maryland Phone Number: (877) 282-6248 Website: ww2.ambitenergy.com Twitter: @AmbitEnergy Facebook: https:...

  2. EA-338 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-338 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Order authorizing Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. to export electric energy to Mexico PDF icon EA-338 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. More Documents & Publications EA-339 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-338-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-338-A Shell Energy North

  3. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTIO...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ...

  4. Idaho Cnty L&P Coop Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cnty L&P Coop Assn, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Idaho Cnty L&P Coop Assn, Inc Place: Idaho Phone Number: 208-983-1065 Website: www.iclp.coop Outage Hotline: 877-212-0424...

  5. File:Wind-turbine-economics-lp-HS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind-turbine-economics-lp-HS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Wind-turbine-economics-lp-HS.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels....

  6. Ea-168-A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Order authorizing PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P to export electric energy to Canada. Ea-168-A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P More Documents & Publications EA-168 PG&E Energy...

  7. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTI...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-161-LNG - ORDER 3357 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO....

  8. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. 10-161-LNG - ORDER 3282 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT....

  9. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTIO...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG -...

  10. EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    -A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Order authorizing Shell Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-339-A Shell...

  11. EA-338-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    -A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-338-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Order authorizing Shell Energy to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-338-A Shell Energy (MX).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-338-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-338 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-339 Shell Energy North

  12. EA-168-B PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -B PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-168-B PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P Order authorizing PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-168-B...

  13. EA-320-A S.A.C. Energy Investments, L.P. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0-A S.A.C. Energy Investments, L.P. EA-320-A S.A.C. Energy Investments, L.P. Order authorizing S.A.C. Energy Investments, L.P. to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-320-A...

  14. EA-168 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-168 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-168 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P Order authorizing PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-168...

  15. EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P Order authorizing PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P More Documents & Publications EA-167-A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-166 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C

  16. EA-359-A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. EA-359-A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. Order authorizing Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading to export electric energy to Canada. Name Change from Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. PDF icon EA-359-A Castleton Commodities (CN) Name Change.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-359-B Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis

  17. QER- Comment of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To: Members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U.S. Department of Energy Enclosed please find comments submitted on behalf of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P. for the record of the QER’s August 21, 2014 Infrastructure Siting and Permitting Meeting in Cheyenne, WY. Feel free to contact me if you need anything further regarding this communication.

  18. EA-167-A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    -A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-167-A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P Order authorizing PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-167-A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P More Documents & Publications EA-168-B PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P Ea-168-A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P

  19. Laboratory Policy (LP) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LP Home Laboratory Policy (LP) LP Home About Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Management & Operating (M&O) Contracts Technology Transfer Work for Others Contact Information Laboratory Policy U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 More Information » The Department of Energy National Laboratories The Department of

  20. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (FLEX II Conditional Order) to Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, ... PDF icon Order 3357-B - Final Opinion and Order Granting LNG Export Authorization More ...

  1. EA-206-B Frontera Generation L.P. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6-B Frontera Generation L.P. EA-206-B Frontera Generation L.P. Order authorizing Frontera Generation L.P. to export electricity to Mexico. PDF icon EA-206-B Frontera (MX).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-403 Frontera Marketing, LLC EA-338-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-403 Frontera Marketing, LLC - Joint ERCOT and Frontera Marketing, LLC and Frontera Generation Limited

  2. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 | Department of Energy LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 No report submitted at this time. More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P.

  3. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR DOMINION COVE POINT, LP - DK. NO. 11-128-LNG -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORDER 3331 (Conditional Order) and Order 3331-A Final Order | Department of Energy DOMINION COVE POINT, LP - DK. NO. 11-128-LNG - ORDER 3331 (Conditional Order) and Order 3331-A Final Order SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR DOMINION COVE POINT, LP - DK. NO. 11-128-LNG - ORDER 3331 (Conditional Order) and Order 3331-A Final Order PDF icon October 2013 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE

  4. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC - 14-005-CIC | Department of Energy Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC - 14-005-CIC Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC - 14-005-CIC Application of Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC to Transfer Control of Long-term Authorization to Export LNG

  5. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - FE DKT. 10-161-LNG - ORDER 3282 | Department of Energy - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. 10-161-LNG - ORDER 3282 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. 10-161-LNG - ORDER 3282 PDF icon October 2013 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT.

  6. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 | Department of Energy EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 PDF icon April 2013 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO.

  7. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-161-LNG - ORDER 3357 | Department of Energy EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-161-LNG - ORDER 3357 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-161-LNG - ORDER 3357 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG -

  8. TEE-0069 - In the Matter of Severson Oil & LP Co., Inc. | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 9 - In the Matter of Severson Oil & LP Co., Inc. TEE-0069 - In the Matter of Severson Oil & LP Co., Inc. On March 23, 2010, Severson Oil & LP Co., Inc. (Severson) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm requests that it be relieved of the requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product

  9. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG ...

  10. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTI...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066

  11. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG On May 17, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOEFE) issued ...

  12. Flint Hills Resources, LP- FE Dkt. No. 15-168-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of receipt of an application, filed on November 5, 2015, by Flint Hills Resources, LP (Flint Hills), requesting long...

  13. EA-359-B Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-359-A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. EA-365-A Centre Lane Trading Limited EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US),...

  14. Sea Mammals:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sea Mammals: Resources and Population The nanrine mammal resources nenr Amchitkn Island consist o f sea otters, harbor seals, and Steller sea 1io11s as perntnnent residents, northern fur seals that migrate througla Aleutian passes, and wholes nnd porpoises in the surrouttdiftg seas. Archaeological and historic data on nni~nnl populations indicate that the species present tlten were the same as those present today nnd dentoxstrate tlre contii~ued importawe that sea mammals haue played in tlre

  15. Simulation and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications Simulation and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications High- and low-pressure exhaust gas recirculation can be combined for an advanced airpath control strategy PDF icon deer09_matthews.pdf More Documents & Publications Impact of Extreme Injection Pressure and EGR on the Combustion System of a HD Single Cylinder Engine Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Control

  16. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR JORDAN COVE ENERGY PROJECT, L.P. - FE DKT. NO.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11-127-LNG - ORDER 3041 | Department of Energy JORDAN COVE ENERGY PROJECT, L.P. - FE DKT. NO. 11-127-LNG - ORDER 3041 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR JORDAN COVE ENERGY PROJECT, L.P. - FE DKT. NO. 11-127-LNG - ORDER 3041 PDF icon April 2012 PDF icon October 2012 PDF icon April 2013 PDF icon October 2013 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR JORDAN COVE ENERGY FE DKT. NO. 12-32-LNG - ORDER 3413

  17. Order 3331-A: Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - Dk. No. 11-128-LNG |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 331-A: Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - Dk. No. 11-128-LNG Order 3331-A: Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - Dk. No. 11-128-LNG FINAL ORDER AND OPINION GRANTING LONG-TERM MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE DOMINION COVE POINT LNG TERMINAL IN CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set forth below, DOE/FE has concluded that the opponents of the Dominion

  18. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10-161-LNG | Department of Energy 0-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG On May 17, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOE/FE) issued Order No. 3282 (FLEX I Conditional Order) to Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, pursuant to section 3(a) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA). As discussed in the below PDF, DOE/FE subsequently amended Order No. 3282 to add FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG

  19. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    11-161-LNG | Department of Energy 1-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 11-161-LNG On November 15, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOE/FE) issued Order No. 3357 (FLEX II Conditional Order) to Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC, and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC (collectively, FLEX) pursuant to section 3(a) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA). As discussed in the PDF below, DOE/FE

  20. Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE Dkt. No 11-128-LNG | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE Dkt. No 11-128-LNG Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE Dkt. No 11-128-LNG ORDER CONDITIONALLY GRANTING LONG-TERM MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE COVE POINT LNG TERMINAL TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set forth below, DOE/FE has concluded that the opponents of the DCP Application have not demonstrated that the requested authorization will be

  1. SF-BREEZE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The hydrogen refueling station would be the largest in the world and serve fuel cell ... led by Sandia, to examine the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of the project. ...

  2. Single spin asymmetries in lp{yields}hX processes: A test of factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; Prokudin, A.; D'Alesio, U.; Melis, S.; Murgia, F.

    2010-02-01

    Predictions for the transverse single spin asymmetry (SSA), A{sub N}, are given for the inclusive processes lp{sup {up_arrow}{yields}h}X and lp{sup {up_arrow}{yields}j}et+X, which could be measured in operating or future experiments. These estimates are based on the Sivers distributions and the Collins fragmentation functions which fit the azimuthal asymmetries measured in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) processes (lp{sup {up_arrow}{yields}l'}hX). The factorization in terms of transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions (TMD factorization)--which supplies the theoretical framework in which SIDIS azimuthal asymmetries are analyzed--is assumed to hold also for the lp{yields}hX inclusive process at large P{sub T}. A measurement of A{sub N} would then provide a direct test of the validity of the TMD factorization in this case and would have important consequences for the study and understanding of SSAs in pp{sup {up_arrow}{yields}h}X processes.

  3. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR JORDAN COVE LNG L.P. - FE DKT. NO. 13-141-LNG -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORDER 3412 | Department of Energy JORDAN COVE LNG L.P. - FE DKT. NO. 13-141-LNG - ORDER 3412 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR JORDAN COVE LNG L.P. - FE DKT. NO. 13-141-LNG - ORDER 3412 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR JORDAN COVE ENERGY PROJECT, L.P. - FE DKT. NO. 11-127-LNG - ORDER 3041 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR JORDAN COVE ENERGY FE DKT. NO. 12-32-LNG - ORDER 3413 ORDER NO. 3413: Jordan Cove LNG

  4. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond sea breeze

  5. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P.: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 158- Aug. 16, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application from RBC Energy Services L.P. to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice Vol 72 No 158

  6. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P.: Federal Register Notice Volume 74, No. 162- Aug. 24, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application from Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice Volume 74 No 162

  7. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  8. OFF-THE-RECORD COMMUNICATION FOR JORDAN COVE ENERGY PROJECT, L.P., FE DKT. NO. 12-32-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Posting of Off-the-Record CommunicationThe documents linked below were sent to the Department of Energy (DOE) in reference to the Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P., FE Dkt. No. 12-32-LNG proceeding....

  9. Development of a methodology for conducting an integrated HRA/PRA --. Task 1, An assessment of human reliability influences during LP&S conditions PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckas, W.J.; Barriere, M.T.; Brown, W.S.; Wreathall, J.; Cooper, S.E.

    1993-06-01

    During Low Power and Shutdown (LP&S) conditions in a nuclear power plant (i.e., when the reactor is subcritical or at less than 10--15% power), human interactions with the plant`s systems will be more frequent and more direct. Control is typically not mediated by automation, and there are fewer protective systems available. Therefore, an assessment of LP&S related risk should include a greater emphasis on human reliability than such an assessment made for power operation conditions. In order to properly account for the increase in human interaction and thus be able to perform a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) applicable to operations during LP&S, it is important that a comprehensive human reliability assessment (HRA) methodology be developed and integrated into the LP&S PRA. The tasks comprising the comprehensive HRA methodology development are as follows: (1) identification of the human reliability related influences and associated human actions during LP&S, (2) identification of potentially important LP&S related human actions and appropriate HRA framework and quantification methods, and (3) incorporation and coordination of methodology development with other integrated PRA/HRA efforts. This paper describes the first task, i.e., the assessment of human reliability influences and any associated human actions during LP&S conditions for a pressurized water reactor (PWR).

  10. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC- 14-005-CIC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application of Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC to Transfer Control of Long-term Authorization to Export LNG to Free Trade...

  11. Freeport LNG Development, L.P. (Freeport LNG)- Blanket Authorization to Export Previously Imported LNG- FE Dkt. No. 15-103-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed June 25, 2015 by Freeport LNG Development, L.P. (Freeport LNG), requesting blanket authorization to export liquefied...

  12. Emission factors for domestic use of L.P. gas in the metropolitan area of Mexico City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, M.M.; Schifter, I.; Ontiveros, L.E.; Salinas, A.; Moreno, S.; Melgarejo, L.A.; Molina, R.; Krueger, B.

    1998-12-31

    One of the main problems found in air pollution in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City (MAMC) is the presence of high concentrations of ozone at ground level in the atmosphere. The official Mexican standard for ozone concentration in the air (0.11 ppm, one hour, once every 3 years) has been exceeded more than 300 days per year. Ozone is formed due to the emissions of nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons originated from either combustion processes or vapors emanating from fuel handling operations. The results of an evaluation of several domestic devices like stoves and water heaters with L.P. gas as fuel are presented. A method for the evaluation of hydrocarbon emission was developed. A prototype of domestic installation was constructed. The prototype includes L.P. gas tank, domestic stove, water heater, piping and instrumentation. Several combinations of stoves and water heaters were evaluated. The sampling and analysis of hydrocarbons were performed using laboratory equipment originally designed for the evaluation of combustion and evaporative emissions in automobiles: a SHED camera (sealed room equipped with an hydrocarbon analyzer) was used to measure leaks in the prototype of domestic installation and a Constant Volume Sampler (CVS) for the measurement of incomplete combustion emissions. Emission factors were developed for each domestic installation.

  13. ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sea surface temperature The temperature of sea water near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  14. Sea bed mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleath, J.F.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides a discussion on sea bed processes with engineering applications. It brings together the material currently available only in technical reports of research papers. It provides formulae and background references necessary for design calculation of problems such as sea bed or coastal erosion, and sub-marine pipeline stability. It also covers dissipation of wave energy, formation of ripples and dunes, and the transportation of sediments.

  15. Calming Plasma's Stormy Seas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calming Fusion Energy's Stormy Seas Calming Plasma's Stormy Seas Simulations show how overcoming ion instabilities in hot plasma can boost a fusion reactor's energy output April 23, 2014 Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov ITERtokamak.jpg Interior view of the ITER tokamak reactor under construction in Cadarache, France. In a tokamak, turbulence caused by microinstabilities in the plasma can significantly impact energy confinement. Image: ITER Energy researchers continue to make

  16. Salton Sea Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salton Sea Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salton Sea Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Salton Sea Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2...

  17. Terra nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment. Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Save Energy Now Case Study.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terra Nitrogen plant in Verdigris, Oklahoma. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment Industrial Technologies Program Case Study Benefits * Saves approximately $3.5 million annually * Achieves annual natural gas savings of 497,000 MMBtu * Achieves a simple payback of 11 months Key Findings * Accurately quantifying potential energy savings can provide renewed impetus to reduce energy use. * Although Terra Nitrogen actively managed

  18. Giver-LP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Vapor Line Intensity Corrections and Rovibrational Assignment Updates of the Shortwave HITRAN and GEISA Databases L. P. Giver, C. Chackerian, Jr., and D. W. Schwenke National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California R. S. Freedman and M. D. DiRosa Space Physics Research Institute Sunnyvale, California P. Varanasi Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York R. L. Sams Pacific

  19. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas September 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Pilot Study on the Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas August 2014 Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 i Table of Contents 1.

  20. SeaMicro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaMicro Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeaMicro Place: Santa Clara, California Zip: 95054 Product: SeaMicro develops energy efficient server systems and is backed by Khosla...

  1. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  2. Triton Sea Wave Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Triton Sea Wave Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Triton Sea Wave Technologies Address: 22 A Thrakis Zip: 15669 Region: Greece Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year...

  3. SeaVolt Technologies formerly Sea Power Associates | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The company's Wave Rider system, which is still in prototype stages, uses buoys and hydraulic pumps to convert the movement of ocean waves into electricity. References: SeaVolt...

  4. Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-06-01

    Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

  5. North Sea platforms revamped

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hare, J.

    1999-12-01

    Many of the early North Sea platforms are reaching their end-of-field life. Most are still equipped with their original drilling package. In a few cases the package has either been removed or decommissioned. The early installations were designed for much simpler and less demanding wells than the horizontal, extended-reach or designer wells common today. Extended-reach wells now can be drilled realistically from ageing platforms, without incurring massive capital expenditure. This can be achieved using the existing drilling package to the limit of its capabilities and supplementing where necessary with relatively minor upgrades or the use of temporary equipment. Drilling even a few more wells from existing platforms not only prolongs field life, it enables any surplus processing capacity to be made available to develop near-field potential with extended-reach drilling (ERD) or by tying back subsea satellite wells, or for processing third-party fluids. The paper describes well design, surface equipment, mud pumps, shakers and solids control equipment, drill cuttings disposal systems, derrick and hoisting system, top drive and drillstring, downhole equipment, well planning, casing wear, logistics, rig preparations, and ERD vs. subsea tie-backs.

  6. BPA-2013-00946-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    requested the following: All documents, including electronic documents, regarding the Port-Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission (or Sea Breeze) Project. In a phone conversation with...

  7. BPA-2013-01170-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration (BPA). You requested the following: All DOE documents regarding the Port-Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission (or Sea Breeze) Project. The enclosed CD has DOE...

  8. Cenozoic stratigraphic evolution, North Sea and Labrador Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gradstein, F.M.; Grant, A.C.; Mudford, B.S. ); Berggren, W.A. ); Kaminski, M.A. ); D'Lorio, M.A. ); Cloetingh, S. ); Griffiths, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors are studying Cenozoic correlation patterns, burial trends, and subsidence history of the Central North Sea, Labrador, and Orphan basins. The authors objectives are (1) to detail intraregional mid-high latitude biozonations using noise filtering and probabilistic zonation techniques; (2) to detail paleobathymetric trends from basin margins to centers; (3) to apply this knowledge to model basin evolution, in the perspective of the evolving North Atlantic Ocean; (4) to evaluate causes for the occurrence of major hiatuses and rapid changes of subsidence; and (5) to relate rapid changes in sedimentation in the last few millions of years to model observed undercompaction trends. Cenozoic microfossil assemblages in these basins are similar, related to similarities in sedimentary and paleoeceanographic conditions. In more basinal wells, flysch-type agglutinated foraminiferal assemblages occur, also known from Carpathians, Trinidad, and Moroccan foredeeps. Over 90% of agglutinated taxa are common between these basins, although local stratigraphic ranges vary sufficiently to rely on the concept of average ranges, rather than total ones for correlations. Cenozoic stratigraphic resolution in the North Sea and Labrador basins generally is in 3-5-Ma units. and paleobathymetric zonations define a minimum of five niches, from inner shelf to middle slope regimes. Significant hiatuses occurred in the late Eocene through the Miocene, particularly in northern Labrador and northern North Sea. Subsidence in the Labrador/Grand Banks passive margin half grabens was strongly influenced by Labrador Sea opening between anomalies 34 (Campanian) and 13 (early Oligocene), when subsidence exceeded sedimentation and bathyal conditions prevailed along the margin. Thermally induced subsidence in the central North Sea grabens was considerable in the late Paleocene, when the Norwegian Sea started to open.

  9. SEA and DOE Extension Comments

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 North Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 Jan. 8, 2007 Anthony J. Como Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability NEPA Document Manager Re: Nov. 2006 Special Environmental Analysis (SEA) by Dept. of Energy Objections Dear Mr. Como: My first objection to the SEA is DOE's extending the radius of the PM 2.5 and SO2 receptor grid to 36 miles*, thereby also extending the health effects to 240,581 people within the larger geographic area. By doing so, the 4000 people

  10. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sea Level Rise: The rate of sea level rise is one of the largest unknowns in current climate models and requires our advanced ocean and ice sheet models for accurate future ...

  11. Checkmate SeaEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Checkmate SeaEnergy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Checkmate SeaEnergy Address: C O Avon Fabrications Unit 6 Pegasus Way Place: Bowerhill Melksham Zip: SN12 6TR Region: United...

  12. Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, Nicole; Hunke, Elizabeth; Elliott, Scott; Turner, Adrian

    2012-06-18

    Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

  13. ARM - Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating Local Sea Level Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level Objective The objective is to train students' skills in observing the local environment based upon the sea level variations. Materials Each student or group of students will

  14. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Sea Level Data Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data Objective The objective of this activity is to feel the changes of sea level in the past. Materials Each student or group of students will need the following: Graph paper Ruler Pen and

  15. ARM - Lesson Plans: Sea Water and Agriculture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sea Water and Agriculture Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Sea Water and Agriculture Objective The objectives of this activity are to help students to understand that even a small rise in sea level can lead to salinization of valuable agricultural land and to

  16. FNOV SEA-2015-01

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Admi nistrator, National Nuclear Security Administration Wash ington, DC 20585 VIA OVERNIGHT CARRIER Dr. Paul J. Hommert President Sandia Corporation 1515 Eubank SE July 13, 2015 Building 802 I Room 3180 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 SEA-2015-01 (FNOV) Dear Dr. Hommert: ///A *. .,~~~~ llV~~~ National Nuclear Security Administration Pursuant to section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, (the Act) 42 U.S.C. § 2282b, and the Department of Energy (DOE) regulations at 10 C.F.R. Part

  17. Sea quark transverse momentum distributions and dynamical chiral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sea quark transverse momentum distributions and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sea quark transverse momentum distributions and...

  18. MHK Technologies/SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaUrchin Vortex Reaction Turbine.jpg Technology Profile...

  19. MHK Technologies/SeaWEED | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Return to the MHK database homepage SeaWEED.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Grey Island Energy Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Description The Sea...

  20. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

  1. Kent SeaTech Corporation Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaTech Corporation Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kent SeaTech Corporation Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  2. Sociedad Eolica de Andalucia SA SEA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sociedad Eolica de Andalucia SA SEA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sociedad Eolica de Andalucia SA (SEA) Place: San Juan de Aznalfarache, Sevilla, Spain Zip: 41920 Product:...

  3. SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc Carnegie Corporation Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc...

  4. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990)...

  5. SeaTech Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Hydro Product: Florida-based developer and distributor of hydro-electric turbines. References: SeaTech Energy1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  6. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The rate of sea level rise is one of the largest unknowns in current climate models and requires our advanced ocean and ice sheet models for accurate future projections. * Rapid ...

  7. Blue Breezes I & II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Energy Developer Dan MooreJohn Deere Wind Energy Energy Purchaser City of Blue Earth Location City of Blue Earth...

  8. MHK Projects/Breeze Point | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    l":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112009 Project City Fort Adams, MS Project StateProvince Mississippi Project Country United States Project Resource...

  9. New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greater Boston Area Sector: Renewable energy, Services, Solar, Wind energy Product: Solar Panel and Wind Turbine Installation Year Founded: 2006 Phone Number: 978-567-9463...

  10. 'Shifter' Makes Container-based HPC a Breeze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... So this results in much better utilization of our resources. Gerhardt: With scientists from the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) ALICE, ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN, we are ...

  11. FRI EL Sea Power S r l | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FRI EL Sea Power S r l Jump to: navigation, search Name: FRI EL Sea Power S r l Address: Piazza del Grano 3 Place: Bolzano Zip: 39100 Region: Italy Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  12. SeaNergy Electric Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaNergy Electric Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeaNergy Electric Ltd Region: Israel Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and...

  13. SeaWest Energy Group Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location Altamont Pass CA Coordinates 37.7347, -121.652 Show Map...

  14. SeaWest Windfarms Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location Altamont Pass CA Coordinates 37.7347, -121.652 Show Map...

  15. The Geysers and Salton Sea Geothermal Fields | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Case Study: The Geysers and Salton Sea Geothermal Fields Author Jeffrey W. Adams Published...

  16. Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will present a process for developing community-based sea level rise projections and facilitating their use.

  17. ARM - What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels? Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels? As the northern polar zone warms up, sea ice could melt (very probable) and the sea/ice interface could retreat to the north. This is likely to

  18. Microsoft Word - SEA_MAPAR_2001.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for 2001 February 20, 2002 Prepared by: Department of Energy Office of Los Alamos Site Operations National Nuclear Security Administration SEA Mitigation Action Plan 2001 Annual Report February 20, 2001 iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS .............................................................................................................................................. iv 1.0

  19. BPA-2013-01170-FOIACorrespondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agency about your request. You requested the following: All DOE documents regarding the Port-Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission (or Sea Breeze) Project. DOE is forwarding all of...

  20. BPA-2013-00946-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    97208 -2tf3 0 4 9,4& - F Re: Freedom of Information Act Request: Documents Regarding Port-Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission (or Sea Breeze) Project Dear Ms. Munro: Pursuant to...

  1. BPA-2013-01170-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 3c21 MAy 1 2013 3 ZAI Re: Freedom of Information Act Request: Documents Regarding Port-Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission (or Sea Breeze) Project (OE Docket No PP-299) Dear...

  2. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and sea-breeze effects and topographically generated clouds. Installing state-of-the-art instruments on a cruise ship that operates in an area of climate sensitivity, is an...

  3. Theory versus practice in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobos, Víctor; Partidario, Maria

    2014-09-15

    Could the theory of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) be ahead of its time and decoupled from its practice? This paper evolved in search for this leading research question. Over the years the discourse on SEA experienced a gradual shift from the technocratic and rationalist thinking that supported its origin to more strategic approaches and integrated concepts, suggested since the mid 1990's. In this paper we share the results of our analysis of international thinking and practical experience with SEA. Results reveal that SEA practice changes very slowly when compared to advanced thinking supporting the noted shift. Current SEA practice shows to be still predominantly rooted in the logic of projects' environmental impact assessment (EIA). It is strongly bound to legal and regulatory requirements, and the motivation for its application persists being the delivery of environmental (or final) reports to meet legal obligations. Even though advanced SEA theoretical thinking claim its potential to help decisions to look forward, change mind-sets and the rationale of decision-making to meet sustainability challenges and enhance societal values, we note a weak relationship between the theoretical development of SEA and its practice. Why is this happening? Which factors explain this apparent inertia, resistance to change, in the SEA practice? Results appear to demonstrate the influence of assumptions, understandings, concepts, and beliefs in the use of SEA, which in turn suggest the political sensitivity of the instrument. - Highlights: • Theoretical thinking in SEA is ahead of its time. • SEA international practice reveals inertia to move out of project’ EIA comfort zone. • World current SEA practice show similar understandings of 30 years ago. • 100 world reports and survey of practitioners supported world review. • SEA great challenge is to change paradigms into new scientific complexity theories.

  4. Glider communications and controls for the sea sentry mission. (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Glider communications and controls for the sea sentry mission. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Glider communications and controls for the sea sentry mission. This report describes a system level study on the use of a swarm of sea gliders to detect, confirm and kill littoral submarine threats. The report begins with a description of the problem and derives the probability of detecting a constant speed threat without networking. It was concluded that glider

  5. ARM - Lesson Plans: When Floating Ice Melts in the Sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When Floating Ice Melts in the Sea Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: When Floating Ice Melts in the Sea Objective The objective is to investigate the effect on sea level due to the melting of floating ice due to global warming. Materials Each student or group of

  6. Sea quark transverse momentum distributions and dynamical chiral symmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    breaking (Conference) | SciTech Connect Sea quark transverse momentum distributions and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sea quark transverse momentum distributions and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking Recent theoretical studies have provided new insight into the intrinsic transverse momentum distributions of valence and sea quarks in the nucleon at a low scale. The valence quark transverse momentum distributions (q - qbar) are governed by the

  7. Sea quark transverse momentum distributions and dynamical chiral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The qualitative difference between valence and sea quark intrinsic psub T. distributions ... May 2013 Publisher: World Scientific Research Org: Thomas Jefferson National ...

  8. Water Sampling At Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton...

  9. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for centuries to come August 5, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, Lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 washington.jpg Because seawater absorbs heat more slowly than the atmosphere above it, our oceans won't feel the full impact of the greenhouse gases already in the air for hundreds of years. Warm water expands, raising sea levels. (Courtesy W.

  10. MHK Projects/Leancon Real Sea Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Leancon Real Sea Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADM...

  11. Multispectral Imaging At Salton Sea Area (Reath, Et Al., 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor ASTER Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes ASTER References K. A. Reath,...

  12. Hyperspectral Imaging At Salton Sea Area (Reath, Et Al., 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Area Exploration Technique Hyperspectral Imaging Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor SEBASS Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes SEBASS References K. A. Reath, M....

  13. SeaWest WindPower Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    planning & permitting, project finance, construction managment, operation & maintenance etc. References: SeaWest WindPower Inc1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  14. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Sonia; Barnett, Jon; Fincher, Ruth; Hurlimann, Anna; Mortreux, Colette; Waters, Elissa

    2013-07-15

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the lived values of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  15. Structural elements of the Sulu Sea, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinz, K.; Block, M.; Kudrass, H.R.; Meyer, H. , Hannover )

    1994-07-01

    The structure and tectonic history of the Sulu Sea are described on the basis of seismic reflection data combined with the findings of onshore and offshore geological studies, and the results of ODP Leg 124 drilling. Closing of a hypothetical Mesozoic proto-South China Sea associated with the formation of oceanic crustal splinters in the late Eocene followed by southward subduction and, in turn, progressive collision of the north Palawan continental terrane with the micro-continental Borneo plate since the middle Miocene, resulted in the formation of the structurally complex Sulu-Borneo collision belt. The latter comprises north Sabah, southern and central Palawan, and the northwest Sulu basin. Fracturing of the Borneo micro-continental plate into the Sulu and Cagayan ridges initiated the opening of the southeast Sulu basin during the late Oligocene through the early Miocene. Collision of the north Palawan continental terrane with Cagayan Ridge in the late early Miocene and oblique collision of these blocks with the central Philippines resulted in the still ongoing closing of the southeast Sulu basin since the middle or late Miocene. Closing of the southeast Sulu basin began with the formation of an oceanic crustal slab.

  16. Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Sea Grant has partnered with the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe and Adaptation International to develop local sea level rise projections and sea level scenario maps for the Jamestown S...

  17. Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2013-07-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

  18. Slim Holes At Salton Sea Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salton Sea Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Salton Sea Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010)...

  19. AES Eastern Energy LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  20. Calpine Energy Services LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 2857 Utility Location Yes Ownership W Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  1. The growing world LP-gas supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoare, M.C.

    1988-11-01

    The possible range of future (LPG) export availabilities is huge, but actual production levels depend on factors, many of which are beyond our direct control - world demand for crude oil and gas, developments in technology, and the price of both energy in general and LPG specifically. Although these factors limit some of the potential developments, a substantial increase in LPG supply is certain, and this is likely to depress its price relative to other products. Over the last few years, a dramatic expansion has taken place in the industry. From 1980 to 1987, non-Communist world production of LPG increased by close to 35%, to a total of 115 million tonnes. If this is set against the general energy scene, LPG represented 3.7% of crude oil production by weight in 1980, rising to 5.4% in 1987. This growth reflects rise in consciousness around the world of the value of the product. LPG is no longer regarded as a byproduct, which is flared or disposed of at low value, but increasingly as a co-product, and much of the growth in production has been due to the installation of tailored recovery systems. LPG markets historically developed around sources of supply, constrained by the costs of transportation. The major exceptions, of course, were the Middle East, the large exporter, and Japan, the large importer.

  2. CPL Retail Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 13151 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a...

  3. Sharyland Utilities LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 17008 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC ERCOT Yes NERC SPP Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  4. Simple Power, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Phone Number: 1.800.692.4776 Website: www.cirroenergy.com Twitter: @cirroenergytx Facebook: https:www.facebook.comCirroEnergy Outage Hotline: 1.800.692.4776 References:...

  5. Spark Energy, LP (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number: 1-877-547-7275 Website: www.sparkenergy.comenhome Twitter: @SparkEnergy Facebook: https:www.facebook.comSparkEnergy Outage Hotline: 1-800-592-2000 References: EIA...

  6. Wood Fuel LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    77034 Region: Texas Area Sector: Biomass Product: Wood by-products consulting and marketing Website: www.woodfuel.com Coordinates: 29.6221328, -95.1872605 Show Map Loading...

  7. Mega Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    56247 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  8. Plymouth Cogeneration LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 15112 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates No Rates Available References ...

  9. Pasadena Cogneration LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 11059 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates No Rates Available References ...

  10. EA-368_BEM_LP_CN.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  11. Salton Sea Power Plant Recognized as Most Innovative Geothermal Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Salton Sea Power Plant Recognized as Most Innovative Geothermal Project Salton Sea Power Plant Recognized as Most Innovative Geothermal Project February 10, 2013 - 3:32pm Addthis The first power plant to be built in the Salton Sea area in 20 years was recognized in December by Power Engineering magazine as the most innovative geothermal project of the year. Sixty miles east of San Diego, the area holds one of the highest temperature resources for geothermal energy, with

  12. SeaEnergy PLC formerly Seaenergy Renewables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy investment firm Ramco Energy Plc, set up to develop, own and operate offshore wind farms. References: SeaEnergy PLC (formerly Seaenergy Renewables)1 This article is a...

  13. SeaTac, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SeaTac is a city in King County, Washington. It falls under Washington's 7th congressional district and...

  14. SeaWest do Brasil Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    do Brasil Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeaWest do Brasil Ltda Place: Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind farm developer and...

  15. V-096: Mozilla Thunderbird / SeaMonkey Multiple Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A weakness and multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in Mozilla Thunderbird and SeaMonkey, which can be exploited by malicious people to disclose potentially sensitive information, conduct spoofing attacks, bypass certain security restrictions, and compromise a user's system.

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - MPL Measurements, Norwegian Young sea...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MPL Measurements, Norwegian Young sea ICE cruise 2014.10.01 - 2015.07.09 Lead...

  17. SeaWest Northwest Asset Holdings LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Holdings LLC Place: Oregon Sector: Wind energy Product: Part owner and operator of the Condon Wind Project. References: SeaWest Northwest Asset Holdings LLC1 This article is a...

  18. Imperial Sea View Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capacity 0.20x106 Btuhr 0.060 MWt Annual Generation 1.20x109 Btuyr 0.40 GWhyr Load Factor 0.68 References Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center1 Imperial Sea...

  19. Continuous sea-floor spreading in Red Sea: an alternative interpretation of magnetic anomaly pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Brecque, J.L.; Zitellini

    1985-04-01

    The magnetic anomaly pattern over the Red Sea can be modeled as a continuous system of sea-floor spreading from the early Miocene to the present by using a timevarying process filter. The half spreading rate is approximately 1 cm/yr (0.4 in./yr) since initial rifting. The parameters that determine the process filter and development of the transition zone are the intrusion parameter (a measure of the dispersion of feeder dikes or horizontal strain about the rift axis), a flow parameter (a measure of the average flow width), and the effusion parameter (a measure of the volcanic effusion and thickness of layer 2). The authors estimate the flow parameter to be 2.7km(1.7 mi) and the intrusion parameter to be 7.5km(4.7 mi) at early rifting. These values suggest that a wide distribution of axial dikes or horizontal strain is the dominant factor in forming the magnetic anomaly pattern. Reduction in the width of the intrusion parameter and the effusion rate as rifting proceeded resulted in focusing of the strain, thinning of layer 2, and formation of the Red Sea deeps. Their modeling suggests that phase 2, or the stratoid phase, began about the time of anomaly 5C or chron C5C approximately 16 Ma. This age is compatible with geologic estimates of the initial rifting at the late Oligocene to early Miocene (Coleman, 1974; Gass, 1977). The opening rate for Africa-Arabia plate motion has remained relatively constant since early rifting although the African margin appears to be accreting faster than the Arabian plate.

  20. SEA-04: Special Environmental Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEA-04: Special Environmental Analysis SEA-04: Special Environmental Analysis Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating Station in Alexandria, Virginia On December 20, 2005, the Secretary of Energy issued an emergency order, DOE Order 202-05-03, requiring Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station in Alexandria, Virginia, to operate under limited circumstances. On September 28, 2006, the Secretary extended the Order,

  1. Sea urchins have teeth? A review of their microstructure,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biomineralization, development and mechanical properties (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Sea urchins have teeth? A review of their microstructure, biomineralization, development and mechanical properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sea urchins have teeth? A review of their microstructure, biomineralization, development and mechanical properties Authors: Stock, Stuart R. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (NWU) [NWU Publication Date: 2014-07-15 OSTI Identifier: 1132110 Resource

  2. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    XCL-2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2 Presented here is the complete genome sequence ofThiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitouschemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-seahydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single

  3. SeaOne Gulfport, LLC (formerly known as SeaOne Pascaguola, LLC)- FE Dkt. No. 14-83-CGL

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on June 3, 2014, by SeaOne Pascagoula, LLC requesting long-term multi-contract authorization to export Compressed Gas...

  4. Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2010-04-01

    Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

  5. North Sea development action brisk; plays expand elsewhere off Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, D.J.

    1996-08-19

    The North Sea may be a mature play, but operators are continually searching for new ways to develop small finds near existing infrastructure and to develop discoveries in new areas at low cost. As they fill in gaps in the North Sea oil and gas infrastructure, companies are also exploring and planning developments in new plays such as the U.K.`s West of Shetlands area, the Irish Sea, and the Atlantic Margin from off western Ireland to northern Norway. Floating production systems and subsea technology are vital parts of many of Northwest Europe`s recently sanctioned field developments, for both large and small reservoirs. The paper discusses the dominant role of floating production units, the niche for subsea developments, new production, the Harding field, the Schieballion and Clair fields (UK), Norway`s plans, the Elgin/Franklin field, small fields, frontier work, in-field projects, flexible floating platforms, deepwater technology, a gas monotower, and subsea control.

  6. Horizontal well replaces hydraulic fracturing in North Sea gas well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Seymour, K.P. )

    1991-11-25

    This paper reports on excessive water production from hydraulically fractured wells in a poor quality reservoir in the North SEa which prompted the drilling of a horizontal well. Gas production from the horizontal well reached six times that of the offset vertical wells, and no water production occurred. This horizontal well proved commercial the western section of the Anglia field. Horizontal drilling in the North SEa is as an effective technology to enhance hydrocarbon recovery from reservoirs that previously had proven uncommercial with other standard techniques. It is viable for the development of marginal reservoirs, particularly where conditions preclude stimulation from hydraulic fracturing.

  7. MHK Technologies/FRI El Sea Power System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FRI El Sea Power System.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization FRI EL Sea Power S r l Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description The device is...

  8. MHK Technologies/SeaRaser buoy seawater pump | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaRaser buoy seawater pump < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaRaser buoy seawater pump.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  9. Land-ice modeling for sea-level prediction (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Land-ice modeling for sea-level prediction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Land-ice modeling for sea-level prediction Authors: Lipscomb, William H 1 ...

  10. Objections to the Nov. 2006 Special Environmental Analysis (SEA) by the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy from Elizabeth C. Chimento | Department of Energy Objections to the Nov. 2006 Special Environmental Analysis (SEA) by the Department of Energy from Elizabeth C. Chimento Objections to the Nov. 2006 Special Environmental Analysis (SEA) by the Department of Energy from Elizabeth C. Chimento Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-07-02: Re: Nov. 2006 Special Environmental Analysis (SEA) by Dept. of Energy Objections: My first objection to the SEA is DOE's extending the radius

  11. Public participation in and learning through SEA in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Heidi; Sinclair, A. John; Spaling, Harry

    2014-02-15

    Meaningful public engagement is a challenging, but promising, feature of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) due to its potential for integrating sustainability principles into policies, plans and programs in developing countries such as Kenya. This research examined two selected SEA case studies to identify the extent of participation, learning outcomes attributable to participation, and if any learning outcomes led to social action for sustainability at the community level. Strengths across the two cases were the inclusion of marginalized populations and consideration of socio-economic concerns. Consistent weaknesses included inadequate notice, document inaccessibility, lack of feedback and communication, and late analysis of alternatives. Despite some learning conditions being unfulfilled, examples of instrumental, communicative, and transformative learning were identified through a focus group and semi-structured interviews with community participants and public officials. Some of these learning outcomes led to individual and social actions that contribute to sustainability. -- Highlights: • The strengths and weaknesses of Kenyan SEA public participation processes were identified. • Multiple deficiencies in the SEA process likely frustrate meaningful public engagement. • Participant learning was observed despite process weaknesses. • Participant learning can lead to action for sustainability at the community level.

  12. Sediment volume in the north polar sand seas of Mars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, N.; Greeley, R. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA))

    1990-07-10

    Data from studies of the cross-sectional area of terrestrial transverse dunes have been combined with maps of dune morphometry derived from Viking orbiter images to generate new estimates of sediment thickness and dune sediment volume in the north polar sand seas of Mars. A relationship between dune spacing and equivalent sediment thickness (EST) was developed from field data on Namibian and North American dunes and was applied to data on dune spacing and dune cover measured on Viking orbiter images to generate maps of dune sediment thickness for Martian north polar sand seas. There are four major sand seas in the north polar region of Mars, covering an area of 6.8 x 10{sup 5} km{sup 2}. Equivalent sediment thickness ranges between 0.5 and 6.1 m with a mean of 1.8 m. The sand seas contain a total of 1158 km{sup 3} of dune sediment, which may have been derived by erosion of polar layered deposits and concentrated in its present location by winds that change direction seasonally.

  13. Towards SEA for the developing nations of Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briffett, Clive; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip; Mackee, Jamie

    2003-03-01

    In the developing and transitional countries of Asia, environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been widely practiced as a planning tool that identifies the potential impacts associated with developments and determines their level of significance and the need for mitigating measures. Not withstanding its extensive use in many Asian countries, certain limitations are now being increasingly recognised with regard to achieving sustainable development within the planning process. It is also noted that the natural environment in Asia has continued to be severely degraded despite the adoption of EIA. This research project was undertaken at the National University of Singapore to review the status on the implementation of EIA procedures and to investigate the status and potential of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in Asia. The research project generally investigated the existing physical attributes of six countries including Hong Kong and Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Vietnam and discussed their prevailing environmental conditions. It more specifically reviewed policymaking and environmental planning, environmental legislation and the practice and procedures of environmental impact assessment. It also evaluated environmental assessment education and training activities. In some cases such as Hong Kong, an opportunity to analyse actual SEA practice was included. In other cases, the potential for possible take up of formal SEA was assessed. A comparative review assesses the degree to which EIA and SEA procedures have been utilized, considers how the use of SEA could overcome the deficiencies of the EIA project-based system and includes aspects of meeting sustainability criteria. Results show that the use and application of EIA is relatively strong across all countries with the possible exception of Singapore which relies more heavily on its planning and control system to address potential environmental impacts arising from development projects. Despite this, EIAs have been undertaken in every country due to aid and bank lending agencies requiring them and multinational companies and many local NGOs completing voluntary EIAs. Even though the mandatory introduction of EIA into some countries is fairly recent such as Hong Kong (1999) and Vietnam (1994), efforts to conduct such investigations may have started many years before. The country reviews highlight many common problems and adverse influences that give rise to inadequate EIA practice, and in some cases, recommendations for improvement are proposed. The potential for SEA is assessed on the basis of its present usage which is generally small except for Hong Kong and the environmental strategic decision-making that is being conducted in policy, plan and programme formulations. While the more comprehensive and well-refined westernized model of SEA is generally weakly implemented at present, there is evidence to suggest that Agenda 21, along with other international treaties such as the Biodiversity Charter and the Ramsar Convention, has motivated certain sustainability initiatives that are resulting in increased environmental considerations at a strategic level. In some cases, these may be reflected in National Plan policymaking or in the sector and area-based activities of various ministries and departments. It is concluded that SEA potential is generally strong in those countries with smaller centralized bureaucracies but that its successful implementation will be highly dependent on changing the mind-sets and motivations of top personnel at ministerial level.

  14. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project Archival Reference, Final Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-03-13

    This report provides an archival reference to the scientific information and other pertinent documents and materials associated with the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSDP). This archiving process ensures that valuable technical data and information obtained during the life of the project can be retrieved, organized and maintained as a historical record for future reference. This paper describes the background of the project and the process used for archiving the materials. [DJE-2005

  15. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Link in New York Times Blog by Nena Moss on Mon, Mar 23, 2009 A document made available by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) was recently linked in the New York Times City Room? blog article "Answers about New York's Weather, Part 3". It was included with the answer to "How strong can an Atlantic sea breeze get? Is there Long Island Sound sea breeze?" posted by Joseph. The document,

  16. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Metropolitan Areas (September 2014) | Department of Energy Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas (September 2014) Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas (September 2014) The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released findings of a pilot study that explores the feasibility of assessing the impacts of sea level rise on energy infrastructure. The goal of the study was to develop a

  17. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Metropolitan Areas (September 2014) | Department of Energy The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released findings of a pilot study that explores the feasibility of assessing the impacts of sea level rise on energy infrastructure. The goal of the study was to develop a method to identify energy facilities exposed to sea level rise (SLR) through 2100 that is flexible and scalable, uses existing and robust data sources, accounts for global and local sea level changes,

  18. Notice of Violation, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, SEA-2011-01 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Notice of Violation, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, SEA-2011-01 Notice of Violation, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, SEA-2011-01 April 18, 2011 Issued to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC related to Classified Information Introduced into Unapproved Information Systems at the Idaho National Laboratory On April 18, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement issued a Final Notice of Violation (SEA-2011-01) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC in accordance

  19. Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is tasked with assessing risk from all hazards to the nation's energy infrastructure. As part of our commitment to understand the risks from climate change and extreme events and help

  20. Patterns of Nitrogen Utilization in Deep-Sea Syntrophic Consortia (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2011-04-26

    Victoria Orphan from Caltech discusses "Patterns of nitrogen utilization in deep-sea syntrophic consortia" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  1. Sea urchins have teeth? A review of their microstructure,biomineraliz...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A review of their microstructure, biomineralization, development and mechanical properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sea urchins have teeth? A review of their ...

  2. Observed hemispheric asymmetry in global sea ice changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalieri, D.J.; Gloersen, P.; Parkinson, C.L.; Comiso, J.C.; Zwally, H.J.

    1997-11-07

    From November 1978 through December 1996, the areal extent of sea ice decreased by 2.9 {+-} 0.4 percent decade in the Arctic and increased by 1.3 {+-} 0.2 percent per decade in the Antarctic. The observed hemispheric asymmetry in these trends is consistent with a modeled response to a carbon dioxide-induced climate warming. The interannual variations, which are 2.3 percent of the annual mean in the Arctic, with a predominant period of about 5 years, and 3.4 percent of the annual mean in the Antarctic, with a predominant period of about 3 years, are uncorrelated. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    XCL-2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 Authors: Scott, Kathleen M [1] ; Sievert, Stefan M [2] ; Abril, Fereniki N [1] ; Ball, Lois A [1] ; Barrett, Chantell J [1] ; Blake, Rodrigo A [1] ; Boller, Amanda J [1] ; Chain, Patrick S [3] ; Clark, Justin A [1] ; Davis, Carisa R [1] ; Detter, J C [4] ; Do, Kimberly F [1] ; Dobrinski, Kimberly P

  4. New Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach That Can Help Communities Assess Possible Impact of Sea Level Rise on Energy Assets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of our commitment to improve the resilience of our electric grid in the face of extreme weather events, OE has released findings of a pilot study that explores the feasibility of assessing the impacts of sea level rise on energy infrastructure. The goal of our study was to develop a method to identify energy facilities exposed to sea level rise (SLR) through 2100 that is flexible and scalable, uses existing and robust data sources, accounts for global and local sea level changes, and can incorporate results from regional studies.

  5. The role of SEA in integrating and balancing high policy objectives in European cohesion funding programmes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiricka, Alexandra Proebstl, Ulrike

    2013-01-15

    Funding programmes for European cohesion policy are a crucial tool to support the sustainability goals of the European Union and national policies of its member states. All these funding programmes require a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) to enhance sustainable development. This article compares five first SEA applications at cohesion policy level to discuss challenges, limitations and benefits of this instrument. In order to support the SEA-process a 'Handbook on SEA for Cohesion Policy 2007-13' (GRDP 2006) was developed. The paper examines the special requirements and challenges at the programme level given the special conditions for stakeholder involvement, integration of SEA in the programme development process and strategies to cope with uncertainties to ensure real compatibility with policy goals. Using action research and in-depth interviews with SEA planners and programme managers enabled us to analyse the suitability of the methodology proposed by the handbook. The results show that some recommendations of the handbook should be changed in order to increase the transparency and to enhance the standard and comparability of the SEA-documents. Overall the SEA proved to be a rather successful tool for the integration of sustainability goals at the EU and national policy levels. Its particular strengths emerged as the process makes uncertainties visible and leads to possible redefinitions while maintaining actual policy goals. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparing five case studies of first applications of SEA at cohesion policy level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall the SEA proved to be a rather successful tool for the integration of sustainability goals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study makes uncertainties visible and shows how SEA could lead to possible redefinitions.

  6. Vulnerability of the US to future sea level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies); White, T.W.; Cushman, R.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The differential vulnerability of the conterminous United States to future sea level rise from greenhouse climate warming is assessed, using a coastal hazards data base. This data contains information on seven variables relating to inundation and erosion risks. High risk shorelines are characterized by low relief, erodible substrate, subsidence, shoreline retreat, and high wave/tide energies. Very high risk shorelines on the Atlantic Coast (Coastal Vulnerability Index {ge}33.0) include the outer coast of the Delmarva Peninsula, northern Cape Hatteras, and segments of New Jersey, Georgia and South Carolina. Louisiana and sections of Texas are potentially the most vulnerable, due to anomalously high relative sea level rise and erosion, coupled with low elevation and mobile sediments. Although the Pacific Coast is generally the least vulnerable, because of its rugged relief and erosion-resistant substrate, the high geographic variability leads to several exceptions, such as the San Joaquin-Sacramento Delta area, the barrier beaches of Oregon and Washington, and parts of the Puget Sound Lowlands. 31 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Fermilab E866 (NuSea) Figures and Data Plots

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    None

    The NuSea Experiment at Fermilab studied the internal structure of protons, in particular the difference between up quarks and down quarks. This experiment also addressed at least two other physics questions: nuclear effects on the production of charmonia states (bound states of charm and anti-charm quarks) and energy loss of quarks in nuclei from Drell-Yan measurements on nuclei. While much of the NuSea data are available only to the collaboration, figures, data plots, and tables are presented as stand-alone items for viewing or download. They are listed in conjunction with the published papers, theses, or presentations in which they first appeared. The date range is 1998 to 2008. To see these figures and plots, click on E866 publications or go directly to http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/papers.html. Theses are at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866theses/e866theses.html and the presentations are found at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866talks/e866talks.html. Many of the items are postscript files.

  8. SeaStar: Subsea cluster manifold system design and installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, P.G.T.; Upchurch, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The SeaStar Cluster Manifold system was engineered as a low cost alternative to larger and more expensive completion template designs. Utilizing field-proven equipment and installation techniques, it was the first of its kind to be installed in the Gulf of Mexico. The Cluster Manifold system allows the connection of flowlines from adjacent satellite wells and numerous infield flowlines consisting of export, service, and methanol lines. With new technological advances, and a variety of flowline connection systems on the market today, deep water completions are being used with increasing frequency. Subsea operations are becoming more routine and installation times are being reduced. The SeaStar system was successfully installed in Garden Banks Block 70/71 in the Gulf of Mexico during the first quarter of 1995. Currently two 4 x 2-in. 10,000 psi lay-away trees are installed and connected to the manifold. Production is being processed at a Marathon platform in Vermilion Block 386B approximately 13.5 miles away from the subsea installation.

  9. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Command | Department of Energy Naval Sea Systems Command 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea Systems Command PDF icon fewm13_nswcphiladelphia_highres.pdf PDF icon fewm13_nswcphiladelphia.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005670: Categorical Exclusion Determination U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 1 EIS-0259: Record of Decision

  10. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  11. Downhole fluid sampling at the SSSDP (Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project) California State 2-14 well, Salton Sea, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Grigsby, C.O.; Dennis, B.

    1987-07-01

    In situ fluid sampling activities were conducted at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) well during late December 1985 and late March 1986 to obtain unflashed samples of Salton Sea brine. In late December, three sampling runs were made to depths of approximately 1800 m and temperatures of 300/sup 0/C. In late March, 10 sampling runs were made to depths of approximately 3150 m and temperatures of 350/sup 0/C. In brief, the Los Alamos tool obtained samples from four of eight runs; the Lawrence Berkeley tool obtained samples from one of one run; the Leutert Instruments, Inc., tool obtained samples from zero of three runs; and the USGS quartz crystal experiment was lost in the well. The most complete sample was obtained from run No. 11, using the Los Alamos sampler and Sandia battery pack/controller on a wireline. About 1635 ml of brine, two noble gas samples, and two bulk gas samples were collected from this run. Samples of brine and gas from productive runs have been distributed to about 15 researchers for various types of analyses. Chemical analyses by the Los Alamos and US Geological Survey analytical teams are presented in this report, although they are not corrected for flashing and precipitation.

  12. Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

    2008-01-11

    It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment in the Salton Sea Basin is the subject of the project described in this report. Much of the project work was done in cooperation with the US Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region Office ('Reclamation'), which manages the Salton Sea Restoration project for the US Department of the Interior, and complements other recent assessment efforts (e.g., Imperial County, 1995). In this context, the notion of groundwater availability is defined by four separate, but interrelated concepts or components: (1) Volume and Capacity--This refers to the volume of groundwater available in storage in (or the related storage capacity of) the sediments and geologic media that comprise a groundwater basin. The volume of groundwater in a basin will vary in time as a function of recharge, well production, and land subsidence. (2) Producibility--This refers to the ease or difficulty of extracting groundwater in a basin from wells. Groundwater producibility will be affected by well depth and the formation permeability surrounding the open intervals in wells. (3) Quality--This refers to the extent that water produced from wells is potable or otherwise suitable for domestic or other uses. It may also refer to the chemical compositions of groundwater that are unrelated to potability or suitability issues. Groundwater quality will be affected by its residence time and flow pathway in the formation and will also be influenced by the quality of its original source before entering the groundwater regime. (4) Renewability and Recharge--This refers to the extent that groundwater is recharged to the basin as part of the natural hydrologic cycle or other artificial means. Groundwater renewability is normally a function of recharge derived from precipitation (and thus a function of regional climate), but may also be affected in local areas by irrigation, leaking canals, aquifer storage and recovery operations, and so forth. Along with the other factors, renewability will strongly affect how much water can be safely produced from a basin from one year to the next. In this report, we specificall

  13. Weakening of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex by Arctic Sea-Ice Loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Baek-Min; Son, Seok-Woo; Min, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Joong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Shim, Taehyoun; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-09-02

    Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere. Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea ice, the mechanism that links sea ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate. Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere. We find that decreased sea ice cover during early winter months (November-December), especially over the Barents-Kara seas, enhance the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the stratospheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January- February). The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes.

  14. Detecting terrorist nuclear weapons at sea: The 10th door problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaughter, D R

    2008-09-15

    While screening commercial cargo containers for the possible presence of WMD is important and necessary smugglers have successfully exploited the many other vehicles transporting cargo into the US including medium and small vessels at sea. These vessels provide a venue that is currently not screened and widely used. Physics limits that make screening of large vessels prohibitive impractical do not prohibit effective screening of the smaller vessels. While passive radiation detection is probably ineffective at sea active interrogation may provide a successful approach. The physics limits of active interrogation of ships at sea from standoff platforms are discussed. Autonomous platforms that could carry interrogation systems at sea, both airborne and submersible, are summarized and their utilization discussed. An R&D program to investigate the limits of this approach to screening ships at sea is indicated and limitations estimated.

  15. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Multifamily Performance Program-- Sea Park East 150 kW CHP System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of Sea Park East 150 kilowatt (kW) Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System in Brooklyn, New York

  16. Development of a geotechnical and pile driving database, Adriatic Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpaneto, R.; Paoletti, L.; Guaita, P.; Pratico, A.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents a geotechnical and pile driving data base relevant to offshore installations in the Adriatic Sea. The paper discusses sources of information, structure, content, and engineering applications of the data base. Data available from Agip`s platform installations in the Adriatic was reviewed, and 20 representative platforms were chosen. Two relational data bases were created, for geotechnical and installation data respectively. The data bases provide a comprehensive and organized source of information about past experience in the area. Such experience is now quickly available for geotechnical engineering activities. As a main application of the data bases, information was processed to make data sets for training Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to predict pile driveability. It is envisioned that the data bases will also be used in ongoing installation program design.

  17. The Triton project -- A North Sea subsea challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    Three companies--Amerada Hess Ltd., Shell Expro (a 50/50 joint partnership between Shell and Esso) and Texaco--have joined forces in a project that will combine their expertise. The Triton project will allow three fields (Bittern, Guillemot West and Gullemot Northwest) to be developed simultaneously using subsea technology, with the wellheads on the seafloor and 68 miles (110 km) of flowlines taking oil and gas produced from the fields to a central floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel. These fields are located in the central area of the North Sea, about 118 miles from Aberdeen in 295 ft of water. The paper discusses the development of the fields, subsea technology, technical challenges, laying the pipeline, and project completion.

  18. Satellite subsea development starts up in North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-23

    New subsea technology, horizontal drilling, and the existing North Sea infrastructure allowed BP Exploration Operating Co. ltd. to develop the Newsham field, a small 1967 gas discovery. Estimated originally in place recoverable reserves are 1.36 billion cu m (48 bcf). The development is in 30 m of water (98 ft) and the subsea well is tied-back to the West Sole pipeline system. The development included: converting a mudline suspension system to a subsea wellhead; deploying a horizontal subsea tree; producing gas from a subsea wellhead; deploying the subsea tree from a jack up drilling rig; installing an over-trawlable wellhead protection structure. The paper discusses field development, design, drilling, wellhead conversion, and subsea completion.

  19. Shallow drilling in the Salton Sea region: The thermal anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1988-11-10

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The central thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 /sup 0/C/m) to extreme (0.83 /sup 0/C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is greater than 600 mW/m/sup 2/ and in the two local anomalies exceeds 1200 mW/m/sup 2/. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes.

  20. Shallow Drilling In The Salton Sea Region, The Thermal Anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R. L.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Younker, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 C/m) to extreme (0.83 C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is >600 mW/m{sup 2} and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m{sup 2}. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes. These observations of the thermal anomaly provide important constraints for models of the circulation of the hydrothermal system. Thermal budgets based on a simple model for this hydrothermal system indicate that the heat influx rate for local ''hot spots'' in the region may be large enough to account for the rate of heat flux from the entire Salton Trough.

  1. Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

  2. EIS-0378: Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmission Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses DOE decision to approve the Sea Breeze Transmission project for a Presidential permit for through DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and for approval for interconnection into the federal transmission system through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  3. Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community Earth

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    System Model (Conference) | SciTech Connect Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community Earth System Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community Earth System Model Coastal stakeholders need defensible predictions of 21st century sea-level rise (SLR). IPCC assessments suggest 21st century SLR of {approx}0.5 m under aggressive emission scenarios. Semi-empirical models project SLR of {approx}1 m or more

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sea-Tac and Alaska Air Group Achieve

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Sky-High Results with Electric Ground Support Equipment Sea-Tac and Alaska Air Group Achieve Sky-High Results with Electric Ground Support Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sea-Tac and Alaska Air Group Achieve Sky-High Results with Electric Ground Support Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sea-Tac and Alaska Air Group Achieve Sky-High Results with Electric Ground Support Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data

  5. SEA effectiveness criteria-equally valid in all countries? The case of Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Thomas B. . E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk; Gazzola, Paola

    2006-05-15

    Recent years have seen the introduction of various sets of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) effectiveness criteria in the professional international literature. Content analysis of key international SEA publications suggest that these have been developed based on the experiences of a selected number of countries only, and to date, the question whether they are fully valid in all systems and countries world-wide has not been addressed sufficiently, yet. In this context, the paper discusses the validity of effectiveness criteria for Italy, a country from which authors have only contributed to a very limited extent to the international SEA literature. It is concluded that, particularly in the light of experiences with a 'flexible', but ineffective EIA system, in Italy SEA needs to be applied in a systematic and rigorous manner, aided by strong enforcement mechanisms.

  6. Resolving Carbon's Rainbow from Uplands to the Deep-sea | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resolving Carbon's Rainbow from Uplands to the Deep-sea Event Sponsor: Environmental Science Division Seminar Start Date: Sep 17 2015 - 11:00am BuildingRoom: Building 240Room...

  7. Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coastal stakeholders need defensible predictions of 21st century sea-level rise (SLR). ... To assess the likelihood of fast retreat of marine ice sheets, we need coupled ice-sheet...

  8. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hallam, Steven

    2011-04-26

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  9. Paleocene sea level movements with a 430,000 year quasi-periodic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sea level movements with quasi-periodicity of 430,000 years are identified in the marine sedimentary units of the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain of Mississippi, Alabama and...

  10. Recovery Act: SeaMicro Volume Server Power Reduction Research Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Lauterbach

    2012-03-22

    Cloud data centers are projected to be the fastest growing segment of the server market through 2015, according to IDC. Increasingly people and businesses rely on the Cloud to deliver digital content quickly and efficiently. Recovery Act funding from the Department of Energy has helped SeaMicro's technologies enhance the total cost of operation, performance and energy efficiency in large data center and Cloud environments. SeaMicro's innovative supercomputer fabric connects thousands of processor cores, memory, storage and input/output traffic. The company's fabric supports multiple processor instruction sets. Current systems featuring SeaMicro technology typically use one quarter the power and take one sixth the space of traditional servers with the same compute performance, yet deliver up to 12 times the bandwidth per core. Mozilla and eHarmony are two customers successfully using SeaMicro's technology. Numerous non-public customers have been successfully using the SeaMicro product in test and production facilities. As a result of the Recovery Act funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, more than 50 direct jobs were created at SeaMicro. To date, they primarily have been high-value, engineering jobs. Hardware, software and manufacturing engineering positions have been created, as well as sales and sales engineering. The positions have allowed SeaMicro to significantly accelerate engineering development and accelerate commercialization. As a result, commercialization and delivery to market are months ahead of initial schedule. Additional jobs were indirectly created through the development of the SeaMicro product. Through many years of research and hard work prior to receipt of public funding, SeaMicro was awarded 2 patents for its work. SeaMicro's product led the way for industry leaders to reconsider the market for low power servers and create new product lines. With valuable support of the U.S. Department of Energy and through SeaMicro's product, the market has been reshaped by the company's unique approach and ground breaking technology.

  11. Major deepwater pipelay vessel starts work in North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heerema, E.P.

    1998-05-04

    Industry`s deepwater pipelaying capability has received a boost this year with the entry into the world`s fleet of Solitaire, a dynamically positioned pipelay vessel of about 350 m including stinger. The converted bulk carrier, formerly the Trentwood, will arrive on station in the North Sea and begin laying pipe this month on Statoil`s Europipe II project, a 600-km, 42-in. OD gas pipeline from Norway to Germany. Next year, the vessel will install pipe for the Exxon U.S.A.`s Gulf of Mexico South Diana development (East Breaks Block 945) in a water depth of 1,643 m and for Mobil Oil Canada as part of the Sable Island Offshore and Energy Project offshore Nova Scotia. Using the S-lay mode, Solitaire is particularly well-suited for laying large lines economically, including the deepwater projects anticipated for the US Gulf of Mexico. Table 1 presents Solitaire`s technical specifications. The design, construction, pipelaying, and justification for building vessels such as the Solitaire are discussed.

  12. Resilient Control System Execution Agent (ReCoSEA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig G. Rieger; Kris Villez

    2012-08-01

    In an increasingly networked world, critical infrastructure systems suffer from two types of vulnerability. The first is the traditionally recognized problem of monitoring the systems for faults and failures, recognizing and analyzing data, and responding with real understanding to the problems of the system. Increasingly complex systems create the opportunity for single points of failure to cascade when inaccurate assessment of system health increases response time or leads to faulty analysis of the problems involved. A second problem involves vulnerability to cyber intrusion, in which bad actors can mask system deterioration or present false data about system status. A resilient system will protect stability, efficiency, and security. To ensure these three states, the system must react to changing conditions within the system with coordination: no one component of the system can be allowed to react to problems without real consideration of the effects of that action on other components within the system. Systems with multi-agent design typically have three layers of action, a management layer, a coordination layer, and an execution layer. A resilient multi-agent system will emphasize functions of the execution layer, which has the responsibility of initiating actions, monitoring, analyzing, and controlling its own processes, while feeding information back to the higher levels of management and coordination. The design concept of a resilient control system execution agent (ReCoSEA) grows out of these underpinnings, and through the use of computational intelligence techniques, this paper suggests an associated design methodology.

  13. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  14. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  15. Pion cloud and sea quark flavor asymmetry in the impact parameter

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    representation (Conference) | SciTech Connect Pion cloud and sea quark flavor asymmetry in the impact parameter representation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pion cloud and sea quark flavor asymmetry in the impact parameter representation We study large-distance contributions to the nucleon parton densities in the transverse coordinate (impact parameter) representation based on generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Chiral dynamics generates a distinct component of the partonic

  16. T-528: Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/SeaMonkey Multiple HTML Injection Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/SeaMonkey Multiple HTML Injection Vulnerabilities. Mozilla Firefox, SeaMonkey, and Thunderbird are prone to multiple HTML-injection vulnerabilities. Successful exploits will allow attacker-supplied HTML and script code to run in the context of the affected browser, potentially allowing the attacker to steal cookie-based authentication credentials or to control how the site is rendered to the user. Other attacks are also possible.

  17. Comments by Julie Crenshaw Van Fleet on DOE/SEA-04, Special Environmental

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Analysis: For Actions Taken Under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating Station in Alexandria, Virginia, November 2006 | Department of Energy Julie Crenshaw Van Fleet on DOE/SEA-04, Special Environmental Analysis: For Actions Taken Under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating Station in Alexandria, Virginia, November 2006 Comments by Julie Crenshaw Van Fleet on DOE/SEA-04, Special

  18. Mirant Reply to Comments re Special Environmental Analysis, DOE/SEA-04

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potomac River Generating Station | Department of Energy Reply to Comments re Special Environmental Analysis, DOE/SEA-04 Potomac River Generating Station Mirant Reply to Comments re Special Environmental Analysis, DOE/SEA-04 Potomac River Generating Station Docket No. EO-05-01: On behalf of Mirant Potomac River LLC ("Mirant"), we respectfully request the opportunity to respond to certain written comments received by the Department of Energy in connection with the Department's

  19. ARM - Lesson Plans: Effects of Solar Radiation on Land and Sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of Solar Radiation on Land and Sea Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Effects of Solar Radiation on Land and Sea Educational resources that have been selected by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) have passed an extensive peer-review

  20. Final Report DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems | Department of Energy DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems Final Report DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems Report that assesses possible interference to various kinds of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. PDF icon

  1. Visualizing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rise | Department of Energy Visualizing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Visualizing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise November 2, 2015 - 11:10am Addthis Alice Lippert Alice Lippert Senior Technical Advisor to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) recently released an innovative, interactive visualization tool to highlight the

  2. Genesee Power Station LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    35.035 MW 35,000 kW 35,000,000 W 35,000,000,000 mW 0.035 GW Commercial Online Date 1995 Heat Rate (BTUkWh) 21020.0 References EPA Web Site1 Loading map......

  3. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56620 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  4. Microsoft Word - 4.24.13 Final LP Testimony

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technology vehicles that would help automobile manufacturers meet more stringent CAFE standards, create jobs, and reduce the nation's dependence on oil. The ATVM Program...

  5. Corn LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Goldfield, Iowa Zip: 50542 Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as raw material Coordinates: 37.707559, -117.233459 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  6. TXU Energy Retail Co LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.txu.comenresidentia Green Button Reference Page: www.txu.comenresidentia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  7. Spark Energy, LP (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: New York Phone Number: 1-877-547-7275 Website: www.sparkenergy.comennew-yor Twitter: @SparkEnergy Facebook: https:www.facebook.comSparkEnergy Outage Hotline:...

  8. Modified Inverse First Order Reliability Method (I-FORM) for Predicting Extreme Sea States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-09-01

    Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulation s as a part of the stand ard current practice for designing marine structure s to survive extreme sea states. Such environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height ( ) and energy period ( ) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first - order reliability method (IFORM) i s standard design practice for generating environmental contours. In this paper, the traditional appli cation of the IFORM to generating environmental contours representing extreme sea states is described in detail and its merits and drawbacks are assessed. The application of additional methods for analyzing sea state data including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the data under consideration is proposed. A reexamination of the components of the IFORM application to the problem at hand including the use of new distribution fitting techniques are shown to contribute to the development of more accurate a nd reasonable representations of extreme sea states for use in survivability analysis for marine struc tures. Keywords: In verse FORM, Principal Component Analysis , Environmental Contours, Extreme Sea State Characteri zation, Wave Energy Converters

  9. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO₂ climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modestmore » reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO₂ induced global warming.« less

  10. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO₂ climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modest reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO₂ induced global warming.

  11. Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-07-29

    A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

  12. Correlation and climate sensitivity of human health and environmental indicators in the Salish Sea- Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project focused on the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, whose traditional territories are particularly vulnerable to threats like sea-level rise and increased storms. These sensitivities of...

  13. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern formore » sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.« less

  14. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.

  15. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; He, Z.; Voordeckers, J.; Zhou, A.; Lee, Y.-J.; Mason, O.U.; Dubinsky, E.; Chavarria, K.; Tom, L.; Fortney, J.; Lamendella, R.; Jansson, J.K.; D?haeseleer, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2011-06-15

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest and largest offshore spill in U.S. history and its impacts on marine ecosystems are largely unknown. Here, we showed that the microbial community functional composition and structure were dramatically altered in a deep-sea oil plume resulting from the spill. A variety of metabolic genes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in the plume compared to outside the plume, indicating a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation or natural attenuation in the deep-sea. Various other microbial functional genes relevant to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and iron cycling, metal resistance, and bacteriophage replication were also enriched in the plume. Together, these results suggest that the indigenous marine microbial communities could play a significant role in biodegradation of oil spills in deep-sea environments.

  16. Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the carbon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dioxide inputs to the surface ocean (Conference) | SciTech Connect Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the carbon dioxide inputs to the surface ocean Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the carbon dioxide inputs to the surface ocean The oceans are estimated to be absorbing one-third of the fossil fuel carbon released into the atmosphere, a process that is expected to change ocean carbon chemistry. I will

  17. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level rise than earlier feared, scientists say Side effects of increasing meltwater less severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say The team found that accelerating ice sheet movement from increasing meltwater lubrication is likely to have only a minor role in future sea-level rise. August 19, 2013 A stream of meltwater on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet enters a moulin connecting to the

  18. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level rise than earlier feared, scientists say Side effects of increasing meltwater less severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say The team found that accelerating ice sheet movement from increasing meltwater lubrication is likely to have only a minor role in future sea-level rise. August 19, 2013 A stream of meltwater on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet enters a moulin connecting to the

  19. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010 00:00 Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary

  20. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel Jacobs - SEA-2010-01 | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Jacobs - SEA-2010-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel Jacobs - SEA-2010-01 July 16, 2010 Issued to Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, related to the Theft of Classified Matter from the East Tennessee Technology Park On July 16, 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation to Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC for violations of 10 C.F.R. 824 associated with the theft of classified matter

  1. The Potential for Renewable Energy Development to Benefit Restoration of the Salton Sea. Analysis of Technical and Market Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagne, Douglas; Haase, Scott; Oakleaf, Brett; Hurlbut, David; Akar, Sertac; Wall, Anna; Turchi, Craig; Pienkos, Philip; Melius, Jennifer; Melaina, Marc

    2015-11-01

    This report summarizes the potential for renewable energy development in the Salton Sea region, as well as the potential for revenues from this development to contribute financially to Salton Sea restoration costs. It considers solar, geothermal, biofuels or nutraceutical production from algae pond cultivation, desalination using renewable energy, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.


  2. Tropical sea snail shells: Possible exotic sources for ceramic biomaterial synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oktar, F. N.; Kiyici, I. A.; Gke, H.; A?aogullar?, D.; Kayali, E. S.

    2013-12-16

    In this study, chemical and structural properties of sea snail shell based bioceramic materials (i.e. hydroxyapatite, whitlockite and other phases) are produced by using mechano-chemical (ultrasonic) conversion method. For this purpose, differential thermal and gravimetric analysis (DTA/TG), X-ray diffraction, infra-red (IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies are performed.

  3. Adsorption of basic Red 46 using sea mango (Cerbera odollam) based activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azmi, Nur Azira Iqlima; Zainudin, Nor Fauziah; Ali, Umi Fazara Md

    2015-05-15

    Sea mango or Cerbera Odollam is another source of carbonaceous material that can be found abundantly in Malaysia. In this research, it is used as a new agricultural source of activated carbon. Sea mango activated carbon was prepared by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide (KOH). The sea mango was soaked in KOH at impregnation ratio of 1:1 and followed by carbonization at temperature of 600C for 1 hour. The sample was then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for surface morphology, while Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) was used to study the surface area. The result shown that sea mango activated carbon (SMAC) developed new pores on its surface and the BET surface area measured was 451.87 m{sup 2}/g. The SMAC performance was then tested for the removal of Basic Red 46 in batch process. The removal of Basic Red 46 (50?mg/L, natural pH, 0.1?g SMAC) was more than 99% in 15 minutes where it reached equilibrium in 30 minutes.

  4. Accelerated sea level rise on Yap (Federated States of Micronesia): Cause for concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahl, M.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Army Corps of Engineers, Pacific Ocean Division, participated in the interagency case study of sea level rise for Yap State in the Federated States of Micronesia. The study, on behalf of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, was in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Engineering and environmental analyses indicate that resources within Yap State at risk from a 1.0 meter rise in sea level by the year 2100 are substantial, including coral reefs, sea grass beds, wetlands, native mangrove forests, groundwater, archaeological and cultural resources, and shoreline infrastructure. Severe constraints associated with land ownership patterns have helped prevent the potential for greater impact. Yet these same constraints will likely hinder future decisions regarding retreat, accommodation, or protection strategies. As a result, there are special institutional and cultural challenges that face Yap in developing and implementing appropriate responses to accelerated sea level rise. These are made more difficult with the many uncertainties associated with current predictions regarding the greenhouse effect.

  5. Overview of physical oceanographic measurements taken during the Mt. Mitchell Cruise to the ROPME Sea Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.M.

    1993-03-31

    The ROPME Sea Area (RSA) is one of the most important commercial waterways in the world. However, the number of direct oceanographic observations is small. An international program to study the effect of the Iraqi oil spill on the environment was sponsored by the ROPME, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  6. Observed drag coefficients in high winds in the near offshore of the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi, Xueyan; Liu, Yangan; Gao, Zhiqiu; Liu, Feng; Song, Qingtao; Huang, Jian; Huang, Huijun; Mao, Weikang; Liu, Chunxia

    2015-07-14

    This paper investigates the relationships between friction velocity, 10 m drag coefficient, and 10 m wind speed using data collected at two offshore observation towers (one over the sea and the other on an island) from seven typhoon episodes in the South China Sea from 2008 to 2014. The two towers were placed in areas with different water depths along a shore-normal line. The depth of water at the tower over the sea averages about 15 m, and the depth of water near the island is about 10 m. The observed maximum 10 min average wind speed at a height of 10 m is about 32 m s?. Momentum fluxes derived from three methods (eddy covariance, inertial dissipation, and flux profile) are compared. The momentum fluxes derived from the flux profile method are larger (smaller) over the sea (on the island) than those from the other two methods. The relationship between the 10 m drag coefficient and the 10 m wind speed is examined by use of the data obtained by the eddy covariance method. The drag coefficient first decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when the wind speeds are 510 m s?, then increases and reaches a peak value of 0.002 around a wind speed of 18 m s?. The drag coefficient decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when 10 m wind speeds are 1827 m s?. A comparison of the measurements from the two towers shows that the 10 m drag coefficient from the tower in 10 m water depth is about 40% larger than that from the tower in 15 m water depth when the 10 m wind speed is less than 10 m s?. Above this, the difference in the 10 m drag coefficients of the two towers disappears.

  7. Probing a &quot;Sea&quot; of Quarks | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing a "Sea" of Quarks March 1999 Scientists who conducted the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Hall A Proton Parity Experiment, or HAPPEX, believe they may have at least a partial answer for an outstanding question in nuclear physics: Where does a proton's spin come from? Syracuse University professor of Physics Paul Souder, a primary HAPPEX architect and co-spokesman for the international HAPPEX science team, will present

  8. Modeling a Typical Winter-time Dust Event over the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalenderski, S.; Stenchikov, G.; Zhao, Chun

    2013-02-20

    We used WRF-Chem, a regional meteorological model coupled with an aerosol-chemistry component, to simulate various aspects of the dust phenomena over the Arabian Peninsula and Red Sea during a typical winter-time dust event that occurred in January 2009. The model predicted that the total amount of emitted dust was 18.3 Tg for the entire dust outburst period and that the two maximum daily rates were ~2.4 Tg/day and ~1.5 Tg/day, corresponding to two periods with the highest aerosol optical depth that were well captured by ground- and satellite-based observations. The model predicted that the dust plume was thick, extensive, and mixed in a deep boundary layer at an altitude of 3-4 km. Its spatial distribution was modeled to be consistent with typical spatial patterns of dust emissions. We utilized MODIS-Aqua and Solar Village AERONET measurements of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) to evaluate the radiative impact of aerosols. Our results clearly indicated that the presence of dust particles in the atmosphere caused a significant reduction in the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface during the dust event. We also found that dust aerosols have significant impact on the energy and nutrient balances of the Red Sea. Our results showed that the simulated cooling under the dust plume reached 100 W/m2, which could have profound effects on both the sea surface temperature and circulation. Further analysis of dust generation and its spatial and temporal variability is extremely important for future projections and for better understanding of the climate and ecological history of the Red Sea.

  9. SNL-ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme Sea State Contour) Code

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme Sea State Contour) Code - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel

  10. Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea-Level

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Rise | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea-Level Rise Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC

  11. Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea-Level

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Rise | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea-Level Rise Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy

  12. New Method Relates Greenland Ice Sheet Changes to Sea-Level Rise | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) New Method Relates Greenland Ice Sheet Changes to Sea-Level Rise Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave.,

  13. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program: Seventh quarterly progress report, April-June 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    The progress and direction of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) is outlined. This reporting period, from April 1 through June 30, 1986, began with initiation of the 6-month shut-in period. Emphasis was placed upon conducting experiments such as downhole temperature and pressure surveys, distribution of samples to researchers, reporting and disseminating data thus far analyzed, and planning future operations in the SSSDP well.

  14. Observed drag coefficients in high winds in the near offshore of the South China Sea

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bi, Xueyan; Liu, Yangan; Gao, Zhiqiu; Liu, Feng; Song, Qingtao; Huang, Jian; Huang, Huijun; Mao, Weikang; Liu, Chunxia

    2015-07-14

    This paper investigates the relationships between friction velocity, 10 m drag coefficient, and 10 m wind speed using data collected at two offshore observation towers (one over the sea and the other on an island) from seven typhoon episodes in the South China Sea from 2008 to 2014. The two towers were placed in areas with different water depths along a shore-normal line. The depth of water at the tower over the sea averages about 15 m, and the depth of water near the island is about 10 m. The observed maximum 10 min average wind speed at a heightmore » of 10 m is about 32 m s⁻¹. Momentum fluxes derived from three methods (eddy covariance, inertial dissipation, and flux profile) are compared. The momentum fluxes derived from the flux profile method are larger (smaller) over the sea (on the island) than those from the other two methods. The relationship between the 10 m drag coefficient and the 10 m wind speed is examined by use of the data obtained by the eddy covariance method. The drag coefficient first decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when the wind speeds are 5–10 m s⁻¹, then increases and reaches a peak value of 0.002 around a wind speed of 18 m s⁻¹. The drag coefficient decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when 10 m wind speeds are 18–27 m s⁻¹. A comparison of the measurements from the two towers shows that the 10 m drag coefficient from the tower in 10 m water depth is about 40% larger than that from the tower in 15 m water depth when the 10 m wind speed is less than 10 m s⁻¹. Above this, the difference in the 10 m drag coefficients of the two towers disappears.« less

  15. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  16. The record of sea level rise by tidal sand bodies of the English Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berne, S; Lericolais, G. (Ifremer, Plouzane, (France)); Lafont, F. (Universite d'Orsay (France))

    1990-05-01

    Improvements of very high resolution seismic reflection provide new information about internal structures of modern sand bodies. This allows us to reconstruct their recent history, which is related to the Holocene sea level rise. A major distinction is found between inner shelf sand bodies, dominated by autocyclic processes, and outer shelf sand bodies, where allocyclic processes are invoked to explain the apparent contradiction between internal structures and present-day dynamics. On the inner shelf, evidence of the migration of tidal dunes (sand waves) has been obtained by repeated surveys using accurate positioning systems. Major bounding surfaces are thought to result from the action of tidal current and/or from episodic storms. A rough estimation of the age of these sand bodies can be proposed. On the outer shelf, some dunes of the English Channel exhibit cross-beds indicative of a past net bed-load transport at the opposite of present days dynamics, inherited from different tidal conditions when sea level was between 20 and 40 m lower. Some large tidal sand banks (e.g., the Sark Bank near the Channel Islands) display a more complicated pattern. The upper part of the sand bank is the result of the migration of very large dunes climbing at positive angles, whereas the lower part shows major erosional surfaces, attributed to the action of storms during lower sea levels.

  17. Microearthquake Study of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California: Evidence of Stress Triggering - Masters Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Austin Adams

    2002-02-01

    A digital network of 24 seismograph stations was operated from September 15, 1987 to September 30, 1988, by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Unocal as part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project to study seismicity related to tectonics and geothermal activity near the drilling site. More than 2001 microearthquakes were relocated in this study in order to image any pervasive structures that may exist within the Salton Sea geothermal field. First, detailed velocity models were obtained through standard 1-D inversion techniques. These velocity models were then used to relocate events using both single event methods and Double-Differencing, a joint hypocenter location method. An anisotropic velocity model was built from anisotropy estimates obtained from well logs within the study area. During the study period, the Superstition wills sequence occurred with two moderate earthquakes of MS 6.2 and MS 6.6. These moderate earthquakes caused a rotation of the stress field as observed from the inversion of first motion data from microearthquakes at the Salton Sea geothermal field. Coulomb failure analysis also indicates that microearthquakes occurring after the Superstition Hills sequence are located within a region of stress increase suggesting stress triggering caused by the moderate earthquakes.

  18. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-12-15

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  19. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kimball, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Dunbar, R.

    2015-12-04

    Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near constant temperature, salinity and pH, and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly-substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzedmorein CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as ?47 values. We analyzed ?47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp.) and calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae) deep-sea corals, and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured ?47 values were compared to in situ temperatures and the relationship between ?47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationship between ?47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate "clumped" isotope calibration data as they show that distinct ?47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite, although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect that crystals may attain nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures only under conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological "vital-effect" influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological "vital" effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on ?47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.less

  20. Who plans for health improvement? SEA, HIA and the separation of spatial planning and health planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Alan; Cave, Ben; Ballantyne, Rob

    2013-09-15

    This study examines whether there is active planning for health improvement in the English spatial planning system and how this varies across two regions using a combination of telephone surveys and focus group interviews in 2005 and 2010. The spatial planning profession was found to be ill-equipped to consider the health and well-being implications of its actions, whilst health professionals are rarely engaged and have limited understanding and aspirations when it comes to influencing spatial planning. Strategic Environmental Assessment was not considered to be successful in integrating health into spatial plans, given it was the responsibility of planners lacking the capacity to do so. For their part, health professionals have insufficient knowledge and understanding of planning and how to engage with it to be able to plan for health gains rather than simply respond to health impacts. HIA practice is patchy and generally undertaken by health professionals outside the statutory planning framework. Thus, whilst appropriate assessment tools exist, they currently lack a coherent context within which they can function effectively and the implementation of the Kiev protocol requiring the engagement of health professionals in SEA is not to likely improve the consideration of health in planning while there continues to be separation of functions between professions and lack of understanding of the other profession. -- Highlights: ? Health professionals have limited aspirations for health improvement through the planning system. ? Spatial planners are ill-equipped to understand the health and well-being implications of their activities. ? SEA and HIA currently do not embed health consideration in planning decisions. ? The separation of health and planning functions is problematic for the effective conduct of SEA and/or HIA.

  1. Support of Publication Costs, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Special Issue of Deep Sea Research II Journal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Honchar

    2012-11-12

    The contribution of funds from DOE supported publication costs of a special issue of Deep Sea Research arising from presentations at the First U.S. Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Meeting held 4-6 May, 2009 to review the US implementation plan and its coordination with other monitoring activities. The special issue includes a total of 16 papers, including publications from three DOE-supported investigators (ie Sevellec, F., and A.V. Fedorov; Hu et. al., and Wan et. al.,). The special issue addresses DOE interests in understanding and simulation/modeling of abrupt climate change.

  2. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  3. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  4. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  5. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  6. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  7. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  8. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  9. Development of global sea ice 6.0 CICE configuration for the Met Office global coupled model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rae, J. . G. L; Hewitt, H. T.; Keen, A. B.; Ridley, J. K.; West, A. E.; Harris, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Walters, D. N.

    2015-03-05

    The new sea ice configuration GSI6.0, used in the Met Office global coupled configuration GC2.0, is described and the sea ice extent, thickness and volume are compared with the previous configuration and with observationally-based datasets. In the Arctic, the sea ice is thicker in all seasons than in the previous configuration, and there is now better agreement of the modelled concentration and extent with the HadISST dataset. In the Antarctic, a warm bias in the ocean model has been exacerbated at the higher resolution of GC2.0, leading to a large reduction in ice extent and volume; further work is requiredmore » to rectify this in future configurations.« less

  10. Development of the global sea ice 6.0 CICE configuration for the Met Office global coupled model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rae, J. G. L.; Hewitt, H. T.; Keen, A. B.; Ridley, J. K.; West, A. E.; Harris, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Walters, D. N.

    2015-07-24

    The new sea ice configuration GSI6.0, used in the Met Office global coupled configuration GC2.0, is described and the sea ice extent, thickness and volume are compared with the previous configuration and with observationally based data sets. In the Arctic, the sea ice is thicker in all seasons than in the previous configuration, and there is now better agreement of the modelled concentration and extent with the HadISST data set. As a result, in the Antarctic, a warm bias in the ocean model has been exacerbated at the higher resolution of GC2.0, leading to a large reduction in ice extentmore » and volume; further work is required to rectify this in future configurations.« less

  11. Development of global sea ice 6.0 CICE configuration for the Met Office global coupled model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rae, J. . G. L; Hewitt, H. T.; Keen, A. B.; Ridley, J. K.; West, A. E.; Harris, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Walters, D. N.

    2015-03-05

    The new sea ice configuration GSI6.0, used in the Met Office global coupled configuration GC2.0, is described and the sea ice extent, thickness and volume are compared with the previous configuration and with observationally-based datasets. In the Arctic, the sea ice is thicker in all seasons than in the previous configuration, and there is now better agreement of the modelled concentration and extent with the HadISST dataset. In the Antarctic, a warm bias in the ocean model has been exacerbated at the higher resolution of GC2.0, leading to a large reduction in ice extent and volume; further work is required to rectify this in future configurations.

  12. Development of the global sea ice 6.0 CICE configuration for the Met Office global coupled model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rae, J. G. L.; Hewitt, H. T.; Keen, A. B.; Ridley, J. K.; West, A. E.; Harris, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Walters, D. N.

    2015-07-24

    The new sea ice configuration GSI6.0, used in the Met Office global coupled configuration GC2.0, is described and the sea ice extent, thickness and volume are compared with the previous configuration and with observationally based data sets. In the Arctic, the sea ice is thicker in all seasons than in the previous configuration, and there is now better agreement of the modelled concentration and extent with the HadISST data set. As a result, in the Antarctic, a warm bias in the ocean model has been exacerbated at the higher resolution of GC2.0, leading to a large reduction in ice extent and volume; further work is required to rectify this in future configurations.

  13. FPGA-based Trigger System for the Fermilab SeaQuest Experimentz

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shiu, Shiuan-Hal; Wu, Jinyuan; McClellan, Randall Evan; Chang, Ting-Hua; Chang, Wen-Chen; Chen, Yen-Chu; Gilman, Ron; Nakano, Kenichi; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Wang, Su-Yin

    2015-09-10

    The SeaQuest experiment (Fermilab E906) detects pairs of energetic μ+ and μ-produced in 120 GeV/c proton–nucleon interactions in a high rate environment. The trigger system we used consists of several arrays of scintillator hodoscopes and a set of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based VMEbus modules. Signals from up to 96 channels of hodoscope are digitized by each FPGA with a 1-ns resolution using the time-to-digital convertor (TDC) firmware. The delay of the TDC output can be adjusted channel-by-channel in 1-ns step and then re-aligned with the beam RF clock. The hit pattern on the hodoscope planes is then examined againstmore » pre-determined trigger matrices to identify candidate muon tracks. Finally, information on the candidate tracks is sent to the 2nd-level FPGA-based track correlator to find candidate di-muon events. The design and implementation of the FPGA-based trigger system for SeaQuest experiment are presented.« less

  14. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K.

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  15. Investigation of Spatial Variation of Sea States Offshore of Humboldt Bay CA Using a Hindcast Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    Spatial variability of sea states is an important consideration when performing wave resource assessments and wave resource characterization studies for wave energy converter (WEC) test sites and commercial WEC deployments. This report examines the spatial variation of sea states offshore of Humboldt Bay, CA, using the wave model SWAN . The effect of depth and shoaling on bulk wave parameters is well resolved using the model SWAN with a 200 m grid. At this site, the degree of spatial variation of these bulk wave parameters, with shoaling generally perpendicular to the depth contours, is found to depend on the season. The variation in wave height , for example, was higher in the summer due to the wind and wave sheltering from the protruding land on the coastline north of the model domain. Ho wever, the spatial variation within an area of a potential Tier 1 WEC test site at 45 m depth and 1 square nautical mile is almost negligible; at most about 0.1 m in both winter and summer. The six wave characterization parameters recommended by the IEC 6 2600 - 101 TS were compared at several points along a line perpendicular to shore from the WEC test site . As expected, these parameters varied based on depth , but showed very similar seasonal trends.

  16. Design, drilling, and testing of a deviated HTHP exploration well in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, K.P.; MacAndrew, R.

    1994-12-01

    Significant quantities of hydrocarbon reserves are contained in North Sea high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) reservoirs. Development of these reserves will require deviated wells. This paper outlines the planning, drilling, and testing of the first deviated HTHP well in the UK Sector of the North Sea. The high temperature requires mud systems, downhole equipment, and tools designed to work at elevated temperatures. The convergence of pore and fracture pressures leads to problems owing to the narrow band of mud weight between inducing losses and inducing a kick. This aspect of these wells probably causes the most trouble. The high mud weights required for well control leads to a situation where, owing to the large difference between formation-fluid and mud pressure gradients, mud overbalance becomes so high at the bottom of long permeable hole sections that differential sticking becomes likely. These problems are magnified when drilling small-diameter directional holes. The most important single factor in controlling these problems is the mud system design.

  17. Preliminary report on shallow research drilling in the Salton Sea region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1988-01-14

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The central thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09/degree/C/m) to extreme (0.83/degree/C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is greater than 600 mW/m/sup 2/ and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m/sup 2/. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes.

  18. FPGA-based Trigger System for the Fermilab SeaQuest Experimentz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiu, Shiuan-Hal; Wu, Jinyuan; McClellan, Randall Evan; Chang, Ting-Hua; Chang, Wen-Chen; Chen, Yen-Chu; Gilman, Ron; Nakano, Kenichi; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Wang, Su-Yin

    2015-09-10

    The SeaQuest experiment (Fermilab E906) detects pairs of energetic μ+ and μ-produced in 120 GeV/c proton–nucleon interactions in a high rate environment. The trigger system we used consists of several arrays of scintillator hodoscopes and a set of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based VMEbus modules. Signals from up to 96 channels of hodoscope are digitized by each FPGA with a 1-ns resolution using the time-to-digital convertor (TDC) firmware. The delay of the TDC output can be adjusted channel-by-channel in 1-ns step and then re-aligned with the beam RF clock. The hit pattern on the hodoscope planes is then examined against pre-determined trigger matrices to identify candidate muon tracks. Finally, information on the candidate tracks is sent to the 2nd-level FPGA-based track correlator to find candidate di-muon events. The design and implementation of the FPGA-based trigger system for SeaQuest experiment are presented.

  19. Estuarine Response to River Flow and Sea-Level Rise under Future Climate Change and Human Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Voisin, Nathalie; Copping, Andrea E.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the response of river flow and estuarine hydrodynamics to climate change, land-use/land-cover change (LULC), and sea-level rise is essential to managing water resources and stress on living organisms under these changing conditions. This paper presents a modeling study using a watershed hydrology model and an estuarine hydrodynamic model, in a one-way coupling, to investigate the estuarine hydrodynamic response to sea-level rise and change in river flow due to the effect of future climate and LULC changes in the Snohomish River estuary, Washington, USA. A set of hydrodynamic variables, including salinity intrusion points, average water depth, and salinity of the inundated area, were used to quantify the estuarine response to river flow and sea-level rise. Model results suggest that salinity intrusion points in the Snohomish River estuary and the average salinity of the inundated areas are a nonlinear function of river flow, although the average water depth in the inundated area is approximately linear with river flow. Future climate changes will shift salinity intrusion points further upstream under low flow conditions and further downstream under high flow conditions. In contrast, under the future LULC change scenario, the salinity intrusion point will shift downstream under both low and high flow conditions, compared to present conditions. The model results also suggest that the average water depth in the inundated areas increases linearly with sea-level rise but at a slower rate, and the average salinity in the inundated areas increases linearly with sea-level rise; however, the response of salinity intrusion points in the river to sea-level rise is strongly nonlinear.

  20. The Use of Tritiated Wastewater from NPP Cernavoda to Estimate Maximum Soluble Pollutants on Danube-Black Sea Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varlam, Carmen; Stefanescu, Ioan; Patrascub, Vasile; Varlam, Mihai; Raceanu, Mircea; Enache, Adrian; Bucur, Cristina

    2005-07-15

    In this paper we propose to use tritiated liquid effluents from a CANDU type reactor as a tracer, to study hydrodynamics on Danube-Black Sea Channel. Tritiated water can be used to simulate the transport and dispersion of solutes in mentioned Channel, because it has the same physical characteristic as water. Measured tracer response curves produced from controlled evacuations provide an efficient method of obtaining necessary data. This paper presents the establishing of proper mixing length, and the base line of tritium concentration in studied area. These first steps were used to construct the unit-peak attenuation (UPA) curve for a sector of the Danube-Black Sea Channel.

  1. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

  2. Iron Fertilization of the Southern Ocean: Regional Simulation and Analysis of C-Sequestration in the Ross Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Arrigo

    2012-03-13

    A modified version of the dynamic 3-dimensional mesoscale Coupled Ice, Atmosphere, and Ocean model (CIAO) of the Ross Sea ecosystem has been used to simulate the impact of environmental perturbations upon primary production and biogenic CO2 uptake. The Ross Sea supports two taxonomically, and spatially distinct phytoplankton populations; the haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica and diatoms. Nutrient utilization ratios predict that P. antarctica and diatoms will be driven to nitrate and phosphate limitation, respectively. Model and field data have confirmed that the Ross Sea is iron limited with only two-thirds of the macronutrients consumed by the phytoplankton by the end of the growing season. In this study, the CIAO model was improved to simulate a third macronutrient (phosphate), dissolved organic carbon, air-sea gas exchange, and the carbonate system. This enabled us to effectively model pCO2 and subsequently oceanic CO2 uptake via gas exchange, allowing investigations into the affect of alleviating iron limitation on both pCO2 and nutrient drawdown.

  3. Linkages of Remote Sea Surface Temperatures and Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity Mediated by the African Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hagos, Samson M.

    2015-01-28

    Warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in North Atlantic and Mediterranean (NAMED) can influence tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the tropical East Atlantic by modulating summer convection over western Africa. Analysis of 30 years of observations show that the NAMED SST is linked to a strengthening of the Saharan heat low and enhancement of moisture and moist static energy in the lower atmosphere over West Africa, which favors a northward displacement of the monsoonal front. These processes also lead to a northward shift of the African easterly jet that introduces an anomalous positive vorticity from western Africa to the main development region (50W20E; 10N20N) of Atlantic TC. By modulating multiple processes associated with the African monsoon, this study demonstrates that warm NAMED SST explains 8% of interannual variability of Atlantic TC frequency. Thus NAME SST may provide useful predictability for Atlantic TC activity on seasonal-to-interannual time scale.

  4. Coiled tubing deployed ESP works well for Shell in North Sea field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, P.; Stewart, D.

    1996-06-01

    What is believed to be the world`s first offshore coiled tubing deployed ESP system was installed by Centrilift, a Division of Baker Hughes Ltd., on Shell Expro`s Auk field Alpha platform in March 1995. After one year, the system is working well and is now viewed as a major step forward in alternative deployment methods for ESPs. Basic features of the system and project background are overviewed here. Shell U.K. Exploration and Production (Expro) operates in the UK Sector of the North Sea on behalf of Shell and Esso. Centrilift worked closely with Shell on this high-profile project and is active on several others, all aimed at reducing the operator`s cost for installing ESPs by using alternative deployment methods.

  5. Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian MacDonald

    2011-05-31

    A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation, respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

  6. Computation of Wave Loads under Multidirectional Sea States for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duarte, T.; Gueydon, S.; Jonkman, J.; Sarmento, A.

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on the analysis of a floating wind turbine under multidirectional wave loading. Special attention is given to the different methods used to synthesize the multidirectional sea state. This analysis includes the double-sum and single-sum methods, as well as an equal-energy discretization of the directional spectrum. These three methods are compared in detail, including the ergodicity of the solution obtained. From the analysis, the equal-energy method proved to be the most computationally efficient while still retaining the ergodicity of the solution. This method was chosen to be implemented in the numerical code FAST. Preliminary results on the influence of these wave loads on a floating wind turbine showed significant additional roll and sway motion of the platform.

  7. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  8. Confidence building measures at sea:opportunities for India and Pakistan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vohra, Ravi Bhushan Rear Admiral; Ansari, Hasan Masood Rear Admiral

    2003-12-01

    The sea presents unique possibilities for implementing confidence building measures (CBMs) between India and Pakistan that are currently not available along the contentious land borders surrounding Jammu and Kashmir. This is due to the nature of maritime issues, the common military culture of naval forces, and a less contentious history of maritime interaction between the two nations. Maritime issues of mutual concern provide a strong foundation for more far-reaching future CBMs on land, while addressing pressing security, economic, and humanitarian needs at sea in the near-term. Although Indian and Pakistani maritime forces currently have stronger opportunities to cooperate with one another than their counterparts on land, reliable mechanisms to alleviate tension or promote operational coordination remain non-existent. Therefore, possible maritime CBMs, as well as pragmatic mechanisms to initiate and sustain cooperation, require serious examination. This report reflects the unique joint research undertaking of two retired Senior Naval Officers from both India and Pakistan, sponsored by the Cooperative Monitoring Center of the International Security Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Research focuses on technology as a valuable tool to facilitate confidence building between states having a low level of initial trust. Technical CBMs not only increase transparency, but also provide standardized, scientific means of interacting on politically difficult problems. Admirals Vohra and Ansari introduce technology as a mechanism to facilitate consistent forms of cooperation and initiate discussion in the maritime realm. They present technical CBMs capable of being acted upon as well as high-level political recommendations regarding the following issues: (1) Delimitation of the maritime boundary between India and Pakistan and its relationship to the Sir Creek dispute; (2) Restoration of full shipping links and the security of ports and cargos; (3) Fishing within disputed areas and resolution of issues relating to arrest and repatriation of fishermen from both sides; and (4) Naval and maritime agency interaction and possibilities for cooperation.

  9. Chemical composition of interstitial waters from the Japan Sea, ODP Leg 128

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturz, A. ); Von Breymann, M.; Dunbar, R. )

    1990-06-01

    During ODP Leg 128, interstitial waters were recovered from Oki Ridge (Site 798) and Kita-Yamato Trough (Site 799) sediment, Sea of Japan. Interstitial water chemical composition reflects diagenetic processes. Evidence indicating organic matter degradation processes includes sulfate depletion, high ammonium concentrations, and shallow maxima of dissolved phosphate. Rapid alkalinity increases in the uppermost sections of the sediments are accompanied by decreases in dissolved calcium, reflecting inorganic calcite precipitation. Authigenic dolomitization results in changes in slopes of the Mg/Ca molar ratios with depth. The opal-A/opal-CT transition is documented by the concentration depth profiles of dissolved silica and lithium. Dolomitization precedes the opal-A/opal-CT transition at both sites. Kita-Yamato Trough sediments show an abrupt change in the compositional character of the pore fluids below 435 mbsf, which coincides with the occurrence of low porosity and high bulk density layers composed of dolomite and opal-CT. These layers impede to some extent diffusional communication with the overlying interstitial waters. The interstitial waters in sediments below 435 mbsf have chloride concentrations of 504-515 mM, significantly lower than that of modern day Japan Sea water (540 mM). The presence of low chloride waters within Miocene age sediments may indicate: (1) diagenetic reactions that involve the release of exchangeable and structural bound water from clay minerals and/or opal-A, (2) Miocene connate brackish lake water, (3) phase separation of hydrothermal fluids associated with rifting, (4) potential effects of clay membrane filtration in a high pressure zone.

  10. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

  11. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

  12. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  13. Gluons and the Quark Sea at High Energies: Distributions, Polarization, Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Daniel; Diehl, Markus; Milner, Richard; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner; Kaplan, David; Montgomery, Hugh; Vigdor, Steven; Accardi, A.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Burkardt, M.; Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hasch, D.; Kumar, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Li, Ying-chuan; Marciano, W.; Marquet, C.; Sabatie, F.; Stratmann, M.; /more authors..

    2012-06-07

    This report on the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is the result of a ten-week program at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle (from September 13-November 19, 2010), motivated by the need to develop a strong case for the continued study of the QCD description of hadron structure in the coming decades. Hadron structure in the valence quark region will be studied extensively with the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV science program, the subject of an INT program the previous year. The focus of the INT program was on understanding the role of gluons and sea quarks, the important dynamical degrees of freedom describing hadron structure at high energies. Experimentally, the most direct and precise way to access the dynamical structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies is with a high luminosity lepton probe in collider mode. An EIC with optimized detectors offers enormous potential as the next generation accelerator to address many of the most important, open questions about the fundamental structure of matter. The goal of the INT program, as captured in the writeups in this report, was to articulate these questions and to identify golden experiments that have the greatest potential to provide definitive answers to these questions. At resolution scales where quarks and gluons become manifest as degrees of freedom, the structure of the nucleon and of nuclei is intimately connected with unique features of QCD dynamics, such as confinement and the self-coupling of gluons. Information on hadron sub-structure in DIS is obtained in the form of 'snapshots' by the 'lepton microscope' of the dynamical many-body hadron system, over different momentum resolutions and energy scales. These femtoscopic snapshots, at the simplest level, provide distribution functions which are extracted over the largest accessible kinematic range to assemble fundamental dynamical insight into hadron and nuclear sub-structure. For the proton, the EIC would be the brightest femtoscope scale lepton-collider ever, exceeding the intensity of the HERA collider a thousand fold. HERA, with its center-of-mass (CM) energy of 320 GeV, was built to search for quark substructure. An EIC, with its scientific focus on studying QCD in the regime where the sea quarks and gluons dominate, would have a lower CM energy. In a staged EIC design, the CM energy will range from 50-70 GeV in stage I to approximately twice that for the full design. In addition to being the first lepton collider exploring the structure of polarized protons, an EIC will also be the first electron-nucleus collider, probing the gluon and sea quark structure of nuclei for the first time. Following the same structure as the scientific discussions at the INT, this report is organized around the following four major themes: (1) The spin and flavor structure of the proton; (2) Three dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space; (3) QCD matter in nuclei; and (4) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. In this executive summary, we will briefly outline the outstanding physics questions in these areas and the suite of measurements that are available with an EIC to address these. The status of accelerator and detector designs is addressed at the end of the summary. Tables of golden measurements for each of the key science areas outlined are presented on page 12. In addition, each chapter in the report contains a comprehensive overview of the science topic addressed. Interested readers are encouraged to read these and the individual contributions for more details on the present status of EIC science.

  14. Gluons and the quark sea at high energies: distributions, polarization, tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, D.; Venugopalan, R.; Diehl, M.; Milner, R.; Vogelsang, W.; et al.

    2011-09-30

    This report is based on a ten-week program on Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies, which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that will be able to collide electrons and positrons with polarized protons and with light to heavy nuclei at high energies, offering unprecedented possibilities for in-depth studies of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This report is organized around the following four major themes: (i) the spin and flavor structure of the proton, (ii) three dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space, (iii) QCD matter in nuclei, and (iv) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Beginning with an executive summary, the report contains tables of key measurements, chapter overviews for each of the major scientific themes, and detailed individual contributions on various aspects of the scientific opportunities presented by an EIC.

  15. Rigid polyurethane foam (RPF) technology for Countermine (Sea) Program -- Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodfin, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    This Phase 1 report documents the results of one of the subtasks that was initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of a foam that can neutralize mines and barriers and allow the safe passage of amphibious landing craft and vehicles was the objective of this subtask of the Sea Mine Countermeasures Technology program. This phase of the program concentrated on laboratory characterization of foam properties and field experiments with prefabricated foam blocks to determine the capability of RPF to adequately carry military traffic. It also established the flammability characteristics of the material under simulated operational conditions, extended the understanding of explosive cavity formation in RPF to include surface explosions, established the tolerance to typical military fluids, and the response to bullet impact. Many of the basic analyses required to establish the operational concept are reported. The initial field experiments were conducted at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM in November 1995 through February 1996.

  16. Underbalanced coiled-tubing-drilled horizontal well in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodka, P.; Tirsgaard, H.; Damgaard, A.P.; Adamsen, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    Maersk Olie and Gas A/S (Maersk Oil) has drilled a 3,309-ft-long near-horizontal drainhole with coiled tubing to a total measured depth (MD) of 11,000 ft in the Danish sector of the North Sea. The well was completed in may 1994 as a 3{1/2}-in. openhole producer in the Gorm field chalk reservoir. Part of the well was drilled at underbalanced conditions, and oil production rates of up to 1,100 STB/D were reached during drilling. Conventional well-test equipment was used for handling returns. A nearby process facilities platform supplied lift gas and received the produced hydrocarbons during the drilling phase. Worth noting are the penetration of several chert layers, the fairly long reach, and the application of geosteering. Indications were that the well productivity was significantly improved compared with that of a conventionally drilled well, but problems were experienced with borehole stability in a fractured region.

  17. Development of an operational global ocean climatology through the use of remotely sensed sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, T.M.

    1995-05-09

    Monthly mean satellite-derived sea surface temperature SST data have been derived globally using daytime and nighttime AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) multi-channel data. From a 12 year data set (1982-1993), valid monthly daytime and nighttime climatologies were created using an eight year subset (1984-1990, 1993). Based on buoy comparisons, four years were omitted due to volcanic aerosol corruption (El Chichon 1982/83, Mt. Pinatubo 1991/92). These resulting monthly climatologies provide SST fields at approximately 1/3rd degree latitude/longitude resolution. Difference fields have been created comparing the new satellite climatology with the older and coarser-resolution climatology constructed from conventional SST data. Regional and zonal climatology differences were also created to highlight the deficiencies, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, in the older climatology believed to result primarily from a lack of buoy/ship (in situ) data. Such comparisons made it clear that the satellite climatology provided a much better product. Ocean current systems, El Nino, La Nina, and other water mass characteristics all appear with better detail and accuracy within the high-resolution satellite climatology.

  18. Management and Retrieval of Historical Nuclear Waste Previously Prepared and Concreted for Sea Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, H.; Davies, E.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the approach of dealing with an historic legacy of pharmaceutical manufacturing operations, which arose as a result of the temporary cessation of sea disposal in 1983. The result of that cessation was an accumulation of 1,000 reinforced concrete lined steel drums containing intermediate level nuclear waste of mixed chemical and physical form. Included are the steps taken which established a policy, the resulting strategy and the unique and innovative means by which the plan was implemented. The objective was to reduce the financial liability of the waste contained within the drums by removing those portions that had already decayed, segregating the waste in terms of non disposable and disposable isotopes, size reduction and long-term storage of the residues in a retrievable waste form. As part of this process the Company established a UK strategy which would ensure that the Company was self sufficient in radioactive waste handling storage facilities until the provision of a national facility, currently predicted to be approximately 2040.

  19. Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Matika, D.; Kollar, R.; Nad, K.; Orlic, Z.

    2011-07-01

    Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

  20. Full-physics 3D heterogeneous simulations of electromagnetic induction fields on level and deformed sea ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samluk, Jesse P.; Geiger, Cathleen A.; Weiss, Chester J.; Kolodzey, James

    2015-10-01

    In this article we explore simulated responses of electromagnetic (EM) signals relative to in situ field surveys and quantify the effects that different values of conductivity in sea ice have on the EM fields. We compute EM responses of ice types with a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-volume discretization of Maxwell's equations and present 2-D sliced visualizations of their associated EM fields at discrete frequencies. Several interesting observations result: First, since the simulator computes the fields everywhere, each gridcell acts as a receiver within the model volume, and captures the complete, coupled interactions between air, snow, sea ice and sea water as a function of their conductivity; second, visualizations demonstrate how 1-D approximations near deformed ice features are violated. But the most important new finding is that changes in conductivity affect EM field response by modifying the magnitude and spatial patterns (i.e. footprint size and shape) of current density and magnetic fields. These effects are demonstrated through a visual feature we define as 'null lines'. Null line shape is affected by changes in conductivity near material boundaries as well as transmitter location. Our results encourage the use of null lines as a planning tool for better ground-truth field measurements near deformed ice types.

  1. Full-physics 3D heterogeneous simulations of electromagnetic induction fields on level and deformed sea ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Samluk, Jesse P.; Geiger, Cathleen A.; Weiss, Chester J.; Kolodzey, James

    2015-10-01

    In this article we explore simulated responses of electromagnetic (EM) signals relative to in situ field surveys and quantify the effects that different values of conductivity in sea ice have on the EM fields. We compute EM responses of ice types with a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-volume discretization of Maxwell's equations and present 2-D sliced visualizations of their associated EM fields at discrete frequencies. Several interesting observations result: First, since the simulator computes the fields everywhere, each gridcell acts as a receiver within the model volume, and captures the complete, coupled interactions between air, snow, sea ice and sea water asmore » a function of their conductivity; second, visualizations demonstrate how 1-D approximations near deformed ice features are violated. But the most important new finding is that changes in conductivity affect EM field response by modifying the magnitude and spatial patterns (i.e. footprint size and shape) of current density and magnetic fields. These effects are demonstrated through a visual feature we define as 'null lines'. Null line shape is affected by changes in conductivity near material boundaries as well as transmitter location. Our results encourage the use of null lines as a planning tool for better ground-truth field measurements near deformed ice types.« less

  2. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

  3. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

  4. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  5. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the modelmeasurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  6. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge

    2011-09-30

    Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

  7. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

  8. File:Wind-farm-policy-simulation lp.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    metadata was last modified 08:57, 7 August 2013 Software used Acrobat PDFMaker 9.0 for Word Conversion program Adobe PDF Library 9.0 Encrypted no Page size 612 x 792 pts (letter)...

  9. File:Tip-top-tip-speed-lp-HS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. File:Power-in-practice-and-theory-lp-HS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. File:What-speed-do-we-need-lp-HS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. File:Tip-top-tip-speed-lp.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  13. File:When-the-wind-doesn't-blow-lp.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  14. File:Wind-farm-policy-simulation lp-HS.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  15. File:When-the-wind-doesn't-blow-lp-HS.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  16. File:Power-in-practice-and-theory-lp.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  17. File:Modeling-power-efficiency-and-tip-speed-ratio-lp-HS.pdf...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. File:What-speed-do-we-need-lp.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  19. File:Modeling-power-efficiency-and-tip-speed-ratio-lp.pdf | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Order 3331-A: Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - Dk. No. 11-128-LNG...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    VESSEL FROM THE DOMINION COVE POINT LNG TERMINAL IN CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set...

  1. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefactio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liquefaction 3, LLC to Transfer Control of Long-term Authorization to Export LNG to Free Trade Agreement Nations and Non-free Trade Agreement Nations in FE Dkts. 10-160-LNG;...

  2. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes how Terra Nitrogen Company saved 497,000 MMBtu and $3.5 million yearly after upgrading the steam system in its ammonia plant in Verdigris, Oklahoma.

  3. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  4. Final Report DE-EE0005380 Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Final Report DE-EE0005380 Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Hao Ling (UT) Mark F. Hamilton (ARL:UT) Rajan Bhalla (SAIC) Walter E. Brown (ARL:UT) Todd A. Hay (ARL:UT) Nicholas J. Whitelonis (UT) Shang-Te Yang (UT) Aale R. Naqvi (UT) 9/30/2013 DE-EE0005380 The University of Texas at Austin ii Notice and Disclaimer This report is being disseminated by

  5. Cores from the Salton Sea scientific drilling program: Metamorphic reaction progress as a function of chemical and thermal environment: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papike, J.J.; Shearer, C.K.

    1987-05-13

    The study investigated the downhole progressive metamorphism at the Salton Sea site by monitoring and evaluating discontinuous and continuous metamorphic reactions. The main emphasis was placed on: (1) the addition of petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical data to the Salton Sea data base; (2) determination of downhole reactions; (3) evaluation of the progress of individual continuous reaction (epsilon) and the overall reaction progress (epsilon/sub T/) during the transition from one metamorphic zone to the next; and (4) evaluation and correlation of mineral reactions and reaction progress with mineral phase and organic material geothermometry. To these ends, thirty-three samples from the Salton Sea core were analyzed for: (1) quantitative modal mineralogy using the x-ray diffraction reference intensity method (RIM), (2) 30 major and trace elements in the whole rock and (3) mineral chemistry and structural state. In addition, a subset of these samples were used for temperature determinations using vitrinite reflectivity.

  6. Results from shallow research drilling at Inyo Domes, Long Valley Caldera, California and Salton Sea geothermal field, Salton Trough, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, L.W.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Vogel, T.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report reviews the results from two shallow drilling programs recently completed as part of the United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The purpose is to provide a broad overview of the objectives and results of the projects, and to analyze these results in the context of the promise and potential of research drilling in crustal thermal regimes. The Inyo Domes drilling project has involved drilling 4 shallow research holes into the 600-year-old Inyo Domes chain, the youngest rhyolitic event in the coterminous United States and the youngest volcanic event in Long Valley Caldera, California. The purpose of the drilling at Inyo was to understand the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of silicic magma as it intrudes the upper crust. This behavior, which involves the response of magma to decompression and cooling, is closely related to both eruptive phenomena and the establishment of hydrothermal circulation. The Salton Sea shallow research drilling project involved drilling 19 shallow research holes into the Salton Sea geothermal field, California. The purpose of this drilling was to bound the thermal anomaly, constrain hydrothermal flow pathways, and assess the thermal budget of the field. Constraints on the thermal budget links the local hydrothermal system to the general processes of crustal rifting in the Salton Trough.

  7. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter change of inundation depth through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  8. Adapting to sea-level rise in the US Southeast: The influence of built infrastructure and biophysical factors on the inundation of coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C. |; Gornitz, V.M.; Mehta, A.J.; Lee, Saychong; Cushman, R.M.

    1992-11-01

    The earth` s global mean surface air temperature has increased by 0.5{degrees}C over the past 100 years. This warming trend has occurred concurrently with increases in the concentration and number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These gases may cause this trend to accelerate in the future and result in a net increase in the earth`s global mean surface air temperature of 1.5 to 4.5{degrees}C by the year 2100. An increase of this magnitude could cause sea surface temperatures to increase would cause sea levels to rise -from thermal expansion of the sea, and the addition of melt waters from alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. To allow for the cost-effective analysis of the impacts that sea-level rise may have on the US Southeast, a method is needed that will allow sites that are potentially at risk to be identified for study. Previously, no objective method was available to identify such sites. This project addresses this problem by using a geographic data base with information on both physical and climatological factors to identify coastal areas of the US Southeast that are at risk to inundation or accelerated erosion due to sea-level rise. The following six areas were selected for further study from the many identified as being at high risk: Galveston, Texas; Caminada Pass, Louisiana; Bradenton Beach, Florida; Daytona Beach, Florida; McClellanville, South Carolina; and Nags Head, North Carolina. For each study area the amount of land, by land use type, in danger from inundation from three sea-level-rise scenarios was calculated. The calculated values were based on elevation alone.

  9. Adapting to sea-level rise in the US Southeast: The influence of built infrastructure and biophysical factors on the inundation of coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R. C.; Gornitz, V. M.; Mehta, A. J.; Lee, Saychong

    1992-11-01

    The earth' s global mean surface air temperature has increased by 0.5°C over the past 100 years. This warming trend has occurred concurrently with increases in the concentration and number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These gases may cause this trend to accelerate in the future and result in a net increase in the earth's global mean surface air temperature of 1.5 to 4.5°C by the year 2100. An increase of this magnitude could cause sea surface temperatures to increase would cause sea levels to rise -from thermal expansion of the sea, and the addition of melt waters from alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. To allow for the cost-effective analysis of the impacts that sea-level rise may have on the US Southeast, a method is needed that will allow sites that are potentially at risk to be identified for study. Previously, no objective method was available to identify such sites. This project addresses this problem by using a geographic data base with information on both physical and climatological factors to identify coastal areas of the US Southeast that are at risk to inundation or accelerated erosion due to sea-level rise. The following six areas were selected for further study from the many identified as being at high risk: Galveston, Texas; Caminada Pass, Louisiana; Bradenton Beach, Florida; Daytona Beach, Florida; McClellanville, South Carolina; and Nags Head, North Carolina. For each study area the amount of land, by land use type, in danger from inundation from three sea-level-rise scenarios was calculated. The calculated values were based on elevation alone.

  10. Mind the gap in SEA: An institutional perspective on why assessment of synergies amongst climate change mitigation, adaptation and other policy areas are missing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vammen Larsen, Sanne; Kornov, Lone; Wejs, Anja

    2012-02-15

    This article takes its point of departure in two approaches to integrating climate change into Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA): Mitigation and adaptation, and in the fact that these, as well as the synergies between them and other policy areas, are needed as part of an integrated assessment and policy response. First, the article makes a review of how positive and negative synergies between a) climate change mitigation and adaptation and b) climate change and other environmental concerns are integrated into Danish SEA practice. Then, the article discusses the implications of not addressing synergies. Finally, the article explores institutional explanations as to why synergies are not addressed in SEA practice. A document analysis of 149 Danish SEA reports shows that only one report comprises the assessment of synergies between mitigation and adaptation, whilst 9,4% of the reports assess the synergies between climate change and other environmental concerns. The consequences of separation are both the risk of trade-offs and missed opportunities for enhancing positive synergies. In order to propose explanations for the lacking integration, the institutional background is analysed and discussed, mainly based on Scott's theory of institutions. The institutional analysis highlights a regulatory element, since the assessment of climate change synergies is underpinned by legislation, but not by guidance. This means that great focus is on normative elements such as the local interpretation of legislation and of climate change mitigation and adaptation. The analysis also focuses on how the fragmentation of the organisation in which climate change and SEA are embedded has bearings on both normative and cultural-cognitive elements. This makes the assessment of synergies challenging. The evidence gathered and presented in the article points to a need for developing the SEA process and methodology in Denmark with the aim to include climate change in the assessments in a more systematic and integrated manner. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synergies between climate change mitigation, adaptation and other environmental concerns are not addressed in Danish SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Institutional explanations relate to organisational set-ups and understandings of climate change as a new planning issue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper points to a need for developing SEA to include climate change in a more systematic and integrated manner.

  11. Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolf Ent

    2012-04-01

    EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the worlds first polarized electron-proton collider, and the worlds first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of energies as more exclusive scattering probabilities are small, and any integrated detector/interaction region design needs to provide uniform coverage to detect spectator and diffractive products. This is because e-p and even more e-A colliders have a large fraction of their science related to what happens to the nucleon or ion beams. As a result, the philosophy of integration of complex detectors into an extended interaction region faces challenging constraints. Designs feature crossing angles between the protons or heavy ions during collisions with electrons, to remove potential problems for the detector induced by synchrotron radiation. Designs allocate quite some detector space before the final-focus ion quads, at the cost of luminosity, given that uniform detection coverage is a must for deep exclusive and diffractive processes. The integrated EIC detector/interaction region design at JLab focused on establishing full acceptance for such processes over a wide range of proton energies (20-100 GeV) with well achievable interaction region magnets. The detector design at BNL uses the higher ion beam energies to achieve good detection efficiency for instance for protons following a DVCS reaction, for proton beam energies starting from 100 GeV. Following a recommendation of the 2007 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort, the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics (DOE/NP) has allocated accelerator R&D funds to lay the foundation for a polarized EIC. BNL, in association with JLab and DOE/NP, has also established a generic detector R&D program to address the scientific requirements for measurements at a future EIC.

  12. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

  13. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

  14. Rare-earth elements in hot brines (165 to 190 degree C) from the Salton Sea geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rare-earth element (REE) concentrations are important indicators for revealing various chemical fractionation processes (water/rock interactions) and source region geochemistry. Since the REE patterns are characteristic of geologic materials (basalt, granite, shale, sediments, etc.) and minerals (K-feldspar, calcite, illite, epidote, etc.), their study in geothermal fluids may serve as a geothermometer. The REE study may also enable us to address the issue of groundwater mixing. In addition, the behavior of the REE can serve as analogs of the actinides in radioactive waste (e.g., neodymium is an analog of americium and curium). In this paper, the authors port the REE data for a Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brine (two aliquots: port 4 at 165{degree}C and port 5 at 190{degree}C) and six associated core samples.

  15. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vose, R.S. . Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Schmoyer, R.L. ); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. ); Eischeid, J.K. . Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the best'' data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  16. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vose, R.S.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R.; Eischeid, J.K.

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the ``best`` data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  17. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... On the other hand, under the changes in the level of the ocean surface, melting glaciers and ice sheets, ocean currents, daily tides, expansion or contraction of water based upon ...

  18. Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, as a near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1983-11-01

    Since high concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not normally encountered in salt domes or beds, finding an exact geologic analog of expected near-field conditions in a mined nuclear waste repository in salt will be difficult. The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, however, provides an opportunity to investigate the migration and retardation of naturally occurring U, Th, Ra, Cs, Sr and other elements in hot brines which have been moving through clay-rich sedimentary rocks for up to 100,000 years. The more than thirty deep wells drilled in this field to produce steam for electrical generation penetrate sedimentary rocks containing concentrated brines where temperatures reach 365/sup 0/C at only 2 km depth. The brines are primarily Na, K, Ca chlorides with up to 25% of total dissolved solids; they also contain high concentrations of metals such as Fe, Mn, Li, Zn, and Pb. This report describes the geology, geophysics and geochemistry of this system as a prelude to a study of the mobility of naturally occurring radionuclides and radionuclide analogs within it. The aim of this study is to provide data to assist in validating quantitative models of repository behavior and to use in designing and evaluating waste packages and engineered barriers. 128 references, 33 figures, 13 tables.

  19. Investigating the Influence of Anthropogenic Forcing on Observed Mean and Extreme Sea Level Pressure Trends over the Mediterranean Region

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barkhordarian, Armineh

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether the observed mean sea level pressure (SLP) trends over the Mediterranean region in the period from 1975 to 2004 are significantly consistent with what 17 models projected as response of SLP to anthropogenic forcing (greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols, GS). Obtained results indicate that the observed trends in mean SLP cannot be explained by natural (internal) variability. Externally forced changes are detectable in all seasons, except spring. The large-scale component (spatial mean) of the GS signal is detectable in all the 17 models in winter and in 12 of the 17 models in summer. However, the small-scalemore » component (spatial anomalies about the spatial mean) of GS signal is only detectable in winter within 11 of the 17 models. We also show that GS signal has a detectable influence on observed decreasing (increasing) tendency in the frequencies of extremely low (high) SLP days in winter and that these changes cannot be explained by internal climate variability. While the detection of GS forcing is robust in winter and summer, there are striking inconsistencies in autumn, where analysis points to the presence of an external forcing, which is not GS forcing.« less

  20. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Hao; Hamilton, Mark F.; Bhalla, Rajan; Brown, Walter E.; Hay, Todd A.; Whitelonis, Nicholas J.; Yang, Shang-Te; Naqvi, Aale R.

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  1. Handbook of methods for the analysis of the various parameters of the carbon dioxide system in sea water. Version 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, A.G.; Goyet, C.

    1994-09-01

    The collection of extensive, reliable, oceanic carbon data is a key component of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS). A portion of the US JGOFS oceanic carbon dioxide measurements will be made during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Hydrographic Program. A science team has been formed to plan and coordinate the various activities needed to produce high quality oceanic carbon dioxide measurements under this program. This handbook was prepared at the request of, and with the active participation of, that science team. The procedures have been agreed on by the members of the science team and describe well tested methods. They are intended to provide standard operating procedures, together with an appropriate quality control plan, for measurements made as part of this survey. These are not the only measurement techniques in use for the parameters of the oceanic carbon system; however, they do represent the current state-of-the-art for ship-board measurements. In the end, the editors hope that this handbook can serve widely as a clear and unambiguous guide to other investigators who are setting up to analyze the various parameters of the carbon dioxide system in sea water.

  2. Use of bromodeoxyuridine immunocapture to identify psychrotolerant phenanthrene-degrading bacteria in phenanthrene-enriched polluted Baltic Sea sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edlund, A.; Jansson, J.

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to enrich and identify psychrotolerant phenanthrenedegrading bacteria from polluted Baltic Sea sediments. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediments were spiked with phenanthrene and incubated for 2 months in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine that is incorporated into the DNA of replicating cells. The bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA was extracted by immunocapture and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing to identify bacterial populations that were growing. In addition, degradation genes were quantified in the bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA by real-time PCR. Phenanthrene concentrations decreased after 2 months of incubation in the phenanthrene-enriched sediments and this reduction correlated to increases in copy numbers of xylE and phnAc dioxygenase genes. Representatives of Exiguobacterium, Schewanella,Methylomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacteroides and an uncultured Deltaproteobacterium and a Gammaproteobacterium dominated the growing community in the phenanthrene spiked sediments. Isolates that were closely related to three of these bacteria (two pseudomonads and an Exiguobacterium sp.) could reduce phenanthrene concentrations in pure cultures and they all harbored phnAc dioxygenase genes. These results confirm that this combination of culture-based and molecular approaches was useful for identification of actively growing bacterial species with a high potential for phenanthrene degradation.

  3. Depositional and erosional coastal processes during the late postglacial sea-level rise: An example from the central Tyrrhenian continental shelf (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tortora, P.

    1996-03-01

    A transgressive systems tract (TST) deposit on the inner continental shelf of the south Tuscany region (central Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) formed during the last postglacial sea-level rise. Its small-scale stratigraphy has been detailed using high-resolution seismic profiles, gravity cores, and grab samples. The TST deposit overlies a lowstand unconformity, shows a tabular geometry, and comprises three internal architectures of beach facies. Because the lateral distribution of these vertical successions is not random, but parallel to the coast, each architecture represents an individual sedimentary stage during sea-level rise. However, all architectures were formed via shoreface retreat in response to the landward migration of a beach complex over the unconformity. During this migration the beach system was characterized by a source diastem located in the surf zone and by two sediment dispersal systems. One moved the eroded sand over the flat back-barrier palustrine area by storm washover, while the other transported part of this sand to the lower shoreface, forming a reworked sand sheet above the older and inactive source diastem (ravinement surface). The TST architectures originated from a transgressive succession of beach facies, differentiated according to the intensity of shoreface retreat. Architecture A represents a low preservation potential of the original beach complex, Architecture B relatively high preservation, and Architecture C no preservation. The intensity of erosion and the consequent preservation potential were totally controlled by antecedent topography.

  4. Application of principal component analysis (PCA) and improved joint probability distributions to the inverse first-order reliability method (I-FORM) for predicting extreme sea states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey C.; Sallaberry, Cédric J.; Dallman, Ann R.; Neary, Vincent S.

    2016-01-06

    Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulations as a part of the standard current practice for designing marine structures to survive extreme sea states. These environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height (Hs) and either energy period (Te) or peak period (Tp) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first-order reliability method (I-FORM) is a standard design practice for generating environmental contours. This papermore » develops enhanced methodologies for data analysis prior to the application of the I-FORM, including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the variables under consideration as well as new distribution and parameter fitting techniques. As a result, these modifications better represent the measured data and, therefore, should contribute to the development of more realistic representations of environmental contours of extreme sea states for determining design loads for marine structures.« less

  5. The Influence of deep-sea bed CO2 sequestration on small metazoan (meiofaunal) community structure and function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carman, Kevin R; Fleeger, John W; Thistle, David

    2013-02-17

    We conducted a series of experiments in Monterey Submarine Canyon to examine potential ecological impacts of deep-ocean CO2 sequestration. Our focus was on responses of meiofaunal invertebrates (< 1 mm body length) living within the sediment at depths ranging between 3000-3600 m. Our particular emphasis was on harpacticoid copepods and nematodes. In the first phase of our DOE funding, we reported findings that suggest substantial (~80%) mortality to harpacticoid copepods. In the second phase of our funding we published additional findings from phase one and conducted follow-up experiments in the Monterey Canyon and in the laboratory. In one experiment we looked for evidence that meiofauna seek to escape areas where CO2 concentrations are elevated. â??Emergence trapsâ? near the source of the CO2-rich seawater caught significantly more harpacticoids than those far from it. The harpacticoids apparently attempted to escape from the advancing front of carbon dioxide-rich seawater and therefore presumably found exposure to it to be stressful. Although most were adversely affected, species differed significantly in the degree of their susceptibility. Unexpectedly, six species showed no effect and may be resistant. The hypothesis that harpacticoids could escape the effects of carbon dioxide-rich seawater by moving deeper into the seabed was not supported. Exposure to carbon dioxide-rich seawater created partially defaunated areas, but we found no evidence that disturbance-exploiting harpacticoid species invaded during the recovery of the affected area. Based on a detailed analysis of nematode biovolumes, we postulated that the nematode community in Monterey Canyon throughout the upper 3 cm suffered a high rate of mortality after exposure to CO2, and that nematodes were larger because postmortem expansions in body length and width occurred. Decomposition rates were probably low and corpses did not disintegrate in 30 days. The observable effects of a reduction in pH to about 7.0 after 30 days were as great as an extreme pH reduction (5.4), suggesting that â??moderateâ?? CO2 exposure, compared to the range of exposures possible following CO2 release, causes high mortality rates in the two most abundant sediment-dwelling metazoans (nematodes and copepods). While we found evidence for negative impacts on deep-sea benthos, we also observed that small-scale experiments with CO2 releases were difficult to replicate in the deep sea. Specifically, in one CO2-release experiment in the Monterey Canyon we did not detect an adverse impacts on benthic meiofauan. In laboratory experiments, we manipulated seawater acidity by addition of HCl and by increasing CO2 concentration and observed that two coastal harpacticoid copepod species were both more sensitive to increased acidity when generated by CO2. Copepods living in environments more prone to hypercapnia, such as mudflats, may be less sensitive to future acidification. Ocean acidification is also expected to alter the toxicity of waterborne metals by influencing their speciation in seawater. CO2 enrichment did not affect the free-ion concentration of Cd but did increase the free-ion concentration of Cu. Antagonistic toxicities were observed between CO2 with Cd, Cu and Cu free-ion. This interaction could be due to a competition for H+ and metals for binding sites.

  6. Sea shell solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for the collection and concentration of solar radiant energy including a longitudinally extending structure having a wall for directing radiant energy. The wall is parabolic with its focus along a line parallel to an extreme ray of the sun at one solstice and with its axis along a line parallel to an extreme ray of the sun at the other solstice. An energy absorber is positioned to receive the solar energy thereby collected.

  7. DOE/SEA-04

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM 10 ). As a result of the study, on August 19, 2005, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) issued a letter to Mirant requesting that Mirant "undertake such action as is necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment, in the area surrounding the Potomac River Generating Station, including the potential reduction of levels of operation, or potential shutdown of the facility." On August 24, 2005, in response to VDEQ's

  8. DOE/SEA-04

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM 10 ). As a result of the study, on August 19, 2005, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) issued a letter to Mirant requesting that Mirant "undertake such action as is necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment, in the area surrounding the Potomac River Generating Station, including the potential reduction of levels of operation, or potential shutdown of the facility." On August 24, 2005, in response to VDEQ's

  9. Observed 1970-2005 cooling of summer daytime temperatures in coastal California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebassi, B.; Gonzalez, J.; Fabris, D.; Maurer, E.; Miller, N.; Milesi, C.; Bornstein, R.

    2009-05-15

    The study evaluated 1948-2004 summer (JJA) mean monthly air temperatures for two California air basins: SoCAB and SFBA. The study focuses on the more rapid post-1970 warming period, and its daily T{sub min} and T{sub max} values were used to produce average monthly values and spatial distributions of trends for each air basins. Additional analyses included T{sub D} values at two NWS sites, SSTs, NCEP reanalysis sea-level pressures, and GCM T{sub ave}-values. Results for all California COOP sites together showed increased JJA T{sub ave}-values; asymmetric warming, as T{sub min}-values increase faster than T{sub max}-values; and thus decreased DTR values. The spatial distribution of observed SoCAB and SFBA T{sub max} values exhibited a complex pattern, with cooling in low-elevation coastal-areas open to marine air penetration and warming at inland areas. Results also showed that decreased DTR values in the valleys arose from small increases at 'inland' sites combined with large decreases at 'coastal' sites. Previous studies suggest that cooling JJA T{sub max}-values in coastal California were due to increased irrigation, coastal upwelling, or cloud cover, while the current hypothesis is that they arises from GHG-induced global-warming of 'inland' areas, which results in increased sea breeze flow activity. Sea level pressure trends showed increases in the oceanic Pacific High and decreases in the central-California Thermal Low. The corresponding gradient thus showed a trend of 0.02 hPa 100-km{sup -1} decade{sup -1}, supportive of the hypothesis of increased sea breeze activity. Trends in T{sub D} values showed a larger value at coastal SFO than at inland SEC, which indicative of increased sea breeze activity; calculated SST trends (0.15 C decade{sup -1}) could also have increase T{sub D}-values. GCM model Tave-values showed warming that decreases from 0.13 C decade{sup -1} at inland California to 0.08 C decade{sup -1} at coastal areas. Significant societal impacts may result from this observed 'reverse-reaction' to GHG-warming, i.e., the decreased JJA T{sub max}-values in coastal areas. Possible beneficial effects include decreased: maximum O{sub 3} levels, human thermal-stress, and energy requirements for cooling.

  10. Evidence of climatic variations in upper Pleistocene and Holocene sediments from the lagoon of Venice (Italy and the Bohai Sea (China))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonardi, M.; Carbognin, L.; Tosi, L.; Marabini, F.

    1996-12-31

    An accurate forecasting of environmental impact on sea level and shoreline changes due to global warming, requires a detailed investigation and interpretation of the events that occurred during the past 20,000 years. This time interval in fact corresponds to two significant climatic global changes: the last Wuermian glaciation, during the Upper Pleistocene, and the warming during the Holocene. Examples of the climatic variation impact on paleoenvironments are here evidenced by sedimentological studies, radiocarbon dating, paleobotanic, paleontological, mineralogical and geochemical investigations of two stratigraphic columns that are geographically far apart: the Lagoon of Venice, Italy, and the Bohai Sea, China. The study focuses first on a general overview of the regional paleoclimatic history of these two core locations and their correlation with the sedimentological variations; second on some depositional events, such clay layers and beachrock formations, that carry the imprints of the climatic conditions. The results of this investigation may contribute to a better understanding of diagenetic processes, still not sufficiently described, caused by the climatic changes. Furthermore the study provided information that may be useful to a more complete overview of the environmental impact caused by natural global warming before the anthropogenic input.

  11. A KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY STRATEGY FOR RELATING SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FREQUENCIES OF TROPICAL STORMS AND GENERATING PREDICTIONS OF HURRICANES UNDER 21ST-CENTURY GLOBAL WARMING SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Race, Caitlin; Steinbach, Michael; Ganguly, Auroop R; Semazzi, Fred; Kumar, Vipin

    2010-01-01

    The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditional and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.

  12. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP Application from Boralex Fort Fairfield LP to export electric...

  13. table10.13_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column ... Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Factors LPG(b) Alternative Energy ...

  14. table10.3_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column ... Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Factors Alternative Energy Sources(c) ...

  15. Platform/foreslope facies and buildup geometry resulting from short-term and long-term eustatic sea level fluctuations: latemar buildup (Middle Triassic), Dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, M.T.; Goldhammer, R.

    1987-05-01

    Superimposed short-term and long-term eustatic sea level fluctuations directly controlled Latemar platform stratigraphy and indirectly influenced the deeper water facies and overall buildup geometry. Deeper water facies, the foreslope and toe of slope, are a function of platform submergence (highstand shedding) and subaerial exposure (lowstand lithification and erosion) and thus only indirectly reflect eustatic fluctuations. The Latemar consists of a platform core (3-4 km wide, 700 m thick) with a narrow margin, flanked by foreslope (30-35/sup 0/ dips), toe of slope, and basin deposits. The shallowing-upward platform sequence records a long-term (about 10 m.y.) eustatic sea level oscillation with an amplitude of about 150 m. The lower 250 m marks an initial catch-up phase (subtidal carbonates); the upper 450 m marks the sequential keep-up phase (meter-scale cyclic carbonates). These cycles record platform submergence and exposure caused by short-term (10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/ years) Milankovitch eustatic oscillations superimposed on the long-term trend. Platform submergence and exposure conditions result in contrasting foreslope deposits. During highstands, platform-derived sands bypass the foreslope, accumulating as toe-of-slope graded beds and basin turbidites. During lowstands, sand supply ceases, producing basin hard-grounds. Foreslope megabreccias contain margin-derived boundstone clasts, with only minor platform-derived sands (highstands) and lithified clasts (lowstands). As the platform margin/foreslope contact is nearly vertical, a progressively increasing volume of foreslope megabreccia was needed to maintain the depositional geometry. This coincides with the most commonly exposed platform interval, suggesting that platform exposure determines buildup flank geometry by controlling megabreccia clast production.

  16. Collaborative research on the Northeast Water Polynya: NEWP92 hydrographic data report. USCGC Polar Sea cruise, July 15--August 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, D.W.R.; Behrens, W.J.; Hopkins, T.S.; Kinder, C.; Deming, J.; Smith, W.O.; Top, Z.; Walsh, I.D.

    1995-06-01

    The Northeast Water Polynya (NEW) off the northeast coast of Greenland was the focus of two cruises aboard the USCGC Polar Sea during the summers of 1992 and 1993. The cruises were supported by the National Science Foundation Arctic Systems Science (ARCSS) program and were part of the Arctic Ocean Science Board`s International Arctic Polynya Program. The Polar Sea cruises were designed as multidisciplinary studies to test hypotheses about the mechanisms of heat, water and carbon flow within and beyond the boundaries of the polynya. Preliminary results of the 1992 study have been described elsewhere. A collection of papers arising from the 1992 cruise have been published in a Special Section of the Journal of Geophysical Research. This data report presents the hydrographic and basic chemical observations made from CTD/Rosette casts during the 1992 cruise. The station positions cruise are plotted in Figure 1. Also included in the report are selected section plots and vertical profiles. A total of 130 CTD casts were made during the cruise, measuring pressure, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and light transmission. Discrete samples were collected in 10-liter, rosette-mounted, Niskin bottles and analyzed, from most casts, for: salinity, dissolved nutrients, dissolved oxygen, anthropogenic halocarbons (e.g., Freon gases), pigments, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen. Suspended particulate matter was analyzed at selected stations and these data were used to calibrate the CTD-transmissometer. Samples were collected from selected stations and depths for tritium and helium analyses, carbonate chemistry, as well as for measurements of bacterial abundance.

  17. "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel

  18. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fairfield LP | Department of Energy 3 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP Application from Boralex Fort Fairfield LP to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon Application to Export Electric Energy OE Cocket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP More Documents & Publications EA-353 Boralex Ashland LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP:

  19. Overview of the first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment: Conversion of a ground-based lidar for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.N.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    The first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) field experiment demonstrated an airborne high energy TEA CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar system for measurement of atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. The system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 during September 1995 in a series of checkout flights to observe several important atmospheric phenomena, including upper level winds in a Pacific hurricane, marine boundary layer winds, cirrus cloud properties, and land-sea breeze structure. The instrument, with its capability to measure three-dimensional winds and backscatter fields, promises to be a valuable tool for climate and global change, severe weather, and air quality research. In this paper, the authors describe the airborne instrument, assess its performance, discuss future improvements, and show some preliminary results from September experiments.

  20. Symposium on Lower Tropospheric Profiling: Needs and Technologies, 1st, Boulder, CO, May 31-June 3, 1988, Papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabberdt, W.F.; Hardesty, R.M.

    1989-10-01

    Papers on lower tropospheric profiling are presented, covering topics such as horizontal resolution needs for adequate lower tropospheric profiling with atmospheric systems forced by horizontal gradients in surface heating, meteorological data requirements for modeling air quality uncertainties, and kinematic quantities derived from a triangle of VHF Doppler wind profilers. Other topics include the intercomparison of wind measurements from two acoustic Doppler sodars, a laser Doppler radar, and in situ sensors, studying precipitation processes in the troposphere with an FM-CW radar, Doppler lidar measurements of profiles of turbulence and momentum flux, and airborne Doppler lidar measurements of the extended California sea breeze. Additional subjects include DIAL tropospheric ozone measurement using a Nd:YAG laser and the Raman shifting technique, design considerations for a network of thermodynamic profilers, nonredundant frequencies for ground-based microwave radiometric temperature profiling, and the sounding range of a 1-m wavelength radio acoustic sounder.

  1. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert Bob Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station/Seafloor Observatory is in danger of lapsing into disuse. However, for the present, interest in the site on the continental slope is healthy and The Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology continues to coordinate all activity at the MS/SFO as arranged through the BOEM in 2005. Field and laboratory research projects and findings are reviewed, new technologies and tests described. Many new sensors, systems and two custom ROVs have been developed specifically for this project. Characteristics of marine gas hydrates are dramatically more refined than when the project was initiated and include appear in sections entitled Accomplishments, Products and Publications.

  2. Solar energy from the sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabata, R.S.

    1981-10-01

    Questions addressed include: what is OTEC, what could OTEC mean for the future, what are some advantages and disadvantages of OTEC, who's working on OTEC, what's happening with OTEC in Hawaii, and what are some possible environmental concerns now being studied. A list of publications, films, and information sources is included. The OTEC resource of the Pacific Ocean is mapped and the closed-cycle OTEC process is explained in elementary terms. (LEW)

  3. SEA and DOE Extension Comments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These microscopic particles are the most dangerous to public health since they are breathed directly into the lungs, causing respiratory infections, asthma attacks, bronchitis, ...

  4. FNOV SEA-2015-01

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 C.F.R. 824.4, the FNOV imposes a civil penalty of 577,500. All classified ... (PNOV) to Sandia with a total proposed civil penalty of 577,500 for four Severity ...

  5. SEA-03: Special Environmental Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (September 2000)

  6. 25000 Volts Under the Sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  7. Evaluation of 2,3,7,8 specific congener and toxic potency of persistent polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans in cetaceans from the Mediterranean Sea, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, B.; Gonzalez, M.J.; Jimenez, O.; Reich, S.; Eljarrat, E.; Rivera, J.

    2000-03-01

    The present study investigates individual 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) concentrations in cetaceans and assesses the PCDD and PCDF contributions to the total TCDD equivalent concentration. Liver samples of a variety of cetaceans species found stranded along the Italian coasts during the period of 1987--1992 were analyzed for PCDDs and PCDFs. The main aims were to scrutinize levels and patterns of PCDDs and PCDFs for the first time in cetaceans from the Mediterranean Sea and to estimate whether chlorinated compounds mentioned are implicated in the exceptionally high mortality of dolphins that occurred in the Mediterranean sea during 1990--1992. PCDD and PCDF profiles were dominated by congeners OCCD and OCDF. The new toxic equivalency factors recommended by WHO in 1997 were used for calculation of dioxin-like toxicity. On the basis of their previous study of PCBs, the overall TEQ calculated from the 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs do not contribute as much dioxin-like toxicity as PCBs.

  8. Florida Biomass Energy Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Florida Biomass Energy Group Place: Gulf Breeze, Florida Zip: 32561 Sector: Biomass Product: Florida Biomass Energy Group is a Florida...

  9. Green Lion Bio Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A bioethanol producer and project developer that is planning three projects; Diamond Ethanol in Charleston Illinois, Emerald Ethanol in Streator Illinois, and Prairie Breeze...

  10. Sandia Energy - Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Project Home Transportation Energy Hydrogen Market Transformation Maritime Hydrogen & SF-BREEZE Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell Project Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

  11. Sustina Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy provides customers with a variety of renewable energy products. Their online store features the Evergreen 180 Watt Solar Module, and the AIR Breeze wind power system.2...

  12. Hudson, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Hudson, Massachusetts AltE New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers References US Census Bureau Incorporated...

  13. Santa Rosa County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Santa Rosa County, Florida Bagdad, Florida Gulf Breeze, Florida Jay, Florida Milton, Florida Pace, Florida Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSantaRo...

  14. RSE Table N1.1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced ... marketing subsidiaries of utilities." " (f) Examples of Liquefied Petroleum Gases ...

  15. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE ... raw" "Natural Gas Liquids '(NGL).'" " (f) 'Other' includes energy that respondents ...

  16. "RSE Table C1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced ... marketing subsidiaries of utilities." " (f) Examples of Liquefied Petroleum Gases ...

  17. Property:EiaUtilityId | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc + 261 + AP Holdings LLC + 56571 + AP Holdings LLC (New York) + 56571 + APN Starfirst, L.P. + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Illinois) + 50153 + APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) + 50153...

  18. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    53 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP: Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP &...

  19. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328 RBC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RBC Energy Services L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P. Application from RBC Energy Services L.P. to export electric energy to...

  20. The influence of air temperature inversions on snowmelt and glacier mass-balance simulations, Ammassalik island, SE Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    In many applications, a realistic description of air temperature inversions is essential for accurate snow and glacier ice melt, and glacier mass-balance simulations. A physically based snow-evolution modeling system (SnowModel) was used to simulate eight years (1998/99 to 2005/06) of snow accumulation and snow and glacier ice ablation from numerous small coastal marginal glaciers on the SW-part of Ammassalik Island in SE Greenland. These glaciers are regularly influenced by inversions and sea breezes associated with the adjacent relatively low temperature and frequently ice-choked fjords and ocean. To account for the influence of these inversions on the spatiotemporal variation of air temperature and snow and glacier melt rates, temperature inversion routines were added to MircoMet, the meteorological distribution sub-model used in SnowModel. The inversions were observed and modeled to occur during 84% of the simulation period. Modeled inversions were defined not to occur during days with strong winds and high precipitation rates due to the potential of inversion break-up. Field observations showed inversions to extend from sea level to approximately 300 m a.s.l., and this inversion level was prescribed in the model simulations. Simulations with and without the inversion routines were compared. The inversion model produced air temperature distributions with warmer lower elevation areas and cooler higher elevation areas than without inversion routines due to the use of cold sea-breeze base temperature data from underneath the inversion. This yielded an up to 2 weeks earlier snowmelt in the lower areas and up to 1 to 3 weeks later snowmelt in the higher elevation areas of the simulation domain. Averaged mean annual modeled surface mass-balance for all glaciers (mainly located above the inversion layer) was -720 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} for inversion simulations, and -880 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} without the inversion routines, a difference of 160 mm w.eq. y{sup -1}. The annual glacier loss for the two simulations was 50.7 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} y{sup -1} and 64.4 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} y{sup -1} for all glaciers - a difference of {approx}21%. The average equilibrium line altitude (ELA) for all glaciers in the simulation domain was located at 875 m a.s.l. and at 900 m a.s.l. for simulations with or without inversion routines, respectively.

  1. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marketing LP Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-368 Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Record of ...

  2. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-164-C...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Commodities Group, Inc Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP: Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151...

  3. Genesis Park | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Genesis Park LP Name: Genesis Park LP Address: 2131 San Felipe Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77019 Region: Texas Area Product: Private equity...

  4. FY 2015 SC Laboratory Performance Report Cards | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    5 SC Laboratory Performance Report Cards Laboratory Policy (LP) LP Home About Laboratory Appraisal Process FY 2015 Report Cards FY 2014 Report Cards FY 2013 Report Cards Report...

  5. table3.4_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Factors Total ... Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Factors 3312 Steel ...

  6. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 10, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Aleutian Trench and the Bering Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

    1987-01-01

    Four major areas with inferred gas hydrates are the subject of this study. Two of these areas, the Navarin and the Norton Basins, are located within the Bering Sea shelf, whereas the remaining areas of the Atka Basin in the central Aleutian Trench system and the eastern Aleutian Trench represent a huge region of the Aleutian Trench-Arc system. All four areas are geologically diverse and complex. Particularly the structural features of the accretionary wedge north of the Aleutian Trench still remain the subjects of scientific debates. Prior to this study, suggested presence of the gas hydrates in the four areas was based on seismic evidence, i.e., presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). Although the disclosure of the BSRs is often difficult, particularly under the structural conditions of the Navarin and Norton basins, it can be concluded that the identified BSRs are mostly represented by relatively weak and discontinuous reflectors. Under thermal and pressure conditions favorable for gas hydrate formation, the relative scarcity of the BSRs can be attributed to insufficient gas supply to the potential gas hydrate zone. Hydrocarbon gas in sediment may have biogenic, thermogenic or mixed origin. In the four studied areas, basin analysis revealed limited biogenic hydrocarbon generation. The migration of the thermogenically derived gases is probably diminished considerably due to the widespread diagenetic processes in diatomaceous strata. The latter processes resulted in the formation of the diagenetic horizons. The identified gas hydrate-related BSRs seem to be located in the areas of increased biogenic methanogenesis and faults acting as the pathways for thermogenic hydrocarbons.

  7. "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," "

  8. "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy

  9. "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural

  10. "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and

  11. "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and

  12. sea level rise | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report...

  13. Salton Sea Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    500-04-051. Karl Gawell. 04032014. Statement of Karl Gawell, Executive Director, Geothermal Energy Association Before the Senate Select Committee on California's Energy...

  14. 05sea1051_95322.job

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville sells andor exchanges power under contracts with over 100 utilities in the Pacific Northwest and Pacific Southwest and with several industrial customers. It also owns...

  15. Clean Cities Reaches Across the Sea

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Cities International collaborates with leaders from Kazakhstan and Sweden share best practices and accomplish mutual goals.

  16. SeaMicro Volume Server Power Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet about saving 75% of computing energy through an inter-connected array of low-power central processing units

  17. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangano, Salvatore [IFIC - Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular, Edificio Institutos de Investigatin, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  18. SeaRoc Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power group with mariners and engineers working on a variety of marine projects including offshore wind, wave and tidal. Coordinates: 44.81454, -71.881084 Show Map Loading...

  19. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These changes are associated with variations in space and time of temperature, salinity, ocean currents and the combined results of the atmosphere and the ocean interaction which ...

  20. Sea for Life | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  1. SeaMicro Volume Server Power Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-31

    Fact sheet about saving 75% of computing energy through an inter-connected array of low-power central processing units.

  2. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328 RBC Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services L.P. | Department of Energy 8 RBC Energy Services L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P. Application from RBC Energy Services L.P. to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P. More Documents & Publications EA-328 RBC Energy Services L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328-A RBC Energy Services LP EA-328-A RBC Energy

  3. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Services L.P. | Department of Energy 9 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. Application from Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. More Documents & Publications EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. EA-359-A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P.

  4. Application to Export Electric Emergy OE Docket No. EA-368-A Brookfield

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Marketing LP | Department of Energy Emergy OE Docket No. EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Application to Export Electric Emergy OE Docket No. EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Application from BEMLP to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-368-A Brookfield Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP: Federal Register Notice,

  5. Wind flow in the Fraser Valley as measured by a pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, L.D.; Banta, R.M.; Hardesty, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Vancouver, British Columbia metropolitan area, with a population close to 1.5 million people, experiences high levels of tropospheric ozone during the summer months. The transport of pollution, including tropospheric ozone, in the Vancouver area, is influenced by a local land/sea breeze circulation, the valley flows associated with the Lower Fraser River Valley to the east of the city, and the complex terrain to the north and northeast of the city. In July and August of 1993, an experiment was conducted in the Vancouver area to assess the distribution and transport of tropospheric ozone. Wind flow and aerosol measurements were obtained with a pulsed CO(sub 2) Doppler lidar and wind fields and their interactions with the complex terrain were mapped. The combination of Doppler lidar measurements of wind velocity and backscattered signal intensity, obtained simultaneously, will help identify wind flow patterns that enhanced the transport of urban pollution from the city of Vancouver to the Lower Fraser River Valley, and the possible recirculation of these pollutants back into Vancouver.

  6. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Doc No. EA-339-A Shell Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    North America (US), L.P. | Department of Energy Doc No. EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Doc No. EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Application from Shell Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-339-A Shell Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-339 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-359-B Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P.

  7. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-338-A Shell Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    North America (US), L.P. | Department of Energy 8-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-338-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Application from Shell Energy to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-338-A Shell Energy (MX).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-338-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-338 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-339 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P.

  8. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and ocean breezes that have always been the major lure for those wanting to escape the memory of winter. While some people opt for ocean cruises, others spend their time visiting...

  9. EECBG Success Story: Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On the street level in Reno, it may be easy to forget that every time the breeze blows off the Truckee River and past the 17-story City Hall, the town is quietly saving money. Learn more.

  10. ORISE: Postdoc Research Experiences - Marcus Beck

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division (GED) in Gulf Breeze, FL, has developed a new tool that will answer some of the big data challenges faced by estuarine ecologists. By employing this tool, researchers are...

  11. Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spring. With gentle breezes, blooming flowers, and warm sunshine, the season marks the beginning of fun outdoor activities—picnics, camping, hikes, and the classic American pastime—baseball. In the...

  12. "RSE Table C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total ... marketing subsidiaries of utilities." " (f) Examples of Liquefied Petroleum Gases ...

  13. "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total ... marketing subsidiaries of utilities." " (f) Examples of Liquefied Petroleum Gases ...

  14. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors" ... marketing subsidiaries of utilities." " (f) Examples of Liquefied Petroleum Gases ...

  15. Supervisory Loan Specialist (Strategic Risk)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Department of Energy (DOE) Loans Programs Office (LPO), Risk Management Division (RMD or LP-40) Strategic Risk Group (LP-40). The incumbent is the supervisor for the...

  16. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-409 Sararcen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Sararcen Power LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-409 Sararcen Power LP Application from Saracen Power to export electric energy to Canada. EA-409 Saracen...

  17. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328-A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -A RBC Energy Services LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328-A RBC Energy Services LP Application from RBC Energy Svcs. to export electric energy to Canada....

  18. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328-A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LP, Federal Register Notice, Volume 77, No. 162 - Aug 21, 2012 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-328-A RBC Energy Services LP, Federal Register Notice,...

  19. Application to Export Electric Emergy OE Docket No. EA-368-A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-368-A Brookfield Energy Marketing LP: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 42 - ...

  20. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-368 Brookfield Energy Marketing LP | Department of Energy 8 Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-368 Brookfield Energy Marketing LP Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): Application from Brookfield Energy Marketing LP to export electric energy to CanadaA PDF icon EA-368

  1. Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Archbald Power Station Biomass Facility Keystone Landfill Biomass Facility Taylor Energy Partners LP Biomass Facility Places in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania...

  2. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-409 Sararcen Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LP | Department of Energy 9 Sararcen Power LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-409 Sararcen Power LP Application from Saracen Power to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-409 Saracen Power (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-409 Saracen Power LP Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-409 Saracen Power LP: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 70 - April 13, 2015 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-196-D Minnesota

  3. Improved Meteorological Input for Atmospheric Release Decision support Systems and an Integrated LES Modeling System for Atmospheric Dispersion of Toxic Agents: Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, E; Simpson, M; Larsen, S; Gash, J; Aluzzi, F; Lundquist, J; Sugiyama, G

    2010-04-26

    When hazardous material is accidently or intentionally released into the atmosphere, emergency response organizations look to decision support systems (DSSs) to translate contaminant information provided by atmospheric models into effective decisions to protect the public and emergency responders and to mitigate subsequent consequences. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)-led Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC) is one of the primary DSSs utilized by emergency management organizations. IMAAC is responsible for providing 'a single piont for the coordination and dissemination of Federal dispersion modeling and hazard prediction products that represent the Federal position' during actual or potential incidents under the National Response Plan. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), locatec at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), serves as the primary operations center of the IMAAC. A key component of atmospheric release decision support systems is meteorological information - models and data of winds, turbulence, and other atmospheric boundary-layer parameters. The accuracy of contaminant predictions is strongly dependent on the quality of this information. Therefore, the effectiveness of DSSs can be enhanced by improving the meteorological options available to drive atmospheric transport and fate models. The overall goal of this project was to develop and evaluate new meteorological modeling capabilities for DSSs based on the use of NASA Earth-science data sets in order to enhance the atmospheric-hazard information provided to emergency managers and responders. The final report describes the LLNL contributions to this multi-institutional effort. LLNL developed an approach to utilize NCAR meteorological predictions using NASA MODIS data for the New York City (NYC) region and demonstrated the potential impact of the use of different data sources and data parameterizations on IMAAC/NARAC fate and transport predictions. A case study involving coastal sea breeze circulation patterns in the NYC region was used to investigate the sensitivity of atmospheric dispersion results on the source of three-dimensional wind field data.

  4. SeaScape Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lancaster, United Kingdom Zip: LA1 4XQ Sector: Wind energy Product: Develops offshore wind farms - specifically the Burbo Bank project. Coordinates: 42.847505, -90.709634...

  5. Evolutionary Genomics of Life in (and from) the Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Dehal, Paramvir; Fuerstenberg, Susan I.

    2006-01-09

    High throughput genome sequencing centers that were originally built for the Human Genome Project (Lander et al., 2001; Venter et al., 2001) have now become an engine for comparative genomics. The six largest centers alone are now producing over 150 billion nucleotides per year, more than 50 times the amount of DNA in the human genome, and nearly all of this is directed at projects that promise great insights into the pattern and processes of evolution. Unfortunately, this data is being produced at a pace far exceeding the capacity of the scientific community to provide insightful analysis, and few scientists with training and experience in evolutionary biology have played prominent roles to date. One of the consequences is that poor quality analyses are typical; for example, orthology among genes is generally determined by simple measures of sequence similarity, when this has been discredited by molecular evolutionary biologists decades ago. Here we discuss the how genomes are chosen for sequencing and how the scientific community can have input. We describe the PhIGs database and web tools (Dehal and Boore 2005a; http://PhIGs.org), which provide phylogenetic analysis of all gene families for all completely sequenced genomes and the associated 'Synteny Viewer', which allows comparisons of the relative positions of orthologous genes. This is the best tool available for inferring gene function across multiple genomes. We also describe how we have used the PhIGs methods with the whole genome sequences of a tunicate, fish, mouse, and human to conclusively demonstrate that two rounds of whole genome duplication occurred at the base of vertebrates (Dehal and Boore 2005b). This evidence is found in the large scale structure of the positions of paralogous genes that arose from duplications inferred by evolutionary analysis to have occurred at the base of vertebrates.

  6. Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    risks to their energy infrastructure so they can be better prepared to make informed decisions about their investments, resilience and hardening strategies, and asset management. ...

  7. Microearthquake Studies at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this project is to detect and locate microearthquakes to aid in the characterization of reservoir fracture networks. Accurate identification and mapping of the large numbers of microearthquakes induced in EGS is one technique that provides diagnostic information when determining the location, orientation and length of underground crack systems for use in reservoir development and management applications. Conventional earthquake location techniques often are employed to locate microearthquakes. However, these techniques require labor-intensive picking of individual seismic phase onsets across a network of sensors. For this project we adapt the Matched Field Processing (MFP) technique to the elastic propagation problem in geothermal reservoirs to identify more and smaller events than traditional methods alone.

  8. Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    species, including insights from a coastal area where I have worked for more than 24 years. I will summarize what we know to date about this process of "ocean acidification". ...

  9. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two....

  10. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications CX-005670: Categorical Exclusion Determination U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 1 EIS-0259: Record of Decision...

  11. MHK Technologies/Sea Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Profile Technology Resource Click here Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Technology Type Click here Closed-cycle Technology Description A stationary floating...

  12. Sea Solar Power International Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    21230 Region: United States Sector: Ocean Product: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology developer. Website: www.seasolarpower.com Coordinates: 39.290555,...

  13. OTEC connection: power from the sea. [An overview of OTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, D.

    1980-02-01

    OTEC is discussed as a means of contributing to United States energy self-sufficiency. The technology involved in the conversion of ocean thermal gradients found in tropical regions to electricity transmittable by submarine cable is examined, with attention given to the operating principles of open- and closed-cycle Rankine engines and design considerations for the evaporators, condensers and heat exchangers. The environmental impact and economics of OTEC are considered, and Department of Energy research projects in areas of OTEC technology including heat transfer, biofouling, environmental assessment, underwater electrical transmission and mooring and test plants are indicated. It is pointed out that US islands presently offer excellent markets for early commercial OTEC plants, with Gulf Coast markets requiring further technology developments to be economically attractive.

  14. MHK Technologies/SeaGen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    which they believe was the world s first tidal turbine They ran a 300kW 11m rotor experimental test rig called Seaflow since 2003 which was and still is the only tidal turbine...

  15. Salton Sea II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  16. Salton Sea I Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  17. Salton Sea V Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  18. Salton Sea IV Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  19. Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  20. Microearthquake Studies at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    The objective of this project is to detect and locate microearthquakes to aid in the characterization of reservoir fracture networks. Accurate identification and mapping of the large numbers of microearthquakes induced in EGS is one technique that provides diagnostic information when determining the location, orientation and length of underground crack systems for use in reservoir development and management applications. Conventional earthquake location techniques often are employed to locate microearthquakes. However, these techniques require labor-intensive picking of individual seismic phase onsets across a network of sensors. For this project we adapt the Matched Field Processing (MFP) technique to the elastic propagation problem in geothermal reservoirs to identify more and smaller events than traditional methods alone.